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Thread: Seabee Stevedores

  1. #16

    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    At Guam, Marianas, Islands, two beach parties from the 53rd N.C.B., One officer and 17 enlisted men, equipped with several tractors, landed on D-Day (H-plus-5 minutes), July 21, 1944, with special mission to assist unloading a Marine Battery of Sherman Tanks from LCM's and LCT's at the edge of the reef at Agat Beach. This task was finished within an hour under heavy enemy mortar and machine gun fire. Three of the Sherman Tanks dropped into bomb craters on their way in from the reef to shore and were submerged. This party volunteered to rescue these tanks safely and succeeded in getting two of the tanks safely to the beach in two hours, under heavy fire. A second beach party of five enlisted men was assigned the task of operating a North West Crane, mounted on a pontoon barge and anchored off the reef of Agat Beach, to unload gasoline and ammunition from LCT's to LVT's in support of assault troops. The party, in charge of the same officer Lt. Reeves, landed on D-Day (H-plus-5) and worked day and night for five days, never leaving the barge. This barge was under heavy mortar fire for the first four days. An LST anchored alongside was hit by enemy artillery and withdrew. The remainder of the battalion moved ashore on D-plus-2 and established, maintained, and constructed roads and bridges in support of the assault troops. The Battalion's beach camp was under enemy artillery fire for four hours on D-plus-3. No enemy air raids were experienced, but sniper fire was in evidence, for a nine months period after D-day, in jungle locations. The 53rd's Demolition Squad, consisted of a Chief Petty Officer and 13 enlisted men. This squad cleared all beaches, roads, and areas ahead of the construction troops over a nine months period. Both Beach Parties have been recommended for special suitable awards. Before jungle could be cleared for road building operations, the squad had first to go out with it's mine detectors. Their efforts saved many lives among our number, without any doubt. There were also armed, unexploded naval shells to be disposed of in many places. And there were detonators to be removed from both friendly and enemy ordinance before much of it could be moved. While the 53rd NCB was attached to the 1st Provisional Marine Brigade, during the initial landing on Guam, they were detached from the Marines on July 27, 1944 and assigned to to duty under the Fifth Naval Construction Brigade.

  2. #17

    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    "BULLDOZER" DECEMBER 2, 1943.

    SEABEES AT SALERNO!

    Long after this struggle is over and every serviceman is home, the story of the heroic exploits of the Seabees shoulder to shoulder with the Rangers and Commandos at Salerno will be told at many a fireside throughout the country. And here's one that won't be overlooked. Shortly after the first landing. English Army Engineers were prevented from laying down a section of wire mesh roadway by heavy fire from a strongly entrenched German Maching gun nest. It couldn't stop a Seabee bulldozer, however from hauling several English trucks which had bogged down. The maching gun nest was finally cleared out, and Commandos were taking care of the Nazis, the trucks were rumbling their badly needed loads inland, thanks to Seabee resourcefulness and courage. Moving in on the exploding beaches together with the first wave of assault troops, and working under severe continuous maching gun, plane and shell fire, the battling builders piled vital supplies ashore, often completely unloading heavily packed LST's in less than an hour per ship. Picked Seabee platoons also unloaded roughly 10,000 vehicles at Salerno and earned high praise for excellent performance.

  3. #18

    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    Milwaukee Journal - Jan. 3, 1944.

    BOUGAINVILLE FIELD IN USE, SEABEES DID JOB!

    With U.S. forces on Bougainville - A 6,500 foot field for light and medium bombers, within less than 250 miles of Rabaul, and only 850 miles from Japan's mighty Naval base of Truk is now in operation in these northern Solomon Islands.

    The airfield, at the base of the fuming volcano, Mount Bagana, was carved out of the heaviest of jungles and was dedicated Christmas day. Called Piva field, after the river village of that name. It is the second field to be established on the expanding beachhead which U.S. Marines first won November 1, 1943 with a landing at Empress Augusta Bay on Bougainville's west central coast. The Torokina fighter field of 4,200 feet, superimposed upon a swamp, has been used since Dec. 12. Torokina has been dispatching fighter planes for sweeps over Rabaul. Now they can screen bombers flying from Piva, a mere aerial skip and jump from Rabaul. The Piva field is the nearest one of the allies to Truk in the Carolines. The building of Piva was accomplished with heroics and utter dis-regard of danger.

