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Clave
04-18-2009, 03:50 PM
The American ones:

F4U-1A of VF-17 US Navy, circa 1944.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U1A_USA_VF17_1.png

F4U-1A of VF-17 US Navy, circa 1943.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U1A_USA_VF17_2.png

F4U-1A of VF-17 US Navy, circa 1944.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U1A_USA_VF17_3.png

F4U-1A of VF-17 US Navy, circa 1943.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U1A_USA_VF17_4.png

F4U-1A of VF-17 US Navy, circa 1944.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U1A_USA_VF17_5.png

F4U-1A of VMF-111 US Marine Corps, circa 1944.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U1A_USA_VMF111_1.png

F4U-1A of VMF-212 US Marine Corps, circa 1943.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U1A_USA_VMF212_1.png

F4U-1A of VMF-214 US Marine Corps, circa 1943.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U1A_USA_VMF214_1.png

Clave
04-18-2009, 03:51 PM
F4U-1A of VMF-214 US Marine Corps, circa 1943.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U1A_USA_VMF214_2.png

F4U-1A of VMF-217 US Marine Corps, circa 1944.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U1A_USA_VMF217_1.png

F4U-1D of VBF-10 US Marine Corps, circa 1945.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U1D_USA_VBF10_1.png

F4U-1D of VF-84 US Navy, circa 1945.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U1D_USA_VF84_1.png

F4U-4 of VF-783 US Navy, circa 1950.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U4_USA_VF783_1.png

This example is an F4U-4 of VMF-232 US Marine Corps, circa 1950.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U4_USA_VMF232_1.png

This example is an F4U-4B of VF-113 US Navy, circa 1950.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U4B_USA_VF113_1.png

F4U-4B of VMF-323 "Death Rattlers" US Marine Corps, circa 1950.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U4B_USA_VMF323_1.png

F4U-5 of VF-14 US Navy, circa 1953.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U5_USA_VF14_1.png

F4U-5NL of VMF-513 US Marine Corps, circa 1950.

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/chance_vought_f4u/F4U5NL_USA_VMF513_1.png

Churchill
04-18-2009, 10:23 PM
Nice! Glad you're showing more of your work here mate!

Clave
04-20-2009, 04:45 AM
Thank you :)

I tend to be running around like a BAF and forget all the places I belong too, but I will make an effort to post more I promise... :D

Orion_VP31
05-01-2009, 09:44 PM
Nice work!

Uyraell
05-02-2009, 03:06 AM
Beautiful work, as ever, Clave ! :D

I can say this, it is strange to sit in a Corsair, with one's posterior all of 11 feet off the ground: I sat in one in a museum here in NZ, a couple of decades ago.

Kind Regards, Uyraell.

Clave
05-03-2009, 05:21 PM
Thanks! :)

They had huge props I believe, which led to the whole 'bent wing' idea in the first place... I can't image what a nightmare they would be for take-off and landing, with that massive nose and the torque-effect from that prop... :shock:

Uyraell
05-05-2009, 12:49 AM
From memory, the prop on a Corsair is 13 foot 1 and 1|2 inches in diameter, compared to 11 ft 10 and 5|8ths of an inch on a Thunderbolt.
This makes the Corsair prop one of the largest to enter service for single-seaters.

Regards, Uyraell.

Uyraell
05-05-2009, 07:59 AM
Additional thought regarding my last post:
There *would have been* huge torque-effect from the crankshaft and prop on the Corsair had it not been for one little design curiosity.

The vertical fin is actually offset at an angle of about 5+1|2 degrees (leading edge of fin to left) from straight along the thrust-line (IIRC), precisely to counteract the torque to which you refer. {It should also be remembered: the use of contraprops on some aircraft types was another method of counteracting/minimising torque-effect. Witness the contraprop Spitfires, late Seafires, and Fairey Gannet, Westland Wyvern.}
From memory, in the FG1 and FG2 that offset could be adjusted on the ground to a maximum of 7 degrees. In scale models, the difference is not sufficient to be notice-able for a static model, and is only barely perceptible in a flying scale model.

The addition of the stall-strip to the leading edge of the left wing, to enable the Corsair to operate from a carrier deck is the final refinement to the above anti-torque design, which could not have been anticipated on the drawing board.

Respectful Regards, Uyraell.

rudeerude
08-05-2009, 09:37 PM
Love the VMF-214 of Maj.Greg Boyington.As a kid I watched the series "Black Sheep Squadron" I even built a model by Revell based on the series,no paint just put it together with glue.At 9-10 years old it was my first model built.I hung it from my ceiling with fishing line.

navyson
08-06-2009, 06:40 AM
Thanks for posting these Clave, somehow I missed these! This has always been one of my favorite planes.


Love the VMF-214 of Maj.Greg Boyington.As a kid I watched the series "Black Sheep Squadron" I even built a model by Revell based on the series,no paint just put it together with glue.At 9-10 years old it was my first model built.I hung it from my ceiling with fishing line.
Hi redeerude, I watched this series also each week with my dad when I was a kid. I had a Corsair model too, it was already dark blue plastic like the color of the planes so I never did paint mine, just added the decals. But, I think my first models put together were Star Wars fighters: X-wing, and Darth Vaders TIE fighter. I even had the VIPER fighter and Cylon fighter from the original Battlestar Galatica series too.