Türk porno yayini yapan http://www.smfairview.com ve http://www.idoproxy.com adli siteler rokettube videolarini da HD kalitede yayinlayacagini acikladi. Ayrica porno indir ozelligiyle de http://www.mysticinca.com adli porno sitesi devreye girdi.
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 67

Thread: New here and I have a story for you.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Vacaville, CA
    Posts
    18

    Default New here and I have a story for you.

    Hello. I'm new to this site and I'm not sure if this is the appropriate forum for my story, but here goes anyways. I am 34 years old and have been a big WW2 history buff since high school. I am interested in all aspects of the war and find it very facinating. I am most interested in the Nazi history of WW2, but please believe me when I say that I have no sympathy nor do I support Nazism in any way. Anyways, My grandpa was in the U.S. Navy during the war and was stationed in Hawaii, although it was after December 7th, 1941. As far as I know, he did not see any action. A few years before he died, we got to talking about the war and he told me something that I had not known before. His brother (my great uncle) was a P-47 Thunderbolt pilot with the 365th fighter squadron. Anyways, my great uncle was on a mission over France in July of 1944 when he was jumped by about 50 ME-109's and FW-190's. He did not return to his base that day. I don't know if it was unusual to be jumped by that many enemy fighters in mid-1944, but my grandpa gave me a copy of the report that was filed when my great uncle Jay did not return from his mission, and the report clearly states 50 enemy fighters. Anyways, a French farmer saw my great uncles plane falling toward the ground and quickly ran out to the aircraft to see if my great uncle was still alive before the Germans got to him. He was dead before he hit the ground. My grandpa and this French farmer were in contact with each other until shortly before my grandpa died in 2005. The guy in France sent my grandpa photos and pieces on the aircraft through the years. The local community where my great uncle was shot down even made a hand painted dinner plate with his airplane, etc painted in great detail. I guess they have alot of respect for my great uncle. My great uncle is buried at Normandy. I forget what squadron shot down my great uncle, but my grandfather told me that he thinks he was able to figure out the name of the German pilot who shot my great uncle down. There is a book out titled "The 365th Fighter Squadron in World War II" by Kent Miller. In the book, my great uncle is mentioned as well as the squadron that shot him down. Anyways, I thought I would share this story about my great uncle, a man I never knew, but am extremely proud of and proud to share his name. I did some research on the internet and this is what I came up with. His ID was 0-674346. He was a First Lieutenant with the U.S. Army Air Forces, 365th Fighter Squadron, 358th Fighter Group. He died on July 14th, 1944 and is buried at the Normandy American cemetery in Colleville-sur-Mer, France. His grave location is Plot B, Row 13, Grave 13. Some of his awards were the Air Medal with 9 Oak Leak Clusters and the Purple Heart. He flew the P-47 Thunderbolt in 25 missions with 50 sorties.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Halifax & Heidelberg
    Posts
    1,231

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    Interesting story. So what squadron attacked your great-uncle?

    It is most unusual that he would get jumped by so many planes, and why was he alone, anyway?

    PS: Try to add spaces between the paragraphs, would reduce the wall of text and make it easier to read...
    The fundamental problem of Democracy is that the majority of voters are idiots fueled by uninformed rage - and the Politicians do everything to cater to them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Buffalo, New York
    Posts
    7,404

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    Fifty Luftwaffe planes does seem to be a bit extraordinary...

    Can you scan the official report?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    743

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    A very interesting stories and as nick said, 50 planes sounds a little to extreme, please do scan it, it would be nice to see.


    "A pint of sweat saves a gallon of blood."
    - General George S. Patton
    "War Isn't about Dying for your country, its about making the other basterd die for his." - Patton

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Aachen/Aken/Aix-la-Chapelle
    Posts
    2,966

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    This -for German late-war measures- huge number of aircrafts would have been more common above German soil (so called "Reichsverteidigung", imperial defense), by mid 1944 in France quite unusual though. The high number along with the fact that different types of planes were involved (you mentioned Me-109 and FW-190) leads to the assumption that it had been a major action of different units.
    You should indeed post the official report.
    "I just ran out of ammo. I will ram this one. Good bye, we'll meet in Valhalla." - Major Heinrich Ehrler, April 4, 1945

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    9,278

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    Joel 109

    50 fighters would be unlikely to attack a single enemy fighter. There isn't enough room in the sky. Three or four of them would normally be more than enough to detach and deal with a single fighter.

    It seems more likely that your great uncle was involved in an action with other Allied planes if 50 German fighters were attacking.
    ..
    A rational army would run away.
    Montesquieu

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Halifax & Heidelberg
    Posts
    1,231

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    The thing that really bothers me, though, is that he seems to have been alone. That doesn't really make any sense, does it?
    The fundamental problem of Democracy is that the majority of voters are idiots fueled by uninformed rage - and the Politicians do everything to cater to them.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    9,278

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Schuultz View Post
    The thing that really bothers me, though, is that he seems to have been alone. That doesn't really make any sense, does it?
    In July 1944, or at any time in the war, it's quite possible that a single Allied (or Axis) plane could become detached from its unit and become prey to enemy fighters.

    It wasn't unusual for a plane or several, depending upon the size of the original unit entering battle, to become detached and have to make its own way home.

    There were also flights by Allied fighters and fighter / bombers over France in 1944, before and after D Day, seeking 'targets of opportunity' which could easily lead to a single Allied plane being a target for German planes.
    ..
    A rational army would run away.
    Montesquieu

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Halifax & Heidelberg
    Posts
    1,231

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    That sounds like a good explanation. But wasn't the Thunderbolt faster than the ME109 and FW190?
    ME190: 640km/h
    FW109: 656km/h
    P-47: 697km/h

    If I saw 50 enemies I would definitely try to fly away.

    That is, if I could and they weren't in my path...
    The fundamental problem of Democracy is that the majority of voters are idiots fueled by uninformed rage - and the Politicians do everything to cater to them.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,087

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    P47 faster in the dive, due to great weight, yes. Able to dogfight as easily, no. Turning radius was about 20% wider, and most P47s were speed limited by the drag of the bomb and droptank shackles, which would have brought them within the speed range of the FW190s and Me.109s in any case. Full throttle climb was very comparable to the German fighters.

    As to 50 German fighters... one thought I had was that perhaps the report identified some of the fighters as belonging to one of the "50" series JagdGeschwaders, such as Jg54, Jg52, Jg53. Were that the case, the number "50" might then be read as the amount of German aircraft present, instead of the possible unit ID's.

    Speculation, I know, but then again, in the air war many odd things did happen, just as on the ground and at sea.

    Regards, Uyraell.
    Last edited by Uyraell; 02-06-2009 at 07:24 PM.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Vacaville, CA
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Schuultz View Post
    Interesting story. So what squadron attacked your great-uncle?

    It is most unusual that he would get jumped by so many planes, and why was he alone, anyway?

    PS: Try to add spaces between the paragraphs, would reduce the wall of text and make it easier to read...
    JG26 and he was not alone. There were three others.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Vacaville, CA
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nickdfresh View Post
    Fifty Luftwaffe planes does seem to be a bit extraordinary...

    Can you scan the official report?
    I have made scans of the MACR and I have tons of photos, newspaper clippings, etc to back up my story, but whenever I try to post a picture on this forum, I get a message telling me that the picture is too big. I don't have any idea how to make the scans, pictures, etc any smaller. Can anyone help?
    Last edited by Joel109; 03-29-2009 at 05:16 AM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Vacaville, CA
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    It was one of these 5 pilots who shot down my great uncle on 14 July 1944.

    Date Pilot Unit Enemy A/C claimed Location Time Reference

    14.07.44 Ltn. Heinz Kemethmüller 4./JG 26 P-47 Ł AC: 1.000-1.200 m. [St. André-de-l'Eure] 14.36 Film C. 2027/II Anerk: Nr.166
    14.07.44 Maj. Karl Borris Stab I./JG 26 P-47 Ł 04 Ost N/AC-1: 1.400 m. [Évreux] 14.36 Film C. 2027/II Anerk: Nr.70
    14.07.44 Oblt. Hans Hartigs 4./JG 26 P-47 Ł 04 Ost N/AC: 1.000 m. [St. André-de-l'Eure] 14.37 Film C. 2027/II Anerk: Nr.167
    14.07.44 Ltn. Joachim Günther 3./JG 26 P-47 Ł 04 Ost N/AC: 1.000 m. [St. André-de-l'Eure] 14.38 Film C. 2027/II Anerk: Nr.153
    14.07.44 Ltn. Joachim Günther 3./JG 26 P-47 Ł 04 Ost N/AC at 400 m. [St. André-de-l'Eure] 14.40 Film C. 2027/II VNE: ASM
    14.07.44 Uffz. Haun 9./JG 26 P-47 Ł AB-69 at 1.100 m. [Verneuil] 14.57 Film C. 2027/II Anerk: Nr. -

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Vacaville, CA
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    Last week I received 9 P-47 parts from France that were excavated from my great uncles crash site in 1999. I have pics of the parts, but again, they are too big to post. If anyone can tell me how to shink my pics so I can actually post them on this forum, I would appreciate it very much.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Vacaville, CA
    Posts
    18

    Default Re: New here and I have a story for you.

    Here is a transcript of a newspaper article that was released in my great uncles hometown in 2000. I would post a picture of the actual newspaper clipping, but again, it is too big.

    Anacortes native Jay V. "Herky" Thomson, a pilot who was killed in a dogfight over France during World War II, was honored at a ceremony Sept. 9 at the village of Saint-Denis du Behelan, France, near the site where his plane crashed.

    "I sure wish I could've gone,” said Thomson’s brother, Bert, who is recovering from a hospitalization.

    "All of my family but me is over there."

    A plaque honoring Thomson, who was a first lieutenant, is placed at the village's soldier’s monument. Dignitaries from Paris, including U.S. Air Force representatives, were scheduled to attend, his brother said.

    The identification of Thomson's crash site and the ceremony were the work of the Forced Landing Association (or Association Pour L'Histoire et le Souvenir des Pilotes et Hommes D'Equipages Allies). Members of this group, many of whom were born after the war, research allied plane crash sites, then excavate and document them.

    Thomson, who still lives in Anacortes, said his older brothers Jay and Chester enlisted in the Army after Pearl Harbor.

    "That's the first thing they did," he said. "They both wanted to be pilots. One made it and one didn't."

    Bert himself graduated from Anacortes High School in 1942, then enlisted in the Navy on Nov.11 of that year. He spent much of the war stationed in Honolulu.

    Jay was attached to the 365th Fighter Squadron of the 358th Fighter Group, in the Army Air Force, where he flew a P-47 Thunderbolt fighter/bomber, Thomson said. His outfit was stationed at High Halden Air Force Base near Kent, England.

    On July 14th, 1944, several squads went out to bomb a railroad tunnel near Neubourg. A contemporary report said the four planes in 1LT Thomson's squad were swarmed by more than 50 German planes over Brezolles, west of Dreux. Thomson's plane was hit by an ME109 and an FW190, according to the report. He was listed as missing.

    Thomson said he always checked VFW magazines for information about his brother’s outfit. One recent edition provided him with a contact, who gave him the addresses of men who were likely to have known Jay.

    "I wrote to nine of them," he said. "I heard back from all but one, and he had died."
    One of the pilots referred him to a friend in England, who lived near the air force base. This friend, in turn, put him in touch with Jean-Luc Gruson of the Forced Landing Association, who was researching several planes that had been shot down on the same day. Gruson pinpointed which was which through excavated artifacts, such as a temperature gauge. Gruson wrote to Thomson and coordinated the ceremony so the family could attend.

    Although he was unable to join his family in France, he and his son Scott went to Causland Memorial Park Saturday to honor Jay with a prayer.

    "It was pretty touching to think they were over in France doing the same thing," he said.

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •