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Egorka
08-12-2009, 03:36 AM
Who can crack this one? :)

Who, where, when?
Pay attention to the details. And to the white swastika on the tribune.

http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff124/sarmata_2007/Polishmountainunitmarchingonparade1.jpg
http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff124/sarmata_2007/Polishmountainunitmarchingonparade1.jpg

pdf27
08-12-2009, 07:40 AM
You might want to rename the file and crop the image to remove the name and flag on the building if you want this to actually be a difficult contest!

Nickdfresh
08-12-2009, 08:04 AM
You might want to rename the file and crop the image to remove the name and flag on the building if you want this to actually be a difficult contest!



:lol:

And I might even guessed without them. At least on the third or fourth try...

Egorka
08-12-2009, 12:38 PM
Well, I was hoping the white swastika would confuse everyone. :)

Nickdfresh
08-13-2009, 05:59 PM
Is there any date on the photo? I imagine it's obviously sometime in the 1930s prior to the outbreak of War...

Egorka
08-14-2009, 02:11 AM
Is there any date on the photo? I imagine it's obviously sometime in the 1930s prior to the outbreak of War...It is atributed to 1936.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountain_warfare#Poland
Podhale rifles (Polish: Strzelcy podhalańscy) is a traditional name of the mountain infantry units of the Polish Army. Formed in 1918 out of volunteers of the region of Podhale, in 1919 the smaller detachments of Podhale rifles were pressed into two mountain infantry divisions, the 21st Mountain Infantry and 22nd Mountain Infantry Divisions, as well as into three brigades of mountain infantry. Considered an elite of the Polish Army, the units were roughly equivalent to the German Gebirgsjäger troops.

THis photo can be found here: http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/2_Pu%C5%82k_Strzelc%C3%B3w_Podhala%C5%84skich

wingsofwrath
10-31-2009, 03:30 AM
Heh. Even without the flag and file name, it's painfully obvious these guys are polish Mountaineers - just look at those ornate collar patches!

Tiger205
03-05-2010, 04:49 AM
Maybe we can start again????

Start with an easy one....
Where this guy is from?
TGR

http://img0.tar.hu/tiger205/size2/73117063.jpg

navyson
04-12-2010, 08:30 AM
I'd say Canada.

Tiger205
04-12-2010, 05:15 PM
I'd say Canada.

Sorry to say no!
Let you study the details of the soldier (weaponS for example!!!)
:)
TGR

Rising Sun*
04-13-2010, 06:35 AM
37 pattern basic pouch but not 37 pattern bayonet. More like a kukri.

So it's a Gurkha, from Nepal.

The terrain and vegetation looks more Mediterranean than Asian, plus he's not wearing tropical uniform, so I'd hazard a guess he's in Italy. Possibly Monte Cassino.

Tiger205
04-13-2010, 09:31 AM
Well Done Rising Sun!

Congrat!
Your turn!

Rising Sun*
04-13-2010, 09:57 AM
Well Done Rising Sun!

Congrat!
Your turn!

Thanks.

Was it Italy?


Here's my quiz.

http://img405.imageshack.us/img405/8489/mysteryp.jpg

Tiger205
04-15-2010, 05:18 PM
Papua New Guiena?
Cape Endaiadere area?
Dec. 1942?
American/Aussie casualties?
To be moved to the rear by the so called "FUZZY WUZZY" natives?

Rising Sun*
04-16-2010, 08:07 AM
Papua New Guiena?
Cape Endaiadere area?
Dec. 1942?
American/Aussie casualties?
To be moved to the rear by the so called "FUZZY WUZZY" natives?

That's about as close as you're going to get.

Well done, on something that is little known in most of the world, and probably virtually unknown in Hungary and most of Europe.

The picture's details aren't too certain, apart from being Fuzzy Wuzzy Angels with Australian wounded in Papua New Guinea. http://www.diggerhistory.info/pages-conflicts-periods/ww2/pages-2aif-cmf/fuzzy-wuzzy.htm

Naturally, the Australian government treated them like shit after the war was over, but the soldiers who served with them retained a great affection for them and thought they deserved better.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/07/24/2635119.htm
http://au.todaytonight.yahoo.com/article/5521214/general/fuzzy-wuzzy-angels-forgotten-heroes

Then again, the Australian government treated its own returned servicemen rather poorly after the war, so at least there is a degree of consistency there.

Your turn.

Tiger205
04-18-2010, 05:43 AM
Thanks a lot,
I am not an average Hungarian, one of my favourite author at my teenager era was Eric Lambert for example (this is an origin of my interest) :army::lol:

So, a very easy one now: who are this cavalrymen?

http://img0.tar.hu/tiger205/size2/74614352.jpg

Rising Sun*
04-18-2010, 07:38 AM
Cossacks or Kalmucks in the Germany army.

No idea which. Both formed separate units but were united in Croatia later in the war.

In a quiz I'd usually go for the lesser known and say they're Kalmucks, except you say it's an easy one so I'll go for the Cossacks.

Tiger205
04-24-2010, 05:03 PM
Well Done!

Sorry for the late response!
Cossacks in the SS Cossack Corps (!)

Your turn!

Rising Sun*
04-26-2010, 09:18 AM
Well Done!

Sorry for the late response!
Cossacks in the SS Cossack Corps (!)

Your turn!

Thanks.

I'd actually forgotten I'd posted in this thread.

Next quiz.


http://img710.imageshack.us/img710/4426/mysteryw.jpg

Librarian
04-26-2010, 09:59 AM
The Air Transport Auxiliary's No. 5 Ferry Pilot's Pool Women's section based at Hatfield, Berkshire.

Mrs. Pauline Gower is right behind the engine nacelle.

Additional information is available here:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-481464/Silk-stocking-Spitfires-The-dark-reality-girls-flew-dangerous-wartime-missions.html

Rising Sun*
04-26-2010, 07:03 PM
The Air Transport Auxiliary's No. 5 Ferry Pilot's Pool Women's section based at Hatfield, Berkshire.

Mrs. Pauline Gower is right behind the engine nacelle.

Additional information is available here:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-481464/Silk-stocking-Spitfires-The-dark-reality-girls-flew-dangerous-wartime-missions.html

110% correct.

Your turn.

Librarian
04-27-2010, 03:42 AM
Thank you very much, my esteemed colleague. You know, that was not extraordinarily difficult – if truth is to be said, those completely visible ATA-wings were quite helpful. :)

And now – something completely different:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Untitled-1-1.jpg

Of course, our standard question still is the same: Who are these guys? ;)

Rising Sun*
04-27-2010, 06:25 AM
Of course, our standard question still is the same: Who are these guys? ;)

No idea at the moment, but despite the apparent battlefield surroundings the creases in the American officer's trousers suggest he hasn't been living rough in the field, which makes me think the Germans under a flag of truce are approaching an American headquarters of some sort of at least battalion but more probably brigade (or US regiment) level or above where officers haven't been sleeping rough.

Librarian
04-27-2010, 07:18 AM
Excellent observation, my dear Mr. Rising Sun! As you know, lieutenant-colonels are representing a sufficiently high-ranking class of military personnel which is capable to shield itself from those sorrowful rigors of a grubby field-business and to take some breaths in relative comfort, enjoying all those blessings of simple military excessiveness. :)

Rising Sun*
04-27-2010, 08:17 AM
Excellent observation, my dear Mr. Rising Sun! As you know, lieutenant-colonels are representing a sufficiently high-ranking class of military personnel which is capable to shield itself from those sorrowful rigors of a grubby field-business and to take some breaths in relative comfort, enjoying all those blessings of simple military excessiveness. :)

Thank you for that, not least because I couldn't identify the American officer's rank.

A moderately expendable but sufficiently, in the circumstances, senior officer is most likely to be sent out to receive the truce party.

A lieutenant-colonel is not expendable in a battalion, given that he's commanding it.

Possibly expendable in a brigade / regiment.

Much more expendable at divisonal level.

Hugely expendable at corps or army level, but the picture doesn't suggest that.

Which brings us back to the question of the rank of the German officer, which I can't identify but which might indicate the level of the unit / formation he represents.

Is there some significance in the cane the American officer is carrying? Seems rather British in a way, except theirs tended to be shorter and carried with more elan. As perhaps the German officer might be doing, or maybe it's just the position of his hand. It doesn't appear to be a true walking stick as the American officer's grip is wrong for weight support.

The German officer appears to be wearing a gaiter rather than the boot which one might expect with jodphurs.

The other German could be very young and, even allowing for battle, poorly clothed.

All of which suggests to me that this in the closing stages of the war, which suggests in Germany.

Librarian
04-27-2010, 09:40 AM
Oh, always be aware of those completely nonexpendable divisional lieutenant-colonels, my dear Mr. Rising Sun - especially when they are carrying our some very sensitive, principally exceptional and intrinsically delicate assignments. ;)

After all – you will have a sufficient amount of majors on your disposal, and they will be completely adequate leaders for your battalions. On the other hand, talented, educated and well-mannered lieutenant-colonels are quite... sporadic military flowers, you know, and they must be preserved for some special tasks. For instance, functioning as mediators in sensitive bargains with German Generalleutnant along one of famous European rivers …

In those cases, sticks are very useful - and not only as symbols of special military status, but as well as very practical docking devices. :)

Rising Sun*
04-28-2010, 07:12 AM
Oh, always be aware of those completely nonexpendable divisional lieutenant-colonels, my dear Mr. Rising Sun - especially when they are carrying our some very sensitive, principally exceptional and intrinsically delicate assignments. ;)

After all – you will have a sufficient amount of majors on your disposal, and they will be completely adequate leaders for your battalions. On the other hand, talented, educated and well-mannered lieutenant-colonels are quite... sporadic military flowers, you know, and they must be preserved for some special tasks. For instance, functioning as mediators in sensitive bargains with German Generalleutnant along one of famous European rivers …

In those cases, sticks are very useful - and not only as symbols of special military status, but as well as very practical docking devices. :)

Thanks for the (somewhat cryptic) clues.

Would this have anything to do with surrender negotiations with Patton after he crossed the Rhine?

Librarian
04-28-2010, 09:38 AM
Bavardage obligé, mon cher Ami. Especially now, in early spring, when the orchards are covered with white flowers and have yet no grown leaves, while we are somehow inclined to pathetically compare ourselves to la Fontaine’s pigeon… In any case, what you got was the factual rank of the German officer. :)

And no, contrasting general Leland Stanford Hobbs, Patton was not connected with this case in any way. ;)

Rising Sun*
04-28-2010, 10:22 AM
Bavardage obligé, mon cher Ami. Especially now, in early spring, when the orchards are covered with white flowers and have yet no grown leaves, while we are somehow inclined to pathetically compare ourselves to la Fontaine’s pigeon… In any case, what you got was the factual rank of the German officer. :)

And no, contrasting general Leland Stanford Hobbs, Patton was not connected with this case in any way. ;)

Thanks again.

Somewhere around Brunswick?

Librarian
04-28-2010, 02:50 PM
No, actually that picture was taken in the vicinity of a lovely German town where Otto von Guericke became a mayor and also fruitfully disproved the famous hypothesis of "horror vacui". :)

Tiger205
04-28-2010, 03:05 PM
Magdeburg Hemispheres ?
Elbe river crossing?
March 1945?

Tiger205
04-28-2010, 03:14 PM
Kurt Dittmar?

"...Generalleutnant Dittmar surrendered to troops of the U.S. 30th Infantry Division after crossing the Elbe in a small boat near Magdeburg. During his time broadcasting communiqués from the front he became known as the “Voice of the German High Command.” A widely respected radio commentator, he drew a following not only in Germany but also among the Allied monitoring staff...."

BUT WHAT WAS THE STICK USED FOR?????

Tiger205
04-28-2010, 03:17 PM
http://img0.tar.hu/tiger205/size2/75075930.jpg

Capt. Abbes, Co. K, 117th with captured Lt. Gen. Kurt Dittmar.

Librarian
04-28-2010, 03:28 PM
Bravo, my dear Mr. Tiger 205 – Wednesday, 25. April 1945, Magdeburg – Biederitz: General Kurt Dittmar, his 16 years old son and US Liutenent-Colonel S. T. McDowel, all safe and sound after successfully finished negotiations. My sincerest congratulations – job well done! :)

And yes, I almost forgot that: stick is an excellent extension of human arm, very useful in docking operations and absolutely excellent for hoisting a flag. ;)

Tiger205
04-28-2010, 03:54 PM
So, Who are this guys (where are they came from?)

http://img0.tar.hu/tiger205/size2/75077021.jpg

Librarian
04-29-2010, 10:15 AM
Well, well, well… Quite interesting snapshot, my dear Mr. Tiger 205: Italian officers (one among them equipped with the Alpine Infantry Tyrolean style field cap) are carefully observing the good old Schwarzlose M 07/12 medium machine gun – weapon that was not the standard equipment of their own units, and that terrain looks like a mountainous one to me …

Not very much for the start, but we have to begin with something. Therefore allow me a question, my dear Mr. Tiger 205: is this picture somehow connected with the Italian forces in the Greek campaign? :)

Tiger205
04-29-2010, 10:19 AM
Dear Mr. Librarian,
"eagle-EYES" :) as always.
You are in a very good path, ITALIANS,and the Fauna & Flora is REALLY Greek.
Can you guess the nationality of the other parties???

Librarian
04-29-2010, 11:47 AM
Of course - Bulgarians! Bulgarian and Italian officers in Greece back there in 1941. Here is a direct link:

http://www.axishistory.com/fileadmin/user_upload/b/bg-it-officers.jpg

BTW – thank you for that truly magnificent compliment. You know, for a man with a highly accentuated myopia, who was even unable event to catch any trace of fauna on that snapshot, that really is a flattering remark. Once again - thank you very much. :D

Tiger205
04-30-2010, 03:38 AM
Well done, Congrat, it's your turn!

Librarian
04-30-2010, 01:59 PM
Thank you, my dear Mr. Tiger 205. So, here we go:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Untitled-6.jpg

Once again, our question is the same: who are these guys? :)

Tiger205
04-30-2010, 02:24 PM
The guy in left wears IMO the pre-war/early war soviet officer's uniform.

Librarian
05-05-2010, 12:51 PM
So sorry for my protracted silence, my dear Mr. Tiger 205. As usually, my professional obligations had been very demanding, but finally I do have some spare time on my disposal.

And yes – your observation is absolutely correct. Furthermore – that guy on the left got a rank of Lieutenant General back there in May of 1945. :)

Tiger205
05-06-2010, 08:12 AM
thanks,
i was out of the city too....
:)
What can we know about the "major" looking guy on the right?

Librarian
05-07-2010, 02:36 PM
Many things, my dear Mr. Tiger 205. For example, the fact that he actually served as a Senior Lieutenant of the artillery units in the Red Army. ;)