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pdf27
09-13-2009, 04:24 AM
Just for fun, I'm going to start a topic of riddles/semi-cryptic clues. Whoever gets one provides the clue to the next.

So, name the following aircraft:

Hungry sea-bird carried aloft by a pair of snakes

The Colonel
10-10-2009, 05:08 PM
Hi PDF27,
In reply to your riddle. Would it be the DeHavilland DH.95 Flamingo? Regards.

pdf27
10-11-2009, 01:43 AM
Last I checked, Perseus wasn't a snake ;)
Right country though, and I should probably give you the hint that this is actually a postwar aircraft - if you stick to WW2 ones only they end up too obscure and this gets too hard.

The Colonel
10-11-2009, 04:40 PM
Hi PDF27,
The reason I thought of the Perseus engines is, as you know, Perseus was the person that slew the Gorgon in greek mythology. Hence Gorgon = snakes. Thanks for the next clue. Still looking.

The Colonel
10-11-2009, 04:51 PM
Hi PDF27,
Fingers crossed ...Fairey Gannet powered by the 'Double Mamba' powerplant?

pdf27
10-12-2009, 01:40 AM
Yep, that's the one! Twin Mamba was just what it says on the tin - a pair of Armstrong Siddeley Mamba turboprops driving a common shaft, and in UK parlance at least someone eating everything they can get their hands on can be described as a Gannet.

Your turn!

The Colonel
10-12-2009, 04:56 AM
OK here's my offering...

You can hear it screaming on the wind,
I'ts there - and then it's not.....
For forty percent of man's history of flight, this aircraft is still rather hot!

This most widely produced ageing 'Old man'
was a 'spectre', it proudly can boast,
For those who flew it a 'superb beast', To the enemy simply a 'Ghost'.

pdf27
10-12-2009, 05:38 AM
F4 Phantom/F-110 Spectre? That's 50% rather than 40% though....

navyson
10-12-2009, 06:40 AM
SR-71 Blackbird?

The Colonel
10-12-2009, 01:05 PM
Hi PDF27,
Well done, Sir. It is indeed the F4 'Phantom.' Commiserations Navyson. Better luck next time! Apparently that was far too easy, will try better next time!!!! PDF27 you have the con. Regards...

pdf27
10-12-2009, 02:18 PM
Well, putting the original name* in the riddle made it rather easy...

Next one:
After a rocky start, this aircraft went on to give birth to a mighty hunter

*The air force version was named the F-110 Spectre, until MacNamara made rather more of an *** of himself than usual by insisting that since the Air Force and Navy were developing two virtually identical aircraft (the F-110 Spectre and F4 Phantom) one project should be cut and the two services should use the same aircraft.

The Colonel
10-12-2009, 05:35 PM
Hawker Sea Hawk/Hawker P.1052

pdf27
10-13-2009, 01:41 AM
Nope, not even close

pdf27
10-14-2009, 07:57 AM
Time for a clue: The mighty hunter in question is still in service today...

pdf27
10-24-2009, 02:48 AM
OK, since nobody has got it, time for the answer.

The mighty hunter in question is the Nimrod, still in service with the RAF as a maritime patrol aircraft (Nimrod is a character in the bible, who is described as a mighty hunter).
The aircraft which gave birth to it is therefore the De Haviland Comet, which was in service with the RAF and RCAF for some years...

Uyraell
02-01-2010, 05:58 PM
This aircraft had three major redesigns, and several engine transplants, before becoming (for a short time at least) one of two very successful fighter designs in its' native country.

Uyraell
02-01-2010, 06:00 PM
This next aircraft, while not a fighter, had more than three redesigns, and more than three different engine designs/types grafted to it, each successfully.
It is still in service, in some parts of the world, and has rightly earned fame for it's longevity.

pdf27
02-02-2010, 01:31 AM
C-47/dc-3?

Uyraell
02-03-2010, 06:50 PM
Yes pdf27, if you're talking of post #17.:)

Your turn, my friend :)

pdf27
02-04-2010, 01:28 AM
Not time for a proper one this morning, so this should be an easy one...

"TSR-2 that was really TSR-1"

Uyraell
02-04-2010, 04:41 AM
Not time for a proper one this morning, so this should be an easy one...

"TSR-2 that was really TSR-1"

English Electric P17A.

pdf27
02-04-2010, 07:42 AM
Nope - you're thinking in the wrong direction...

Uyraell
02-05-2010, 03:33 PM
Nope - you're thinking in the wrong direction...

That leaves one other option, and a rare bird it is indeed, in fact, afaIk, only one remains, and that may not even have engines in place.

Bristol 188.

Was manufactured from stainless steel, and though officially a research test vehicle, it, or its' subsequent descendants were intended to fulfill a similar role to the TSR2.

Kind Regards pdf27, Uyraell.

pdf27
02-05-2010, 04:00 PM
Nope. Looks like you need a hint - there was more than one TSR.2!

Uyraell
02-06-2010, 07:10 AM
Which brings us to another research vehicle:

Fairey 92 (E, I think).

If so, That too is a rare bird.

Kind Regards pdf27, Uyraell.

pdf27
02-07-2010, 01:52 PM
You're still barking up the wrong forest, let alone the wrong tree. You've correctly identified the second TSR-2. Now go away and figure out what the first one is - and that's the answer to the riddle. As a further hint, in the one you are looking for, it does not stand for Tactical Strike & Reconnaissance.

Uyraell
02-07-2010, 11:53 PM
You're still barking up the wrong forest, let alone the wrong tree. You've correctly identified the second TSR-2. Now go away and figure out what the first one is - and that's the answer to the riddle. As a further hint, in the one you are looking for, it does not stand for Tactical Strike & Reconnaissance.

I must be getting old and slow.

The only other TSR I can think of right now is "Torpedo Strike Reconnaiscance"
Which puts us looking at the Westland Wyvern, Or possibly the DH Sea Hornet in short range configuration.

If I'm wrong this time, then I cede you the point.

Kind Regards pdf27, Uyraell.

pdf27
02-08-2010, 01:27 AM
You're getting there - it was "Torpedo Spotter Reconnaissance" - "Strike" in UK parlance has a specifically nuclear connotation.

Uyraell
02-10-2010, 01:12 AM
I'm left with the venerable Fairey Swordfish. :D

Very neatly done, pdf27. :)

I'll wait to see if I got it correct, this time.

Regarding "Strike", it was my understanding that the nuclear connotation came to be employed only in the 1960's, whereas during WW2 it was used to denote a rapid attack by torpedo-carrying aircraft. I admit, I may be in error about that, however.

Kind Regards, Uyraell.

pdf27
02-10-2010, 02:12 AM
Correct - the Fairey Swordfish was indeed the TSR.2, and while there was presumably a TSR.1 I've never heard of it. Quite why this is less famous than that failed 1960s jet I'll never know, particularly on a WW2 forum ;)

Uyraell
02-11-2010, 04:01 PM
From reading the Swordfish info, it appears the preceding prototype may have been the "TSR1", or intended to be so.

This next birdy was very unusual, but yet flew surprisingly well, from accounts I have read.


Kind Regards, Uyraell.