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Thread: Extremely high power to weight ratio: results.

  1. #46
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    Default Re: Extremely high power to weight ratio: results.

    Quote Originally Posted by J.A.W. View Post
    For some reason the automatic Rx8 was detuned too, - but I really liked that triple rotor howling sound made by the 20B Rolex championship sports-racing Rx8s..
    They were fun to drive, I think Mazda was shying away from the super-car thing as the last of the RX-7's were virtually on par with Corvettes and more expensive Euro performance vehicles. The RX-8 was marketed as a nice, fun car to drive with real world performance. But it wasn't powerful enough for enthusiasts and the fuel economy was abysmal. Also, Mazda went to their MazdaSPEED entries for the turbocharged Mazda3 in the U.S. as their performance niche making the RX-8's obsolete. And many people who would have bought an RX-8 simply opted for the Miata. I think they're still working to comeback with a Rotary powered sports car in the future...

  2. #47
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    Default Re: Extremely high power to weight ratio: results.

    There were some Corvettes that had Wankel engines in them, though they never made it to a showroom. The XP-895,(1973) an outgrowth of the XP-882 program (a Corvette with a transverse V-8 Mid-Engine design) The 895 used a pair of joined 2 rotor engines from another Chevy product program. This was later changed to the XP-897GT which used a single 2 rotor engine, along with some other design changes. The entire program was tossed out as the fuel shortages of the early 70's made it unlikely to be a sales success.

  3. #48
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    Default Re: Extremely high power to weight ratio: results.

    Quote Originally Posted by J.A.W. View Post
    If there is any merit in the 'Liquid Piston' set-up, I `d wonder if Toyo Kogyo hasn't checked it out..
    They've probably taken a look and left it at that for now. As with any prototype engine, there are enormous hurdles to be overcome before you can even think about commercialisation. Far better to have them continue to work on it, and license the design if it ends up working moderately well in order to refine it for mass production.
    Personally I suspect Mazda will never use it for a road car (or if they do, it'll be a niche model for remote areas) - given the trajectories of oil prices and battery performance, in 20 years or so I think cars will be overwhelmingly electric. It does have potential use in aviation though, where weight is critical.
    I have neither the time nor the inclination to differentiate between the incompetent and the merely unfortunate - Curtis E LeMay

  4. #49
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    Default Re: Extremely high power to weight ratio: results.

    Electrickery...nah..battery power is a dead-end,... heavy, limited range & long re-charge times..useless..

    Unless maybe an electromotive type, with a high-efficiency liquid/gas fuelled ceramic 2-stroke turbo-diesel engine running at max torque - as generator to electric drive..

    ..& maybe with an electro-regenerative motor at each wheel, like Porsche drew up over a century ago..

    Or a NASA surplus, deep-space probe, plutonium fuel-cell electro-drive..

  5. #50
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    Default Re: Extremely high power to weight ratio: results.

    Back to the Stirling engine we go, even Sears, and Roebuck sold them in the latter 1800, they did well for field engines on the farm, and in mining. Sears even sold a solar version having a cast iron collector at the top. modern incarnations of the Stirling might well do for a car. (as long as no one wants it to go very fast. )

  6. #51
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    Default Re: Extremely high power to weight ratio: results.

    Quote Originally Posted by J.A.W. View Post
    Electrickery...nah..battery power is a dead-end,... heavy, limited range & long re-charge times..useless..
    Recharge time has been demonstrated in the lab to be a product of microstructure, not chemistry. They've demonstrated on a benchtop scale the technology to recharge a car with ~300 miles of range in under a minute, for a total system weight very comparable to current petrol-based systems. Given the throttling losses IC engines experience, once you get the charge speed and cost right (which is now a matter of engineering, not science), electric cars will always be cheaper to run.
    I have neither the time nor the inclination to differentiate between the incompetent and the merely unfortunate - Curtis E LeMay

  7. #52
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    Default Re: Extremely high power to weight ratio: results.

    I wish they were cheaper to buy, for my general inclement weather needs, a battery only car would do a good job. The price is much too high at present to make a purchase worthwhile. I appreciate the technology, and all of the present troubles one may avoid by driving an all electric, (and can only wonder at what future troubles they may present us) but its still too costly. I have hopes that the GM Highwire will someday be available at something approaching a realistic price, would have one in a heart beat, fuel cell clean, but no range limitation.

  8. #53
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    Default Re: Extremely high power to weight ratio: results.

    Prices are coming down pretty rapidly, the likes of the Nissan Leaf are still pretty expensive but that's always the case for a first prototype. Give it another decade and they'll be on a par with combustion engines.
    I have neither the time nor the inclination to differentiate between the incompetent and the merely unfortunate - Curtis E LeMay

  9. #54
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    Default Re: Extremely high power to weight ratio: results.

    Quote Originally Posted by pdf27 View Post
    Prices are coming down pretty rapidly, the likes of the Nissan Leaf are still pretty expensive but that's always the case for a first prototype. Give it another decade and they'll be on a par with combustion engines.
    The Leaf is available here in the mountains, I had given it a look over. Would be fun to have one someday.

  10. #55
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    Default Re: Extremely high power to weight ratio: results.

    Wonder what hill climbing power usage will do to battery endurance/car range?

    I 've heard proposals that quick swap battery packs will become available, at gas stations, or maybe Hydrogen fuel cells..

    How does running other power ancilliaries [ heating/aircon/lights/sound systems & etc] affect battery car range?

    Maybe there is a Tesla wireless energy transfer system coming...kinda like a slot-car - but without the need for direct electrode [source-to-pickup] contact?

  11. #56
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    Default Re: Extremely high power to weight ratio: results.

    Like any other finite power source, the more you use, the faster it's depleted. They don't have a great deal of range to begin with, maybe 100 miles best conditions, start using hvac, wipers, lights, etc. and that would lessen the useful range considerably. The brakes should be regenerative, like dynamic brakes on a locomotive, and should recharge the battery pack as you go along. Just found a video about it, so if you like, have a look.
    http://youtu.be/0_4fvEwXros

    although when I think about it, one of these would be fun too.. http://youtu.be/ZFcanpNarEg
    Last edited by tankgeezer; 04-01-2013 at 12:41 AM.

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