    Once tractors were leveling ground within a few feet of where a bomb disposal crew, under Marine Lt. Ed Curry of Bostom Mass. was supervising the digging up of a string of Japanese duds and time bombs. Again a Japanese patrol harassing the Seabees got so close to the field that a Seabee was captured. When Seabee surveyors started laying out the field, they actually worked for several days beyond our lines. As they returned from work, they would chide the Marines. If you guys don't hurry up and take that country, we'll have the field finished before you get there.

    The Bougainville fields put dive bombers and torpedo planes within reach of Rabaul. The Piva field was ready for bombers less than six weeks after the Seabees broke ground. The toughest job was in pushing roads through swamps to it, often under Japanese fire. Once that was accomplished. the clearing, grading and surfacing proceeded swiftly.

  4. #19

    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    24th N.C.B. at Rendova, & Munda, New Georgia.

    The battalion was divided into two echelons, the first to participate with a task force of Army, Navy, and Marine units in establishing a beachhead: the second to carry the heavy equipment and household gear to Guadalcanal for staging when the beachhead would be ready to receive it. The second echelon left Noumea, New Caledonia on May 25, 1943 and after a five day trip on four LST's established a bivouac on Guadalcanal. There the men made their first acquaintance with the darkness of coconut groves, the fever of malaria, the urgency of operations on the beaches of a staging area. It was to be seven weeks before the battalion was to be reunited.

    The first echelon, under the command of the Officer-in-Charge, Commander Horace R. Whittaker, on the 7th of June sailed from Noumea harbor aboard the converted President liner, U.S.S. Jackson and the U.S.S. Hayes. With them, and on other ships, the U.S.S. Adams, and the U.S.S. McCawley, were the 172nd Infantry Combat Teams and Boat Pool 8. On the tenth of June came the tautness of the first air raid at sea, then a day in Guadalcanal, then two weeks of training on the beaches of New Hebrides. On the 29th of June the task force was back at Guadalcanal. There it was joined by the attack cargo ships, U.S.S. Libre and Algorab, embarking the Marine Ninth Defense Battalion and additional men of the Twenty-Fourth.

    At dawn of the morning of June 30, the task force stood off Rendova. There was a light drizzle, later to turn to rain. A few miles away Jap coastal guns at Munda airfield opened up. A Destroyer returned the fire and the guns were silenced. The men stood quietly around the decks and then were over the sides into the landing craft. There were the shots of snipers as the boats neared the beaches of Rendova; the brief fight, the confusion and uncertainty of the beaches; and as the day wore on, the back breaking labor of unloading supplies. Overhead were the corsairs with the Marine pilots standing between the beaches and the persistent Jap air attacks.

    There was the nervousness of the first bivouac, the eerie sounds of a wet tropical night, the constant bark of uncertain rifles. Dawn found the roads collapsing, the urgency, the back-breaking labor of coconut log corduroy over which to move the 155mm guns, the ammunition, and vital supplies. At the beaches the LST's came in, each to be unloaded by hand between dawn and dark. It was to go on day after day. On July 2, the Japanese planes broke through. That grim night the battalion mourned the death of twenty-one men. On July 4, they broke through again, and again the battalion was hard hit. Through all of July on Rendova, with few respites, continued the rains, the heavy labor at the beaches, the nightly air raids, and the mud.

    On July 18 the second echelon arrived and established its camp on Kokorana. At last, on August 5, the airfield at Munda was taken. The next day the battalion began moving to Munda, until on 15 August, the entire unit was bivouacked three quarters of a mile north of the airfield. The 73rd battalion moved in to take over construction of the airfield on which our equipment had set to work at once. The battalion turned to the construction of vital roads, of coconut log crib quays at the beaches for LST's and pontoon lighters, of a tank farm, distribution system, and tanker berth for aviation gasoline, of a base hospital, a widely dispersed bomb dump, a splinter proof radio communications center- rough work and fast work to make Munda a base. The 73rd made great progress on the airfield, the first plane landing a week after construction started.

