Posts Tagged ‘fight’

Army sets up Chindits-style social media unit to ‘fight in information age’

February 1st, 2015

Modelled on the Chindits, a specialist unit which fought in Burma during the Second World War, the new unit’s focus will be on “unconventional” non-lethal, non-military methods such as “shaping behaviours through the use of dynamic narratives”, an Army spokesman said.

The spokesman said: the brigade “is being created to draw together a host of existing and developing capabilities essential to meet the challenges of modern conflict and warfare”.

“It recognises that the actions of others in a modern battlefield can be affected in ways that are not necessarily violent and it draws heavily on important lessons from our commitments to operations in Afghanistan amongst others.”

The brigade will be based at Hermitage, Berkshire, with detachments at other MoD sites, and will operate across the Army, Royal Air Force and Royal Navy, as well as training and working with other nations and across UK government departments.

It will build on “the spirit of innovation and offensive spirit of the men and women” who served in the Chindits between 1942 and 1945.

In 1943 the elite guerilla unit deployed deep behind enemy lines to fight in Japanese-occupied Burma with a mission to disrupt communications and supply routes fuelling the Japanese war effort.

The Chindits were named after the Chinthe – fierce lion-like creatures that stood guard at every Burmese temple – and the 77th Brigade’s cap badge will feature the mythical animal, according to reports.


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Respect those who fight for their country – and for our freedom

November 9th, 2014

Fittingly, the online canadian pharmacy last of 888,246 poppies to complete the display will be planted on Armistice Day. That final poppy recalls the life of Pte George Edwin Ellison of the 5th Royal Irish Lancers. He was one of the first to be involved in the fighting at the outbreak of war, having participated in one of the British Expeditionary Force’s earliest campaigns at Mons, in 1914. He survived being gassed and the harrowing experience of the Somme, and is believed to have been the last British soldier to fall.

It is to the soldiers of the trenches, such as Pte Ellison, that our thoughts will inevitably turn today on Remembrance Sunday. Yet we must not forget that the attritional battle in the trenches was just part of a vast war effort by men and women, Service and civilian, from across the globe. It was a war fought over a sprawling canvas, both on land and at sea, defeating the U-boat blockade and winning the battle of the Atlantic.

But the poppies at the Tower don’t just remind us of the sacrifice of the soldiers, sailors and airmen of the First World War, but also of those who followed them in later conflicts – those who stepped on to the beaches of Normandy 30 years later, those who fought in Korea, and those who, more recently, have fought in the heat of Iraq and on the dusty plains of Helmand.

Particularly this year, as we conclude our combat operations in Afghanistan, we remember those who have died and who have suffered life-changing injuries. And we particularly think of their families.

Yet, at the same time as we remember their sacrifice, we should also remember their service. The thousands of personnel who served in Afghanistan from all three Services have achieved an enormous amount. Through their efforts, they have made that country more secure and ensured that millions more Afghans can receive an education and experience a better quality of life. They have put that country on a road to recovery.

Above all, they have succeeded in our principal strategic purpose: stopping terrorists from using Afghanistan to mount attacks on British people on British streets.

And already, our forces have turned their service to new threats – policing Baltic airspace to deter Russian aggression; targeting the Isil menace in Iraq; helping to combat the spread of Ebola in West Africa.

Reflecting on the service of our Armed Forces over the years has another powerful effect. By recalling their fortitude, we come to a greater appreciation of what service itself means.

We appreciate that those soldiers, sailors and airmen were not just fighting for their country, they were fighting for our freedom and our future. It is service that connects all our Armed Forces past, present and future.

So today, as we come together as a nation, either standing at the Cenotaph or conducting acts of remembrance, let there be pride for the service, as well as sorrow for the sacrifice.

We will remember the fallen not just with sadness, but also with eternal respect and gratitude, in the knowledge that we are living the future they fought for.


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Cuts mean we could no longer fight World War 2, claims military historian

May 23rd, 2014

Speaking at the Hay Literary Festival, Dr Jonathan Boff, of Birmingham University, said that it was unlikely that today’s generals would be able to stand up to politicians and make a case for the best tactics.

“There is a problem I think, and that I have seen over the last 10, 11, 12, 13 years, and generation after generation, of the military being cut by civil servants,” he said.

The defence committee studied Britain’s nuclear and conventional forces, considering whether the country still has sufficient military power to deter attacks and threats from other states.

MPs concluded that the credibility of both forces is put in doubt by recent cuts in the Armed Forces, and warned against any additional cuts.

A Strategic Defence and Security Review is due next year, and some military commanders fear it will lead to more cuts.

However Dr Boff claimed that Britain’s defence capability no longer needed to be as strong as it had been as global threats had diminished.

“There is now no kind of existential threat to Great Britain,” he said, “What you require is an ability to adapt and role with the punches.

“There are no longer any threats that are susceptible to military force.”

In his lecture Dr Boff also argued that Britain did not stumble blindly into the first and second world wars but was actually fairly well equipped to fight by the time the conflicts were announced.

“Even in 1939 Britain was the strongest military power in the world with the biggest navy that only rash people would have take on,” he said.

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