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Thread: KG.200 and allied planes used by the Luftwaffe

  1. #1
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    Default KG.200 and allied planes used by the Luftwaffe

    KG.200 was a Luftwaffe unit that used non-German planes for many clandestine missions, often behind lines such as dropping agents off in UK. During the war it was inevitable that Allied aircraft would fall into the hands of the Luftwaffe or its allies due to accidents , pilot error, or even from careful reconstructions of crashed aircraft.

    Whilst KG.200 used the heavier aircraft for clandestine jobs the smaller aircraft were used by other units in order to train pilots against the aircraft that they would eventually fight.

    Here is a picture of a Spitfire wearing the Swastikas (ah the shame).



    Other planes included Blenheims, Swordfish, Hurricanes, Gladiators, Typhoons, Dakotas, Liberators and Corsairs. Even a Welly was captured and used here are a few pictures below of the aircraft...


    Blenheim in Nazi colours.


    Gladiator, note black crosses on wing underside.



    Hurricane in Nazi colours.


    Typhoon, black cross just visible under wing.


    Wellington, note the black cross just visable under the wing.

    More info on KG.200

    Despite its importance, Outstation Olga was little more than a rough runway beside a forest. The command post consisted of two huts hidden in the woods. The operational aircraft included six Junkers Ju-188s and a pair of captured and renovated Boeing B-17s, redesignated Dornier Do-288s. Enemy "Jabos," as the Germans called Allied ground-attack aircraft, were overhead so often that personnel took the precaution of dodging from tree to tree, never appearing in the open during daylight.

    Detachment Olga was responsible for landing agents in France, which was under Allied control. The KG 200 pilots usually dropped agents by parachute, but on some flights they would drop a personnel drop device--a metal and plywood container holding three agents and their equipment that would parachute to earth. The KG 200 pilots made supply runs to keep their covert activities in operation.

    Agents were trained at the Reich Main Security Office's well-fortified luxury hotel, on a mountain in southwestern Poland. The hotel was ringed by guards and could be reached only by cable-car. Upon graduation, the new agents were sent to KG 200 for transport to their areas of operation.

    These secret missions were only flown at night, and the runway lights were turned off as soon as the aircraft had taken off or landed. Under cover of darkness, as they dropped their passengers or acted as airborne listening posts, the KG 200 pilots and planes were relatively safe from attack. Landing was another matter; the airfields often came under attack and were extensively damaged while the KG 200 pilots were in the air, making landing impossible and leading to the loss of airplanes and crews.

    Pressed by a shortage of long-range aircraft, KG 200 used captured Allied aircraft--given German markings--to fly their missions. Phyllis Marie, a Boeing B-17F, was one example. Phyllis Marie went down with battle damage on March 8, 1944, at Werben, Germany. The plane was captured and repaired from the large stock of B-17 spare parts that the Germans had amassed during the years of heavy daylight bombing attacks by U.S. planes. Maltese crosses were painted on the wings and a raked swastika on the rudder, but otherwise Phyllis Marie remained unchanged. U.S. forces recaptured the plane on a runway at Altenburg on May 4, 1945.
    KG.200 also seemed to have a far more sinister role as alluded to here.

    KG 200 was also in charge of the German suicide pilots. The Germans mirrored the Japanese kamikaze efforts with the Reichenberg IV suicide bomb. The concept was developed by a glider pilot who was a veteran of the famous 1940 assault on the Belgian fortress of Eben Emael. As the war turned against Germany and his fellow pilots were slaughtered, he thought that if glider pilots were to be sent to perish, they should be armed with a suitable weapon to bloody the enemy. The Reichenbergs were to be piloted by "self-sacrifice men." Thousands of men volunteered for vaguely defined "special operations," and 70 of them were sent to KG 200.

