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32Bravo
09-24-2009, 02:16 PM
Went along for a dancing lesson yesterday evening. Turned out to be the Argentine Tango. Piece of cake really. It looked complicated, but once you get the idea of how to do it, it's really quite simple (figures really :lol:). I guess anyone who has spent endless hours on a drill square and marching to a band should pick it up easily. :lol:

I wonder if P.K. can dance it - probably not! :lol:

herman2
09-24-2009, 04:06 PM
I took Salsa lessons some time ago and the instructor told us that salsa , tango etc, was a dance invented at the brothels near the Argentina Wharfs where women would dance sultry on the piers to attract the sailors. I don't know if thats true or not but the instructor was Argentinian.

Panzerknacker
09-24-2009, 08:04 PM
I wonder if P.K. can dance it - probably not! :lol:

I never liked really

Let face it...the main reason for a man to dance is to pick up girls, fortunately I can do it in other ways. :rolleyes:

http://i35.tinypic.com/2rz4cn8.jpg

Rising Sun*
09-24-2009, 10:12 PM
I never liked really

Let face it...the main reason for a man to dance is to pick up girls, fortunately I can do it in other ways. :rolleyes:

http://i35.tinypic.com/2rz4cn8.jpg


Which one is you? ;) :D

Panzerknacker
09-25-2009, 12:08 AM
Well, the one I am by now look very much like the girl in the left. :mrgreen:

32Bravo
09-25-2009, 03:56 AM
I never liked really

A weapon training instructor of mine - a million years ago - once commented to one of me marra, that we usually don't like things which we are afraid of or can't do.



Let face it...the main reason for a man to dance is to pick up girls, fortunately I can do it in other ways. :rolleyes:

http://i35.tinypic.com/2rz4cn8.jpg

In your dreams, no dubt! :lol:

32Bravo
09-25-2009, 03:57 AM
I took Salsa lessons some time ago and the instructor told us that salsa , tango etc, was a dance invented at the brothels near the Argentina Wharfs where women would dance sultry on the piers to attract the sailors. I don't know if thats true or not but the instructor was Argentinian.

There's probably some truth in that...thought Salsa was Cuban?

herman2
09-25-2009, 08:59 AM
www.gardelweb.com/tango_history.htm

Originally, the tango dance developed as an "acting out" of the relationship between the prostitute and her pimp.

32Bravo
09-25-2009, 01:43 PM
That makes a lot of sense. The strutting pimp and the pliable woman.

Check out Al Pacino as a blind guy in 'Scent of a Woman'

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBHhSVJ_S6A

The instructors gave us a demonstration in my class, and they both had their eyes closed throughout.


But this probably best demonstrates your point:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cFeAwZslAHY&feature=related

Panzerknacker
09-25-2009, 06:42 PM
A weapon training instructor of mine - a million years ago - once commented to one of me marra, that we usually don't like things which we are afraid of or can't do.



Probably so, but again I did not enjoy it a lot, the same with fish I really dont like it.


In your dreams, no dubt! :lol:

Ah...believe it or not I had date better looking girls, briefly that is true, but with enough time to...;) Actually with the quantity and quality of girls around here is not such achievement.

Is quite logic that a limited budget,middle aged playboy like you choose tango, is a very sexy dance. Nevertheless I must say this, you weirdy humoristic, overcharged and doubtful witty approach might, might not be very welcomed outside the islands. I say this if you are planing a trip for the southern territories. The girls might not understand you very well.

32Bravo
09-26-2009, 06:13 AM
Ah...believe it or not I had date better looking girls, briefly that is true, but with enough time to...;)

Look kind of average to me - no great shakes - as they say. Then again, if one is acustomed to sardines...
...personally, I prefer caviar.



Actually with the quantity and quality of girls around here is not such achievement.

Desperate, hey? :lol:




Is quite logic that a limited budget,middle aged playboy like you choose tango, is a very sexy dance. Nevertheless I must say this, you weirdy humoristic, overcharged and doubtful witty approach might, might not be very welcomed outside the islands. I say this if you are planing a trip for the southern territories. The girls might not understand you very well.

Sound advice, to those that need it. :lol:

Panzerknacker
09-26-2009, 09:36 AM
Desperate, hey?


Maybe, but for social relations it feels the same. :)



Sound advice, to those that need it.


Oh, take it just as a friendly advice, I dont want you be puzzling girls around argieland instead pick them up.


....now I am thinking about, does the argie girls need to be picked by a guy like you ?....interesting question. probably it would do no harm, I know worst characters paired with very good looking women.

http://rlv.zcache.com/argentinian_girls_tshirt-p235629995925759605qqsy_400.jpg

32Bravo
09-26-2009, 10:22 AM
Very good! :lol:

32Bravo
10-01-2009, 02:12 AM
Another fabulous evening on the dance floor. Although, I must confess, it was sometimes reminiscent of being a sprog on the drill square. :lol:

Chevan
10-01-2009, 08:09 AM
Went along for a dancing lesson yesterday evening. Turned out to be the Argentine Tango. Piece of cake really. :
Piece of sh...t really:)Why does the man need to dance?
If you have a lot of free evening time - lets go to sport room or play football.Usialy it does help:)To me at least.

Chevan
10-01-2009, 08:15 AM
Well, the one I am by now look very much like the girl in the left. :mrgreen:
Do you really migh to pick up only the 14 years girl?

32Bravo
10-01-2009, 12:09 PM
Piece of sh...t really:)Why does the man need to dance?
Clear, concise and to the point. :)



If you have a lot of free evening time - lets go to sport room or play football.Usialy it does help:)To me at least.


You are such a chap, Chevan!

I suppose you believe that the only time women are aloud out of the bedroom is to go to the kitchen - or would that be the other way around? :lol:

I like to try different things before I reach a time that I'm no longer able to do them. :)

If I do something, I like to do it well.

The Tango may be described as a sexy dance, but when performed well, it is so much more. It allows a chap to display a little finesse, and the ladies like a masterful chap. :)

Nothing wrong with the gym and sports either, like to perform well there also. :cool:

Panzerknacker
10-01-2009, 06:12 PM
Shooting and hunting, those are manly activities, but tango is ok since in UK you can hardly do the earlier ones.



Do you really migh to pick up only the 14 years girl?


She got nothing that young, believe me. :mrgreen:



The Tango may be described as a sexy dance, but when performed well, it is so much more. It allows a chap to display a little finesse, and the ladies like a masterful chap. :)

Nothing wrong with the gym and sports either, like to perform well there also


Do you have an indigenous teacher or an argentine one ?

32Bravo
10-02-2009, 02:19 AM
Do you have an indigenous teacher or an argentine one ?

Yes, he's from Buenos Aires, a professional teacher and a very nice chap as it happens.


Silly of you to ridicule the standard of the dance in the UK. When you don't know what the standard is here and you can't do the dance anyway.

Panzerknacker
10-02-2009, 10:01 AM
Do I did ...what ?
Relax Bravo, I just asked the nationality of the teacher for simple curiosity.

32Bravo
10-02-2009, 12:00 PM
Do I did ...what ?
Relax Bravo, I just asked the nationality of the teacher for simple curiosity.

I'm totally relaxed, old chap.

32Bravo
10-03-2009, 05:11 AM
For those of you who might have some interest in this thread beyond the incidental and puerile bickering between P.K. and myself, I feel compelled to say that if for no other reason I am pleased to have taken up this activity as it has introduced me to a style of music that, hitherto, I was completely unaware of.

As I have previously mentioned, if I'm going to do something, I like to do it well. So, I took myself off to the music shop and purchased a set of three C.D.'s. The shop held two sets of three, but I figured one set to be suffiecient for the time being.

On the case it states: Argentinian Tango originated in the poor districts of Buenos Aires at the end of the nineteenth century, but quickly became one of the world's most popular dance styles.

"That'll do!" methinks.
However, if I had read on I would have noticed that this was a compilation of what has become dubbed as electro-tango in Argentina. These include sounds such as: Tango Chill; Tango Bar and Tango Club.

Happily, for me that is, I rather like this new sound and am particularly taken with Tango Chill. On one of the C.D.'s one or two tracks become a little monotonous. Mainly for two reasons: the first being that the songs are in foreign - but that in itself is not a reason for not listening, as one or two of the ladies have voices that are very easy on the ear; and, second, they can be simple and repetitive, which for simply listening I would not recommend. However, considering that it is intended to be dance music, it would be very suitable for that purpose.

So, my intention is to compile my own disc from the tracks that I favour, as I feel they are very suitable for long motor journeys through the night as well as incidental music when going about other indoor activities.

By the way. The other C.D. set in the shop contains more traditional tango music, and I will probably return there and purchase it at some point, but in the meantime, I would say I made a very fortuitous mistake in choosing this one. :)

Here's a sample (driving through the night - as I figured:) )

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBb0dS57xNM

Rising Sun*
10-03-2009, 06:17 AM
For those of you who might have some interest in this thread beyond the incidental and puerile bickering between P.K. and myself...

