Türk porno yayini yapan http://www.smfairview.com ve http://www.idoproxy.com adli siteler rokettube videolarini da HD kalitede yayinlayacagini acikladi. Ayrica porno indir ozelligiyle de http://www.mysticinca.com adli porno sitesi devreye girdi.
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 22

Thread: Natives

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    9,278

    Default Natives

    Almost always overlooked but often critical to Allied, and Japanese, operations.

    Here is one example.
    http://images.google.com.au/imgres?i...%3Dig%26sa%3DX

    Here is something which casts a shadow over the last perspective.
    http://www.abc.net.au/lateline/conte...7/s2045729.htm

    But it's a bit more complex, as outlined here
    http://exkiap.net/forum/viewtopic.ph...77a6b532851831

    But they also fought as soldiers
    http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/news...?page=fullpage

    And then the natives are ignored, as usual, by governments and reduced to charity from the people they helped, who were entitled to government war pensions.
    http://www.kokodatrackfoundation.org...Dinner2007.pdf

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    9,278

    Default Re: Natives

    I'm a bit disappointed that nobody else has taken this up.

    It's not a minor issue but, as it seems to be on this board as in the general community, the efforts of natives in various countries are still overlooked, while the efforts of other natives are extolled.

    Where would the British have been in Burma without the Karens?

    How much did the Filipino guerrillas risk after MacArthur lost and before he returned a few year later?

    What about the Timorese who supported the Australians in Timor?

    We don't hear much about these people, yet the Italian and Yugoslavian partisans (who in some cases were just pre-war brigands legitimised by war) and the French Maquis (in whose modest number about a hundred thousand times more French people claim to have served) are well known.

    Being a guerrilla, or partisan or Maquis in the European sense, was a lot more dangerous as far as the consequences went when doing it under the Japanese.

    So why don't the native people who took grave risks under the Japanese rank as highly as the Maquis, which was just another native resistance organisation?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    9,278

    Default Re: Natives

    One example of how the Allies rewarded natives who supported them.

    A fair go for the hugely oppressed Timorese for supporting Australian troops in WWII?

    Yeah. Right!

    Many Timorese including liurai paid with their lives either for standing neutral or for alleged support of Australian guerrillas. Many other Portuguese and Timorese were executed by the Japanese without court martial. One Portuguese writer who has studied this question, Vieira da Rocha, lists the names of 75 Portuguese and assimilados who died as a result of the Japanese occupation. At least ten died in combat against the Japanese, 37 were murdered while eight died in detention. Many were deportado, most were officials. The number of Timorese who died during the war is impossible to calculate with precision but is of the order of 40-70,000 out of a total prewar population of around 450,000. The disruption to native agriculture and the breakdown of prewar society stemming from the harsh system of food collection and corvees imposed by the Japanese inevitably led to famine and other hardships, including debilitating disease.

    It is clear that the Australian War Crimes investigators were only interested in investigating crimes against the Australian commandos, not against civilian Timorese or Chinese victims who suffered most from Japanese regime of terror. While Australian investigators collated a mass of oral testimony as to atrocities committed against Portuguese, Chinese, and Timorese, no action was taken in these cases. While Japanese crimes against the Portuguese were actually commemorated in stone in a splendid and surviving monument in Aileu it also has to be said that ordinary Timorese were prime victims of Japanese excesses and recriminations. Equally, it was ordinary Timorese who suffered most from draconian labour details not to mention the economy of scarcity imposed by wartime conditions.

    It also cannot pass without mention that alone among the peoples and countries occupied by Japan during the Pacific War, Portugal's oceanic colony was not a beneficiary of war reparations as set down at the 1951 San Francisco Conference as Portugal was not, technically, a belligerent in this war. As a visiting private Japanese consortium learnt at first hand in Timor in the 1970s, neither had Japan seen fit to redeem military script issued during the war, the basis upon which the Japanese army financed its occupation of the country. The issues of Japanese wartime compensation including the claims of so-called "comfort women" or sexual slavery in Timor first became public in 1997 but only in the Macau media where it was taken up by Jose Ramos-Horta speaking on behalf of the Timorese people.
    My bold http://members.pcug.org.au/~wildwood/early500.htm


    Our current government recognises the the sacrifices of the Timorese for Australia's benefit but ignores the reality of how Australia treated the Timorese.

    Hardship, courage, resilience, sticking together—they are also watchwords of Australia and Timor’s history of WWII.

    In 1942 the 2/2nd and 2/4th Independent Company waged war here in East Timor on the Japanese invaders.

    In July 1942, there were around 700 Australians in Timor fighting a force of as many as 20,000.

    And losing 40 Australians, Sparrow force caused 1500 Japanese casualties.

    And today’s service has particular poignancy, because it is very close to here that eleven of those 40 men lost their lives.

    According to records, on or about the 19th of February, sixteen Australian soldiers members of the 2/2nd Independent Company (later Commandos) were returning to Dili from the mountains, unaware that the Japanese has just landed and were heading west up the main road towards them.

    After a brief struggle the party was captured at the Comoro river.

    Eleven of the soldiers were never seen again.

    The official war record relates a number of statements from 1945, including that the soldiers:

    “were tied together and moved towards Dili. Later reports from a Dutchman were that this Party had been executed at Dili Aerodrome”. (now known as the heliport)

    The official findings of 1946 were that they had “died whilst POW, executed by Japs 20 Feb 1942.’

    And today - we remember them…and their comrades.

    We also remember the East Timorese, without whom so many more Australians would have been lost.

    Because what Sparrow force achieved could never have been done alone…and the Timorese help came at a terrible cost to themselves.

    Horrendous casualties were suffered by the East Timorese who it is estimated lost 40,000 as the Japanese wiped out whole villages suspected of offering aid to the Australians. (Kenneth Davidson, the Age 14/11/1991).

    The members of Sparrow force were befriended, harbored, guided, protected and fed by loyal Timorese comrades in their common quest to rid the island of the Japanese invasion force.

    Individual Australians had the assistance of Timorese offsiders, known as “Creados”,

    As one Australian soldier said of these indomitable and courageous people ; “they were so good, the creados, they risked their lives all the time for us, it shamed you really.”
    http://www.minister.defence.gov.au/S...CurrentId=7645


    So, how did Australia as a nation repay that debt?

    East Timor - betrayal, hypocrisy and genocide
    Martin Lehmann - 26 September 1999

    Australian governments since 1975 must share a huge responsibility for the tragic events in East Timor.

    It all started with self-styled "elder statesman", Gough Whitlam. This so-called champion of the downtrodden, without reference to the parliament, gave the nod in 1975 to the murderous Indonesian regime that it was OK as far as Australia was concerned, to invade East Timor. With Whitlam's acquiescence, the Indonesians invaded the tiny province of East Timor on Australia's doorstep, just two hours flight from Darwin.

    In a series of purges and massacres since 1975 the brutal regime has murdered at least a third of the population of East Timor, a genocide that ranks with that of Pol Pot in Cambodia.

    And what were our governments doing all this time? They were pouring hundreds of millions of taxpayers' dollars into supplying Indonesia with military weapons and training. In 1993, Prime Minister Paul Keating gave the regime $114 million in military aid while at the same entering into dubious personal business deals with Indonesian officials.

    Australia is the only country in the world to officially endorse Indonesia's invasion of East Timor.
    http://www.australian-news.com.au/EastTimor.htm


    But the Australian men who fought there did not forget the Timorese.

    But for the Timorese many Australian diggers, like retired wharfie Paddy Kenneally, would have died at the hands of the Japanese during WW2. Now it's time to return the favour...

    "Australia dragged East Timor into the war, and close to 60,000 of them died for us," said John "Paddy" Kenneally.

    Paddy was one of the speakers at Remember East Timor Rally in Sydney held in conjunction with ANZAC day, on April 26. He spoke from experience.

    Paddy was working on the Pyrmont wharves when his foreman told him that the Japanese Air Force had just bombed Pearl Harbour. It was December 7, 1941.

    "I got up, dropped my tool belt and started to leave," said Paddy. "The foreman asked where I was going and I said I was going to join the army."

    Six weeks later, on January 21, 1942, Paddy landed in East Timor (then Portuguese Timor) with the 2nd Independent Company, known as the 2/2 Commandos. He now realises, they should never have gone there.

    "East Timor was a neutral country," said Paddy. "It wasn't at war. Us being there was an act of aggression. Even the Portuguese didn't want Australian troops there."

    The Japanese army arrived in East Timor a month after the 2/2 Commandos. By that time, 80 per cent of the 300 diggers were already sick with malaria.

    The Australian troops headed for the mountains for cover, and Paddy recalled how the Timorese took care of them right from the beginning of hostilities in East Timor.

    "The very first day the Japanese arrived, the Timorese saved the first Australian," he said.

    The 2/2 Commandos stayed in East Timor for another 10 months and fought a guerrilla campaign - something they could not have done without the support of the Timorese people. "That's the key of a guerrilla war," said Paddy.

    During the 11 months of warfare, the 2/2 Commandos lost less than 40 soldiers, while the Timorese lost an estimated 2500 lives. For the whole war (1942-1945), the number of East Timorese who died because of their involvement with Australia was 60,000.

    They were either killed in battle, tortured or died of disease caused by malnutrition.

    After the war, RAAF planes flew over East Timor dropping flyers saying "Your friends will not forget you." However, aside from the oil in the Timor Sea, the Australian Government did forget.
    http://workers.labor.net.au/14/d_review_paddy.html

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    9,278

    Default Re: Natives

    Some examples, of people who often took far bigger risks for far longer than Allied troops did in liberating their countries from Japan.

    Filipinos
    Japanese occupation of the Philippines was opposed by increasingly effective underground and guerrilla activity that ultimately reached large-scale proportions. Postwar investigations showed that about 260,000 people were in guerrilla organizations and that members of the anti-Japanese underground were even more numerous. Their effectiveness was such that by the end of the war, Japan controlled only twelve of the forty-eight provinces. The major element of resistance in the Central Luzon area was furnished by the Huks, Hukbalahap, or the People's Anti-Japanese Army organized in early 1942 under the leadership of Luis Taruc, a communist party member since 1939. The Huks armed some 30,000 people and extended their control over much of Luzon. Other guerrilla units were attached to the United States Armed Forces Far East.
    My bold http://countrystudies.us/philippines/21.htm

    Burma
    Full of resentment, the Kachins, if provided with equipment and leadership, were more than ready to fight the Japanese. Around them, the Office of Strategic Services would build perhaps the most successful guerrilla organization of World War II.
    My bold. p. 98 at http://www.history.army.mil/books/ww...42/70-425.html

    Malaya
    The Malayan People's Anti-Japanese Army (MPAJA) originated from four battalions of Overseas Chinese-including Communists recently released from Changi Prison-trained by the British before the fall of Singapore. Though MPAJA and its parent organization, the Malayan Communist Party (MCP), suffered initial setbacks in 1942, they were able to regroup their forces with new recruits and reinforcements from British Force 136. By the end of the war another four battalions had been mobilized for a total of some 3-4,000 soldiers, who were supported by tens of thousands of sympathizers.

    Beginning in 1943, Force 136 sent agents and supplies, first by submarine and later by air drops. These agents were largely KMT soldiers trained in India and Sri Lanka. They waged anti-Japanese activities while laying groundwork for a planned Allied invasion of Malaya. The MPAJA operated in every Malay state, harassing the Japanese with hit-and-run guerrilla warfare, but the Third and Fourth Battalions, in Johore, and the Fifth Battalion, in Perak, were most active. Accordingly, these two states were described as "security risk" areas.
    http://www.aasianst.org/absts/1996abst/inter/i181.htm

    Timor
    During the early months, the success of the guerrillas in East Timor was only made possible by the support they received from the local Timorese who, risking execution by the Japanese, acted as porters and guides and provided food and shelter.
    http://www.ww2australia.gov.au/japadvance/timor.html

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    2,923

    Default Re: Natives

    Quote Originally Posted by Rising Sun* View Post
    I'm a bit disappointed that nobody else has taken this up.

    It's not a minor issue but, as it seems to be on this board as in the general community, the efforts of natives in various countries are still overlooked, while the efforts of other natives are extolled.

    Where would the British have been in Burma without the Karens?

    How much did the Filipino guerrillas risk after MacArthur lost and before he returned a few year later?

    What about the Timorese who supported the Australians in Timor?

    We don't hear much about these people, yet the Italian and Yugoslavian partisans (who in some cases were just pre-war brigands legitimised by war) and the French Maquis (in whose modest number about a hundred thousand times more French people claim to have served) are well known.

    Being a guerrilla, or partisan or Maquis in the European sense, was a lot more dangerous as far as the consequences went when doing it under the Japanese.

    So why don't the native people who took grave risks under the Japanese rank as highly as the Maquis, which was just another native resistance organisation?

    Indigenous irregulars fighting in their own country?

    Where do we begin?

    British Imperial troops were recruited from all corners of the Empire, and few recieve not only little recognition today, but also the respect and admiration which they deserve. When one considers that, then it is not surprising that irregulars fighting under their own banner, yet supplied by the Allies recieve little recognition.

    I haven't read all that you have posted above, but when one speaks of recognition, I can't help thinking of the Chinese Stay-behind forces of Malaya, or the irregulars serving under the command of Ho Chi Minh.


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    9,278

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    2,923

    Default Re: Natives

    Of course, the Arabs are remembered in Lawrence's book The Seven Pillars of Wisdom.
    Have a copy on the old book shelf.

    And of course, John Wayne remembered the guerilla fighters of the Phillipines.

    After a couple of brief but quite cool battle sequences, the movie settles in to its main plot of John Wayne training Philippinos in the art of guerilla warfare against their conquerors,
    http://www.amazon.com/Back-Bataan-Jo.../dp/6301325478
    Last edited by 32Bravo; 06-14-2008 at 08:48 AM.


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    9,278

    Default Re: Natives

    Quote Originally Posted by 32Bravo View Post
    Of course, the Arabs are remembered in Lawrence's book The Seven Pillars of Wisdom.
    That was the first time around.

    The first time they were promised the world and ended up with nothing (the Balfour Declaration being a bit of an obstacle).

    Rather like the second time.

    Rather like all the native troops in both wars.

    Quote Originally Posted by 32Bravo View Post
    And of course, John Wayne remembered the guerilla fighters of the Phillipines.

    http://www.amazon.com/Back-Bataan-Jo.../dp/6301325478
    Not to mention his great depiction of the Green Berets in Vietnam (which was one of the best comedies we never bothered to watch at the time) and other heroic filmic adventures defending America behind a celluloid barrier during various wars, while people like Jimmy Stewart and David Niven went off and did what had to be done and never made any noise about it.

    Still, I can't criticise Wayne for being a draft dodger during a time of war when his nation's last two presidents were draft dodgers during the same war that Wayne distorted in Green Berets and, like him, were hugely belligerent later when their own balls weren't in the vice.

    He was just a man ahead of his time.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Surrey
    Posts
    2,923

    Default Re: Natives

    He probably did more for the American war effort by making films than he could have as a soldier, regardless of how brave he might o might not have been.

    He did give the Phillipinos a mention. I remembered the film from having seen it as a youngster. If he hadn't have made it, it's unlikely that I, for instance, would have ever heard of them. Hollywood reaches wide audiences.

    The Arabs got a bum deal in both wars, as did other indigenous troops, that's history (or, perhaps, economics?) and probably the future also.

    It reminds me of one American scientist describing the Apollo programme and the race for the moon "It was like a dog chasing a car! We caught it, pissed on it, and left it!"


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    9,278

    Default Re: Natives

    Quote Originally Posted by 32Bravo View Post
    He probably did more for the American war effort by making films than he could have as a soldier, regardless of how brave he might o might not have been.
    True.

    And there's a skill in being a great film actor, which very few people have.

    The Arabs got a bum deal in both wars, as did other indigenous troops, that's history (or, perhaps, economics?) and probably the future also.
    So far as the future is concerned, not since oil became so important.

    Saudi Arabia would still be a third rate camel park if it didn't have oil, but look how oil makes it (or some of its citizens) rich beyond belief, and for bugger all local effort plus the Yanks defending it to the hilt, despite it being one of the most pernicious sources of rabid Islamic fascism.

    To paraphrase Orwell, all Arabs are equal, but Arabs with oil are more equal than other Arabs.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    9,278

    Default Re: Natives

    Senate wants Fuzzy Wuzzy medals

    June 24, 2008 06:26pm

    AUSTRALIA may soon issue medals and provide financial support to the "fuzzy wuzzy angels" of Papua New Guinea.

    The Koiari people along the Kokoda Track earned the nickname during the 1942 battles against invading Japanese forces, when they carried Australian supplies and equipment and helped evacuate wounded soldiers.

    "The fuzzy wuzzy angels saved the lives of many Australian troops during the Kokoda campaign," Liberal Senator Guy Barnett said today.

    "They carried stretchers, stores and sometimes wounded diggers directly on their shoulders over some of the toughest terrain in the world.

    "It has been over 65 years since the Kokoda battles commenced, without official recognition and a medal."

    The Senate, including government members, today agreed to Senator Barnett's motion calling for prompt recognition and support for the surviving angels.

    The successful motion directs the Defence Awards and Honours Tribunal to "promptly determine the most appropriate form of medal or recognition for the remaining fuzzy wuzzy angels or their surviving families".

    It also calls on the government to consider a small ex-gratia payment to each fuzzy wuzzy angel, and to also fund initiatives to upgrade the health and education status of the PNG people in the isolated villages along the Kokoda Track.
    http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599...-29277,00.html


    PNG would welcome 'fuzzy wuzzy angels' recognition

    Posted Thu Jun 26, 2008 12:04pm AEST

    The High Commissioner of Papua New Guinea, Charles Lepani says official recognition by Australia of the 'fuzzy wuzzy angels' will strengthen ties between the two countries.

    Fuzzy wuzzy angels is the affectionate name given to those who helped Australian soldiers during the Kokoda campaign against the Japanese in World War II.

    The Senate moved a motion this week from Tasmanian Liberal Senator Guy Barnett calling for their formal recognition.

    The new Defence Awards and Honours Tribunal will consider the case.

    Mr Lepani says he is pleased with the Senate's motion.

    "It's a wonderful initiative by the Senate and it will be very much appreciated by not only the fuzzy wuzzy angels but the Government and the people of Papua New Guinea for this recognition," he said.
    http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2...section=justin


    Gee, this is a great idea a mere 65 years after the poor bastards who did sterling work for Australians actually did the work.

    How about doing something of practical value to recognise the effort and the sacrifice rather than just striking a bloody medal to be given, in almost all cases, to the people at least one or two if not three generations removed from the blokes who actually earned it.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,087

    Thumbs up Re: Natives

    Quote Originally Posted by Rising Sun* View Post
    I'm a bit disappointed that nobody else has taken this up.

    It's not a minor issue but, as it seems to be on this board as in the general community, the efforts of natives in various countries are still overlooked, while the efforts of other natives are extolled.

    Where would the British have been in Burma without the Karens?

    How much did the Filipino guerrillas risk after MacArthur lost and before he returned a few year later?

    What about the Timorese who supported the Australians in Timor?

    We don't hear much about these people, yet the Italian and Yugoslavian partisans (who in some cases were just pre-war brigands legitimised by war) and the French Maquis (in whose modest number about a hundred thousand times more French people claim to have served) are well known.

    Being a guerrilla, or partisan or Maquis in the European sense, was a lot more dangerous as far as the consequences went when doing it under the Japanese.

