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Thread: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

  1. #1
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    Default A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    I don't know if this has been discussed here, but...

    In a series of articles written by ex-US Army CID investigator turned postwar journalist David Snell, for the Atlanta Constitution, it is claimed that the Japanese conducted a successful nuclear test in Korea shortly before the end of the War in 1945. The articles and claims were quickly forgotten and evidence was difficult to corroborate because the test area was in the Soviet zone in what is today North Korea:

    Japan Developed Atom Bomb;

    Russia Grabbed Scientists


    Copyright 1946 by the Atlanta Constitution and David Snell.

    Actual Test Was Success

    Japan developed and successfully tested an atomic bomb three days prior to the end of the war.

    She destroyed unfinished atomic bombs, secret papers and her atomic bomb plans only hours before the advance units of the Russian Army moved into Konan, Korea, site of the project.

    Japanese scientists who developed the bomb are now in Moscow, prisoners of the Russians. They were tortured by their captors seeking atomic "know-how."

    The Konan area is under rigid Russian control. They permit no American to visit the area. Once, even after the war, an American B-29 Superfortress en route to Konan was shot down by four Russian Yak fighters from nearby Hammung Airfield.

    I learned this information from a Japanese officer, who said he was in charge of counter intelligence at the Konan project before the fall of Japan. He gave names, dates, facts and figures on the Japanese atomic project, which I submitted to United States Army Intelligence in Seoul. The War Department is withholding much of the information. To protect the man that told me this story, and at the request of the Army, he is here given a pseudonym, Capt. Tsetusuo Wakabayashi.

    The story may throw light on Stalin's recent statement that America will not long have a monopoly on atomic weapons. Possibly also helps explains the stand taken by Henry A. Wallace. Perhaps also, it will help explain the heretofore unaccountable stalling of the Japanese in accepting our surrender terms as the Allies agreed to allow Hirohito to continue as puppet emperor. And perhaps it will throw light new light on the shooting down by the Russians of our B-29 on Aug. 29, 1945, in the Konan area.

    When told this story, I was an agent with the Twenty-Fourth Criminal Investigation Department, operating in Korea. I was able to interview Capt. Wakabayashi, not as an investigator or as a member of the armed forces, but as a newspaperman. He was advised and understood thoroughly, that he was speaking for publication.

    He was in Seoul, en route to Japan as a repatriate. The interview took place in a former Shinto temple on a mount overlooking Korea's capital city. The shrine had been converted into an hotel for transient Japanese en route to their homeland.

    Since V-J Day wisps of information have drifted into the hands of U.S. Army Intelligence of the existence of a gigantic and mystery-shrouded industrial project operated during the closing months of the war in a mountain vastness near the Northern Korean coastal city of Konan. It was near here that Japan's uranium supply was said to exist.

    This, the most complete account of activities at Konan to reach American ears, is believed to be the first time Japanese silence has been broken on the subject.

    In a cave in a mountain near Konan, men worked against time, in final assembly of genzai bakuden, Japan's name for the atomic bomb. It was August 10, 1945 (Japanese time), only four days after an atomic bomb flashed in the sky over Hiroshima, and five days before Japan surrendered.

    To the north, Russian hordes were spilling into Manchuria.

    Shortly after midnight of that day a convey of Japanese trucks moved from the mouth of the cave, past watchful sentries. The trucks wound through valleys, past sleeping farm villages. It was August, and frogs in the mud of terraced rice paddies sang in a still night. In the cool predawn Japanese scientists and engineers loaded genzai bakudan aboard a ship in Konan.

    Off the coast near an inlet in the Sea of Japan more frantic preparations were under way. All that day and night ancient ships, junks and fishing vessels moved into the anchorage.

    Before dawn on Aug. 12 a robot launch chugged through the ships at anchor and beached itself on the inlet. Its passenger was genzai bakudan. A clock ticked.

    The observers were 20 miles away. This waiting was difficult and strange to men who had worked relentlessly so long who knew their job had been completed too late.
    ...
    More here after "OBSERVORS BLINDED BY FLASH"

    pdf here



  2. #2
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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    Sounds like a lot of hot cock to me.

    Long on journalistic devices, short on verifiable fact, or any fact.

    I'm not aware of Japan having any capacity during WWII to produce atomic weapons, or even any great interest in doing so.
    ..
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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    There was a Japanese nuclear weapons project during WW2, which got as far as correctly calculating critical mass and some small-scale (lab) experiments with Uranium enrichment - so significantly more advanced than the German project. When the guy running the testing tried to get permission to take things further, he was told he should use some other metal instead of Uranium as it was too hard to produce. Not very long afterwards his lab was burned down in a B-29 raid.

    This story is remarkably similar to one about Germany in mid-1945 where a similar event was reported on the Baltic coast. In both cases it is claimed that a "small" nuclear weapon was tested, with the implication that this was a really crude device and so within the technical capabilities of the Germans/Japanese. The reality of course is that small devices are actually significantly harder to manufacture than 20kT ones - thus showing the story was cooked up by someone with an overactive imagination and no grasp of physics.
    I have neither the time nor the inclination to differentiate between the incompetent and the merely unfortunate - Curtis E LeMay

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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    history net claims they did.

    JAPAN’S SECRET WAR: JAPAN’S RACE AGAINST TIME TO BUILD ITS OWN ATOMIC BOMB
    ‘Shortly after World War II had ended,” writes Robert K. Wilcox in the introduction to his reissued book Japan’s Secret War:Japan’s Race Against Time to Build Its Own Atomic Bomb (Marlowe & Co., New York, 1995, $12.95), “Americanintelligence in the Pacific received a shocking report: The Japanese, just prior to their surrender, had developed andsuccessfully test-fired an atomic bomb.”
    story

    im not buying it. kinda hard to keep a nuke explosion secret?????? they were trading with the Nazi's for nuke material. but forced to bring in by submarine. I just don't think they enough of or enough time


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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    The story is absurd.
    Soviets did never use the Japanes datas in our Nuclear project.
    They were only getting data from ..USA.

    "I decide who is a Jew and who is an Aryan "- Hermann Goering

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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    That's a little harsh - the Soviets had some awfully bright nuclear physicists who worked the majority of it out on their own. The US data only really reduced the amount of work they had to do by a small amount, largely through telling them what didn't work before they found out the hard way by themselves.
    I have neither the time nor the inclination to differentiate between the incompetent and the merely unfortunate - Curtis E LeMay

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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    I looked around a bit and even Wiki called the articles "sensationalistic." They may be based on hearsay regarding a real weapon's project or an even that happened, but I doubt it was a test of a nuke...



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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    The only way Japan was to get Uranium in large amounts was from Germany, and the submarine was captured when Germany fell, and Japan had no way of delivering such a device to the "Kichiku-Bei Ei" (sorta translates to beastly and demon-like English and Americans), or most anybody else besides the Chinese, Koreans, or maybe the Russians.

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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    Quote Originally Posted by pdf27 View Post
    That's a little harsh - the Soviets had some awfully bright nuclear physicists who worked the majority of it out on their own. The US data only really reduced the amount of work they had to do by a small amount, largely through telling them what didn't work before they found out the hard way by themselves.
    Yes yo're right.
    I just was meaning that the Soviet scientists never mentioned the "Japan trace" in Soviet nuclear program.

    "I decide who is a Jew and who is an Aryan "- Hermann Goering

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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    I seem to recall reading that there was some evidence of some sort of German nuclear test in March 1945. It was claimed that Soviet intelligence had reported a massive explosion whose cause was unknown.

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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    The reporter is one Rainer Karlsch, who has written a rather implausible book which makes a number of outlandish claims - that particular explosion being among them. Perhaps the most outlandish is that Germany actually succeeded in making a Teller-Ulam fusion device work using a shaped charge rather than a fission bomb as the trigger.

    http://www.spiegel.de/international/...346293,00.html
    I have neither the time nor the inclination to differentiate between the incompetent and the merely unfortunate - Curtis E LeMay

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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chevan View Post
    Yes yo're right.
    I just was meaning that the Soviet scientists never mentioned the "Japan trace" in Soviet nuclear program.
    You are correct, in as far as I'm aware regarding the Russian nuclear program. However, while it is indeed unlikely the Russians captured Japanese nuclear physicists, they did kidnap both British and French nuclear scientists and force them to work on an atomic bomb project for 4 years. As far as I know, two sources support this. Airey Neave is said to have made reference to the above in a radio interview in the late 1960's early 1970's; and Chapman Pincher refers to the kidnappings of the French and British nuclear scientists in at least two of his many books.
    While I agree it likely that one of the above sources may be apocryphal, it is unlikely that both are, in my view.

    Regards, Uyraell.
    Last edited by Uyraell; 02-04-2009 at 09:10 PM.

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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    I'm certainly not suggesting that all the claims in the book are authentic but it sounded like there was some evidence to support the claim of the test on March 3, 1945. For example, if there were really contemporary reports of the explosion this would prove it was not something that was made up many years later.

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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    Ummm.... remembering that this was wartime, large explosions were really rather common - even inordinately large ones. The RAF for instance had one estimated at around 4kT (so larger than the ones Karlsch claims) at Fauld in November 1944. There was a similar sized explosion in Halifax harbour in December 1917 when an ammunition ship exploded, causing a huge number of casualties.

    Secondly, because so few people had experienced really large explosions (and none of his witnesses had any experience of them at all), how accurate are their yield estimates? If there really was a nuclear yield it will have shown up on seismographs across the world (this is one of the ways the CTBT is enforced) - indeed, even a big conventional explosion will have shown up clearly. I have little doubt that such seismograph records exist somewhere - so have to question why he hasn't dug them out and pointed to them.
    I have neither the time nor the inclination to differentiate between the incompetent and the merely unfortunate - Curtis E LeMay

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    Default Re: A Successful Japanese Atomic Bomb Test?

    There are several good books on the subject. Richard Rhodes 'The Making of the Atomic Bomb' is very good and still easily available on the used book market.

    One of the weaker points in these tales is the lack of refrence to where or how the weapons grade Uranium or Plutonium was made. To refine or seperate the hot or weapons grade Uranium isotope from the more stable isotope requires a massive industrial plant. Thousand of meters of tubes for gas diffusion seperation Many large powerful electomagnets and millions of kilowatts power for magnetic seperation.

    Plutonim manufactor first requires a functional atomic pile and the ability to control the sustained reaction.

    The German and Japanese had the ability to produce flyspeck size quantitys of the proper Uranium isotope under laboratory conditions. A few micrograms after several weeks work. Their understanding of slow controled reactions never progressed to the point of even the crudest atomic piles. So, no Plutonium breeder reactor.

    I've never seen anyone present the slightest shred of believable evidence such a manufactoring plant was built.

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