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Thread: British Helmets and Other Equipment in World War II

  1. #76
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    Default Re: British Helmets and Other Equipment in World War II

    Quote Originally Posted by 32Bravo View Post
    In my experience, a pink helmet, as issued, can be very attractive to the ladies.
    Perhaps, but putting scrim or hessian over it just makes it rough for both. And soggy.
    ..
    A rational army would run away.
    Montesquieu

  2. #77
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    Default Re: British Helmets and Other Equipment in World War II

    Quote Originally Posted by Rising Sun* View Post
    Perhaps, but putting scrim or hessian over it just makes it rough for both. And soggy.

    never tried that...I'll just have to take your word for it.


    "Although God cannot alter the past, Historians can"


    Samuel Butler


  3. #78
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    Default Re: British Helmets and Other Equipment in World War II

    Quote Originally Posted by 2nd of foot View Post
    You may think you look cool but the last thing you want to do when you are leaking is to mess with your helmet and try and get your FFD (first field dressing) out. Particularly when there are hot bit of metal flying around. There is absolutely no need to put your FFD on your tin bin. The same was true for the numpties who taped it to their webbing. You would die from blood loss before you got it off. Standard operating procedure (SOP) is to have you FFD in the front right hand pocket that was designed for it. That way when you are leaking in the dark and your mate is looking for your FFD they know were to find it. He will not use his on you as HE may need it soon.

    And your helmet needs scrim on it to stop the shine as you can see from the flash.
    You're right, but:
    I dont think that soldiers were putting their one and only dressing under helmet net. In right pocket was enough space only for one dressing, and where that 'poor' soldier would put another one or two? Smallpack? Not bad idea, but taking it off is not an easy thing and its also not the best idea.

    So (i will write in 1st person ) if I would get hurt and one of my mates would like to dress my wound, he could just rip the net. I know that its solid, and things, but during adrenaline inflow, in the middle of battle? He could manage it. I'm not sure but I possibly heard, that soldiers cut's some of their nets near dressing before battle, just to take it out easier.

    Now, during my reenactor-things im always carrying with me 4 dressings:
    2 under helmet net, one in right pocket and last one in smallpack

    I also get rid of scrims. I studied very much photos of Polish soldiers during WWII, and I didnt noticed scrims on their helmets (except paratroopers).

    We, Warsaw children will fight for you
    for every stone of yours
    our City, we'll shed blood

  4. #79

    Default Re: British Helmets and Other Equipment in World War II

    We were required (1980s) to put ours inside the respirator case. The pocket on the then-issue trousers was incapable of holding any issue dressing (even WW2 ones).

  5. #80
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    Default Re: British Helmets and Other Equipment in World War II

    Re the field dressings carried in the helmet netting -- I've gotten the impression it wasn't so much for the benefit/access of the soldier carrying the dressing, as it was for his fellows. I mean, if you've just been shot and have a collapsed lung, or even a shattered shin, it seems much more likely that a buddy or the medic is going to fishing out the dressing from either their helmets or yours, long before you're going to get your act sufficiently together to dress the wound yourself. Likewise, helmets would usually be available where fatalities occur, meaning unowned dressings would likewise be lying around.
    "...we have met the enemy and he is us." -- Pogo (Walt Kelly)

  6. #81
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    Default Re: British Helmets and Other Equipment in World War II

    The ALICE gear from the 80's/early 90's had a designated pouch near the buckle of the pistol belt for holding a field dressing. But you could attach extra pouches to the belt, provided you could get your hands on extra pouches. ALICE was much easier to modify and add to than the British load-carrying equipment of WWII.

  7. #82
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    Default Re: British Helmets and Other Equipment in World War II

    Quote Originally Posted by Cezar View Post
    Now, during my reenactor-things im always carrying with me 4 dressings:
    2 under helmet net, one in right pocket and last one in smallpack
    Well, unless something goes terribly wrong during a re-enactment, I think those dressings should last you for a lifetime.

    As for field dressings under scrim nets on helmets, the Canadians seemed to do it.

    When it became apparent that the First Field Dressing carried in the right-thigh pocket of the Battledress trousers was inadequate, a large Shell Dressing came into use by combat troops. This bandage was too large for the trousers’ pocket and was carried under, or attached to, the helmet net. In that position, it offered the additional advantage of breaking up the helmet’s distinctive profile.
    http://perthregiment.org/rperth4.html

    And see the many photos in the link of dressings under helmet scrim nets.
    ..
    A rational army would run away.
    Montesquieu

  8. #83
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    Default Re: British Helmets and Other Equipment in World War II

    P.S.

    Note that a FFD and a Shell Dressing are quite different things and quite different sizes.
    ..
    A rational army would run away.
    Montesquieu

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