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Thread: Weapons quiz

  1. #1
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    Default Weapons quiz

    what gn has a 8 round clip,30-06 cartridge,origined in the us.what is it?
    -lest we forget-

  2. #2
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    Default Re: waepons quiz

    hint:it was invented by a canadian.
    -lest we forget-

  3. #3
    colonel hogan Guest

    Default Re: waepons quiz

    m-1 garrand semi-automatic rifle, whenthe 8th round is fired the clip ejects witha distinctive "ping" which may get you killed.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: waepons quiz

    Quote Originally Posted by colonel hogan
    m-1 garrand semi-automatic rifle, whenthe 8th round is fired the clip ejects witha distinctive "ping" which may get you killed.

    Is this distinctive "ping" at a special lethal frequency ?

    I think it's very silly idea to design a rifle that kills your own soldiers after the eighth shot.
    I guess that all the veterans that came home again only ever fired seven times.

    Why didn't they only put seven rounds in the clips ?
    I think this is a much betterest idea. I wouldn't want to die after shooting my own rifle.
    "Don't call me stupid !" - Otto 'Galtieri' West.
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  5. #5
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    Default Re: waepons quiz

    Quote Originally Posted by Cuts View Post
    Is this distinctive "ping" at a special lethal frequency ?

    I think it's very silly idea to design a rifle that kills your own soldiers after the eighth shot.
    I guess that all the veterans that came home again only ever fired seven times.

    Why didn't they only put seven rounds in the clips ?
    I think this is a much betterest idea. I wouldn't want to die after shooting my own rifle.
    nope.

    It just signals the enemy that your gun is empty and they can now charge at will before you have a chance to reload.

    In the latter days of the war it was also used by US troops as a ruse - one soldier would empty his weapon to make the very distinctive "ping" noise, while several others would be standing by with fully loaded rifles to pick off any German who decided to take advantage of the situation...

  6. #6
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    Default Re: waepons quiz

    Quote Originally Posted by wingsofwrath
    Quote Originally Posted by Cuts
    Is this distinctive "ping" at a special lethal frequency ?

    I think it's very silly idea to design a rifle that kills your own soldiers after the eighth shot.
    I guess that all the veterans that came home again only ever fired seven times.

    Why didn't they only put seven rounds in the clips ?
    I think this is a much betterest idea. I wouldn't want to die after shooting my own rifle.
    nope.

    It just signals the enemy that your gun is empty and they can now charge at will before you have a chance to reload.

    In the latter days of the war it was also used by US troops as a ruse - one soldier would empty his weapon to make the very distinctive "ping" noise, while several others would be standing by with fully loaded rifles to pick off any German who decided to take advantage of the situation...
    This point has been covered on these fora many times, but we can go over it again.

    In the real world away from computer games, contacts are quite loud and intense occurrences.
    The noise of ones own weapons firing and crack of 30-06 downrange tends to be a bit louder than that of a spring clip being ejected up-range.

    Screenplay authors tend to let their imaginations get the better of reality, but then most haven't been in the situations about which they write.






    Edited for mong punctuation.
    Last edited by Cuts; 12-26-2008 at 09:06 AM.
    "Don't call me stupid !" - Otto 'Galtieri' West.
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  7. #7
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    Default Re: Weapons quiz

    I know real battle is both loud and confusing, having attended my share of WW2 reenactments (I'm part of a group that reenacts the Romanian Army, 1859 to WW2: http://www.traditia-militara.ro/inde...=1&language=en) but then again one thing I noticed - despite the obvious din of the various arms, some other extraneous sounds can be heard specifically because they are so different from the actual sound of discharging weapons.

    For example, during an "engagement" in the Czech Republic, at Orechov, back in 2006, I was totally amazed because I could hear the clinking of spent casings hitting the side of an Sdkfz 251 (converted OT 810) some 30m away despite the fact there were two working mg-s on it and everybody else was firing at the halftrack.
    Even more puzzling is the fact that although I could hear that, about 5 minutes later I totally failed to hear a T34 moving into position behind me, and I nearly got run over...

    Also, battles are not usually uniform in the level of noise they produce, but are a mix of "fast and furious" engagements and longer periods of relative calm when only a few of the protagonists are shooting at the same time. With that in mind, I think it is not that far fetched to assume that under the right circumstances the very distinctive "ping" of the empty clip being ejected from a Garand could be heard over the other background noise.
    Of course, that is unfortunately only my modest opinion, not having taken part in any engagements where the venerable M1 might be used to test this particular phenomenon first hand.

    And getting back to the Quiz at hand: since there are two "small arms quizzes" going on in this particular area of the forum, is it worth it to preserve this thread?
    If yes, then I ask Colonel Hogan to post a follow-up, since it was him who answered the last question.
    If not, I would like to ask an Administrator or Board Moderator to close it, so we could concentrate on the other one.
    Last edited by wingsofwrath; 01-23-2009 at 07:00 AM.

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    Default Re: Weapons quiz

    Can anyone describe and explain what is, and what causes, the phenomena known as 'Sniper's-eye' ?


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


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    Default Re: Weapons quiz

    Quote Originally Posted by 32Bravo View Post
    Can anyone describe and explain what is, and what causes, the phenomena known as 'Sniper's-eye' ?
    It's main cause is ****-headedness:
    Inappropriate eye-relief coupled with failure to grasp the First Rule of Marksmanship helps ensure the firer to break out in bruising, (or in worse cases a cut,) generally on or around the brow of the eye looking through the optic.
    It is inflicted by the ocular bell of the scope compressing the soft tissue covering of the bony orbit on recoil.

    It serves as a reminder not to be a knob.
    "Don't call me stupid !" - Otto 'Galtieri' West.
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Weapons quiz

    Quote Originally Posted by Cuts View Post
    It's main cause is ****-headedness:
    Inappropriate eye-relief coupled with failure to grasp the First Rule of Marksmanship helps ensure the firer to break out in bruising, (or in worse cases a cut,) generally on or around the brow of the eye looking through the optic.
    It is inflicted by the ocular bell of the scope compressing the soft tissue covering of the bony orbit on recoil.

    It serves as a reminder not to be a knob.
    Yes. I guess I've suffered from ****headedness in my time.

    Anyone know which shooting position most lends itself to this form of ****-headedness?


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


  11. #11
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    Default Re: Weapons quiz

    Quote Originally Posted by 32Bravo View Post
    Yes. I guess I've suffered from ****headedness in my time.

    Anyone know which shooting position most lends itself to this form of ****-headedness?
    Hawkins position. That's how I got mine!!!!
    1884 electric cartridge. Look similar to anything?

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Weapons quiz

    Quote Originally Posted by Man of Stoat View Post
    Hawkins position. That's how I got mine!!!!
    Spot-on (if you'll excuse the pun).

    Anyone else, other than our two experts - MOS and Cuts - know why this is so?


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


  13. #13
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    Default Re: Weapons quiz

    The Hawkins position is generally used in open, and fairly bare-arsed, country where the only cover maybe a shallow fold in the ground, or when shooting from the reverse slope of a bank. The reason it is best used in these conditons is that it offers a lower profile than the standard prone position as the elbows are not used to support the weapon.

    Instead of placing the butt of the weapon in the shoulder, it is held in the armpit. The left arm is extended to grip the sling at the forward slingswivel, pushing against the web of flesh between the thumb and forefinger.

    It is a very stable position allowing a great deal of accuracy although there is a tendency for the shots to fall a little high, but this can be compensated for by site adustment.

    Another sympton of the position is that the eye is closer to the scope than with the standard prone position. Quite often, sniper students who are using the Hawkins position for the first time forget this, and when they fire the weapon the recoil causes the site to strike them in the area around the eye. This is particularly unpleasant with the site on a Lee Enfield L42, which is an old site. Its aperture is of thin and fairly sharp metal, which usually pierces the skin/soft-tissue around the eye leaving a bloody ring and bruising allowing for a lot of piss-taking - this usually ensures that they take more care in the future.

    Naturally, the impact of being struck by the site in this way does not allow for a sweet-let-off, the shot is spoiled and one might feel like a silly fart.

    I think that just about covers it, but it is several decades since I thought about this, so if I've missed anything, then please do add - Wathout!...Watchout!
    Last edited by 32Bravo; 01-31-2009 at 02:37 AM.


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


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  14. #14
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    Default Re: Weapons quiz

    Managed to find this:
    (6) Hawkins position. The Hawkins position (Figure 3-8) is a variation of the prone unsupported position. The sniper uses it when firing from a low bank or a depression in the ground, over a roof, or so forth. It cannot be used on level ground since the muzzle cannot be raised high enough to aim at the target. It is a low-profile position with excellent stability and aids concealment. To assume this position, the sniper uses the weapon's sling and proceeds as follows:



    CAUTION

    LOCK THE NONFIRING ARM STRAIGHT OR THE FACE WILL ABSORB THE WEAPON'S RECOIL.


    (a) After assuming a prone position, grasp the upper sling swivel and sling with the nonfiring hand, forming a fist to support the front of the weapon.

    (b) Ensure the nonfiring arm is locked straight since it will absorb the weapon's recoil. Wearing a glove is advisable.

    (c) Rest the butt of the weapon on the ground and place it under the firing shoulder.

    The sniper can make minor adjustments in muzzle elevation by tightening or relaxing the fist of the nonfiring hand. If more elevation is required, he can place a support under the nonfiring fist.
    Not sure about the glove. Leather gloves are useful for assisting the gripping of the furniture of the weapon when shooting, but I never experienced any problems by not using gloves in the Hawkins position...never considered them, really.

    figure 3.8, in the link:

    http://www.biggerhammer.net/manuals/...ch3.htm#fig3_8
    Last edited by 32Bravo; 01-31-2009 at 04:23 AM.


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


  15. #15
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    Default Re: Weapons quiz

    easy to produce,32 rd mag,9mm,submachine gun,used by french resistance in ww2
    -lest we forget-

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