Türk porno yayini yapan http://www.smfairview.com ve http://www.idoproxy.com adli siteler rokettube videolarini da HD kalitede yayinlayacagini acikladi. Ayrica porno indir ozelligiyle de http://www.mysticinca.com adli porno sitesi devreye girdi.
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: It Never Snows in September: The German View of Market Garden...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Kutno, Poland
    Posts
    657

    Default It Never Snows in September: The German View of Market Garden...

    I've just started reading this one, and after some 90 pages I got to say it is a really interesting one, packed with witnesses stories and as mentioned in the title - from the German view.

    I'll post two examples:

    "[...]Here Major Oswald Finzel's 1st Battalion Fallschirmjäger Regiment 2 were being attacked by elements of XII Corps supporting GARDEN. A company messenger in Captain Ortmann's company, H. Sitter, vividly describes the scene as the 15th Scottish Infantry Division attacked their positions. His disjointed notes sent as a letter to Finzel after the war read like a series of film clips:
    'Railway embankment with a signalman's cabin which changed hands several times during the course of the day. You Finzel, occupied the battalion command post in a farmhouse. Suddenly a strong enemy attack, you were cut off. Captain Ortmann sent me to you as a messenger. Received machine gun fire en route, dashed for cover in a hedgerow, can't get any further. Range to the machine gun is approximately 20 metres, am under continuous fire. Then a German tank rolls by. I hope that it has got you out. Afterwards I see eight to ten paratroopers walking towards the machine gun nest with their hands up, followed by Tommies or Canadians. A brief halt, the machine gun swings around and shoots up all the prisoners. I am powerless, having lost my machine pistol when I dashed for cover to the hedgerow. It is lying a few metres away. I went to reach for it slowly, suddenly "Hands up!" [in English]. I think that's it. Another mortar barrage. My captors take cover. I get my machine pistol. Short bursts of fire, a few enemy less, including the machine gun nest. Able to report back to Ortmann and also report on the killing of the prisoners. Ortmann informs me that you have made it back.[...]" p. 88

    "[...]Richter's Kampfgruppe reached Budel in the late afternoon. 1st and 2nd Companies secured the village entry points, and 3rd
    Company, little more than a platoon strong, established itself as a reserve jointly located with the command post in the centre of the village. Having been denied rest for 38 hours, observing the steady build-up of Allied strength in the bridgehead, and exhausted and dismayed by their sudden retreat, all ranks snatched what rest they could. This lasted well beyond midnight, until suddenly, at 0430, four English tanks accompanied by infantry roared into the centre of the village, having slipped past the dozing security outposts. Fifteen other tanks bypassed the perimeter and took up positions on either side of the village. Tanks stood between the outlying companies and the command post and reserve. They were trapped. Machine guns and main tank armaments covered all the exit routes. There appeared to be no route out. SS-Lieutenant Heinz Damaske, Richter's adjutant, described the ensuing rout:
    'Enemy night raids in such strength had until now been the exception rather than the rule. After the initial panic caused by the tank-shock "Willy's" desire to survive quickly surfaced. The commander and his adjutant as well as the signallers demonstrated by example how to destroy four Sherman tanks in close combat. The battalion was then able, albeit with heavy losses, to flee between and through houses, over walls and through hedges and gardens eastwards clear of Budel. This withdrawal in contact, which had to be conducted without anti-tank cover, lasted until 0930 the following day.[...]" p. 85

    And here's my question: anybody knows what was the British unit that got involved in Budel village?

    source: "It Never Snows in September: The German View of Market-Garden and the Battle of Arnhem September 1944" by Robert J. Kershaw

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Aachen/Aken/Aix-la-Chapelle
    Posts
    2,966

    Default Re: It Never Snows in September: The German View of Market Garden...

    A book with a fine reputation which is certainly on my wish list - unfortunately it's not particularly cheap...
    "I just ran out of ammo. I will ram this one. Good bye, we'll meet in Valhalla." - Major Heinrich Ehrler, April 4, 1945

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    357

    Default Re: It Never Snows in September: The German View of Market Garden...

    From £3.28 (Used) and £5.04 (New) Paperback on Amazon FTG.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Aachen/Aken/Aix-la-Chapelle
    Posts
    2,966

    Default Re: It Never Snows in September: The German View of Market Garden...

    Being a lazy bugger I'd prefer the German version. Right now there's a copy available on German Ebay for about 80 Euro...
    "I just ran out of ammo. I will ram this one. Good bye, we'll meet in Valhalla." - Major Heinrich Ehrler, April 4, 1945

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Kutno, Poland
    Posts
    657

    Default Re: It Never Snows in September: The German View of Market Garden...

    Finished yesterday.
    I got to say, the book is really impressive. It is really based on German momoirs, after action reports, letters and first hand testimonies.
    Personally, when I'm reading a historic book, I get bored after few pages of facts, dates, etc. This one is different. It is nicely ballanced, with plenty of tiny details which give you at least a vivid picture of what was going on in September 1944 in Holland. Few really detailed maps and drawings together with arieal reconnaissance photos allow to easily follow the proggress of the operation.
    It was also interesting because gave a new perespective towards the reasons of German victory, turning attention to German ability to reorganise and deploy units which couple days before were in full retreat, demoralised, unequipped and lacking manpower.

    Especially interesting were descriptions of attempt of breaking through the German lines towards the Arnhem bridge taken by 1st and 3rd PARA. Personally, I was not aware how drammatic and bloody it was.
    And of course, as a Pole, I was quite happy to read about Polish 1st Independent Para Brigade - from the German point of view. In one case I was pretty surprised.
    One SS veteran described his anger that Poles didn't respect "civilised rules of engagement" (allowing the medics to attend the wounded, not shooting wounded in no-man's land, etc.). It was happening in September 1944 when Warsaw was burning, thousands of polish civilians were butchered by the SS, and millions already murdered after years of occupation. And he was angry with them.

    So, I strongly reccomend this one. It is not one of those memoirs of "brave German" which are nothing more than paeans of Nazi military might, full of some concealed neo-Nazi crap, but a really good analysis of military operation from a different point of view.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Aachen/Aken/Aix-la-Chapelle
    Posts
    2,966

    Default Re: It Never Snows in September: The German View of Market Garden...

    I just managed to snatch a copy on German ebay for about 8 Euro . A real bargain buy! Can't wait to have it in my mail box.
    I am now the happy owner of "It never snows in september", "A Bridge too far" by Cornelius Ryan and "In the Firestorm of the Last Year of the War" by Wilhelm Tieke...means, I now got the "Market Garden" topic literarily covered.
    "I just ran out of ammo. I will ram this one. Good bye, we'll meet in Valhalla." - Major Heinrich Ehrler, April 4, 1945

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Ireland
    Posts
    357

    Default Re: It Never Snows in September: The German View of Market Garden...

    Quote Originally Posted by flamethrowerguy View Post
    I just managed to snatch a copy on German ebay for about 8 Euro . A real bargain buy! Can't wait to have it in my mail box.
    I am now the happy owner of "It never snows in september", "A Bridge too far" by Cornelius Ryan and "In the Firestorm of the Last Year of the War" by Wilhelm Tieke...means, I now got the "Market Garden" topic literarily covered.
    Considering the last price you saw was €80 I would say €8 is certainly a bargain

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Aachen/Aken/Aix-la-Chapelle
    Posts
    2,966

    Default Re: It Never Snows in September: The German View of Market Garden...

    Quote Originally Posted by downwithpeace View Post
    Considering the last price you saw was €80 I would say €8 is certainly a bargain
    Yup, the 80€ offer is still available though (who would've thought...):
    http://www.ebay.de/itm/Arnheim-44-Se...item25681cdb19

    I got the book in the mail today. After thumping through it I have to say it indeed looks most promising.
    Last edited by flamethrowerguy; 02-21-2012 at 04:03 PM.
    "I just ran out of ammo. I will ram this one. Good bye, we'll meet in Valhalla." - Major Heinrich Ehrler, April 4, 1945

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •