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View Full Version : Accuracy of demountable sniper rifles?



Rising Sun*
01-23-2009, 07:33 AM
I'm watching a film which has the usual sequence of a sniper rifle in segments in a case being assembled by attaching the barrel to the breech and then attaching a scope on top, which will then be used for a long shot.

I suppose that given enough money anything can be made to snap together exactly the same way every time but, given the time I spent zeroing scopes on fixed barrels which scopes could lose accuracy during transport, I wonder whether putting separate components together would result in a rifle which was exactly as accurate upon reassembly as it was when zeroed before being disassembled.

Anyone know if such rifles would maintain accuracy after disassembly and reassembly?

32Bravo
01-23-2009, 07:50 AM
I'm watching a film which has the usual sequence of a sniper rifle in segments in a case being assembled by attaching the barrel to the breech and then attaching a scope on top, which will then be used for a long shot.

I suppose that given enough money anything can be made to snap together exactly the same way every time but, given the time I spent zeroing scopes on fixed barrels which scopes could lose accuracy during transport, I wonder whether putting separate components together would result in a rifle which was exactly as accurate upon reassembly as it was when zeroed before being disassembled.

Anyone know if such rifles would maintain accuracy after disassembly and reassembly?

With the L42", once the scope was removed, it required re-zeroing.

I imagine the same applies to those which are portrayed in films as being assembled prior to the assassin taking his shot?

http://www.rollanet.org/~stacyw/brit_42a1_sniper_sling_with_rifle.jpg

Rising Sun*
01-23-2009, 08:32 AM
I imagine the same applies to those which are portrayed in films as being assembled prior to the assassin taking his shot?

That's my suspicion.

It might be different if the scope remained mounted on the breech housing and only the barrel was attached.

Given the history of removable barrels on machine guns, I expect that accuracy can be maintained with just a reassembled barrel. Although this might be questionable: http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=W8kqHgciN70 :D

32Bravo
01-23-2009, 09:35 AM
Whenever I've seen one of these films my curiosity has tingles much in the same way as yours.

I was always a little amused by the film The Day of the Jackal - starring Edward Fox (formerly commisioned into the Loyals Regiment) - and how the Jackal took the time to zero his weapon, and then stripped it down. Now, that weapon would very definately have required re-zeroing.

http://thisdistractedglobe.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/08/Day%20of%20the%20Jackal%20pic%201.jpg

Man of Stoat
01-24-2009, 09:51 AM
Depends entirely on the construction...

Rising Sun*
01-25-2009, 05:46 AM
Depends entirely on the construction...

What construction is required to make it accurate upon reassembly?

32Bravo
01-26-2009, 04:28 AM
I have a problem accepting that a removed, optic-site doesn't have to be re-zeroed.

I appreciate that there have been technological advances, but it goes against the grain for me.

Does anyone know of an actual sniper weapon which can be dismantled, including optic-site, without it losing its zero?

Man of Stoat
01-26-2009, 04:49 AM
The "tactical" Blaser 93 rifles appear to hold zero after being taken down and reassembled.

Anything with a modern, quality, Picatinny/Weaver rail and good quality rings will hold zero when the scope is dismounted and remounted.

32Bravo
01-26-2009, 05:02 AM
The "tactical" Blaser 93 rifles appear to hold zero after being taken down and reassembled.

Anything with a modern, quality, Picatinny/Weaver rail and good quality rings will hold zero when the scope is dismounted and remounted.

Thanks!