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Young man disturbs a WW II munition.
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Thread: Young man disturbs a WW II munition.

  1. #1
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    Default Young man disturbs a WW II munition.

    I saw this just the other day, and it fits with the Bomb going off in a Barley field posted earlier. It also serves as a caution to those who like to go Relic hunting without an experienced person along to guide them. The Story speaks of a "bomb" but I'm thinking it's just a small munition such as a Grenade, or Mine. Anyway, I hope you find it of interest.

    "A teenage military history buff discovered a WWI bomb which immediately blew up, leaving him riddled with 50 pieces of shrapnel.

    Treasure hunter Paul Aiden was hunting for coins in a forest near his home in Metz, France, earlier this month when his metal detector started going off.

    Thinking he had struck gold, the 18-year-old began digging through the dense undergrowth before a massive explosion sent him flying backwards.

    Woodworker Mr Aiden admitted that by the time he realised he had struck on a WWI era detonator it was already 'too late' - as it blew up despite being more than 100 years old.

    A teenage military history buff discovered a WWI bomb which immediately blew up, leaving him riddled with 50 pieces of shrapnel. Treasure hunter Paul Aiden (above, with some of his injuries) was hunting for coins in a forest near his home in Metz, France, earlier this month when his metal detector started going off +3
    A teenage military history buff discovered a WWI bomb which immediately blew up, leaving him riddled with 50 pieces of shrapnel. Treasure hunter Paul Aiden (above, with some of his injuries) was hunting for coins in a forest near his home in Metz, France, earlier this month when his metal detector started going off

    Thinking he had struck gold, the 18-year-old began digging through the dense undergrowth before a massive explosion sent him flying backwards. Pictured, some of the shrapnel
    Roughly 50 pieces of shrapnel shot through his chest and arm, blowing off an index finger and leaving him with no feeling in his left hand
    Thinking he had struck gold, the 18-year-old began digging through the dense undergrowth before a massive explosion sent him flying backwards. Roughly 50 pieces of shrapnel shot through his chest and arm, blowing off an index finger and leaving him with no feeling in his left hand



    Roughly 50 pieces of shrapnel shot through his chest and arm, blowing off an index finger and leaving him with no feeling in his left hand.

    Mr Aiden said he felt lucky to be alive.

    'It was so crazy because it felt like I was being transported back to 1914,' he said.

    'I was on the ground bleeding and I was completely disorientated. I felt shell-shocked because I didn't know what happened until after the explosion when I saw all the blood on my chest and most of my index finger was blown off.

    'I'm so lucky to be alive because if the shrapnel was just 6cm higher, it would have hit my face and I would have died.'

    Mr Aiden limped back home where his parents immediately called an ambulance.

    During the hour-long operation, surgeons removed roughly 50 pieces of shrapnel and reattached his index finger with a skin graft.

    Mr Aiden said: 'I was on the ground bleeding and I was completely disorientated. I felt shell-shocked because I didn't know what happened until after the explosion when I saw all the blood on my chest and most of my index finger was blown off'


    Despite the successful surgery, the young metal detector no longer has any feeling in his left hand and has been experiencing continuous ringing in his ear.

    'I think it really puts into perspective the realities of the soldiers during the war,' he said.

    'I have so much admiration for what they did because every step they took could have been their last. What they did was absolutely insane, they are true heroes. Their hell was every day.'

    Mr Aiden has since discovered the bomb he came across was a French Mle 1915 Impact detonator.

    Police and bomb experts were later called to the scene and found a second detonator with a German phosphorus stick grenade.

    Mr Aiden vowed to carry on with his hobby.

    'I will continue metal detecting all my life, I won't allow some WWI bomb to stop me,' he said.
    Last edited by tankgeezer; 07-11-2019 at 08:24 AM.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Young man disturbs a WW II munition.

    "Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same." - Ronald Reagan

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Young man disturbs a WW II munition.

    While Stationed in Germany, our training areas were just parts of Germany that were designated for training, and untouched since 1945. These areas were littered with unexpended ordnance, some left from the war, the rest stuff we had used in training. While the EOD guys had been busy through the years gathering up these leftovers, there remained enough of the stuff that we had to walk through various areas to mark any ordnance we came across. A flag was planted nearby to show the EOD guys where to go. Every Day we were admonished to not disturb anything we might come across when out training with catchy little phrases like "Reach down for a Dud, come back with Stubs" Still there was always someone who ignored the obvious dangers. Mostly the training stuff is not explosive, but "training practice" inert munitions. There were however Service munitions also. Two young Soldiers made a big mistake one day when one of them picked up an unexploded 40mm Grenade. Brought it back to the Field Barracks, and tossed it to his buddy, who looked at it, then tossed it back in a sort of game of Catch. When he tossed it back to the first guy, it exploded, killing the man who had picked it up originally, and seriously wounding the other fellow. Did a number on the building too. I wish that someone would offer training to relic hunters to keep such things as happened to the man in the story from happening again. Given the millions of mines, and unexploded ordnance devices laying in the ground around the World I'm thinking this will happen again, and again.
    Last edited by tankgeezer; 3 Weeks Ago at 11:30 PM.

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