Posts Tagged ‘over’

Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s family attack Donald Trump over Muslim ban policy

December 18th, 2015

“As a nation, internment weakened us all. It is a tragic reminder of what happens when we allow fear and hysteria to trump our values.

“Historians and leaders across the political spectrum agree internment was a grievous mistake and a violation of basic human rights. It detracts from the amazing efforts by my grandfather to rescue our economy and build the foundation of America’s great middle class.”

American-Japanese citizens en route to a internment camp in California in April 1942

Earlier this week, Mr Trump compared his plan to Roosevelt’s classification of thousands of Japanese, Germans and Italians living in the US during the war as “enemy aliens”.

President Franklin Roosevelt signing the declaration of war against Japan

He said Roosevelt, one of America’s greatest presidents, was “highly respected by all”, and then stated: “Take a look at presidential proclamations, what he was doing with Germans, Italians and Japanese, because he had to do it.”

FDR tried to save Jewish refugees during Second World War, book claims

The billionaire businessman made the proposal, that Muslims including would-be immigrants, students and tourists, should be blocked from entering the country, in the wake of the deadly shootings in San Bernardino, California, last week by a married couple inspired by Islamic State militants.


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Battle of Britain Spitfire flypast over London cancelled after Shoreham crash ramps up insurance cost

September 6th, 2015

A Battle of Britain commemoration flypast by 20 Spitfires over London has been cancelled after the Shoreham air disaster made the cost of insuring the event unaffordable.

The organisers of the flypast, which they had hoped would happen on September 20, were told they would need third party insurance cover of £250 million, which would have required a premium of around £50,000.

It raises the prospect that air shows scheduled for next year may find the cost of insurance prohibitive as a result of the Hawker Hunter crash at Shoreham, in which 11 people died.

Paul Beaver, who was organising the event, said: “The intention was that 20 privately-owned Spitfires would fly over London to mark the 75th anniversary of the Battle of Britain. We had started the planning in March, and had applied to the Civil Aviation Authority and even the Prime Minister to get the go-ahead.

“The route we were going to take would have made sure there was always somewhere for an aircraft to land if it got into difficulties, and usually the individual owners’ aircraft insurance, which provides £5 million of third party cover per aircraft, would have been enough.

“But after Shoreham we took soundings from an insurance expert who advises the air shows, and he said the feedback he was getting from underwriters was that we would need to take out £250 million of insurance cover, which made the whole thing untenable.

“I really hope the underwriters take a pragmatic view when the air show season starts next year, because if they don’t it will make life very difficult.”

An unrelated flypast of massed fighter planes will still go ahead on September 15 over the south of England which will be attended by Prince Harry.

Top (L-R): Matt Jones, 24, Matthew Grimstone, 23, Jacob Schilt, 23, Daniele Polito, 23, Mark Trussler, 49, James Mallinson, 72. Bottom (L-R): Maurice Abrahams, 76, Mark Reeves, 53, Richard Smith, 26, Dylan Archer, 42, Tony Brightwell, 52.


World War Two

David Cameron to boycott Moscow’s WWII commemorations in protest over Ukraine crisis

March 12th, 2015

The Prime Minister’s Deputy Official Spokesman said: “We will be considering our representation in light of our ongoing discussions with Russia, and our concerns about their activity.

“We don’t have plans for the Prime Minister to attend, and I’m sure we will set out who will represent the government in due course.”

“We would consider our representation within our broader ongoing relationship with Russia. Recently, there have not been ministerial visits, and we will take that into account when we consider who attends.”

Vladimir Putin had sent invitations to the parade to a host of world leaders, but has been met with refusals from the Presidents of Poland, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia and the German Chancellor. President Obama has also refused, citing a tight schedule. Mrs Merkel will attend a wreath laying at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier the following day.

In a re-emergence of old Cold War loyalties, the leaders of Vietnam, Serbia, the Czech Republic, China and North Korea are expected to attend.

“It will not affect the spirit, the emotional aspect and the scale of the holiday,” Dmitry Peskov, Putin’s spokesman said earlier, said of the apparent boycott.


Russian servicemen march during the Victory Day Parade in Moscow’s Red Square

Victory Day ranks among the most important days in the Russian calendar, with more than 20 million Soviet citizens killed in the war, and is marked with a mass parade of tanks, troops and missiles on Red Square in Moscow and the overflight of dozens of jets and bombers.

It falls on May 9 – the day after Britain marks Victory in Europe Day, and two days after the General Election is held.

This year’s event is likely to be highly politicised and feature the largest display of military hardware in years, including a newly formed aerobatics team named Crimean Wings.

Russian media daily compares the fighting in Ukraine to the Second World War, with claims that the Ukrainian government is a “Fascist junta” and warnings that Jewish people are in danger. The orange and black Ribbon of St George, widely associated with the Great Patriotic War, has been adopted as a symbol of the separist fighters.

David Cameron last visited Russia for the G20 summit in St Petersburg. That saw Mr Cameron launching an impassioned defence of Britain after it was dismissed by a Russian official as “just a small island”.

In 1995, during the post-Cold War thaw, John Major and Bill Clinton attended commemorations in Moscow to mark fifty years since the end of the war. In 2005, John Prescott, the Deputy Prime Minister, represented Britain alongside President Bush. Tony Blair sent apologies, having only days before won a third general election.


Better times: Welsh Guards in Red Square on Victory Day, 2010

In 2010, Nato troops from Britain, France, Poland the US marched alongside 10,000 Russians.

The EU has imposed sanctions, including asset freezes and travel bans, on some 151 people and 37 entities, in response to the assault on Ukrainian sovereignty. The Foreign Secretary this week warned that Russia, which is rapidly modernising its military, as at risk of becoming the single greatest threat to British national security.

Britain may broadcast Putin’s financial secrets
The Ukraine crisis is too grave for Cameron to ignore
Video: David Cameron warns Vladimir Putin


World War Two

Archbishop of Canterbury speaks of ‘regret’ over bombing of Dresden

February 14th, 2015

“Whatever the arguments, events here seventy years ago left a deep wound and diminished all our humanity,” he said.

His comments have been seen by some as an insult to those who gave their lives to defeat the Nazis.

“These remarks do sound to me like an apology. For the Archbishop to make an apology for our defeat of Hitler is bizarre,” Conservative MP Philip Davies told the Daily Mail.

“I would have thought the last thing we should be doing is apologising. We should be praised for defeating Hitler. These words are an insult to the young men who gave their lives in the defeat of Germany.”

Former defence minister Sir Gerald Howarth added: “I do not hear Angela Merkel apologising for the Blitz”.

Meanwhile, the BBC’s coverage of Dresden was criticised after one presenter referred to Dresden as a “war crime” and a British prisoner of war said the raids were “demonic” and “evil”.

It is claimed the BBC’s coverage failed to mention the 55,000 airmen who died for Britain during the war, or mention the devastating Nazi bombing raids on London and Coventry.

“It is very unfortunate that the BBC chose on all days to produce such a one-sided account,” Sir Gerald told the Mail. “What about the civilians in London who were bombed out of their homes? What about the bombing in the Blitz?”

A BBC spokesman said: “The bombing of Dresden has always been a controversial episode in the war.

“On Thursday evening the main BBC News bulletins reflected this and featured interviews with British veterans in coverage of preparations for the commemoration.

“On Friday we covered the commemoration ceremony in Dresden, which understandably reflected on the German experience.

“BBC News has covered in greater depth than any other broadcaster many aspects of the commemoration of World War II – both the human cost on all sides and the military action – and will continue to do so.”

The Archbishop of Canterbury’s words had little immediate impact in Germany, where they were overshadowed by an address by the German President, Joachim Gauck, in which he laid the blame for the atrocities of the war clearly with Germany, and rejected any attempt to compare it with Allied responsibility.

“We know who started the murderous war, we know it,” President Gauck said. “And that’s why we will never forget the victims of German warfare. We do not forget, even as we remember here today the German victims.”

President Gauck spoke at the same memorial service which the Archbishop addressed, and it was clear from his words that the Archbishop came under no pressure from the German side to express regret.

“A country that is responsible for a monstrosity like the Holocaust cannot expect to go unpunished and emerge undamaged from a war that it had provoked,” President Gauck said.

From February 13, 1945, Allied forces unleashed a massive 37-hour bombing raid on Dresden, sparking a firestorm that destroyed much of the city centre.

Previously almost untouched by the Allied air assault on Nazi Germany, the city became a symbol of the horrors of war, even though others, such as the northern port of Hamburg, suffered far worse devastation.

In Dresden, up to 25,000 people died in the raids, which some critics said were strategically unjustified as Hitler’s Germany was already effectively defeated and the bombs appeared to be aimed at civilians rather than military targets.


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Nazi Auschwitz camp officer, 93, to face trial over 300,000 deaths

February 3rd, 2015

For this reason, he was known as the “bookkeeper” of Auschwitz.

The accused also helped remove the luggage of victims so it was not seen by new arrivals, thus covering up the traces of mass killing, according to the prosecutors.

They said the defendant was aware that the predominantly Jewish prisoners deemed unfit to work “were murdered directly after their arrival in the gas chambers of Auschwitz”.

Groening told German daily Bild in 2005 that he regretted working at Auschwitz, saying he still heard the screams from the gas chamber decades later.

“I was ashamed for decades and I am still ashamed today,” said Groening, who was employed from the age of 21 at the camp, which was liberated 70 years ago last week.

“Not of my acts, because I never killed anyone. But I offered my aid. I was a cog in the killing machine that eliminated millions of innocent people.”

The German office investigating Nazi war crimes sent files on 30 former Auschwitz personnel to state prosecutors in 2013 with a recommendation to bring charges against them.

The renewed drive to bring to justice the last surviving perpetrators of the Holocaust follows a 2011 landmark court ruling.

For more than 60 years German courts had only prosecuted Nazi war criminals if evidence showed they had personally committed atrocities.

But in 2011 a Munich court sentenced John Demjanjuk to five years in prison for complicity in the extermination of Jews at the Sobibor camp, where he had served as a guard, establishing that all former camp guards can be tried.

About 1.1 million people, mostly European Jews, perished at Auschwitz-Birkenau, operated by the Nazis from 1940 until it was liberated by Soviet forces on January 27, 1945.


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Two Lancaster bombers fly over Dambusters practise site in Derbyshire

September 22nd, 2014

They have been united for a series of events in the UK this year with one, Thumper, based in Lincolnshire, while the other, Vera, has been shipped over from Canada.

Retired Sqn Ldr Stuart Reid, who has flown the RAF’s Battle of Britain Memorial Flight (BBMF) Lancaster, said: “It was very much a British and Foreign and Commonwealth attack against the dams, as was much of the bombing campaign fought against Germany during the Second World War.”


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Germany charges 93-year-old over 300,000 Auschwitz murders

September 16th, 2014

Prosecutors said the accused was aware that the predominantly Jewish prisoners deemed unfit to work “were murdered directly after their arrival in the gas chambers of Auschwitz”.

A regional court must now decide whether the accused will go on trial.

The German office investigating Nazi war crimes last year sent files on 30 former Auschwitz personnel to state prosecutors with a recommendation to bring charges against them.

The renewed drive to bring to justice the last surviving perpetrators of the Holocaust follows a 2011 landmark court ruling.

For more than 60 years German courts had only prosecuted Nazi war criminals if evidence showed they had personally committed atrocities.

But in 2011 a Munich court sentenced John Demjanjuk to five years in prison for complicity in the extermination of Jews at the Sobibor camp, where he had served as a guard, establishing that all former camp guards can be tried.

More than one million people, mostly European Jews, perished at Auschwitz-Birkenau, operated by the Nazis from 1940 until it was liberated by Russian forces on January 27, 1945.


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World’s last airworthy Lancaster Bombers fly over the Lake District

September 8th, 2014

The world’s last two airworthy Lancaster Bombers were filmed flying over Windermere in the Lake District on Sunday.

The flyover was organised in honour of Britain’s last surviving Bomber Command veteran, Archie Johnstone, of Grange-over-Sands, who died in April this year.

Vera and Thumper, the two planes seen in the footage, glided across Thirlmere reservoir in Cumbria before flying the length of Windermere.

The Bombers are famous for their ‘bouncing bombs’ used in Dambusters raids against German dams during World War Two.


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Lancaster and Vulcan bombers fly over new WW2 memorial site

August 22nd, 2014

A flypast by the last two airworthy Lancasters and the last flying Vulcan bomber took place in Lincolnshire.

The event was to mark the first turf-cutting of the new memorial centre at Canwick Hill, which will tell the stories of those involved in the conflict.

The Lincolnshire flypast was a poignant moment for all of those who attended as, during the Second World War, it was home to thousands of crew from Bomber Command.


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Japan complained over ‘Tenko’ BBC television series

July 16th, 2014

The idea for the programme emerged from research into Evelyn Turner, a British military nurse, for an episode of “This is your Life”. Ms Turner was aboard one of the last transport ships to leave Singapore while it was under attack from Japanese forces in early 1942, but was captured after the vessel was sunk.

She endured regular beatings, malnutrition, disease and the death of many of her friends in a succession of camps in Sumatra.

The initial approach to the Foreign Office stated that while the Japanese Embassy was “not trying to deny the historical fact”, according to Kyodo News, the embassy nevertheless suggest there was “a danger that the association of past Japanese violence, and its gratuitous screening at this moment, with the cultural manifestations of the exhibition, would create a bad impression”.

The embassy also felt it had received a “deliberate brush-off” when it previously contacted the BBC and asked the Foreign Office to intervene.

Louise Jamieson as Blanche Simmons in Tenko (BAND Photo)

An official “expressed anxieties” to the BBC, while another Foreign Office official criticised the BBC’s “complete lack of feeling over timing” in correspondence to a colleague.

He also pointed out that the BBC had broadcast a documentary about Japanese atrocities in Malaya earlier in the year, when Zenko Suzuki, the then-Japanese prime minister, was paying an official visit to Britain.

The files also show that Julian Ridsdale, the chairman of the British-Japanese Parliamentary Group, asked George Howard, the chairman of the BBC, to edit the programme.

Mr Ridsdale allegedly asked the BBC to make “cuts in the future [programmes] to remove some of the more brutal scenes”. It is not clear whether the BBC acted on the request.

Tenko – which translates as “roll call” – regularly attracted 15 million viewers and was largely filmed in Dorset.


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