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Thread: An Act of Bastardry

  1. #1
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    Default An Act of Bastardry

    So the Japanese interned in America during WWII think they were badly treated?

    Just heard a radio interview with the author of this book
    http://www.cdu.edu.au/cdupress/books/EmptyNorth.htm who said that not only did Australia intern its Japanese when war began (including one non-naturalised Japanese who held a commissioned rank in the intelligence section of the Royal Australian Navy!), but after the war it classified many of them as merchant seamen (which they weren't) so it could send them and their families back to Japan penniless, after confiscating their assets.

    Many of the children couldn't speak Japanese to any useful extent.

    Many families had no way to accommodate or support themselves in post war Japan, isolated and without community support.

    It reflects the generally remorseless attitude Australia had towards Japan and Japanese during and after the war, typified by running war crimes trials against the Japanese much longer than Britain and America.

    Doesn't alter the fact that it was an act of bastardry.

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    i think the americans did what they had to to try to keep their country safe, it may look like an act of bastardry now, but when compared to other internment camps it is not so bad, also wee must look at what trying to get by as a japanese american on the outside would have been like during the war

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    HEY Rising Sun. Strange but true - the Japanese Americans in Hawaii were never interned during WW2.

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    Quote Originally Posted by overlord644 View Post
    i think the americans did what they had to to try to keep their country safe, it may look like an act of bastardry now, but when compared to other internment camps it is not so bad, also wee must look at what trying to get by as a japanese american on the outside would have been like during the war

    No, we really didn't. It was racism combined with a land grab - pure and simple...

    The internment camp was one thing, the fact that most of these people lost all of their property and livelihood is another...

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    Quote Originally Posted by royal744 View Post
    HEY Rising Sun. Strange but true - the Japanese Americans in Hawaii were never interned during WW2.
    Astonishing!

    I thought there were serious concerns in Hawaii about Japanese spies etc, before and after Pearl Harbor.

    Was it to do with the proportion of Japanese in the community, being needed to keep things going?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rising Sun* View Post
    Astonishing!

    I thought there were serious concerns in Hawaii about Japanese spies etc, before and after Pearl Harbor.

    Was it to do with the proportion of Japanese in the community, being needed to keep things going?
    Common, thery were alreqady in Hawaii! How much further away can you send them?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Egorka View Post
    Common, thery were alreqady in Hawaii! How much further away can you send them?
    May be to the Alaska, or Syberia

    "I decide who is a Jew and who is an Aryan "- Hermann Goering

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chevan View Post
    May be to ... Syberia
    IIRC, there was a certain amount of Soviet resistance to Japan moving into Siberia.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Egorka View Post
    Common, thery were alreqady in Hawaii! How much further away can you send them?
    More seriously, the Japanese and other Asians were brought to Hawaii as labourers, seen by some as modern slaves in some respects, late in the 19th and early in the 20th century.

    Australia was doing the same thing with Pacific Islanders, commonly called Kanakas (not to be confused with PanzerKanakas ), at the same time, for much the same reason.

    The sugar industry.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickdfresh View Post
    No, we really didn't. It was racism combined with a land grab - pure and simple...

    The internment camp was one thing, the fact that most of these people lost all of their property and livelihood is another...
    i don know about that, i heard that japanese were allowed to sell their homes, although i could be wong

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    Quote Originally Posted by royal744 View Post
    HEY Rising Sun. Strange but true - the Japanese Americans in Hawaii were never interned during WW2.
    this is because there was such a massive japanese population, that the islands would have been emptied

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    Quote Originally Posted by overlord644 View Post
    i don know about that, i heard that japanese were allowed to sell their homes, although i could be wong
    I'm pretty sure they were sold well below market value. Pretty clearly, things were a buyers market...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickdfresh View Post
    I'm pretty sure they were sold well below market value. Pretty clearly, things were a buyers market...
    You're right, at least on vegetable farms in California where there had long been tensions between Caucasian American vegetable growers and Japanese immigrant / American born Japanese growers.

    The history of it is one of the things that contributed to negative sentiments towards America in Japan. There's a good but relatively short history of it in the link from which the following quote is taken.

    The fact that Japanese farmers were not welcomed back after the war contradicts the security arguments given for the evacuation. Security concerns certainly did not exist after the war. It is quite clear that some viewed the situation in California immediately following the attack on Pearl Harbor as a unique opportunity to get rid of competitors. In May 1942, O. L. Scott, another member of the Grower-Shipper Vegetable Association wrote to Congressman Anderson:


    If it were not for the "white-skinned Japs" in this country there wouldn't be any Japanese question. What can you suggest I do and thousands of Californians be led to do, that may make it possible to get rid of all Japs, sending them back to Japan either before or after the war is won. I am convinced that if it is not done or at least the action completed before the war is over, it will be impossible to get rid of them.... The Japanese cannot be assimilated as the white race [and] we must do everything we can to stop them now as we have a golden opportunity now and may never have it again.[9]


    As a consequence of the evacuation, farms owned by Japanese-Americans were sold for a few cents on the dollar to Caucasian farmers. One estimate of the value of Japanese farmland in 1940 was over $72 million. After the war, internees were paid only a small fraction of the value of their losses. Attempting to remedy this situation, the government passed a bill in 1988 that did two things. First, the government apologized to Japanese-Americans for the internment, also admitting that the relocation was not justified for security reasons. Second, the bill provided that each of the 60,000 internees or their descendants be paid a lump sum of $20,000. Perhaps these funds should have come not from the taxpayers of this country at large, but from the farmers who benefited directly from the land and crops taken from the Japanese-Americans in 1942.
    My bold.
    http://www.fee.org/publications/the-...e.asp?aid=4220

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    What is still unbeleivable about this shameful episode, is that many Japanese-Americans fought bravely and loyally; even when they knew their families were being treated so.

    For those who have watched the Karate Kid. Mr Miyagi was a brave Japanese-American Soldier, whose family were interned in a camp.

    Specifically this one

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manzana...nternment_camp

    If you read to the bottom you will even see a PFC who won the Congressional Medal of Honour, and was recruited direct from the camp.

    Perhaps those that gained the most from the deals, should pay more, but the whole country of America owes a great debt to many of its own citizens that it treated so shabbily.
    If you post idiocy, don't get upset if you are seen as an idiot.... I don't.

    Here endth the lesson.




    Have you seen any combat?

    Seen a little on TV.

    You talk the talk, but do you walk the walk?



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    Quote Originally Posted by 1000ydstare View Post
    What is still unbeleivable about this shameful episode, is that many Japanese-Americans fought bravely and loyally; even when they knew their families were being treated so.
    It shows a greater nobility and more courage in people who were discriminated against than those who discriminated against them.

    Due to their outstanding bravery and the heavy combat duty they faced, the 100/442nd RCT became the most decorated unit in U.S. military history for its size and length of service. There were over 18,000 individual decorations for bravery, 9,500 Purple Hearts, and seven Presidential Distinguished Unit Citations.
    http://www.njahs.org/research/442.html

    (Not that those of us in some countries are impressed by Purple Hearts where the best we'd get for the same wound was a few stitches and a swab of gentian violet in an RAP and no entry in the victim's paybook or RAP records. This ensured that the the victim could have fun spending the next forty or fifty years trying to convince the Repatriation Department that the wound with visible bits of shell splinter under the skin hadn't been acquired during a drunken civilian party convened for the sole purpose of ripping off the government for medical treatment under the Repat Scheme. )

    We're seeing pretty much the same bullshit from governments today with a lot of their anti-Muslim hysteria, although provoked by quite different circumstances. Sixty years on it'll be seen that we treated a lot of people very badly because of fear rather than fact and reason; drove some people to the other side; and that we should be ashamed of not treating the rest as we found them rather than as we feared they might be.

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