    So why don't the native people who took grave risks under the Japanese rank as highly as the Maquis, which was just another native resistance organisation?
    Frankly, the only reason I have not gone into this topic in any great detail in my own researching is that other research projects have always seemed to claim greater priority.
    Such seems to be the case in general terms, everywhere.
    However, I do have a copy of "Z-Force" (IIRC. the book is well buried among several dozens of others) in which details of co-operation with, variously, Malay natives, Indonesian natives, and others are furnished, and make quite interesting reading.

    My personal thought as to why the various southeast asian native populational contribution tends to be ignored is this:
    Given that those same populations had, in the immediate postwar years generally to be quelled as a result of the Maoist-inspired Communist uprisings, it would seem the view taken of those same populaces is that the "stain" of Communist involvements cancels-out any recognition those same populaces might have received for their wartime efforts towards Allied victory.
    ie:"They went commo, so the wartime stuff no-longer counts."

    While that is an injustice to the vast majority of natives that rendered sterling service to the various Allies in the various native territories, the Western nations have never really acknowledged the native contributions.
    In recent memory, the one attempt to do so is the case of the Hmong Peoples, most of whom eventually requested to return to their homelands, after the US had gone to great effort to relocate them in America.

    Offhand, I do not recall similar British attempts.

    Overall, I do feel the contributive efforts by the natives of those various S.E.A nations have been in general overlooked, and that this is an injustice to them.

    Regards, Uyraell.

    "Honi-Soit Qui Mal'Y Pense." :
    "Ill unto he who ill of it thinks."
    Edward III, Rex Britania, AD1348.

    "Wenn Schon, denn schon."
    "Be It Done, Best be It Be Done Well."
    Known German adage.

    "Until you have looked into a veteran's eyes and actually seen it,
    you'll never fully understand."
    ^Uyraell^

    "Aligaes : Amore vel Ira." :
    "^Winged Ones^ : Love or Wrath."

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    South West
    Posts
    953

    Default Re: Natives

    In some instances the British armed and paid natives to fight the Japanese but did not get anything like the response they were expecting in the way of damaging supply lines so diverting fighting forces into rear areas.

    Then there was the unfortunate instances of where British troops were engaged in hostilities with the natives (armed by Britain and captured Japanese weapons) at the cessation of the fighting against Japan, as they wanted independance from the European colonial powers 'specifically French Indo China and the Dutch East Indies'

    I have even read an account of where British and Japanese troops fought on the same side to disarm some natives for a short period in French Indo China after the japanese surrender but I am unable to recall or find the source for that
    (I seem to remember it had something to do with preventing more weapons falling into the hands of what were now becoming insurgents in the colonial powers eyes)

    So native troops and guerillas tended to be ignored as they were not part of the armed uniformed forces (Also remember Slims 14th Army has long been called the 'Forgotten Army' and they were part of the regular Order of Battle)

    Paragraph 4 The Post-War Arrangements mentions the use of Japanese by the British

    http://indochine54.free.fr/hist/begin.html
    Last edited by leccy; 03-15-2009 at 02:05 PM. Reason: Added a link

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    1,087

    Thumbs up Re: Natives

    I have already posted the following in the "Shaggy Ridge, real bad country" Thread.

    If a Moderator should decide that post should be eliminated in favour of the posting here, then so be it:
    Reflection on the matter has guided me to place the post in this thread instead, which is, imho, where it more appropriately belongs.
    _________________________

    I have earlier mentioned the poem "The Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels",
    which was written about the Papua New Guinea Campaign, and the native auxiliaries.
    After much soul-searching, I've decided to place it here, in the hope it at least gets seen for the fine piece of writing it is.
    According to Martin Page, from whose book, "For Gawdsake Don't take Me" (Page 66), I am quoting it, the poem was written by an unknown Australian Soldier.

    The Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels.

    Many a mother in Australia, when the busy day is done,
    Sends a prayer to the Almighty, for the keeping of her son;
    Asking that an angel guide him and bring him safely back --
    Now we see those prayers are answered on the Owen Stanley Track.

    Though they haven't any haloes, only holes slashed through the ear,
    And their faces marked with tattoos, and with scratchpins in their hair,
    Bringing back the badly wounded, just as steady as a hearse,
    Using leaves to keep the rain off, and as gentle as a nurse,

    Slow and careful in bad places, on the awful mountain track,
    And the look upon their faces makes us think that Christ was black,
    Not a move to hurt the carried, as they treat him like a saint,
    It's a picture worth recording that an artist's yet to paint.

    Many a lad will see his mother, and the husbands, wee'uns and wives
    Just because the fuzzy-wuzzies carried them to save their lives.
    From mortar or machine-gun fire or a chance surprise attack
    To safety and care of doctors at the bottom of the track
    May the mothers in Australia, when they offer up a prayer
    Mention these impromptu angels with the fuzzy-wuzzy hair.
    __________________________________________________ ______________________
    Personal Note:
    During the 30-plus years I have owned the book, I have read the above poem many times and each time it has had an impact upon me.
    Typing it out here though, was an emotional experience.
    You see: Though those I knew were not in the PNG Campaign, this poem calls to mind some of the things I have seen in the eyes of the Veterans I knew long-ago.
    I give Thanks for having known those Men, for what they did, and what they later chose to share with me, of their wartime experiences.
    Thus, in a sense, typing out this poem is a very small personal tribute to them also.
    __________________________________________________ _______________________
    Kind and Respectful Regards, Uyraell.

    "Honi-Soit Qui Mal'Y Pense." :
    "Ill unto he who ill of it thinks."
    Edward III, Rex Britania, AD1348.

    "Wenn Schon, denn schon."
    "Be It Done, Best be It Be Done Well."
    Known German adage.

    "Until you have looked into a veteran's eyes and actually seen it,
    you'll never fully understand."
    ^Uyraell^

    "Aligaes : Amore vel Ira." :
    "^Winged Ones^ : Love or Wrath."

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    334

    Default Re: Natives

    I'm not sure I agree with the premise that native populations in South East Asia were completely ignored by the Allies for the contributions they made to the victory over the Japanese.

    I can't speak for Malaysians, Indonesians, or the natives of New Guinea, but in every history I have read of the campaign to liberate the Philippines from the Japanese, the role of the Filipino irregulars is prominently mentioned. Many American historians even go so far as to accord them their own chapter and in some cases multiple chapters, in explaining their role and contributions. Ultimately, however, given the appalling state of the average American's knowledge of history these days, no one gets the credit they deserve for the sacrifices that were made by all parties involved in the liberation of the Philippines.

    Some people seem to feel that recognition should go beyond mere mention of the Filipino's contributions, and encompass some monetary or other physical reward. I can't agree. Given the political situation surrounding the Philippine Commonwealth in 1944-45, it seems to me that the primary beneficiary of the sacrifices of the Filipino resistance fighters were the Philippine people themselves; it was their country they were fighting for. The Americans who fought and bled in the Philippines did so not to reestablish American sovereignty, but to give the Filipino's real independence. It is only right that they should have been assisted in that endeavor by Filipinos fighting alongside them.

    My wife is Chinese; on a recent trip to Australia to visit some relatives she acquired a book by Jack Wong titled "Blood on Borneo". It details the activities of "Z" force in the Jungles of Borneo. It is of interest to her because her mother, father, and older siblings were resident in Miri when the Japanese invaded in 1941. Her father, an oil field production engineer, helped destroy the oil wells before the Japanese arrived and was forced to hide in the jungle for some time afterward. He was eventually rescued and evacuated by "Z" Force operatives. After the war, in recognition of services rendered, Australia gave my wife's parents preferential treatment in relocating to that country.

    I think it is appropriate to put the contributions of various native populations in perspective; objectively, how much did they really contribute given the overall situation? Were they motivated by a real desire to see the Allies victorious, or were they mostly acting out of self-interest? Is it possible to identify those who really helped, as opposed to those who simply avoided contact with both sides, or perhaps even actively aided the Japanese? Assuming it would be possible to identify those who truly deserve some kind of reward, what would best serve their interest t6oday? After six and a half decades, this would not be easy, and most of the people who actually made contributions are either dead or so old that no reward would make much difference.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •