Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 56 of 56

Thread: The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer

  1. #46
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    U.S.A.
    Posts
    19

    Default Re: The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer

    The first time I read this book I was 13. I was just starting to gain interest in military history as well. I was just awestruck with the way Guy described his experiences in the German army. In a way his writing almost made you feel as though you were right there with him. I have a couple of copies of this book, and am currently reading it, for..oh...I don't know..about the....50th time.. Excellent read, and I give it a 5 star rating! And if you have not read it, you really should.

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Lee, NJ
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer

    Quote Originally Posted by Hosenfield View Post
    Forgotten soldier remains one of the best written war memoirs ever with deep personal analysis. Sajer was a french-german grunt in the elite Greater Germany Armored division. Book ends with him being in american custody.
    however, there have been claims to the book's authenticity in that the GD rolls indicate that no Guy Sajer existed and certain events/things he said happened in fact didn't. also, there are no photos of guy sajer or his comarades.
    I read it last summer. And I agree; the book is definitely worth reading.

    Ludwik Kowalski (see Wikipedia)

  3. #48
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Valhalla
    Posts
    28

    Default Forgotten soldier by Guy Sayer

    Hi everyone,

    just to point out this great book. I read quite a few of them but this one is by far the best because it packs first hands emotional punch. The book really builds up like a epic movie... say Gone with the wind... or ... Titanic... and ends with sorrow of Prussia.

    Anyway, at one point after barely surviving Cossack onslaught and after having survived full year of relentless everyday massacres in the east, Guy writes about speech by new unit commander hauptman Weiserdau (who afterwards unfortunately got killed by partisan mine):
    "We are trying, taking due account of the attitudes of society, to change the face of the world, hoping to revive the ancient virtues buried under the layers of filth bequeathed to us by our forebears. We can expect no reward for this effort. We are loathed everywhere: if we should lose tomorrow those of us still alive after so much suffering will be judged without justice. We shall be accused of an infinity of murder, as if everywhere, and at all times, men at war did not behave in the same way. Those who have an interest in putting an end to our ideals will ridicule everything we believe in. We shall be spared nothing. Even the tombs of our heroes will be destroyed, only preserving-as a gesture of respect toward the dead-a few which contain figures of doubtful heroism, who were never fully committed to our cause. With our deaths, all the prodigies of heroism which our daily circumstances bring and the memory of our comrades, dead and alive, and our communion of spirits, our fears and our hopes, will vanish, and our history will never be told. Future generations will speak only of an idiotic, unqualified sacrifice. Whether you wanted it or not, you are now part of this undertaking, and nothing which follows can equal the efforts you have made, if you must sleep tomorrow under the quieter skies of the opposite camp. In that case, you will never be forgiven for having survived. You will either be rejected or preserved like a rare animal which has escaped a cataclysm. With other men, you will be as cats are to dogs and you will never have any real friends.
    Do you wish such an end for yourselves
    ? "

    Needles to say after this I already got chills at this point....

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Aachen/Aken/Aix-la-Chapelle
    Posts
    2,880

    Default Re: The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer

    Threads merged...
    "I just ran out of ammo. I will ram this one. Good bye, we'll meet in Valhalla." - Major Heinrich Ehrler, April 4, 1945

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Switzerland
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer

    A good read as such, but the question of authentication haunts me. More research should be done by people who had been closer to this division. Maybe the book is 'faction'.

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    San Antonio, Texas
    Posts
    574

    Default Re: The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer

    Fabulous book. Read it a long time ago. It was the best personal war experience narrative by a soldier on either side of the line I ever read. I've read both sides of the Guy Sajer controversy. I believe Sajer.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Larue, Texas
    Posts
    235

    Default Re: Forgotten soldier by Guy Sayer

    Quote Originally Posted by witman111 View Post
    Hi everyone,

    just to point out this great book. I read quite a few of them but this one is by far the best because it packs first hands emotional punch. The book really builds up like a epic movie... say Gone with the wind... or ... Titanic... and ends with sorrow of Prussia.

    Anyway, at one point after barely surviving Cossack onslaught and after having survived full year of relentless everyday massacres in the east, Guy writes about speech by new unit commander hauptman Weiserdau (who afterwards unfortunately got killed by partisan mine):
    "We are trying, taking due account of the attitudes of society, to change the face of the world, hoping to revive the ancient virtues buried under the layers of filth bequeathed to us by our forebears. We can expect no reward for this effort. We are loathed everywhere: if we should lose tomorrow those of us still alive after so much suffering will be judged without justice. We shall be accused of an infinity of murder, as if everywhere, and at all times, men at war did not behave in the same way. Those who have an interest in putting an end to our ideals will ridicule everything we believe in. We shall be spared nothing. Even the tombs of our heroes will be destroyed, only preserving-as a gesture of respect toward the dead-a few which contain figures of doubtful heroism, who were never fully committed to our cause. With our deaths, all the prodigies of heroism which our daily circumstances bring and the memory of our comrades, dead and alive, and our communion of spirits, our fears and our hopes, will vanish, and our history will never be told. Future generations will speak only of an idiotic, unqualified sacrifice. Whether you wanted it or not, you are now part of this undertaking, and nothing which follows can equal the efforts you have made, if you must sleep tomorrow under the quieter skies of the opposite camp. In that case, you will never be forgiven for having survived. You will either be rejected or preserved like a rare animal which has escaped a cataclysm. With other men, you will be as cats are to dogs and you will never have any real friends.
    Do you wish such an end for yourselves
    ? "

    Needles to say after this I already got chills at this point....
    As a US Viet Nam veteran these sentiments strike home. But this is not a new thing. A Roman Centurion, Marcus Flavinues, wrote the following around 2,000 years ago:“Make haste to reassure me, I beg you, and tell me that our fellow citizens understand us, support us and protect us as we ourselves are protecting the glory of the Empire. If it should be otherwise, if we should have to leave our bleached bones on these desert sands in vain, then beware of the anger of the Legions!

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Buffalo, New York
    Posts
    6,895

    Default Re: The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer

    An interesting website regarding this book, it seems the consensus is building that Sajer did serve in the East in some capacity; the comments in this thread regarding the potential that he actually changed what unit he served in, from Das Reich to Grossdeutschland, is pretty interesting...

    http://members.shaw.ca/grossdeutschland/sajer.htm



  9. #54
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Fort Lee, NJ
    Posts
    15

    Default Re: The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer

    Quote Originally Posted by The Commander View Post
    The first time I read this book I was 13. I was just starting to gain interest in military history as well. I was just awestruck with the way Guy described his experiences in the German army. In a way his writing almost made you feel as though you were right there with him. I have a couple of copies of this book, and am currently reading it, for..oh...I don't know..about the....50th time.. Excellent read, and I give it a 5 star rating! And if you have not read it, you really should.
    I was also very much impressed by his memoir, reading it a year ago, at the age of 80.

    ======================================
    Ludwik Kowalski, author of a free on-line “Diary of a Former Communist: Thoughts, Feelings, Reality.”

    http://csam.montclair.edu/~kowalski/life/intro.html 1946-2004.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    177

    Default Re: The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer

    I can hardly support lauding the ideals and practices of the German aggressions in WW2.
    The world would have gotten on quite well without all that misery.

  11. #56
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    265

    Default Re: The Forgotten Soldier by Guy Sajer

    Notwithstanding the mistakes, and the clearly "factional" padding-out in places, I tend to believe that "The Forgotten Soldier" is a reasonably authentic memoir - but one informed by a more artistic temprament than that behind many veteran memoirs written by old soldiers of more prosaic frame of mind. As to the suggestion that Sajer may have been a member of a different unit on the Eastern Front - perhaps "Das Reich", or another Waffen-SS outfit - it is certainly an interesting suggestion. It would certainly help to explain the armband business. I don't know, however. I know that it is difficult to work out the timelines, given the rather limited, claustrophobic point of view of the protagonist (one of the convincing aspects of the book, actually), but a "Das Reich" timeline does not work as well for me as a "Grossdeutschland" timeline; a lot more fictionalising would seem required to make this work. Still, it is a little while since I read the book; I should look at it again with "Das Reich" timelines in mind. Best regards, JR.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Hitler's Third Reich in the News
    By alephh in forum WWII Websites
    Replies: 79
    Last Post: 01-06-2009, 08:19 PM
  2. Replies: 56
    Last Post: 02-08-2008, 05:03 PM
  3. Soldier Song
    By american sniper in forum 2006 Archive Room
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-09-2006, 12:09 PM
  4. Poetry
    By 1000ydstare in forum 2006 Archive Room
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 01-31-2006, 08:39 AM
  5. Walther War Machines big book of Soldier Knowledge
    By Bluffcove in forum 2005 Archive Room
    Replies: 465
    Last Post: 10-19-2005, 08:55 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •