Türk porno yayini yapan http://www.smfairview.com ve http://www.idoproxy.com adli siteler rokettube videolarini da HD kalitede yayinlayacagini acikladi. Ayrica porno indir ozelligiyle de http://www.mysticinca.com adli porno sitesi devreye girdi.
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 18 of 18

Thread: 1941: Masquerade in Ukraine..

  1. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Southern Russia , Krasnodar
    Posts
    4,077

    Default Re: 1941: Masquerade in Ukraine..

    Quote Originally Posted by flamethrowerguy View Post
    The German Federal Archives (Bundesarchiv) offers some beautiful color photos of such an event (it was indeed not only done to welcome high-level Nazis etc.). Near Poltava, summer 1941:
    Poltava is a Central Ukraine there were never Nazis-greeting parades.Therefore the Nazis bosses didn't go there a often. Civil peoples meet the Wermacht mostly friendly (at least until the SS-troops arrived and first ethnic clearings and "anti-partisanen actions" began). Such a rural scenes were common also for the Middle and Southern Russia. My gramma told me in my native city of Tichoreck ( Krasnodar area) Germans had arrived in end of1942, but in mid 1943 they abandoned ,be folowed to the general withdraw from Caucaus.She told me that ordinary germans soldiers were enough neutral, however the local puppet Police started immediatelly the tortures and killings of former Soviet officials like the Chairman of local collective farm and members of Comunist party.Some traitor has discovered them to a germans administration. Later the traitor has been hanged by NKVD.

    "I decide who is a Jew and who is an Aryan "- Hermann Goering

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Wroclaw, Poland, EU
    Posts
    5

    Default Re: 1941: Masquerade in Ukraine..

    Quote Originally Posted by Rising Sun* View Post
    I don't know anything about the different groups in the Ukraine.

    Some obviously supported the Nazis, which wasn't surprising at the time as there were fascist movements all over Europe and even in America and Britain.

    But what were the ethnic differences?

    Was it a bit like Yugoslavia when it collapsed after Tito into civil, ethnic and religious wars? Not unlike Yugoslavia during WWII in some equally vile and violent respects.
    Dear Rising Sun,
    after the I World War Poland was a very multiethnic and multicultural state, unlike today.
    The Polish state before 1939 had very different borders than it has now after the 2 World War.
    Large parts of what is now Ukraine, Lithuanaia and Beloruss were parts of its territory.
    Please look at the articles about the Polish National Census of 1931 on Wikipedia,
    and the map of the mother tongues of its citizens (1937):
    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Poland1937linguistic.jpg

    Conflicts were plenty, as You say "civil, ethnic and religious" but also economic.
    (Polish nobles sine times of the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth had more land and wealth than lets say their Ukrainian neighbours).
    All those conflicts lead to genocide and reprisal killings during the war just like in the former Yugoslavia.
    The biggest of those from the Polish perspective were the massacres of Poles in Volhynia.
    Arguably the uninational character of Poland after the war may be the only good thing that came out of it for the Poles.
    I can very well see Poland taking the Yugoslavian road in the east after the collapse of the USSR in the early 90's had it not occurred.
    But it also saddens me that we lost a lost the multicultural and ethnic aspect of my country and as some Germanas we
    Poles also have a lot of sentiment for the former Polish lands in the east.
    (I'm actually departing today for a whole week to Lviv [Ukraine] as a turist as part of my vacation, just like the Germans who come here to Wroclaw [former German city name Breslau]).

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    87

    Default Re: 1941: Masquerade in Ukraine..

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim.D View Post

    Arguably the uninational character of Poland after the war may be the only good thing that came out of it for the Poles.
    Looking at our history from a distance, yes, we could say that that was the best thing to come out of World War II, but let us not forget that the war gave us forty-four years of Communism, a glaring fact we won't easily forget.


    Poles also have a lot of sentiment for the former Polish lands in the east.
    (I'm actually departing today for a whole week to Lviv [Ukraine] as a turist as part of my vacation, just like the Germans who come here to Wroclaw [former German city name Breslau]).
    Yes, I agree. We have a great fondness for Lviv and Vilnius, both cities we lost to the Ukrainians and Lithuanians. I tend to think of my relatives who used to live there in Lviv, and that attractive Ukrainian girl I used to, well, um, smooch in the woods.

    In September, I'm planning on going back to Poland. Hopefully I'll find everything to my liking but, as is often the case with people who have come back to their mother country after a long exile, I'll probably not even recognize my own town. 64 years is a long time, and things change everyday over there. I'll be lucky if I even recognize some street signs.
    Last edited by Kregs; 04-24-2011 at 11:07 PM.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •