Türk porno yayini yapan http://www.smfairview.com ve http://www.idoproxy.com adli siteler rokettube videolarini da HD kalitede yayinlayacagini acikladi. Ayrica porno indir ozelligiyle de http://www.mysticinca.com adli porno sitesi devreye girdi.
Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: China Buried US Korean War POW

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Buffalo, New York
    Posts
    7,404

    Default China Buried US Korean War POW

    China admits taking, burying U.S. POW
    Case was focal point of a six-decade cover-up

    The Associated Press
    updated 7:31 p.m. ET, Thurs., June. 19, 2008

    China for the first time acknowledged burying Army Sgt. Richard G. Desautels, a U.S. prisoner of war on its soil, telling U.S. officials half a century after the fact that an American soldier it captured in the Korean War died one week after he "became mentally ill."
    WASHINGTON - After decades of denials, the Chinese have acknowledged burying an American prisoner of war in China, telling the U.S. that a teenage soldier captured in the Korean War died a week after he "became mentally ill," according to documents provided to The Associated Press.

    China had long insisted that all POW questions were answered at the conclusion of the war in 1953 and that no Americans were moved to Chinese territory from North Korea. The little-known case of Army Sgt. Richard G. Desautels opens another chapter in this story and raises the possibility that new details concerning the fate of other POWs may eventually surface.

    Chinese authorities gave Pentagon officials intriguing new details about Desautels in a March 2003 meeting in Beijing, saying they had found "a complete record of 9-10 pages" in classified archives.

    Until now, this new information had been kept quiet; a Pentagon spokesman said it was intended only for Desautels family members. The details were provided to Desautels' brother, Rolland, who passed them to a POW-MIA advocacy group, the National Alliance of Families, which gave them to AP.

    Family didn't believe new details
    In a telephone interview Thursday, the brother said he did not follow up on the information he got in 2003 because he did not believe it. He was not aware that it marked the first time China had acknowledged taking a U.S. POW from North Korea into Chinese territory or burying an American there.

    Two months after the March 2003 meeting, the Pentagon office responsible for POW-MIA issues sent Rolland Desautels a brief written summary of what a Chinese army official had related about the case.

    "According to the Chinese, Sgt. Desautels became mentally ill on April 22, 1953, and died on April 29, 1953," the summary said. It added that he had been buried in a Chinese cemetery but the grave was moved during a construction project "and there is no record of where Desautels' remains were reinterred."

    The reported circumstance of Desautels' death — sudden mental illness — may sound improbable. But the key revelation — that he was taken from North Korea to a city in northeastern China and then buried — matches long-held U.S. suspicions about China's handling, or mishandling, of American POWs during and after the war.

    It raises the possibility that wartime Chinese records could shed light on the fate of other U.S. captives who were known to be held in Chinese-run POW camps but did not return when the fighting ended in 1953.

    Pentagon's stance at issue
    And it appears to undercut the Pentagon's public stance that China returned all POWs it held inside China. The Pentagon has focused more on the related issue of China's management of POW camps inside North Korea during the war, which Chinese troops entered in the fall of 1950 on North Korea's side.

    Desautels' reported burial site — the city of Shenyang, formerly known as Mukden — is interesting because it is far from the North Korean border and was often cited in declassified U.S. intelligence reports as the site of one or more prisons holding hundreds of American POWs from Korea. Some U.S. reports referred to Mukden as a possible transshipment point for POWs headed to Russia.

    Desautels was an 18-year-old corporal, a member of A Company, 2nd Engineer Battalion, 2nd Infantry Division, when his unit encountered a swarming Chinese assault near Kunu-ri, North Korea, on Dec. 1, 1950. According to a Pentagon account, Desautels and his fellow captives were marched north to a POW compound known as Camp 5, near Pyoktong, on the North Korean side of the border with China.

    POW thought he might disappear
    Subsequent events are a bit fuzzy, but Desautels was moved among prison camps and apparently was used by the Chinese army as a truck driver. A number of U.S. POWs told American interrogators after their release from captivity that they had seen Desautels alive and well in Camp 5.

    One who said he spent four months with Desautels said that in March 1952 Desautels said that if he should disappear, others should make inquiries with the proper military authorities. Numerous returned POWs said Desautels had spent several months inside China before being returned to Camp 5 in 1952.

    The U.S. Army promoted Desautels from corporal to sergeant while he was held prisoner.

    Rolland Desautels, 81, recalls his older brother as "a strong character who came off the farm," enlisted in the Army at age 17 and was stationed at Fort Lewis, Wash., before being shipped to Korea in August 1950, two months after the war began with North Korea's invasion of the South.

    The Pentagon has taken an interest in the Desautels case for many years. A June 1998 Pentagon cable to the U.S. Embassy in Beijing said that the case was one of several on which China should be pushed to provide answers, that "we believe the Chinese should be able to account for these individuals."

    Now it turns out that China did provide an accounting, although it is incomplete and was kept under wraps for five years.

    Larry Greer, a spokesman for the POW-MIA office at the Pentagon, said Thursday that although U.S. officials asked to see the nine- to 10-page file on Desautels, China has yet to provide it or additional information.

    Mark Sauter, an author and researcher on the subject of POWs from the Korean War, said in an interview that Beijing authorities are to be commended for finally providing useful information.

    'This is the first crack in the dike'
    "The case of Sgt. Desautels has been a focal point of a six-decade cover-up by the Chinese government," Sauter said. "This is the first crack in the dike. From what we can tell, the Pentagon has not aggressively followed up, either on the Desautels case or those of hundreds of other Americans for whom the Chinese should be able to account."

    American officials believed from the earliest days of the armistice that concluded the Korean War without a formal peace treaty in July 1953 that the Chinese and North Koreans withheld a number of U.S. POWs, possibly in retaliation for U.S. refusal to repatriate those Chinese and North Korean POWs who chose not to be returned to their home country out of fear of retribution.

    Gen. Mark W. Clark, the American commander of U.S.-led forces during the final stages of the Korean War, wrote in a 1954 account that "we had solid evidence" that hundreds of captive Americans were held back by the Chinese and North Koreans, possibly as leverage to gain a China seat on the U.N. Security Council.

    Over time, however, U.S. officials muted their concerns, while periodically pressing the Chinese in private. Publicly, the Pentagon's stance today is that China returned all the U.S. POWs it held.

    "Some U.S. POWs spent time across the (Yalu) river in Manchuria, but to the best of our knowledge, all have returned," the Pentagon's POW/MIA office says in a summary of wartime POW camps.

    Copyright 2008 The Associated Press.

    MSNBC

    Related: US to get Chinese War Records

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    9,278

    Default Re: China Buried US Korean War POW

    Bullshit!

    There is, by obvious definition, no mental illness which progresses naturally to death, let alone in seven days.

    Most probable 'mental' illness that killed him was a Chinese bullet in the brain, or some other mistreatment.

    Typical Chinese (and Japanese) obfuscation and refusal to admit responsibility for what they did when it causes loss of face.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Buffalo, New York
    Posts
    7,404

    Default Re: China Buried US Korean War POW

    Yeah, that made me sort of angry too. Plus, it sounds like this kid sort of knew he was going to get it...

    Frankly, what really shocked me though was the sheer number of MIA Americans from the Korean War, something like 8000. I mean, no disrespect to 'Nam vets, but all I've ever heard about are how the North Vietnamese were holding Americans alive in the Rambo and Chuck Norris inspired fantasies (which most likely aren't true or are exaggerated). If anything, it was this War in which regular soldiers, airmen (Sabre pilots especially) were essentially abducted and probably died in captivity or under torture in China and the Soviet Union...

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    china
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: China Buried US Korean War POW

    Ishould say ,it is not real
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	1950年11月16日,美国巡逻队将一.jpg 
Views:	354 
Size:	76.4 KB 
ID:	5662  
    Last edited by jixingchen; 09-03-2011 at 08:12 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Up in the land of the Yoopers.
    Posts
    4,308

    Default Re: China Buried US Korean War POW

    This smacks of psychological torture used to interrogate or turn prisoners. Sometimes drugs would be used, and to my mind, this would best account for the man's "mental illness" An induced state of psychosis in which terror could be created and then manipulated to break a prisoner. It would not be surprising to find that the man died from the stress of such treatment, or even killed himself.
    I would not for a minute believe the account contained in the file.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Southern Russia , Krasnodar
    Posts
    4,077

    Default Re: China Buried US Korean War POW

    Quote Originally Posted by Nickdfresh View Post
    If anything, it was this War in which regular soldiers, airmen (Sabre pilots especially) were essentially abducted and probably died in captivity or under torture in China and the Soviet Union...
    No one american Korea POW's never were tortured or even prisoned in/by the USSR.The Soviet military corp in Korea had also just limited access to an American POWs.

    "I decide who is a Jew and who is an Aryan "- Hermann Goering

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    201

    Default Re: China Buried US Korean War POW

    I call bullshit on that. What is your source?

    Too much information exists including testimony by Russian officials.

    There was an awful lot of technical information that was squeezed out of a lot of guys who were never seen again.

    What cretin ever considered war as an honorable or pleasant activity?

    What double cretin gets his shorts in a wad when he sees evidence of that?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Buffalo, New York
    Posts
    7,404

    Default Re: China Buried US Korean War POW

    Quote Originally Posted by Chevan View Post
    No one american Korea POW's never were tortured or even prisoned in/by the USSR.The Soviet military corp in Korea had also just limited access to an American POWs.
    American POW's, just like their unfortunate comrades shot down over the Soviet Union on reconnaissance missions, were in fact interrogated and interred in the USSR. Why ever would the Soviets have "limited access?"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Southern Russia , Krasnodar
    Posts
    4,077

    Default Re: China Buried US Korean War POW

    Quote Originally Posted by Nickdfresh View Post
    American POW's, just like their unfortunate comrades shot down over the Soviet Union on reconnaissance missions, were in fact interrogated and interred in the USSR. Why ever would the Soviets have "limited access?"
    Do you kniow just one amrtican captured pilot who was send to USSR after beeing shot down over Korea?
    I don't. As for these who were shoted down or emergency landed over soviet territory - this is another theme.
    I know only one survived american pilot of U-2, shoted down in 1961. I read also there were about dozen american reconnaissance missions ( mostly they fly RB-29) which were intercepted over Soviet territories since 1946-1953 but no one crew member have survived or captured alive.

    "I decide who is a Jew and who is an Aryan "- Hermann Goering

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    9,278

    Default Re: China Buried US Korean War POW

    Quote Originally Posted by Chevan View Post
    I know only one survived american pilot of U-2, shoted down in 1961.
    Or 1960, being Gary Powers?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chevan View Post
    I read also there were about dozen american reconnaissance missions ( mostly they fly RB-29) which were intercepted over Soviet territories since 1946-1953 but no one crew member have survived or captured alive.
    Like the Chinese didn't have Sgt. Desautels?

    Or the North Koreans never kidnapped Japanese citizens?

    Or America had nothing to do with deposing Allende and was never in Cambodia during the Vietnam War?

    And a very long list of lies by those and most other nations when it suited their purposes.

    All governments lie when it suits their purpose
    ..
    A rational army would run away.
    Montesquieu

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Southern Russia , Krasnodar
    Posts
    4,077

    Default Re: China Buried US Korean War POW

    Quote Originally Posted by Rising Sun* View Post
    Or 1960, being Gary Powers?
    sure it was Powers in 1960, my typo. Now you know too much
    All governments lie when it suits their purpose
    Its true. When govenments are interesting in lie the do it witout regrets.

    "I decide who is a Jew and who is an Aryan "- Hermann Goering

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    104

    Default Re: China Buried US Korean War POW

    I know that this an older thread, but the historical value remains the same.

    (New York Times) Decades Later, Tales of Americans in Soviet Jails
    http://www.nytimes.com/1996/07/19/wo...iet-jails.html

    (LA Times )
    http://articles.latimes.com/1993-08-...2_1_korean-war

    (U.S. Pilots Help Russians Trace Korean War MIAs)
    http://www.defense.gov/news/newsarticle.aspx?id=41795

    (POWs HELD IN USSR)
    http://www.americanfreepress.net/htm...d_in_ussr.html

    (POW/MIA REPORT: AMERICAN POWs TAKEN TO USSR FROM KOREAN AND VIETNAM WARS)
    http://www.taskforceomegainc.org/USSR.html

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	pow mia.jpg 
Views:	96 
Size:	12.6 KB 
ID:	7323


    POW/MIA Missing but not forgotten.
    Last edited by Wittmann; 01-09-2015 at 10:51 PM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    china
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: China Buried US Korean War POW

    Thanks,very useful articles~~~

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •