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Thread: Rank Quiz.

  1. #16
    Join Date
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    Yep you are right - apologies for posting duff information.

    According to Wikepedia the British Army abbreviated Brigadier General to just Brigadier in 1922 with Brigadier being either the highest field rank or lowest General rank. So where I posted "Bigadier General " in the British Army I should have just said "Brigadier" ...

    Quoted from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brigadier

    "In many countries, especially those formerly part of the former British Empire, a Brigadier is either the highest field rank or most junior General appointment, nominally commanding a Brigade. It ranks above a full Colonel and below a Major General.

    The rank is used by the British Army, Royal Marines, Australian Army, New Zealand Army, Pakistan Army, Indian Army and several others. Although it is not always general officer rank, it is equivalent to Brigadier General in services which use that rank. In NATO forces, Brigadier is OF-6 on the rank scale.

    The title is derived from the equivalent former British rank of Brigadier General used until 1922, and still used in many forces including those of the US. "Brigadier" was already in use as a generic term for a commander of a Brigade irrespective of their specific rank.

    From 1922 to 1928 the British rank title used was that of Colonel Commandant which, although reflecting its modern role in the British Army as a senior colonel rather than a junior general, was not well received. Until shortly after the Second World War, it was only an appointment conferred on Colonels (as Commodore was an appointment conferred on naval Captains) and not a substantive rank.

    In Commonwealth and most Arabic-speaking countries (in which the rank is called Amid) the rank insignia comprises a crown (or national/presidential emblem in republics) with three stars (sometimes called "pips"), which are, in the Commonwealth, arranged in a triangle. A Brigadier's uniform may also have red collar flashes. It is otherwise similar to that of a Colonel (Colonels have a crown/emblem with two stars).

    Until 1788, a rank of Brigadier des armées ("Brigadier of the Armies") existed in the French Army, which could be described as a senior colonel or junior brigade commander. The normal brigade command rank was Field Marshal (Maréchal de camp) (which elsewhere is a more senior rank). During the French Revolution, the ranks of Brigadier des armées and Maréchal de camp were replaced by Brigade General. In common with many countries, France now uses the officer rank of Brigade General instead of a "brigadier" rank."

    Changing the subject does any one know why the British Army don't appoint Field Marshals during "peace time" - i.e. now? And what level of warfare would warrant one being appointed?

  2. #17
    Join Date
    May 2005
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    The entire British army could just about pull together a Corps, maybe two at a pinch nowadays (if they called up everyone including Cadets!). Hence there is really no call for a Field Marshal.
    I have neither the time nor the inclination to differentiate between the incompetent and the merely unfortunate - Curtis E LeMay

  3. #18
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    May 2005
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    In German Hillbilly country, the Hunsrück
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdf27 View Post
    No such thing as a Brigadier General in the British army - they're simply Brigadiers. Hence, in the British army a Major General is the most junior General rank. You will occasionally find British officers in a coalition environment such as ARRC HQ or Baghdad wearing star insignia on their collars to help allied soldiers figure out their rank, but there is no such thing officially in the British army.
    Not anymore. The Brigadier was called Brigadier General up to shortly after WW1.

    Jan

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