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Thread: Map of Trinidad

  1. #1
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    Default Map of Trinidad

    Map of Trinidad


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


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    Default Re: Map of Trinidad

    Memory Spirituals of the Ex-slave American Soldiers in Trinidad's "Company Villages"

    http://www.jstor.org/pss/779480
    Last edited by 32Bravo; 10-14-2008 at 12:11 PM.


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


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    Default Re: Map of Trinidad

    The term 'Obeah' was used in this period to include any religious or magical practices, including healing and conjuring of all types, which were believed to be African-derived. Most working-class blacks believed in the efficacy of such practices and consulted obeahmen and women; probably many upper- and middle-class Creoles did too. people saw no contradiction in attending Christian churches and consulting the obeahman; it was only prudent to be on good terms with both sets of gods. In the same way, the less orthodox Christian sects often combined African religious practices and tendencies with Christian theology ritual. Like the 'Shouter Baptists' who held noisy, emotional services that featured loud preaching, singing and movements by the congregation. The more orthodox Baptists regarded this kind of behaviour with concern and contempt. Yet it was a genuine fusion of fundamentalist Baptist worship with African religious practices, and it evolved into an indigenous church, which was especially strong among the 'Americans' of the Company villages who had been converted baptists in the southern USA and had kept up their religion in Trinidad.


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


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    Default Re: Map of Trinidad

    These 'Americans' were a part of a settlement of former slaves composed of American ex-slaves, some of whom had fought for Britain in the war of 1812-14 in the Corps of Colonial Marines, while others had been liberated by British officers during the course of the war. After 1816 some of these men with their families were settled in Trinidad in eight 'Company Villages' in the southern part of the island near Princes Town. Each refugee was allotted 16 acres of land, and the villages were put under the control of unpaid sergeants and corporals who were to have minor disciplinary powers, and a white superintendent. The 'Americans', as they were called, were expected to maintain road communications between San Fernando and the southern eastern coasts, and to open up a district that was still largely uncleared in the 1820s (Hard Bargain). These people were mainly Baptists practising the exuberant forms of worship to be found in th slave states of America. After 1831 the Company villages ceased to be separate settlements under the special control of government and gradually, as sugar cultivation spread into the southern district, they were more and more integrated into the general economic and social life of the island. Yet as late as the end of the nineteenth century the descendants of the Americans were still proud of their separate identity and their history.


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


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    Default Re: Map of Trinidad

    Quote Originally Posted by 32Bravo View Post
    These 'Americans' were a part of a settlement of former slaves composed of American ex-slaves, some of whom had fought for Britain in the war of 1812-14 in the Corps of Colonial Marines, while others had been liberated by British officers during the course of the war. After 1816 some of these men with their families were settled in Trinidad in eight 'Company Villages' in the southern part of the island near Princes Town. Each refugee was allotted 16 acres of land, and the villages were put under the control of unpaid sergeants and corporals who were to have minor disciplinary powers, and a white superintendent. The 'Americans', as they were called, were expected to maintain road communications between San Fernando and the southern eastern coasts, and to open up a district that was still largely uncleared in the 1820s (Hard Bargain). These people were mainly Baptists practising the exuberant forms of worship to be found in th slave states of America. After 1831 the Company villages ceased to be separate settlements under the special control of government and gradually, as sugar cultivation spread into the southern district, they were more and more integrated into the general economic and social life of the island. Yet as late as the end of the nineteenth century the descendants of the Americans were still proud of their separate identity and their history.
    I think every one belives you.What bought this up. Are you proofing some one wrong?

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    Quote Originally Posted by aly j View Post
    I think every one belives you.What bought this up. Are you proofing some one wrong?
    Why must there be an ulterior motive to posting information that some might find interesting and, just maybe, like to discuss or read further?


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


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    Default Re: Map of Trinidad

    Hi 32bravo!
    Sorry, have been busy the last few days. Working out of town, getting home late. Just letting you know I'm keeping up. A lot of "black" churches here in the US are of the more exuberant form. The two that I've visited were actually kind of fun. The worship (music, singing) wasn't nearly as "dry" as regular church. (I'm not one to stand up, sing a song, sit down, repeat)
    "Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same." - Ronald Reagan

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    Default Re: Map of Trinidad

    Quote Originally Posted by 32Bravo View Post
    Why must there be an ulterior motive to posting information that some might find interesting and, just maybe, like to discuss or read further?
    Sorry didt realize what you were doing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by navyson View Post
    Hi 32bravo!
    Sorry, have been busy the last few days. Working out of town, getting home late. Just letting you know I'm keeping up. A lot of "black" churches here in the US are of the more exuberant form. The two that I've visited were actually kind of fun. The worship (music, singing) wasn't nearly as "dry" as regular church. (I'm not one to stand up, sing a song, sit down, repeat)

    I got into what was known as 'Negro Spirituals' as a schoolboy. My music teacher was really quite keen on them.

    One of my favourites was the Gospel train:

    The Gospel train's comin'
    I hear it just at hand
    I hear the car wheel rumblin'
    And rollin' thro' the land

    Get on board little children
    Get on board little children
    Get on board little children
    There's room for many more

    I hear the train a-comin'
    She's comin' round the curve
    She's loosened all her steam and brakes
    And strainin' ev'ry nerve

    The fare is cheap and all can go
    The rich and poor are there
    No second class aboard this train
    No difference in the fare
    These made me think about the people that used to sing them, in the old days, and gave me much food for thought as to my attitude to black people and their plight. They being of a race of people to which I had had hardly any exposure, but had a natural tendency to consider myself superior.

    There is a portrait of gospel singers commissioned by Queen Victoria. I have seen it on a TV docu, but not exhibited, something I wouldn't mind seeing.

    Just googled this:

    It's little known that the very first public performances of African-American music in Britain took place as long ago as 1873. The Fisk Jubilee Singers - a group of freed slaves from Tennessee - became a national sensation during the following decade, drawing vast crowds around the country and invitations to sing for Gladstone and the Royal Family. Queen Victoria was so moved by their voices that she commissioned the Singers’ portrait, which today hangs in Fisk University in Nashville - built with the proceeds of their historic tours.
    http://www.gbmnews.com/News_Photos/051108/Fisk_2.jpg

    http://www.fiskjubileesingers.org/our_history.html

    Today

    “All of a sudden, there was no talking,” says musicologist and former Jubilee Singers Musical Director Horace C. Boyer. “They said you could hear the soft weeping…and I’m sure that the Jubilee Singers were joining them in tears, because sometimes when you think about what you are singing, particularly if you believe it, you can’t help but be moved.”
    http://www.fiskjubileesingers.org/

    I do enjoy a little music at a service when it is done well and in the context of the service, but I do believe it can be overdone. And not just by black congregations.

    I believe it should be God almighty... not 'God allmatey'.
    Last edited by 32Bravo; 10-15-2008 at 02:41 PM.


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


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    Quote Originally Posted by aly j View Post
    Sorry didt realize what you were doing.
    I must confess that your remarks astonished me. If you were referring to RC's posting of info regarding Trinidadian 'Merickans' (and I can not think of any other reasons for your post), let me assure you that I was inspired by RC's posting and hoped that what I had posted in response served to reinforce what he had written.

    No hard feelings


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


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    Default Re: Map of Trinidad

    The Corps of Colonial Marines:
    Black freedom fighters of the War of 1812



    This article gives an account of work in progress, a project first referenced in the author's "The Corps of Colonial Marines 1814-16: a summary", published in Immigrants and Minorities, 15/1, April 1996. The text here, incorporating recent research, is developed from an unpublished paper delivered in Trinidad in January 2001 at the St Augustine campus of the University of the West Indies: "Origins of the 'Merikens', African American settlers of Trinidad's Company Villages". The most recent presentation of the subject as a whole is a paper given at the 5th IMEHA International Congress of Maritime History, University of Greenwich, in June 2008: "Taking their freedom by way of the Royal Navy in the War of 1812".

    1 INTRODUCTION
    In 1815 and 1816 Trinidad welcomed over seven hundred free Black American settlers, refugees from the War of 1812, the second and last armed conflict between the United States and Great Britain. The majority found their new homes in the south of the island around the Mission of Savanna Grande, now Princes Town, mostly within the area known since then as The Company Villages. Local history sometimes asserts that they came out of the War for American Independence, at which time most were not yet born, or that they were part of the West India Regiments, whose settlement at a different time and a different place remains to be fully researched. But the sea soldiers that were the founders of the Company Villages community were part of a great African American emigration, unparalleled and almost ignored, the most significant departure from slavery between the Haitian revolution of the 1790s and British colonial abolition in the 1830s. The Merikens of the Company Villages had been the Corps of Colonial Marines, who saw fighting service with the British in the War of 1812, garrisoned after the war on the island of Bermuda for fourteen months and disbanded in Trinidad in 1816 to form a new free Black yeomanry.
    More: http://www.mcnishandweiss.co.uk/hist...almarines.html


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


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    Default Re: Map of Trinidad

    Hey - when did I get promoted, I hadn't noticed?


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


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    Default Re: Map of Trinidad

    Lol, about 49 posts ago.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Churchill View Post
    Lol, about 49 posts ago.
    Well, I'm attending a function at the Army & Navy Club (The Rag) today, so I think that's worth one or two pink ones - cheers!

    http://www.armynavyclub.co.uk/the-club/index.php
    Last edited by 32Bravo; 10-16-2008 at 03:42 AM.


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


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    Quote Originally Posted by 32Bravo View Post
    I must confess that your remarks astonished me. If you were referring to RC's posting of info regarding Trinidadian 'Merickans' (and I can not think of any other reasons for your post), let me assure you that I was inspired by RC's posting and hoped that what I had posted in response served to reinforce what he had written.

    No hard feelings
    Why would my feelings get hurt? You spoke to me in a responceable way.

    Cheers.

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