    Although these men were trained on gliders, they were to fly a manned variant of the V-1 buzz bomb. The V-1, also known as the Fiesler Fi-103, was already in mass-production for its primary purpose as a flying bomb. The German Research Institute for Gliding Flight at Ainring modified the V-1 to carry a pilot. By 1945, however, the attitude toward using the flying bomb had changed so much that only criminals or pilots who were in a depressed state or were ill would be allowed to fly Reichenbergs.
    Not sure about this I will look for more info. Would hate to think what the outcome of allowing criminals or depressed pilots to pilot V-1s over your own territory!!!
    If you post idiocy, don't get upset if you are seen as an idiot.... I don't.

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  2. #2
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    Great info I did not know about this unit. I wonder if they took part in big operations.

    Henk


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    No, i don't think they did.

    Strictly single plane jobs I think, it was clandestine such as dropping agents so many planes would increase the possiblity of detection. They were also used for recce and pathfinding, so they may have supported larger Ops, although not actually taken part in them as such.
    If you post idiocy, don't get upset if you are seen as an idiot.... I don't.

    Here endth the lesson.




    Have you seen any combat?

    Seen a little on TV.

    You talk the talk, but do you walk the walk?



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    Henk, didn't you say you collected "Take Off". If so there is an article in it about KG.200. I think it was in about vol 7 or 8. It stars with a painted picture of a Liberator with swastikas on it's tail plane and covered in the dappeled night fighter camoflage scheme.
    If you post idiocy, don't get upset if you are seen as an idiot.... I don't.

    Here endth the lesson.




    Have you seen any combat?

    Seen a little on TV.

    You talk the talk, but do you walk the walk?



  5. #5
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    I read once (book long gone) that they had B-17 and Liberators that would join the Bomber groups in US colours to ascertain their tactics. A good idea I suppose, but I cant remember how effective it was.

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    Quite a daring and daunting task!!! They would risk getting shot down from all angles!!! For the very little information that couldn't be gathered by the fighter pilots or observing them from afar.

    There were those garishly painted bombers that were used to marshall the many different squadrons in to formation, can't remember what they were called. And the pathfinders.
    If you post idiocy, don't get upset if you are seen as an idiot.... I don't.

    Here endth the lesson.




    Have you seen any combat?

    Seen a little on TV.

    You talk the talk, but do you walk the walk?



  7. #7
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    Not really, would you shoot at an ac that had you markings, you have to remamber that there were hundreds of ac in the skies at the same time.

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    No, but I don't know what the procedures would be for a random plane joining the group. Someone would notice surely (the gunners especially would be on the look out for planes not in formation) and then a signal, probably by blinky light, could be sent.

    The danger of shoot down would be rest quite a fair bit on behalf of the Luftwaffe night fighters/flak.
    If you post idiocy, don't get upset if you are seen as an idiot.... I don't.

    Here endth the lesson.




    Have you seen any combat?

    Seen a little on TV.

    You talk the talk, but do you walk the walk?



  9. #9
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    nope 1000ydstare it is not in 7 or 8, but maybe it is the others that iI did not get. I only got 1-19, 22, 35, 37, 42, 43, 44, 45, 53, 55, 58. I was still small when my dad stoped it and I collected a few from second hand book shops, but I wish I had all of them and I also realised how good they are later in my live.

    Henk


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    Regimentul 38 "Neagoe Basarab"
    Divizia 10 Infanterie


    101st Airborne

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    Recently gave mine away!!!
    If you post idiocy, don't get upset if you are seen as an idiot.... I don't.

    Here endth the lesson.




    Have you seen any combat?

    Seen a little on TV.

    You talk the talk, but do you walk the walk?



  12. #12
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    You should never have done that. Dani that B-17 is Flack Dancer or is it not?

    Henk


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    No Henk, it is Wulf Hound.
    Regimentul 38 "Neagoe Basarab"
    Divizia 10 Infanterie


    101st Airborne

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    ooops , thank you Dani.

    Henk


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    Gave them to a pot crab.

    What is a flack dancer or wulf hound?
    If you post idiocy, don't get upset if you are seen as an idiot.... I don't.

    Here endth the lesson.




    Have you seen any combat?

    Seen a little on TV.

    You talk the talk, but do you walk the walk?



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