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Thread: An Act of Bastardry

  1. #31
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    Default Re: An Act of Bastardry

    You were just thinking of the Okie Air Corp.
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  2. #32
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    Default Re: An Act of Bastardry

    I'm pretty sure the unit number I showed was wrong as well. Whatever, it was the unit that Senator Inouye from Hawaii served in in Italy. Sorry 'bout that...

  3. #33
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    Default Re: An Act of Bastardry

    Quote Originally Posted by Rising Sun* View Post
    You're right, at least on vegetable farms in California where there had long been tensions between Caucasian American vegetable growers and Japanese immigrant / American born Japanese growers.

    The history of it is one of the things that contributed to negative sentiments towards America in Japan. There's a good but relatively short history of it in the link from which the following quote is taken.

    My bold.
    http://www.fee.org/publications/the-...e.asp?aid=4220
    Yes, RS, I've heard it enough times before to believe that it probaby is true that the Japanese resented the way the US treated Japanese immigrants and the manner in which US immigration policy towards the japanese shifted. Maybe they resented Australia's too. What puzzles me at the same time is that there are few societies on earth that are as closed to immigration as Japan itself. The chances of a foreigner - gaijin - being "accepted" in Japan - much less becoming a citizen - are zero to none. Prior, certainly, to WW2, all foreigners were carefuly watched by the Kempeitai (sp?) and their travel within Japan was surveilled and limited to designated areas. No doubt there were problems of discrimination on the US west coast and there must have been communities that were less than pleased to have "too many" Japanese living among them, but I do not recall hearing about them being prevented from moving around the country. So what, one wonders, were they really complaining about?

  4. #34
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    Default Re: An Act of Bastardry

    Quote Originally Posted by royal744 View Post
    Yes, RS, I've heard it enough times before to believe that it probaby is true that the Japanese resented the way the US treated Japanese immigrants and the manner in which US immigration policy towards the japanese shifted. Maybe they resented Australia's too. What puzzles me at the same time is that there are few societies on earth that are as closed to immigration as Japan itself. The chances of a foreigner - gaijin - being "accepted" in Japan - much less becoming a citizen - are zero to none. Prior, certainly, to WW2, all foreigners were carefuly watched by the Kempeitai (sp?) and their travel within Japan was surveilled and limited to designated areas. No doubt there were problems of discrimination on the US west coast and there must have been communities that were less than pleased to have "too many" Japanese living among them, but I do not recall hearing about them being prevented from moving around the country. So what, one wonders, were they really complaining about?
    They certainly resented Australia's "White Australia Policy" which existed in various forms from about the middle of the 19th century until after WWII and which excluded, among others, Asians as migrants.

    At leadership levels in politics, trade and commerce, the Japanese resented what they quite legitimately regarded as discriminatory policies and practices towards them by America and Australia, and Britain to a lesser extent so far a immigration policies were concerned. This resentment was compounded by the recognition that while America forced Japan to open its borders and to trade with the West, Japan was not treated as an equal in trade or politics by the West.

    As for Japan being a closed society which was was hostile to immigration to Japan, that is quite true.

    I think the characteristic which explains both Japanese resentment of treatment by the English speaking countries, and the West more generally, and seemingly contradictorily resisting immigration by Westerners is that the Japanese had a sense of racial and cultural superiority which entitled them to maintain their racial and cultural purity by resisting immigration while denying the same right to countries to which Japanese emigrated. That sense of racial and cultural superiority also underpinned Japanese atrocities in China and during the Pacific War.

    Of course, America and Australia saw themselves as racially and culturally superior to the Japanese, so racial arrogance wasn't unique to the Japanese.
    ..
    A rational army would run away.
    Montesquieu

  5. #35
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    Default Re: An Act of Bastardry

    Were these just people born in Japan that were being interned or also people of Japanese descent that had been born in Australia?

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