    First came the Marines with their Corsairs, SBD's and TBF's. Then came the Army bombers. Air raids became infrequent. Munda was in full tactical operation. As we passed the first of the year the work abated. Scuttlebutt ran wild "we were going home"- we were going to New Zealand- we were on our way. And then at last came final word. We were to have a rest. It was to be New Zealand. But there was something we wanted to do before we left. Quietly the battalion marched to Munda cemetery, there to say good-bye to the two officers and twenty-five men who had given their lives for their country.

  5. #20

    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    Army & navy register - june 10 1944

    seabee regiment commended

    a regiment of navy seabees has been commended by army, navy, & marine corps officers for the part it played in repelling a sustained 17- day counter-attack on bougainville.

    The seabees were under command of comdr. L.v. Clark deichler, cbc, usnr.

    Two batt., bivouacked just off the torokina fighter strip, were subject to especially heavy fire.

    In order to remain alive, in the bivouac area between march 8 and 24, 1944, an official report stated, it was necessary for all hands to spend some of the daylight hours in foxholes and to sleep in foxholes each night.

    In one 24 hour period, the japs scored 11 direct hits on the camp of one battalion and dropped more than 110 shells within 50 yards.

    These combat conditions did not prevent the seabees from completing all emergency repairs on the piva fighter strips, which had taken a heavy battering. During the entire 17 day period, no naval facility was out of commission for more than 30 minutes.

    Airfield repair groups have been recommended for appropriate awards by maj. Gen. R.j. Mitchell, u.s.m.c., who was then com. Aircraft, solomon islands, and who is now com. Air south pacific.

    Throughout the assaults, the seabees continued work on a hospital, a pt base, boat pool repair facilities, and other important naval base structures. They replaced infantrymen in handling rations & unloading cargo. They furnished a combat team of approximately 400 men to be held in reserve for front-line duty.

    Their work, in the face of continued enemy opposition has been on the highest order and reflect great credit upon the battalion participating, said rear admiral o.o. Badger, u.s.n. Com. Service squadron, south pacific force. This command, rear admiral badger continued, takes this opportunity to commend the regiment for the excellence of their performance.

    The seabees also were commended by maj. Gen. Mitchell, capt. H.s. Sease, u.s.n. Com. Air center, torokina, maj. Gen. O.w. Griswold, army com. Off. And capt. O.o. Keesing, u.s.n., com. Naval air base, torokina.

  6. #21

    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    Civil engineer corps bulletin - june 1949.

    "action at peleliu"

    cdr p. Corradi's story of how the 33rd seabees hit the beach and built a landing strip during the attack on peleliu.

    D-day - the first seabees went ashore early this morning. They;ve been on barges at the reef all day, transferring beans, bullets, and men from the assault boats to the amphibious tractors that are being used as ferries between the reef and the beach. Mortar shells are dropping all around them, and disabled amtracks are piling up pretty fast. None of the transfer barges which are manned by the seabees have been hit.

    It's amazing that there is any fight left in peleliu's defenders. For days the big guns of the pre-invasion bombardment force have been pouring heavy shells into the island. Since before dawn this morning, strike after strike of carrier planes have strafed and bombed the beaches. The lcir's have been whizzing 5-inch rockets into shore defenses all morning but still the jap mortars make the stretch from reef to beach deadly. The beach itself is a bedlam of gear, wrecked equipment, and pinned down marines and seabees.

    About noon, freddie davis(lt c.f. Davis, cec, usnr) and obie obrien (chcarp e. E. O'brien, cec, usnr) went ashore with two hundred more thirty-thirders to join the shore party and help unscramble the beach.

    D+1- we were to start work on the airfield today, but intense fighting is still going on at the southeast portion of the airdrome. The northwest portion is still in jap hands. The thirty-thirders are engaged entirely in shore party operations. Casualties amongst the aid parties have been extremely high, so our people have taken over stretcher bearer's assignments. We started a cemetery at orange beach today.

    D+2- fighting has moved up to the northwest end of the airdrome. The skipper and hank auch (lt herman h. Auch, cec, usnr) made a reconnaissance of the airfield with colonel francis fenton, the division engineer, first marine division. There isn't much left of the jap strips. The pre-invasion bombardment and the fighting of the past two days has left them hardly recognizable as air strips. The plan is to repair one strip as a fighter field and to completely rebuild the other thirty five hundred foot strip as a bomber strip, extending it to 6,500 feet.

    D+3- the mortar fire is too heavy at the reef to risk beaching the lst's hence no equipment is available to start the airfield work. We are going to work like the japs undoubtedly did- with pick and shovel. Lt walter suydam and fifty more of the battalions men were landed today with a supply of hand tools. A human chain was formed across the area where the jap strip had been, and we started to comb the place for shrapnel, unexploded bombs, booby traps, etc. Chief carpenter's mate, salvatore impelletteri, and his boys were kept busy disarming and disposing of the bombs and booby traps. A mound of heaped up pieces of shrapnel soon began to form. Impelletteri's crew dug up a jap torpedo war head that had been rigged with a pressure tripping device. The easterly end of the former strip had been cleared by dark.

    D+4- filling in the holes at the east end of the strip was begun at dawn. The work is hot and slow. Crockford was killed. The battalion command post was moved up to the strip from the beach. Dugouts were excavated to replace the individual fox holes. A battery of 155-mm guns was set up in our bivouac are. The pontoon causeway sections were launched form our lst's and some of the heavy equipment was transferred from the tank decks to the pontoons via the bow doors. This had to be done outside the range of the shore guns in deep water. When the tractors, shovels, trucks, etc. Had been moved onto the pontoons, the causeways were tied up alongside the lst's for the rest of the night.

    D+5- the 155's fired over our heads all last night. After the sound had been likened to a subway express by a few former denizens of new york, little further note was taken of them and we even managed to sleep while the guns pumped shells all night into bloody nose ridge. One loaded causeway section was beached and we now have 2 trucks, 3 graders, and a dozer with scraper. Repair work on the fighter strip really speeded up with the acquisition of this equipment. A damaged fighter plane landed on our partially completed strip this afternoon. Our rubber tired motor graders were practically immobilized by the many bits of shrapnel that still cover the field. Efforts were re-doubled to clean up the remainder of the steel fragments. Snipers still cause work stoppages. The carpenter crew that started erection of the flight operations tower, which lt cambell and wo hynes had prefabricated back in the russells, was twice stopped by sniper fire.

    D+6- more equipment was landed over the pontoon causeway today. Twenty three officers and six hundred and seventy three men are now ashore with the battalion. Enough equipment is at hand to start construction of the bomber strip. Freddie davis shore party group has rejoined the battalion foor the airfield work. More dugouts were excavated and tarps were stretched over them to keep out the blistering sun and, alternately, the pouring rain. A squadron of our fighters landed on the strip this afternoon. We started the fighter taxiways. We had our first hot meal today.

    D+7- heavy rains today. We concentrated on removal of wrecked equipment from around and in the airfield. Someone counted over one hundred enemy aircraft that we had hauled to a central dump. The borrow pit for coral is in full operation. No one thought thought the one and one half cubic yard shovel would ever make it over the floating pontoon causeway which is only two pontoons wide. The heavy equipment crew moved it safely, however. Fighting continues on the northwest edge of the airdrome. Chief strasser was killed today.

    D+8- unloading the construction equipment has finally been completed. We now have our own distillation units. One was put into immediate operation. We had been drinking water that was hauled ashore in steamed out oil drums, but its taste was horrible. Work is proceeding on the bomber strip taxiways. We tried to make better time by working after dark tonight, but the marines shot out our lights which were silhouetting their troops on the slope below bloody nose ridge. We worked for awhile by moonlight. The heat and the flies are bad. Doc york and doc geer are busy with their numerous dysentery patients.

    D+9- impelletteri's crew has all mines, duds, and booby traps cleared from the airfield area but they can't be everywhere. Chief pellissier and gene yuettner were wounded by a booby trap today while attempting to salvage some enemy gear. One jap roller has been reapaired and was put into service on the taxiway today. Grading continues.

    D+10- the coral pit is really producing. Surfacing of the bomber strip has been started. The argus 20 radar installation was completed today. The crew that has been trying to put in the avgas spillway on the west road has not been able to get back to location as fighting has broken out there again. Attempts to drill wells for fresh water have been unsuccessful. Since brackish water is the best we can bring in, myron watson (ccm, cec, usnr) is hooking up the intake to the distillation units to the best of the brackish water wells. Today we have a gang shower piped up from the well. What a joy!

    D+11- we worked all night last night hauling coral. The moon was bright and the star shells over bloody nose ridge gave an almost continuous bright light. Today, work was resumed on the avgas spillway. The temporary camp is well along. We have cots set up in the dugouts, dormitory style. The ga;;ey tent is serving hot meals continuously.

    D+12- thew enemy resistance has been pretty well localized on bloody nose ridge. Our fighter planes are taking off almost continuously from the strip we put into operation just a few days ago. They are strafing and bombing the enemy on the ridge about a thousand yards yards to the north of the strip itself. The skipper took a reconnaissance trip in a piper cub today. He reported that the marine pilot who flew him took along a supply of hand grenades which he tossed out at likely targets. As a result of this and other reconnaissance it was decided to locate the proposed hospital up the west coast of the island on land which has not yet been secured. Lt bety was assigned the job of following up on the hospital.

    D+13- work progresses on the bomber strip. Planes continue to pile in and emphasis has shifted to providing taxiways and dispersal areas for them. Twenty four hour operation has been approved and coral hauling help from other units obtained. There was a rumor that the japs had surrendered today, but the intense firing on the ridge continues. Bell and bartlett were killed.

    For this, the thirty third received a navy unit commendation, while the shore party who landed on d-day was awarded a presidential unit citation.

  7. #22
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    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    I have come into possession of a photo album by CMM H.E. Remington, 33rd NCB, B-6. It contains over 100 developed photographs of the Peleliu invasion in addition to photographs from Guadalcanal and Green Island. According to the album, Mr. Remington was the company photographer. The album includes, among others, photo's of the combined tank-infantry attack as it moves into the Horseshoe in the Umurbrogol on Peleliu as well as a developed photograph of Jacob Vouza holding a severed Japanese head on Guadalcanal. I believe he was with the first echelon at Peleliu as there are photographs of the actual landing as well.

    I am attempting to research the authenticity of these photographs and discover the story behind them. Is anyone on this forum familiar with H. Emerson Remington and/or the 33rd NCB? I purchased the 33rd NCB Cruise Book and can confirm that Mr. Remington was indeed with the 33rd, but otherwise have found no further details. Any information that could be provided would be greatly appreciated.

  8. #23
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    minnesota
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    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    Hello - I am new to this and I see some of these posts are quite old. My dad is now 87 years old, and was a member of the 122 Battalion, Seabees. He is Paul Leslie ("Les") Anderson and lives in North Dakota. I read him the post below and he was enthralled. He was in all of the same places mentioned below: Port Huaneme, New Guinea (Hollandia), Phillippines (Samar). He also PLAYED THE CLARINET in that USO show Bob Hope performed in. He served from 1943 to 1946. He was the company clerk, and also chaplain's assistant. If you can share any names of your sailor dads and grandfathers who were in the 122ndI would love to share that with my dad to see if he remembers. I will also post some pictures the next time I visit him. Thanks so much.

  9. #24

    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    2ND SPECIAL SEABEES COMPANY "B" ON GUAM

    Stevedores See Combat Action. Sent into the front lines as a combat unit for approximately ten days, a platoon of Second Special Seabees is believed to be the first unit of "STEVEDORES" to engage in direct action against the enemy.
    Company B of the Second Special landed on the beach of the island within a few hours of the assault waves and assisted in unloading ships of the task force, getting the cargo on the beaches, and carrying ammunition to Marine gunners. The platoon which went into the front line came from this company.
    The Seabees suffered three casualties: one man was shot while carrying mortar ammunition to a Marine gun emplacement, another was picked off by a sniper while on patrol, and the third has been missing in action since an enemy shell or mine exploded close to where he was working.


    2ND SPECIAL BATTALION
    The Second Special Battalion was assembled at Camp Peary in Jan. 1943
    and moved to Hueneme Jan. 14. Sailing from Hueneme on Feb. 25, the
    Battalion arrived at Noumea, New Caledonia, March 20. After a year's duty
    at Noumea, the outfit moved to Guadalcanal, arriving March 10, 1944. On
    June 1, 1944, B Company was detached and ordered to CTG 10, the
    remainder of the Battalion was attached to the Third Amphibious Corps. B
    Company landed on Guam on July 21 (D-Day) and the rest of the outfit
    arrived there Sept. 8. On the follow-later. On May 4 the unit moved to
    Guadalcanal and arrived at Koli-Point, May 11. On Jan. 1, 1944, the
    Battalion moved to the Tasafaronga area on that island. Sailing for home
    Oct. 20, 1944, the outfit arrived at Camp Parks Nov. 14. The ing day B
    Company was again attached to the Battalion. War's end found the outfit
    still on Guam.

  10. #25
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    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    Hi...I am new to this as well. My Dad is 87 years old & was in the 122nd Battalion.....and he played the clarinet in the band too! Dad said if he remembers correctly, a Les Anderson sat next to him in the band. Dad would love to re-connect with your Dad & share pictures with him.

  11. #26
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    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    Hello Baylee 27!!! You've made my day, and my dad's day. When I joined this thread my dad asked me to search for 3 names and your dad's name was one of them. He would love to reconnect too. He did sit next to your dad and they both played sax. I have a picture and am going to try figure out how to send it to you. I'm not sure how the communication works, but we have to figure it out. I did accept your friend invitation, but I'm not sure how that works either. My phone number is 763-XXX-XXXX. I live in Minneapolis. He lives in North Dakota. I'm attempting to attach pictures. If it doesn't work, I'll see if I can send you a message throught the friend avenue. I look forward to hearing more from you.

    I uploaded some photos into my album. I'm hoping you can access them. There is one that your dad may be in.
    Last edited by jfriede55; 07-26-2011 at 07:30 PM.

  12. #27
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    winston salem north carolina
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    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    Hello,
    My father served in Company B 1st Corpt Motor Transport during Vella LaVella campaign. His name was harvey Burgess. PFC USMC. Would love to know if anyone remembers him. He was a track driver and bull dozer operator. He only talked a little of his service time. Is there any pictures of this time as I would lvoe to see them. The story told to me by a friend of his during a reunion was that when the LST was hit he went in and borught out many wounded . He told me later the owrst one was the person who lost both legs and a arm and begged him to shot him. Would love to know more about Company B guys. Help
    David Burgess
    Semper Fi

  13. #28
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    winston salem north carolina
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    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    My Father was with Company B Motor Transport Battalion. he told me the short version but would not talk about it uch. The only thing he said was the worst case was one of the men begged him to shoot him since he was missing both legs and an arm. My fathers name was harvey Burgess. He was a PFC and would never take rnak. If anyone rembers him I wuld lvoe to hear more. He passed away in 1996 due to cancer.
    Thanks
    DAvid Burgess

  14. #29
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    Default Re: Seabee Stevedores

    Hi there. I'm glad you were able to view the picture. My dad is the one in the middle. He would love to hear from your dad. Is there a way we can arrange for this to happen? I left my phone number on the thread. Also, I will be visiting him all next week (July 9 - 15). I'll be at his house. That phone number is 701-XXX-XXXX. We would love to hear from you and your dad. (I'm sorry if you received this more than once. Having trouble sending.)

    Mod edit: It's not a good idea to list personal phone numbers on an open internet forum. You should use the PM function to communicate such info. --Nickdfresh
    Last edited by Nickdfresh; 07-07-2011 at 02:08 AM.

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