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Kamikaze
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View Poll Results: Are the Japanese kamakazis being a little too desparite

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  • Yes

    7 77.78%
  • No

    2 22.22%
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Thread: Kamikaze

  1. #1
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    Default Kamikaze

    In the Japaneese Empire the pilots were to crash into Enemy Carriers if burning, low on fuel, or just for their country. The pilots had no doubt of kamikazing the enemy carriers if it meant their life. Because deep inside they would be proud of their self. This technique helped the japaneese empire alot. It sunk many carriers and many casualties for the U.S.A navy. But the bad thing is they lost planes by doing this. Here is a site with more information on the Kamikazes.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kamikaze
    Good Conduct Medal
    "The Russian colossus...has been underestimated by us...whenever a dozen divisions are destroyed the Russians replace them with another dozen."
    General Franz Halder-Army Chief of Staff-August 1941

  2. #2
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    Yes a kamikaze usally crash to attack a ship for there country.The japs never surrender they would kill themselves rather then getting captured.


    "A pint of sweat saves a gallon of blood."
    - General George S. Patton
    "War Isn't about Dying for your country, its about making the other basterd die for his." - Patton

  3. #3
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    I heard in time of defeat they would gather around each other and one would pull a gernade's pen and then they would gather together and die togethher.
    Good Conduct Medal
    "The Russian colossus...has been underestimated by us...whenever a dozen divisions are destroyed the Russians replace them with another dozen."
    General Franz Halder-Army Chief of Staff-August 1941

  4. #4
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    This is a Kamikaze photo in the Pacific Campaign.
    Good Conduct Medal
    "The Russian colossus...has been underestimated by us...whenever a dozen divisions are destroyed the Russians replace them with another dozen."
    General Franz Halder-Army Chief of Staff-August 1941

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RifleMan20 View Post
    Yes a kamikaze usally crash to attack a ship for there country.The japs never surrender they would kill themselves rather then getting captured.
    I believe the reason they treated enemy POWs so poorly was because they didn't believe in surrender. Am I right?
    asrg


  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfgang Von Gottberg View Post
    I believe the reason they treated enemy POWs so poorly was because they didn't believe in surrender. Am I right?
    Never thought of it like that. That is an awesome thought.
    Good Conduct Medal
    "The Russian colossus...has been underestimated by us...whenever a dozen divisions are destroyed the Russians replace them with another dozen."
    General Franz Halder-Army Chief of Staff-August 1941

  7. #7
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    Thankyou. Do you know if kamakazie pilots were ordered to attack a certain part of the target?

    ie: bow, control tower, aircraft, etc.
    asrg


  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wolfgang Von Gottberg View Post
    Thankyou. Do you know if kamakazie pilots were ordered to attack a certain part of the target?

    ie: bow, control tower, aircraft, etc.
    They would first strike the Commanding Tower first and then they would attack the platform that lifted the planes from under the carrier.
    Good Conduct Medal
    "The Russian colossus...has been underestimated by us...whenever a dozen divisions are destroyed the Russians replace them with another dozen."
    General Franz Halder-Army Chief of Staff-August 1941

  9. #9
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    Wolfgang wrote:"I believe the reason they treated enemy POWs so poorly was because they didn't believe in surrender. Am I right?" German Soldier responded:
    Quote Originally Posted by GermanSoldier View Post
    Never thought of it like that. That is an awesome thought.
    The Japanese may have died rather than surrender, which was all right for them, but the Allies believed it was smart to retreat when a battle was obviously lost. They lived to fight another day, and they ultimately won the war. So who do you think had the best strategy? If you haven't already done so, I suggest you do some research on the Bataan Death March. I know you aren't much interested in the War in the Pacific, but you might be interested in the Bataan Death March. At least do these men the honor of being as interested in them as you are in the Japanese kamikaze's, okay?
    Start with this link first if you have high speed internet because it is a link to a great video. Let me know what you think. I won't call it homework because I know how you feel about that
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6A393E3wF-o

    http://home.pacbell.net/fbaldie/In_Retrospect.html

    "About 1,200 survivors of Bataan are alive today. In perhaps ten years, they will all be gone. Most, if not all, would like to leave behind them the truth that was Bataan. To do less would dishonor those men who died in both events."


    http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/macarth...n_capture.html

    http://history.sandiego.edu/gen/st/~...ath_march.html

    http://www.bataansurvivor.com/conten...th_march/1.php

    http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/8967/

    http://www.ghostofbataan.com/bataan/abiemain.html

  10. #10
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    Francesca1973 I really enjoyed your posts. Very funny. I never knew that. Thanks for the information. I thought it was very interresting. You were right I really enjoyed those sights. Thanks for putting these websites forward.
    Good Conduct Medal
    "The Russian colossus...has been underestimated by us...whenever a dozen divisions are destroyed the Russians replace them with another dozen."
    General Franz Halder-Army Chief of Staff-August 1941

  11. #11
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    Default

    Your welcome German Soldier. I'm glad you liked the sites. I enjoy your posts, too. Were you able to watch the video tribute to Veterans of WWII on www.youtube.com? I know the music might not be to everyone's liking, but I thought the message in the song and the video was a very important one. It is a wonderful tribute and Thank You to the Veterans of WWII, as well as to all the men and women of the Greatest Generation. If you go to www.beforeyougo.us it tells the story of how Dr. Sam came to write the song. It is a really great story.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Francesca1973 View Post
    Your welcome German Soldier. I'm glad you liked the sites. I enjoy your posts, too. Were you able to watch the video tribute to Veterans of WWII on www.youtube.com? I know the music might not be to everyone's liking, but I thought the message in the song and the video was a very important one. It is a wonderful tribute and Thank You to the Veterans of WWII, as well as to all the men and women of the Greatest Generation. If you go to www.beforeyougo.us it tells the story of how Dr. Sam came to write the song. It is a really great story.
    Yeah the song was good and good video. The song really meant alot. Thank you for the song information.
    Good Conduct Medal
    "The Russian colossus...has been underestimated by us...whenever a dozen divisions are destroyed the Russians replace them with another dozen."
    General Franz Halder-Army Chief of Staff-August 1941

  13. #13
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    The ultime japanese kamikaze, the Okha. I guess that this was the japanese "smart bomb"
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  14. #14
    Rising Sun Guest

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    The kamikaze pilots came into being only when Japan was losing the war and its leadership was seeking increasingly desperate ways of defending the home islands from the remorseless advance of the Allies, being for practical purposes the Americans

    There are instances which suggest that individual American pilots tried the kamikaze approach earlier in the war when America's position was more desperate than in 1944 when the Japanese employed it.

    The first recorded expression of American kamikaze attitudes is Lt Col Doolittle's answer to another pilot's question, before the air raid he took over Japan in April 1942, to the effect that if things came to the worst he'd bail out his crew and then fly his bomber into the best target he could find.

  15. #15
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    Default

    The Kamikaze were volunteers and as Rising Sun says came about near the end of the War as a desperate measure to holt the US march towards victory in the Pacific. There is evidence that a number of pilots were put under pressure to volunteer rather than doing so because they wished to die for their Emperor. Having said that there is no doubt there were a lot of them who were quite happy to give their life up, seeing it as an honour to die for the homeland.

    I’m not sure you can compare western soldiers or airman who made a decision to see a mission through to the end regardless of whether this meant death or not with the Kamikaze. The allied men made the decision personally; they were not working under orders and were not part of a deliberate policy based on a historical code of honour. I know actions occurred daily where allied troops were in effect going on suicide missions but it is still a fact that their orders were not to die, but to succeed at all cost.

    The Kamikaze had only one purpose, to cause as much death, damage & disruption as they could by sacrificing their lives. Any pilot who returned to base having not found a target was viewed with distrust and sent out ASAP to complete their mission. The name, Kamikaze gives some idea what their role was. Kamikaze means “Devine Wind” and relates historically to a wind that blew a far superior invading army away from Japan’s coast, therefore saving the homeland from expected defeat. This was Japan’s optimistic hope for the wartime Kamikaze pilots.

    A funny story about a Kamikaze pilot is the one about the Kamikaze who flew three unsuccessful missions. He set of in his plane three times but always came back. Twice he had engine trouble and once could not find a target. His senior officers were losing patience with him but fortunately the war came to an end and saved his life. I know this is true because I saw him been interviewed after the war. During that interview he was telling the story of another Japanese Kamikaze pilot who was a big hero is Japan. When he died, as a Kamikaze, the whole country mourned their favourite hero with full military honours only for the man who was been interviewed to spot him walking down a street in Tokyo a few years after the war ended. It seemed he had not carried out his mission preferring to land on a US occupied island and hand himself over to the Americans.

    Another point is the view that Japanese soldiers did not surrender. This is historically untrue. While Japan’s forces were successful on all fronts they had very little cause to worry about surrendering. Once the Allies began to turn the tide the cases of Japanese soldiers giving themselves up increased. The nearer the allies got to Japan and the more it became obvious Japan would loose the war the larger the number of forces surrendering became.

    I’m not for a minute comparing the Japanese forces view on surrendering with that of the allies. They did see it as a dishonour and many thousands did kill themselves in either suicide charges or by dying together in suicide pacts as has been mentioned. They even persuaded their own civilians to kill themselves as the US Forces Island hopped towards the Japanese home islands. What I am saying is the view they never surrendered is based more on a popular miff rather than the truth. Tens of thousands eventually gave up their arms before the end of the conflict and most of these were more than happy to do so.

    The Japanese view of surrender may well explain why they treated allied prisoners as they did but this would not explain why they treated Burmese locals they forced to work building railways etc even worse or why they treated so many other civilians so badly.
    Last edited by town3173; 02-08-2007 at 11:16 AM.

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