Türk porno yayini yapan http://www.smfairview.com ve http://www.idoproxy.com adli siteler rokettube videolarini da HD kalitede yayinlayacagini acikladi. Ayrica porno indir ozelligiyle de http://www.mysticinca.com adli porno sitesi devreye girdi.
Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 77

Thread: Japanese sword, a toy or a destructive device ?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cordoba-Argentina
    Posts
    6,392

    Default Japanese sword, a toy or a destructive device ?

    Probably many people had seen one of these use as ornamental device but in the close combat arena it was a very usable edged weapon..or not?

    The japanese army adopted it in 1937 and used until the end.




    http://www.compfused.com/directlink/608/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cordoba-Argentina
    Posts
    6,392

    Default

    The katana used as propaganda weapon, a gigantic samurai sinking ships in this italian poster celebrating the attack on Pearl Harbour.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Sydney - Down Under
    Posts
    610

    Default

    Japanes officers swords had also very infamous usage - beheading of allies POWs...
    I will send some photos Monday - have them at work.
    Swords become very much sought collectibles among allied troops.
    Japanese flag - original one - was going for about $100 - quite considerable sum these days. Sword could fetch even $300.

    Personally I don't believe that samurai swords had an advantage when confronted with Tomphson SMG or Garand Rifle...

    Cheers,

    Lancer44

    .


    "Accuse them of murdering three men and a dog, and they will triumphantly produce the dog alive."
    --Fr. George Tyrell, about Jesuits ca. 1900

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    1,763

    Default

    I don't really understand the point of those videos.
    That tempered steel can sometimes deflect a soft copper envelope containing even softer lead ?

    They remind me of the schoolboy discussions of which would win in a fight, a shark or a grizzly bear.

    Not even a pretence of scientific analysis, the sword vibrates, the M2 was bedded by Action Man - and as for the 9 mm (?) "test" the less said the better.

    Now all we need is a swordsman who is slimmer than his wpn and with reactions of a speeding bullet.




    Can hardly wait for the test of sunglasses against a fission wpn...
    "Don't call me stupid !" - Otto 'Galtieri' West.
    __________________
    Stupidity should be a crime. Ignorance should be punished.
    Refusal to accept corroborated facts should result in a chainsaw enema.

    a luta continua, em adiante a vitória
    __________________

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cordoba-Argentina
    Posts
    6,392

    Default

    the purpose of the video ?...dont know but is however is fun



    Personally I don't believe that samurai swords had an advantage when confronted with Tomphson SMG or Garand Rifle...
    I had no chance for sure, but probably it was more useful than a bayonet.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cordoba-Argentina
    Posts
    6,392

    Default

    A interesting link dealing with the parts and elaborated construction and finishing of te katana sword.

    http://www2.memenet.or.jp/kinugawa/e...d/sword100.htm


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    35

    Default

    It seems that main use of the Japanese sword was chopping the heads off of innocent civilians in the rape of Nanking.

    I doubt it ever saw much use in combat.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cordoba-Argentina
    Posts
    6,392

    Default

    Not only in Nanking but also in other places, yes it was the practice, I have some pictures but I wont post those for matters of good taste.

    Probably the only combat it saw was in the last stand "Banzai" infantry attack.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    1,930

    Default

    Unless I am very much mistaken the Japanese officers always carried their swords exposed in attacks, as their soldiers nearly always fitted bayonets even their MGs (in particular the one that looked similar to the Bren) were fitted with bayonets. So I would surmise that the swords did see action. If only close in when the toms had opted for bayonet fighting.

    Certainly the jungle warfare that the Japanese were often involved in would have lent itself to the use of a sword as a particularly effective close in weapon.
    If you post idiocy, don't get upset if you are seen as an idiot.... I don't.

    Here endth the lesson.




    Have you seen any combat?

    Seen a little on TV.

    You talk the talk, but do you walk the walk?



  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 1000ydstare
    Unless I am very much mistaken the Japanese officers always carried their swords exposed in attacks, as their soldiers nearly always fitted bayonets even their MGs (in particular the one that looked similar to the Bren) were fitted with bayonets. So I would surmise that the swords did see action. If only close in when the toms had opted for bayonet fighting.

    Certainly the jungle warfare that the Japanese were often involved in would have lent itself to the use of a sword as a particularly effective close in weapon.
    The purpose of the samurai sword is not so much functional. It is rather ceremonial in nature. It is a symbol of the Bushido spirit. A comparable symbolism in the western world is like how American cavalry officers during the American Civil War still wielded rapiers during battle even when muskets were the standard weapons. A more modern example is that when men of the USMC don their dress uniforms, they still carry their ceremonial swords. Swords are symbols of the proud history of a soldier's profession, and to the Japanese the traditiona is not only military but also spiritual.
    World War II Database
    8400 photos and growing!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cordoba-Argentina
    Posts
    6,392

    Default

    Sure the simbolism was important, even sometimes ackward check this japanese tankist with katana. ¡¡¡¡


  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Seattle, Washington
    Posts
    68

    Default

    Somewhat entertaining video but not very practical to decide whether the Katana was effective as a functioal weapon or not. After all the katana wasn't intended to be used as armor of to deflect bullets. You could use similiar video to question the use of a trench knife or K-bar or bayonet. I'm guessing they wouldn't fair much better if mounted in cement with an M-2 unleashed on them. If I was in a fixed bayonet charge I wouldn't want to meet the guy skilled with a Katana. To me the video just proves that some people have no respect for a fine edged weapon. What a waste of Katana. To me a better demonstration would have been to pit a man with a Katana against a man with a rifle and bayonet (practice weapons of course).

  13. #13
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Sydney - Down Under
    Posts
    610

    Default



    Aitape, New Guinea, 24 October 1943: Sergeant L. G. Siffleet, M Special Unit, tied and blindfolded, about to be beheaded. Sergeant Siffleet, a radio operator, was part of a long-range reconnaissance unit led by Dutchman, Sergeant Staverman, operating behind Japanese lines in New Guinea. The party was betrayed and Staverman killed. Siffleet and two Ambonese companions – Reharin and Pate Wail – were taken to the Japanese base at Aitape where all three were executed by beheading on the order of Vice-Admiral KAMADA, commander of Japanese naval forces at Aitape. According to the original caption to this photograph the name of the Japanese executioner was YASUNO, who died before the end of the war. Siffleet was buried on the beach at Aitape below the tideline and his body was never recovered. The photograph of his execution was taken by a Japanese soldier and found by American forces when they invaded Hollandia in 1944. The photograph of Siffleet’s execution appeared shortly afterwards in American, and subsequently Australian, publications as an illustration of the brutality with which prisoners of the Japanese were treated. For many years in Australia the photo was captioned as if it depicted the execution of Flight Lieutenant Newton VC, Royal Australian Air Force, by the Japanese at Salamaua, New Guinea, on 29 March 1943.

    Photograph and caption courtesy of AMW Canberra

    Lancer44

    .


    "Accuse them of murdering three men and a dog, and they will triumphantly produce the dog alive."
    --Fr. George Tyrell, about Jesuits ca. 1900

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Cordoba-Argentina
    Posts
    6,392

    Default

    Well, really sad and brutal situation, some of the Doolitle B-25s mission crews wich were unfortunate enough to land in japanese controlled territory , sufered the same treatment.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    306

    Default

    Being an AUstralian I do not particulary like looking at Aus. POW's. Awful way to die, by the sword.

Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Japanese cannibalism
    By Lancer44 in forum 2008 Archive Room
    Replies: 30
    Last Post: 09-27-2008, 04:09 AM
  2. WWII Japanese Army and Navy Websites
    By George Eller in forum 2006 Archive Room
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-13-2006, 10:40 PM
  3. POW Treatment in WW2
    By Lancer44 in forum 2006 Archive Room
    Replies: 24
    Last Post: 08-11-2006, 02:52 PM
  4. Type Zero
    By Firefly in forum 2006 Archive Room
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 01-25-2006, 09:53 AM

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •