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Thread: GOOD BOOKS

  1. #151
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    Yes, I get it. Thanks. Regarding Spam (a sort of ham with beef compressed "luncheon meat" developed in the US shortly before WW2), opinions may be divided as to its taste, but it still sells. During the war, huge quantities of Spam were supplied for inclusion in soldiers' rations, in the US and beyond. Some Soviet Red Army soldiers referred to cans of Spam (in the absence of more tangible manifestations up to 1944) as "Second Fronts". Best regards, JR.

  2. #152
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    The 50's Dinner stand-by, (we had it often when I was very young) was really not bad tasting, but it did take a little getting used to. And was preferred by all of us over the other stand by, hot Tuna Casserole. In it's current iteration, Spam contains Ham, Pork shoulder, salt, and some vaguely menacing preservative. I remember there were a few dozen cans of it, and lots of other things kept in the cellar during the Cuban missile crisis.
    Last edited by tankgeezer; 12-03-2014 at 09:37 AM.

  3. #153
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    I may have been wrong about the beef element; pork seems more ... harmonious. Regarding canned tuna - you can do quite an acceptable pasta sauce with canned tuna, canned tomatoes, onions and a little garlic. I like a few sliced mushrooms in it, myself. It is one of our standbys ... although perhaps not everybody would like the look of it. My wife describes it as "tuna mush" ... Yours from the Depths of the Larder, JR.

  4. #154
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    Spam has been around since 1937, and given the times it faced, the recipe may have been changed from time to time. So it may well have had some beef in it depending on the times, or the market it was intended for. (kind of guessing at that, the official Hormel Spam site doesn't address that.)
    I'm a big fan of cold tuna salad, in sandwiches, and also the pasta version with sliced cucumber, and tomato. The Tuna pasta sauce might work though, I'll have to try that on some Spaghetti squash.

  5. #155
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    Quote Originally Posted by JR* View Post
    I may have been wrong about the beef element; pork seems more ... harmonious.
    Maybe.

    Australian version was 'Camp Pie'. Read the ingredients and you'd find it was mainly cereal fillers.

    Spent a very hot Scout camp in the early 1960s where we had camp pie for every lunch and evening meal (along with bread and jam for dessert and general filler) for a fortnight. Ugly, sweating, jelly like blobs of otherwise unsaleable offal and grease rapidly covered in the flies which weren't busy shitting in the open jam tins, after a busy day of blowing the sheep. (No, not making the sheep smile, just laying maggots in the shit stuck in the wool on the back of the sheep's legs, which was why sheep were sometimes mulesed which is now something well intentioned but ignorant people who don't understand farming and have never had to put down a fly blown sheep think was a form of voluntary sadism practised on defenceless animals by evil farmers: http://www.petaasiapacific.com/featu...ralianWool.asp )

    When my children were in primary school I had the brilliant idea of introducing them to fried camp pie, which I had vague recollections from post-Scout camp encounters as being edible, largely because of the crunchy outside. My children rejected it as soon as they put in their mouths. So, immediately afterwards, did I as soon as I put it in my mouth with a view to challenging their rejection.

    I was probably of the last Australian generation which in our childhood ate foods which were common to earlier generations but which now would offend more delicate tastes, such as aged mutton, liver, kidney and other offal. I ate mutton routinely when I worked in the bush in the 1960s. I'd probably retch or even vomit if I had try to to eat it now. When I was a kid, mutton was common and lamb was a spring delicacy, while chicken was something eaten only a couple of times a year on special occasions such as Xmas. Now, chicken is spewed out of every fast food outlet on every corner while lamb is eaten occasionally, and nobody would eat mutton even if anyone was silly enough to try to sell it.

    I need to check the shelves in the supermarket next time I'm there to see if camp pie is still stocked.
    ..
    A rational army would run away.
    Montesquieu

  6. #156
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    I seem to recall that frying was a favored method of preparation for Spam - may even have done it myself, long time ago. Regarding mutton - it has been coming back into vogue with some chefs Over Here, who like its stronger flavor in stews, pies, slow-roasts etc, when compared to lamb. Mutton is actually quite hard to get here on the retail market. Lamb is regarded as a premium product both here and in our external markets (notably France), so few farmers have much interest in keeping a wooly long enough to be mutton. Interestingly, my father - who grew up in early 20th century rural West of Ireland - will not eat sheepmeat of any description. Not that he has no experience of the stuff - quite the opposite. His reason appears to be that, at the time and place of his upbringing, sheepmeat was regarded as "poor man's fare", which meant he got plenty of it. However, he no longer wishes to remind himself of the association ... Yours from The Bog, watching the sheepishes ... JR.

  7. #157
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    I once had Lamb, (at least I was told it was Lamb) at a dinner given by my In-Laws many years ago. I was told that it was oh so good, and tasty, and that I would enjoy it. I was out of sorts for several days, and have not yet ventured to try it again. (In truth, I believe it was a fiendish plot by my In-Laws to get me out of the Family)
    Next time I visit the WalMart, I'll look for some Spam, and fry it up, and give a comprehensive report of the experience. At least its not Bully Beef.

  8. #158
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    Wink Re: GOOD BOOKS

    I must confess that I am not very partial to lamb myself. But my wife is. So I end up eating (and cooking) more than enough of it. Mind you, while she grew up in a vastly less-than-wealthy household herself, it was in Newbridge, Co. Kildare (only 50 minutes drive from Dublin on a good day). I expect that the well-fed woolies of the Lilywhite County were too valuable to have been "poor man's fare". I must ask her what the Kildare equivalent was - cast-off racehorse, perhaps ? Yours from the Curragh, JR.

  9. #159
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    We also have another version of "Mystery Meat" called either Mock Chicken, or City Chicken. Had lots of it while growing up, not the worst tasting thing, but nothing to write home about. This is the ingredients list.
    "minced veal, pork, or other meat, molded onto a stick or skewer so that it somewhat resembles a chicken leg, then breaded and braised. " Somewhat resembles a Chicken leg is more than a little literary license, it was just a rectangular block of stuff on a round stick. (Still better than Lamb....)

  10. #160
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    Interesting, tankgeezer. Quite recently, a survey was done (I think by Britain's Trading Standards Authority) of pizza restaurants and takeaways in the region of a North of England town/city. I cannot quite remember which - it may have been Scarborough. Since this is not a very prosperous place, pizza restaurants and takeaways are almost as common as bookies' shops in the area. They discovered, among other things, that almost all of the restaurants and takeaways were using a "chicken" pizza topping of "mechanically-recovered meat" with quite a similar composition to that of your "Mock Chicken". The one thing it did not contain was actual chicken. We do not have a Trading Standards Authority here in the Emerald Isle, more's the pity. Since I read an article on this, I have not gone near a chicken pizza. Or, indeed, any pizza ... Yours from Napoli, in mourning, JR.

  11. #161
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    Quote Originally Posted by JR* View Post
    Yes, I get it. Thanks. Regarding Spam (a sort of ham with beef compressed "luncheon meat" developed in the US shortly before WW2), opinions may be divided as to its taste, but it still sells. During the war, huge quantities of Spam were supplied for inclusion in soldiers' rations, in the US and beyond. Some Soviet Red Army soldiers referred to cans of Spam (in the absence of more tangible manifestations up to 1944) as "Second Fronts". Best regards, JR.
    I thought it was "Roosevelt Sausage"...

  12. #162
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    Soylent Red.... Hormel is probably close to selling their 8 billionth can of the stuff.
    Last edited by tankgeezer; 12-04-2014 at 10:24 PM.

  13. #163
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    Quote Originally Posted by JR* View Post
    His reason appears to be that, at the time and place of his upbringing, sheepmeat was regarded as "poor man's fare"
    It was rabbit here, during the 1930s Depression. Sold in pairs, presumably because you can't get a feed off one of the stringy little semi-rodents. Still sold a bit in butchers in my childhood in the 1950s, but my parents' and grandparents' generations generally wouldn't buy them because of the 'poor man' stigma, although none of them were so poor during the Depression that they had to survive on rabbits.

    Which, despite grand stories by various people of living on rabbit alone during the many years of the Depression, just ain't possible. http://www.raising-rabbits.com/rabbit-starvation.html

    Shot and occasionally trapped or snared my share of rabbits as a kid to young adult. Now, as testament to how ageing transforms one to a gentler person, I like looking at them as they bounce around my beach shack, with no desire to hurt the cute little bunnies. Although from time to time I do visualise a head shot on one of the really fat ones, then I think of the blood and flies while gutting and skinning them which confirms my aged preference for meat served up on polystyrene trays in supermarkets rather than killing my own.
    ..
    A rational army would run away.
    Montesquieu

  14. #164
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    Quote Originally Posted by tankgeezer View Post
    I once had Lamb, (at least I was told it was Lamb) at a dinner given by my In-Laws many years ago. I was told that it was oh so good, and tasty, and that I would enjoy it. I was out of sorts for several days, and have not yet ventured to try it again.
    Quite possibly the fat, which is very rich. And yummy, yummy, yummy when concentrated in crispy meat.

    I love lamb, especially the crispy fat on roasts and chops, but it doesn't love me. Poor consequences are proportional to fat ingested. Oddly enough, pork crackling is similar. Which is a pity as I've found a place on the way to the beach shack that does pork roast dinners for $14, with a miserly bit of pork crackling on it, but also sells crackling slabs about 4 inches square for $2. Gee, which one is better value to sustain me until I hit the bakery 40 minutes down the road which does the world's best lamingtons with strawberry jam and fresh cream?

    The best lamb is Greek spit roast over charcoal, on its own or in a souvlaki on pita bread warmed on a grill with olive oil then filled with tzatziki or garlic sauce, tomato, lettuce, lemon juice and herbs.
    ..
    A rational army would run away.
    Montesquieu

  15. #165
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    Default Re: GOOD BOOKS

    Quote Originally Posted by JR* View Post
    Interesting, tankgeezer. Quite recently, a survey was done (I think by Britain's Trading Standards Authority) of pizza restaurants and takeaways in the region of a North of England town/city. I cannot quite remember which - it may have been Scarborough. Since this is not a very prosperous place, pizza restaurants and takeaways are almost as common as bookies' shops in the area. They discovered, among other things, that almost all of the restaurants and takeaways were using a "chicken" pizza topping of "mechanically-recovered meat" with quite a similar composition to that of your "Mock Chicken". The one thing it did not contain was actual chicken. We do not have a Trading Standards Authority here in the Emerald Isle, more's the pity. Since I read an article on this, I have not gone near a chicken pizza. Or, indeed, any pizza ... Yours from Napoli, in mourning, JR.
    Bunch of numbnuts animal rights protesters here some years ago tried to stop a ship sailing with live sheep for Arab countries.

    Genius protesters bought large quantities of pizza ham; invaded the ship; and sprinkled the pizza ham liberally over the sheep, believing that the sheep contaminated by pork would be rejected by the Muslim countries for which they were destined.

    Slight problem for numbnuts. "Pizza ham" was in fact a beef product treated with various non-pork products to make it ersatz pork, much cheaper than anything containing even a trace of the real piggy stuff.

    This is what happens when you don't eat enough meat, especially pork in my preferred forms of bacon and crackling, to maintain sound brain function.
    Last edited by Rising Sun*; 12-05-2014 at 06:59 AM.
    ..
    A rational army would run away.
    Montesquieu

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