Well, it takes two to tango. :D

32Bravo
10-03-2009, 06:30 AM
Well, it takes two to tango. :D

:lol: :lol: :lol:

Panzerknacker
10-03-2009, 04:44 PM
Well, it takes two to tango.

Yup, unfortunately Bravo keep always scraping me with his beard everytime we dance togheter. :rolleyes:

In a serious note I might add that the tango world championship happen yearly and it have a fixed location, Buenos Aires.

Chevan
10-06-2009, 02:00 AM
Yup, unfortunately Bravo keep always scraping me with his beard everytime we dance togheter. :rolleyes:

Are you sure, it was his beard?:)
I mean the Bravo, claims he like the sexual context in tango:mrgreen:

32Bravo
10-06-2009, 03:52 AM
Are you sure, it was his beard?:)
I mean the Bravo, claims he like the sexual context in tango:mrgreen:

Did I?

I thought it was the artistry, poise and grace combined with the athletic context which attracted me to the dance, thus allowing my aging frame to remain nimble - I'm already sexy! :lol:

My facial hair has gone the way of that on the top of my head, I'm sorry to report. :(

32Bravo
10-06-2009, 03:57 AM
In a serious note I might add that the tango world championship happen yearly and it have a fixed location, Buenos Aires.

Like this?:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynjBJMVTNZs

I've been dancing with a lady from Macedonia. She likes to throw herself about like this:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CcNA_9ko04A&feature=related

but she hasn't acquired the skills, as yet, so she keeps wrapping herself about me...well, you know what these Slav women are like?

...Puts me off my step somewhat! :lol:

Panzerknacker
10-14-2009, 09:57 PM
MARADONA GOES TO SOUTH AFRIKA !!!!!

With a last gap goals ( two actually if we count the sunday one of Palermo) we go to African Wold Cup, ha. somehow he pull it off. :mrgreen:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/football/2009/oct/15/argentina-uruguay-diego-maradona-mario-bolatti

Sunday match

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8RL-kzC6L_w

Chinese comentators get grazy with palermos s goal

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0LGo1CKx_8Y

32Bravo
11-21-2009, 05:19 AM
It is ironic, don't you think, that the production of soya, in Argentina, mainly for export as cattle fodder to Europe and China, has led to the decline of the cattle industry in Argentina itself. Furthermore, it has led to many social problems with the impoverishment of the traditional, agricultural community.



IV. The Rural Exodus and the Growth of Poverty

In 1992, the Argentine government proclaimed that 200,000 producers would have to quit farming because units smaller than 200 hectares were deemed to run at a loss. Small farmers have found it extremely difficult to compete under the economic conditions in the country and the arrival of RR soya has increased the pressure. Small farmers cannot afford the massive machines used for direct drilling and direct drilling and large scale spraying require little manual labour, so many people have sold or rented their land and left, together with workless farm labourers for slums in the cities. Others have been driven out due to threats and violence. "Sowing pools", powerful investor groups that have replaced contractors and brought in their own employees to grow soya, are farming large areas of land.

The export model exemplified by soya seriously threatens food sovereignty in Argentina. The Argentine diet used to include plenty of cheap meat, dairy produce, lentils, beans and other vegetables. Mixed farming, with animals and crops in rotation, provided good yields but received no support from the government. In recent years, soya has replaced the production of food staples, which are now being imported. This has led to higher food prices for the population. In fifteen years Argentine dairy farms decreased by 50%, from 30,000 in 1988 to 15,000 in 2003. Milk is now being imported from Uruguay at a higher price.

The population of Argentina is predominantly urban, so the rural crisis has long remained invisible. Nobody believed there could be hunger in a country that produced so much food. However, economic instability, public sector reform, wage cuts, the dismantling of national industries, replacing national food crops with RR soya for export and the rural exodus have all had disastrous consequences for ordinary Argentineans.In 1970, 5% of the population were below the poverty line, in 1980 12%, in 1998, 30% and in 2002 51%. Malnutrition among infants is estimated to be somewhere between 11% and 17%, and rising.

In some regions, RR soya is exacerbating old injustices. In the nineteenth century the region of Santiago del Estero supplied the rest of the country with agricultural products. The beginning of the twentieth century saw the massive extraction of timber to make more than 20 million sleepers for the new railway system. Much of the mobile labour force that carried out this work settled on the land afterwards. Argentine law says that if people settle on a piece of land for 20 years it becomes theirs, but the legal process of proof is complex. This has been the case in the province of Santiago del Estero, an area that has long been subject to almost feudal rule, with rampant deforestation and the concentration of land in the hands of the few. In this part of the country and coinciding with the emergence of the soya boom, strangers began to approach long-established peasant communities, claiming to own their land. If they refused to leave, armed groups would steal their cattle, burn their crops and threaten them with violence. Once traditional communities like these are dislodged, the situation becomes irreversible. To counteract this phenomenon, a peasant organisation called the Santiago del Estero Farmers' Movement (MOCASE – Movimiento Campesino de Santiago del Estero) has been formed to defend the rights of local people. So far, they have had some successes. Nevertheless, the lure of profits from RR soya is the latest and most serious threat to their livelihoods.

http://www.econexus.info/pdf/ENx-Argentina_GE_soya_Sum.html

Panzerknacker
11-22-2009, 10:37 PM
True in parth, but the soya has brought an period of unequalled growth in the period 2003-2007 for the producers, the people working for the producers and for the construction business, today you can see new cars ( some of them very pricey) a new houses/apartaments everywhere.
After all soyabean and sunflowers export was the thing wich rescued Argentina from a very bad economical crissis of 2001-02.



If they refused to leave, armed groups would steal their cattle, burn their crops and threaten them with violence. Once traditional communities like these are dislodged, the situation becomes irreversible. To counteract this phenomenon, a peasant organisation called the Santiago del Estero Farmers' Movement (MOCASE – Movimiento Campesino de Santiago del Estero) has been formed to defend the rights of local people. So far, they have had some successes. Nevertheless, the lure of profits from RR soya is the latest and most serious threat to their livelihoods.


Well, this part ( armed violence) is kind of invention, we are not Brazil in wich the estancia owners imposess its own at shotgun point ( remember incidents like the Chico mendes case), I dont remember any of this in the past years. I do now however that there were several trials in wich people has been legally expelled from their ( supposedly their) land by bigger fatter landowers.

Today the Goverment keeps 34,5 % of the dollars of the export of Soyabean. ( a big, BIG amount of money) teorically to deter the expansion of the cultive...at the same time the Govt in this way had made himself very dependant of it .
I think the big problem with soyabean is the exhaustion of the land, after the harvest only thing you can see is a dusty path of land.

Probably the most balance solution would be a law regulating a proper rotation of the cultives, combining soya with wheat, sunflower, linseed, etc.


Milk is now being imported from Uruguay at a higher price.

Milk as far I now (reading the labels in my fridge) is still coming from our sacred land. However the low ( at list low from the producers point of view) prices thing is always a trouble.

32Bravo
11-24-2009, 03:59 AM
From my point of view, the main problem with soya, is that it is being cultivated to produce bio-fuels. The mad thing about this is that, in the main, and probably not the case in Argentina, they soya producing companies are reducing the rain-forests in order to make way for cultivation. How can that be ecologically sound?

Generally speaking, I think it a sad situation when people are displaced from their traditional ways of life to make way for, so-called, progress. Usually because someone wants to make a fast buck rather than there being any real benefits to the population as a whole.

Having read other reports regarding the cattle industry in Argentina, a very large country, the industry apears to be thriving in other areas, so, perhaps the picture for the country as a whole isn't quite so glum.

Panzerknacker
11-25-2009, 06:52 PM
Could be in a small pecentage, I know of first hand ( one of my uncles work for the AFA, federation of argentines farmers) and he told me most of teh soyabean go to asiatic countries for making animal food. other part go to make lecitine, an aditive for candies and other sweets.



Generally speaking, I think it a sad situation when people are displaced from their traditional ways of life to make way for, so-called, progress. Usually because someone wants to make a fast buck rather than there being any real benefits to the population as a whole.



Agreed, soya reason of being is fast buck. In spite of being one of the less complicated cultives is still the best priced.



Having read other reports regarding the cattle industry in Argentina, a very large country, the industry apears to be thriving in other areas, so, perhaps the picture for the country as a whole isn't quite so glum.


definately is not, however I should tell you a little secret...in spite of the popular images of infinite grass field along our country there are plenty of desertic plains too, completely unsuitable for other thing that goat of lamb. Fortunately the desert can cooperate to make another fine product, wine.

http://www.rocinantestravels.com/pan-am/part18/Ruta-40-1-6930.jpg