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Nickdfresh
01-16-2009, 09:38 AM
That would certainly have been our pespective. ;)

I like the new sig. But my favorite quote from "The Outlaw Joesy Whales" is, "We have a saying in Missouri too: Don't piss on my back, and tell me it's raining." :D

Rising Sun*
01-16-2009, 09:47 AM
I like the new sig. But my favorite quote from "The Outlaw Joesy Whales" is, "We have a saying in Missouri too: Don't piss down my leg, and tell me it's raining." :D

Oh, mate, there are so many great quotes there.


Dyin' ain't much of a livin', boy.


And


Personally, I don't think much of Hoosiers neither.

And


"We left and thought about the phrase 'endeavour to persevere'. When we had thought about it long enough...we declared war on the Union".

Nickdfresh
01-16-2009, 09:58 AM
Oh, mate, there are so many great quotes there.




And



And


A very underrated film here only now getting respect as a true classic (I think mainly because its protagonist was on the wrong side of the War, and hence, political correctness)...

It's strange as the sequel of sorts, "Pale Rider," was thought to be an instant classic...

Rising Sun*
01-16-2009, 10:07 AM
A very underrated film here only now getting respect as a true classic (I think mainly because its protagonist was on the wrong side of the War, and hence, political correctness)...

It's strange as the sequel of sorts, "Pale Rider," was thought to be an instant classic...

Pale Rider and some of the others are good films, but nothing equals Josey Wales.

The Unforgiven is, despite its illustrious awards, inferior compared with Josey Wales for story, character, and general development during the film. Still, Hollywood and the critics creamed their jeans over it, so who am I to say it didn't deserve a bit of dampness in the critical gusset? ;) :D

Nickdfresh
01-16-2009, 10:12 AM
Pale Rider and some of the others are good films, but nothing equals Josey Wales.

The Unforgiven is, despite its illustrious awards, inferior compared with Josey Wales for story, character, and general development during the film. Still, Hollywood and the critics creamed their jeans over it, so who am I to say it didn't deserve a bit of dampness in the critical gusset? ;) :D


Ha! I agree, JW is one of my all time favorites. Also, although it tends to be campy and has a very mixed record regarding the historical details, I really enjoy the 1993 version of "Tombstone" and especially Val Kilmer's Doc Holiday...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_6Xhyusw94

Rising Sun*
01-16-2009, 10:17 AM
Ha! I agree, JW is one of my all time favorites. Also, although it tends to be campy and has a very mixed record regarding the historical details, I really enjoy the 1993 version of "Tombstone" and especially Val Kilmer's Doc Holiday...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_6Xhyusw94

That's okay, but what's that embarrassing Western with that little squirt Leonardo de Caprio in it?

Not a patch on The Wild Bunch, which is a seriously good Western movie.

I'm going to bed now, so if you think this should be a separate topic you can do the work while I'm snoring. :D

Nickdfresh
01-16-2009, 10:22 AM
Done!

Schuultz
01-16-2009, 10:40 AM
Well, does anybody know the Winnetou movies?
They're neither epic nor historically accurate in any way, but they're a lot of fun to watch...:D

Drake
01-16-2009, 01:19 PM
The good, the bad and the ugly is my favourite.

Rising Sun*
01-17-2009, 05:35 AM
Well, does anybody know the Winnetou movies?
They're neither epic nor historically accurate in any way, but they're a lot of fun to watch...:D

No, because I don't know what a Winnetou movie is, but I seem to recall that Western movies and re-encactors were big in Germany at one stage and, I think, also in Scotland.

Rising Sun*
01-17-2009, 06:03 AM
High Plains Drifter strikes me as much better than Pale Rider, as the latter seems to struggle with a hackneyed plot at times while there is a mystery to be solved in the final scenes of High Plains Drifter while the sense of vengeance in seemingly pointless acts like painting the town red adds to the mystery and tension and eventual resolution.

Hang 'em High is about as good as High Plains Drifter in a different way.

What makes them all good films is that they tell an engrossing yarn without cinematic pretensions of the sort which make film critics put their hands to their tumescent groins, which is why the critics ignore them and the public loves them.

Rio Bravo is a good solid Western, notable mostly for Dean Martin probably being drunk while playing a drunk. :D

A great film is The Bravados with Gregory Peck, where he seeks revenge against the men who killed his wife. Sort of an earlier version of Josey Wales in its early motivation, but it pursues a different line into more moral than story telling issues.

Another theme of moral ambiguity is pursued by John Wayne (not my favourite actor by any means) in The Searchers where his conduct and attitudes in trying to find a young woman kidnapped by Indians go beyond the simplistic Western movie.

(Well, those are my impressions of films I haven't seen for ages.)

Rising Sun*
01-17-2009, 06:27 AM
I really enjoy the 1993 version of "Tombstone" and especially Val Kilmer's Doc Holiday...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D_6Xhyusw94

Yeah, I agree.

Sorry I glossed over that last night. It's in a different mould to the Eastwood types of film but still a good one with a different range of things to say in a different way from the loner played by Eastwood and others.

navyson
01-17-2009, 07:54 AM
That's okay, but what's that embarrassing Western with that little squirt Leonardo de Caprio in it?

Not a patch on The Wild Bunch, which is a seriously good Western movie.

I'm going to bed now, so if you think this should be a separate topic you can do the work while I'm snoring. :D

Hi RS, I think the movie with Leonardo de Caprio was Quick and the Dead. Also had Sharon Stone, Russell Crowe, Gene Hackman, and others I can't remember off the top of my head.

Rising Sun*
01-17-2009, 08:06 AM
Hi RS, I think the movie with Leonardo de Caprio was Quick and the Dead. Also had Sharon Stone, Russell Crowe, Gene Hackman, and others I can't remember off the top of my head.

I think you're right.

What a turkey!

Sharon Stone was a real turkey in it when, on other performances, one might reasonably have expected a beaver. ;) :D

That was a seriously crap movie.

Nickdfresh
01-17-2009, 09:56 AM
The good, the bad and the ugly is my favourite.

I think any Eastwood "Spaghetti Western" was great. I think there was also "A Fist Full of Dollars," and a couple of others I'll watch when they come on.

One of my favorites would be the classic "High Noon." Of course, a few months back, I had the pleasure (or displeasure) of watching the cheesy sequel TV-movie staring Lee Majors (The Six Million Dollar Man) for the 1970s...

The last really good Western was "3:10 to Yuma" where both Christian Bale and Russell Crowe both were great...

Schuultz
01-17-2009, 10:25 AM
No, because I don't know what a Winnetou movie is, but I seem to recall that Western movies and re-encactors were big in Germany at one stage and, I think, also in Scotland.

Winnetou is actually the name of the main character... there was 3 or 4 of them made. Thinking about it, I'm not even sure if there was an English translation for them...

http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=qw6sKPk2_4g

flamethrowerguy
01-17-2009, 11:17 AM
Winnetou is actually the name of the main character... there was 3 or 4 of them made. Thinking about it, I'm not even sure if there was an English translation for them...

http://ca.youtube.com/watch?v=qw6sKPk2_4g

A lot of the Karl May classics were translated and published in english language (Winnetou, Old Surehand, The treasure of Nugget Mountain etc.).

Anyway, my faves would be "Little Big Man", "The Magnificent Seven" and "Ulzana's Raid".

Schuultz
01-17-2009, 12:41 PM
Wasn't "The Magnificent Seven" just a remake of an old Japanese movie, with only the setting and some or minor things changed accordingly?

I think the original was about 7 Samurai instead of 7 Cowboys...

flamethrowerguy
01-17-2009, 12:51 PM
Wasn't "The Magnificent Seven" just a remake of an old Japanese movie, with only the setting and some or minor things changed accordingly?

I think the original was about 7 Samurai instead of 7 Cowboys...

Right, "Shichinin no samurai" from 1954.

Schuultz
01-17-2009, 03:25 PM
Right, "Shichinin no samurai" from 1954.

There should be a remake of that... way too few Samurai movies coming out at the moment!

Nickdfresh
01-17-2009, 04:23 PM
Right, "Shichinin no samurai" from 1954.


A great film. The English title is "The Seven Samurai." Kurosawa's "Throne of Blood" is also a brilliant adaption of Shakespeare's Macbeth...

Librarian
01-17-2009, 07:56 PM
Oh, that great film epoch…


Rio Bravo is a good solid Western, notable mostly for Dean Martin probably being drunk while playing a drunk.

Completely agreed, my dear Mr. Rising Sun, but for me Mr. Walter Brennan was absolutely magnificent, as one of the finest and most neglected of supporting-role stars. His performance in that film remains as one amongst the greatest ever achieved supporting-role performances on the screen:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsnPpt4r7mk


Another theme of moral ambiguity is pursued by John Wayne (not my favourite actor by any means) in The Searchers where his conduct and attitudes in trying to find a young woman kidnapped by Indians go beyond the simplistic Western movie.

Yet again, we are on the same wavelenght, my dear Mr. Rising Sun. :D

With at least a dozen complete books written on this film, what can one say about it that hasn’t already become a platitude through a years of repetition? Perhaps only that this film for me represents the finest ever arranged Western film, with the best ending scene in the whole history of Hollywood!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=woahas_W35A

And although the phrase "strong, quiet he-man" has become something of a cliché used in describing leading men of the Western, actually there were relatively few stars to whom it really applied. Mr. John Wayne was certainly one of them. He was the quiet, reliable type, who carried those he-man characteristics into all his roles, ever ready to stand and sacrifice his own happiness, willing to shoulder the blame for misdeeds that were not his in order to protect the weak, and a man of two-fisted courage when the time finally came to swing into action.

One of his finest performances,however, that one achieved in his last film, "The Shootist", is somehow neglected, although it certainly represents one of the most memorable film roles ever made, in which an aging legendary gunfighter puts his lifelong ideals in order as he waits out the final seven days of his life.

However, by my personal oppinion his best line originates from the "True Gritt", where he played the role of a U.S. Marshal Rooster Cogburn:

"I never shot nobody I didn't have to!"

For sure, there is something philosophical in it, something basically different and uncorroborated with our modern, supposedly more sophisticated and enlightened times…

HAWKEYE
01-18-2009, 01:21 AM
Don't forget "The Magnificent Seven" another Japanese samurai movie adapted into a western? Little quiz: what was the other great western movie made from a Samurai movie?

I enjoyed "Open Range" a great deal...and I don't like Kevin Kostner that much.
"Angel and the Badman", everytime it comes on I'll watch it.
"Red River", John Wayne should have gotten his Oscar for this one and at least nominated for "The Searchers".
"The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance"
Does "Lonesome Dove" count?

Rising Sun*
01-18-2009, 08:24 AM
Just to add to my earlier Josey Wales quotes:


Not a hard man to track. Leaves dead men wherever he goes.

navyson
01-18-2009, 10:32 AM
I think any Eastwood "Spaghetti Western" was great. I think there was also "A Fist Full of Dollars," and a couple of others I'll watch when they come on.

One of my favorites would be the classic "High Noon." Of course, a few months back, I had the pleasure (or displeasure) of watching the cheesy sequel TV-movie staring Lee Majors (The Six Million Dollar Man) for the 1970s...

The last really good Western was "3:10 to Yuma" where both Christian Bale and Russell Crowe both were great...
I'd have to agree on all three paragraphs.
I love to watch the old "spaghetti westerns" with him playing in them.
Clint Eastwood is still going at it... http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1205489/
though it's not a western.
I liked the movie "High Noon" with Gary Cooper also. But never saw the '70's movie with Lee Majors.
I liked both the old and new versions of the 3:10 to Yuma movies.

Drake
01-18-2009, 01:35 PM
The last really good Western was "3:10 to Yuma" where both Christian Bale and Russell Crowe both were great...

Yeah, very good movie. Funny, I just saw it last week on DVD for the first time. I like both Crowe and Bale very much, so I am biased, but indeed, they were great in this one.

Cuts
01-19-2009, 03:28 AM
Not generally a big fan of westerns, I did enjoy The Culpepper Cattle Co. in that the portrayal of the working cowboys seemed very believable.

Another western I will happily watch again is Cat Ballou.
A very entertaining bio with Lee Mavin giving an outstandingly funny performance, ably aided & abbeted by his horse. Indeed Marvin reckoned that he should have shared the Oscar with his co-star and I'm not talking about Hanoi Jane who played the title rôle.
I, like many, are not terribly keen on the 'lady' although it must be admitted that the opening sequence of Barbarella caused a number of them to temporarily suspend their dislike for the daft cow. ;)

32Bravo
01-19-2009, 07:42 AM
High Plains Drifter strikes me as much better than Pale Rider, as the latter seems to struggle with a hackneyed plot at times while there is a mystery to be solved in the final scenes of High Plains Drifter while the sense of vengeance in seemingly pointless acts like painting the town red adds to the mystery and tension and eventual resolution.



For my money, Pale Rider is a re-make of Shane...or did you say that already?

32Bravo
01-19-2009, 07:48 AM
With at least a dozen complete books written on this film, what can one say about it that hasn’t already become a platitude through a years of repetition? Perhaps only that this film for me represents the finest ever arranged Western film, with the best ending scene in the whole history of Hollywood!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=woahas_W35A

The stance, adopted by Wayne in the fnal scene, where he grips his forearm as he's framed by the doorway(see link picture), was typical posture of a late friend of his - whose name escapes me - and the lady in the scene to whom he is saying farewell, was said friend's widow, so he did it for her - cute.

http://www.imdb.com/media/rm3528956160/tt0049730

32Bravo
01-19-2009, 07:58 AM
There are many great westerns, but my top three, or joint top one, are Shane, Big Country and Magnificent Seven.

Of the more rece3nt releases, I have to opt for 'Open Range'

http://www.criticsrant.com/Images/criticsrant_com/Retro/Open%20Range/OpenRange_thumb.jpg

Rising Sun*
01-19-2009, 08:12 AM
For my money, Pale Rider is a re-make of Shane...or did you say that already?

No, I didn't, because I'm not sure I've ever seen more than brief parts of Shane.

Even if I have, I've missed any connection with Pale Rider.

I've googled Shane and found that Alan Ladd and Van Heflin were in it, when I mistakenly thought Dan Duryea was in it. But at least I was right in remembering that some whinger was in the lead role.

Sorry to be so harsh, but the three actors I've named have to be close to the top of my list of least favourite actors because they usually play what they think are fraught characters which simply annoy me. Although Danny Kaye on his worst day could beat the lot of them combined.

32Bravo
01-19-2009, 09:10 AM
Harsh?...I hadn’t noticed!

Obviously you are familiar with Pale Rider, so I’ll just describe one or two scenes from Shane for you to consider and compare:

Lone rider approaches from the distance observed by young lad.

Just passing through and asks if he can have some water; invited in for supper; decides to dig up old tree stump which the farmer has been struggling with. Both get stuck-in, a bonding moment.

Ranchers trying to drive the ‘sod-busters’ off the range, hire a gunfighter after Shane and his buddy beat the crap out of a the local cowhands.

Stubborn farmer – not the same one – goes to town to buy provisions and ham-it-up act tough, gets killed by gunfighter.

Shane climbs into his ‘Kit Carson’ outfit, rides into town, kills gunfighter (Jack Palance).

Rides off into the sunset with young lad trying to catch up and say goodbye and calling ‘I love you Shane!”

Pale Rider :

Substitute – young girl for young lad, rock for tree stump, miners for ranchers, marshals for gunfighter.

Plot:

Gunman feels he has an opportunity to leave his past life behind and start a new life.

Can’t escape who and what he is - rides off into the sunset.

Nickdfresh
01-19-2009, 09:42 AM
"Silverado" I think also bears mentioning. I think it was the first big-budget Hollywood Western in the late 1980s when Westerns had been out of favor...

Then there's "Youngguns," which seemed to be a pretty silly showcase film for young actors with light substance...

Librarian
01-19-2009, 02:52 PM
Don't forget "The Magnificent Seven" another Japanese samurai movie adapted into a western? Little quiz: what was the other great western movie made from a Samurai movie?

Oh, you mean Sergio Leone’s film "A Fistful of Dollars", my dear Mr. Hawkeye? Yes, it was influenced by Kurosawa’s "Yojimbo", which introduced the winning formula of a lone gunman with a morally ambiguous characters, who is in pursuit of money to the exclusion of all else. Technically an excellent, visually highly innovative film, which for a long time represented something like a cause célèbre amongst film esthetes, but for me personally it always was somehow... short in genuine, heartwarming human epic, which always represented an obligatory part of a true Western.

That’s why I always will prefer "My Darling Clementine" (if nothing else, John Ford successfully convinced me that the possibilities of the wide outdoor scenes, when handled with care and craftsmanship, always will be able to emphasize that important old-western standby, embedded into the hero’s personal dignity, unshakable even at loss, with real power behind that sentiment. That departure scene with Linda Darnell and Henry Fonda is absolutely flawless – an classicistic work of emotional perfection.

"High Noon" , on the other hand, perhaps is the only film entitled to take its place alongside a sociological study! Is it possible to single out any one western film, and say "This is the greatest?" Frankly, I don’t know. But if I were asked "What Western film is greater than High Noon", I couldn’t provide an answer…

And how about Otto Preminger’s "River of no return?" Putting aside everything else, it has to be emphasized that Marilyn Monroe in this film achieved some extraordinary expressive sequences. I know many people who have never seen this exciting jewel of a personal shrift, embedded in magnificently demurring gesture, sad glare of an eye and pensively shadowed voice, which rarely was used to suggest that the Old West - like our world today - actually desperately looked for some kindheartedness and tragically missing human shelter.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Rekabezpovratka.jpg

Those people tend to laugh condescendingly when her name is mentioned, but I think that they just don’t know the true value of those Golden Era movies, in which unforced perspicuity of emotional response of a beautiful woman was able to invoke genuine sentiment of compassion, mainly due to the naturally and openly offered epitome of her life as a determined pursuit of lasting happiness that somehow always eluded her…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uX-TA_EndbM&feature=related

After all, that’s why I like this film so much.:)

Hanz Lutz
01-19-2009, 05:24 PM
My the best are from producer Sergio Leone and acting Clint Eastwood: The God ,the bad and the ugly, Fisthfull of dollars, and For a few dollars more.
Also i like Rio Bravo :D

tankgeezer
01-19-2009, 06:14 PM
Big Jake, Outlaw Josie Whales, The Shootist, High plains Drifter, and Pale Rider. Though the last two are nearly the same movie.And lastly, more for comedic qualities than cinematic, "Duck you Sucker" later retitled "A fistful of Dynamite" Starred James Coburn, and Rod Steiger another Sergio Leone movie.

32Bravo
01-20-2009, 02:54 AM
Quick question: what was the Samurai movie made from a western?

Rising Sun*
01-20-2009, 04:49 AM
Harsh?...I hadn’t noticed!

Obviously you are familiar with Pale Rider, so I’ll just describe one or two scenes from Shane for you to consider and compare:

Lone rider approaches from the distance observed by young lad.

Just passing through and asks if he can have some water; invited in for supper; decides to dig up old tree stump which the farmer has been struggling with. Both get stuck-in, a bonding moment.

Ranchers trying to drive the ‘sod-busters’ off the range, hire a gunfighter after Shane and his buddy beat the crap out of a the local cowhands.

Stubborn farmer – not the same one – goes to town to buy provisions and ham-it-up act tough, gets killed by gunfighter.

Shane climbs into his ‘Kit Carson’ outfit, rides into town, kills gunfighter (Jack Palance).

Rides off into the sunset with young lad trying to catch up and say goodbye and calling ‘I love you Shane!”

Pale Rider :

Substitute – young girl for young lad, rock for tree stump, miners for ranchers, marshals for gunfighter.

Plot:

Gunman feels he has an opportunity to leave his past life behind and start a new life.

Can’t escape who and what he is - rides off into the sunset.

Actually, I think I might have had a different movie in mind as your description brings back some recollections of Shane which differ from the vague impressions I had of 'the other Shane'.

Doesn't make me any fonder of Alan Ladd, though. :D

Rising Sun*
01-20-2009, 04:53 AM
The Wild Bunch is in my top few.

And Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid isn't, if only because it had Katharine Ross and a bicycle in it.

A borderline Western, given that it's set in the 1920s but nonetheless in a setting that is common to many Western movies, and a great film is The Treasure of Sierra Madre.

Extending the time line for Westerns but still a film set in a cowboy town with the requisite stranger coming into town to upset the past and present, and with a WWII component, and another great film is Bad Day at Black Rock.

Rising Sun*
01-20-2009, 05:46 AM
And how about Otto Preminger’s "River of no return?" Putting aside everything else, it has to be emphasized that Marilyn Monroe in this film achieved some extraordinary expressive sequences. I know many people who have never seen this exciting jewel of a personal shrift, embedded in magnificently demurring gesture, sad glare of an eye and pensively shadowed voice, which rarely was used to suggest that the Old West - like our world today - actually desperately looked for some kindheartedness and tragically missing human shelter.

Those people tend to laugh condescendingly when her name is mentioned, but I think that they just don’t know the true value of those Golden Era movies, in which unforced perspicuity of emotional response of a beautiful woman was able to invoke genuine sentiment of compassion, mainly due to the naturally and openly offered epitome of her life as a determined pursuit of lasting happiness that somehow always eluded her…

She suffered from unfair criticism. Contrast her 'dumb blonde' performances in Some Like it Hot and Seven Year Itch with Judy Holliday as a 'dumb blonde' in Born Yesterday.

They're both equally pleasant to watch in their respective roles, but nobody bothers to ask if Judy 'could really act or just had big tits' etc.

32Bravo
01-20-2009, 05:50 AM
Actually, I think I might have had a different movie in mind as your description brings back some recollections of Shane which differ from the vague impressions I had of 'the other Shane'.

Doesn't make me any fonder of Alan Ladd, though. :D


Alan ladd:
http://tw.youtube.com/watch?v=AFquzxwYoeE



TV series - David Caradine:

http://tw.youtube.com/watch?v=Wj75EFlgqOw&NR=1

Rising Sun*
01-20-2009, 06:13 AM
Alan ladd:
http://tw.youtube.com/watch?v=AFquzxwYoeE

Yeah, not a bad ending.

They didn't stint themselves on the musical score or music volume did they?

I can see the relationship with the Clint Eastwood film with the little bloke under the buildings etc, who was marginally uglier than the kid in Shane, although he had the age advantage.

The dog in the saloon and its reactions to the scene as it progresses were a nice touch.


TV series - David Caradine:

http://tw.youtube.com/watch?v=Wj75EFlgqOw&NR=1

If I was going to construct a list of actors who bore me rigid, Carradine would be near the top. Or possibly just not on my list, he was so forgettable.

Please tell me that that video is a spoof, although it looks disturbingly convincing as a real TV show.

If I was going to cast a gunfighter series with Jill Ireland in it, I'd cast her hubby Charles Bronson as the gunfighter instead of Grasshopper.

32Bravo
01-20-2009, 07:57 AM
If I was going to construct a list of actors who bore me rigid, Carradine would be near the top. Or possibly just not on my list, he was so forgettable.

Please tell me that that video is a spoof, although it looks disturbingly convincing as a real TV show.

If I was going to cast a gunfighter series with Jill Ireland in it, I'd cast her hubby Charles Bronson as the gunfighter instead of Grasshopper.

Preferred his father, John Caradine. A good character actor.

HAWKEYE
01-20-2009, 10:00 AM
Shane was also the first time they ever had the sound of a pistol firing in a closed room as loud as it really was. People in the audience actually jumped in shock at the sound.

Yes, Clint Eastwood has said many times it was the thought of re-making Yojimbo that made him travel to Spain to do "Fist Full of Dollars". He also said that he hated the little cigars they made him smoke, he was a non-smoker.

Yes, the stance that John Wayne was in at the end of "The Searchers" was in tribute to his late friend Harry Carey, an actor who had gone from silent pictures into the talkie era. It was Harry Carey who got Wayne his start in pictures. His son was a staple in nearly all of Wayne's movies, Harry Carey,Jr.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v280/tomasutpen/harrycarey.jpg
http://www.chronicleoftheoldwest.com/pics/harry_carey_jr.jpg

32Bravo
01-21-2009, 02:58 AM
And how about Otto Preminger’s "River of no return?" Putting aside everything else, it has to be emphasized that Marilyn Monroe in this film achieved some extraordinary expressive sequences. I know many people who have never seen this exciting jewel of a personal shrift, embedded in magnificently demurring gesture, sad glare of an eye and pensively shadowed voice, which rarely was used to suggest that the Old West - like our world today - actually desperately looked for some kindheartedness and tragically missing human shelter.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Rekabezpovratka.jpg

Those people tend to laugh condescendingly when her name is mentioned, but I think that they just don’t know the true value of those Golden Era movies, in which unforced perspicuity of emotional response of a beautiful woman was able to invoke genuine sentiment of compassion, mainly due to the naturally and openly offered epitome of her life as a determined pursuit of lasting happiness that somehow always eluded her…

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uX-TA_EndbM&feature=related

After all, that’s why I like this film so much.:)


You mean she was horny!

32Bravo
01-21-2009, 03:00 AM
Answer to which Western inspired a Samaurai movie:

Dances With Wolves - The Last Samaurai!

Librarian
01-21-2009, 08:44 AM
You mean she was horny!

No, my dear Mr. Bravo, I don’t mean that. Do you remember that old movie plot about the clown who made millions laugh but never achieved happiness himself? Well, it has a striking real-life parallel in the career of Marilyn Monroe. Perhaps it would be an exaggeration to say that she never was happy – she lived her life to the fullest, considering only the present. But her real life always seemed almost a mockery of the carefree spright that she repeatedly played on the wide screen. :(

Marilyn was a lovely girl, as beautiful as a Spring morning. And though she specialized in light comedy she had exceptional dramatic ability too. Many thought she could have been one of the screen’s finest dramatic actresses had she been given the guidance and chance. Even in her comedies, there were often moments of pathos or drama that showed there were good foundations for this belief. I do feel somehow that she regularly was mercilessly vivisected by the critics, and that didn’t serve to bolster her sagging spirits. In this film she had some great material, and that was the one and only entity of my mind in those previously mentioned sentences.

BTW: how about that half-forgotten "Paint your wagon"? Yes, I know – it’s a musical, but in the very same time it is the best example that even obligatory thought of a crooning Klint Eastwood as Dirty Harry is capable to perish quickly in a well elaborated script. But truly magnificent performance of an actor known mainly for his tough guy roles, Mr. Lee Marvin surely represents an everlasting value of this film. If nothing else, it is worth sitting through the movie waiting for his singing performance! What a melody!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnbiRDNaDeo&feature=related

Therefore, just relax, and imagine that you are observing that magnificent peak of Mt. Shasta, as seen from US 99 near Dunsmuir. I am assuring you, honorable ladies and gentlemen, that you will be completely tranquil, even after a crazy day at work… :)

32Bravo
01-21-2009, 08:51 AM
No, my dear Mr. Bravo, I don’t mean that.


Of course she was, that was her problem.

I saw Tony Curtis speaking about her recently. He also stated that she had lost that flame in her eye which was her spirit, had to give away too much the casting-couch types - a candle in the wind!

Librarian
01-21-2009, 09:03 AM
Well, Tony surely knows that… Just look at that gaze in his eyes:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Nekitovolevruce.jpg

:D

32Bravo
01-21-2009, 09:51 AM
Well, Tony surely knows that… Just look at that gaze in his eyes:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Nekitovolevruce.jpg

:D

He used to date her before they became famous, so he knew her before and after, so-to-speak.

In the interview, he said he "exploded" twice when doing the couch scene in that film (Some Like It Hot).

32Bravo
01-21-2009, 10:42 AM
Perhaps we should include TV series'? here's one of my favourites:

http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://www.whirligig-tv.co.uk/tv/children/westerns/rintin1.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.whirligig-tv.co.uk/tv/children/westerns/rintintin.htm&usg=__5fcHNKpVnPDyf5Ludo4H0seA3_M=&h=242&w=240&sz=10&hl=en&start=5&tbnid=aZTB0DJaSfLS7M:&tbnh=110&tbnw=109&prev=/images%3Fq%3Drin%2Btin%2Btin%26gbv%3D2%26hl%3Den%2 6sa%3DG

Librarian
01-21-2009, 01:57 PM
He used to date her before they became famous, so he knew her before and after, so-to-speak.

Sure, my dear Mr. 32 Bravo – as we all do know from our courses in psychology, dating always represented the best form of a deep interpersonal understanding. After all, he has the very same glare in his eye, although this time he is looking on Daphne... You know, for some unknown reasons, I have a strong feeling that Joe DiMaggio actually represented the only male who actually cared for madam Monroe. After all – he was the only person that actually cried at her funeral and ordered half-dozen of red roses to be delivered 3 times a week to her crypt for 20 years. Quite a strange fellow for our modern standards… :(

However, even without those couch scenes Mr. Jack Lemon was much more momentous actor in that film. Simply, in every detail Daphne was vigorously feminine and superbly adequate in her pleasantry. What a transformation that was! Perhaps only Dustin Hoffman in "Tootsie" was correspondent with his role next to this masterpiece of personal excellence in performing arts.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Nekitovolevruce-2.jpg

Daphne, Sugar Kane and Josephine

But enough with our unproductive personal contemplations... Western movies are representing our main theme in this thread, therefore – back to those old, forgotten times of Golden Epoch! Here is another forgotten part of the western film pack – "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon"! Yes, I know – this motion picture actually represents a cavalry epic. But the spirit of the Old West is still present in this masterpiece directed by Mr. John Ford.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Nosilajezututraku.jpg

John Wayne as captain Nathan Brittles

In addition, that beautiful marching song is available here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bVJOcJvjTY&feature=related

Enjoy! ;)

Byron
01-21-2009, 05:22 PM
Excellent thread--wish I'd found it earlier! I love almost every movie mentioned so far (that I've seen)! Here's a couple of others I really enjoy:

The Cheyenne Social Club - great show with Jimmy Stewart and Henry Fonda.

Chato's Land - Charles Bronson as a vengeful Indian. My dad made us watch this several months ago and I was surprised by how good a film it is. Very enjoyable!

HAWKEYE
01-22-2009, 01:36 AM
Sorry Librarian, that's not from "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" I believe that's from "The Horse Soldiers".

Cast of SWAYR:
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2155/2307566656_7d29fb1221_o.jpg

From The Horse Soldiers:
http://www.silverscreenclassics.com/images/video/04183001.jpg

32Bravo
01-22-2009, 02:58 AM
...You know, for some unknown reasons, I have a strong feeling that Joe DiMaggio actually represented the only male who actually cared for madam Monroe. After all – he was the only person that actually cried at her funeral and ordered half-dozen of red roses to be delivered 3 times a week to her crypt for 20 years. Quite a strange fellow for our modern standards…


So, in effect, if I understand you correctly, her ambition led her away from the one person that cared about her for herself rather than her being just another trophy and into a life of misery and confusion. One might argue that, on account of her ambition, she became her own worse enemy?

32Bravo
01-22-2009, 03:00 AM
Excellent thread--wish I'd found it earlier! I love almost every movie mentioned so far (that I've seen)! Here's a couple of others I really enjoy:

The Cheyenne Social Club - great show with Jimmy Stewart and Henry Fonda.

Chato's Land - Charles Bronson as a vengeful Indian. My dad made us watch this several months ago and I was surprised by how good a film it is. Very enjoyable!


Chato's Land was a good one, although I think it was Charles Bronson who made it so. Didn't Burt Lancaster make a similar film - Apache or something?

Librarian
01-22-2009, 12:20 PM
Sorry Librarian, that's not from "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" I believe that's from "The Horse Soldiers".

And you are right, my dear Mr Hawkeye! I was a little bit overwhelmed with that video-search at You Tube. Thank you for the correction and for that nice color picture of Mr. Wayne as well! :D

In the meantime, here is another color snapshot about that previously mentioned Western-musical, "Paint Your Wagon":

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/PaintYourWagon-1.jpg

Paint Your Wagon - Klint Eastwood, Lee Marvin and Jean Seberg


So, in effect, if I understand you correctly, her ambition led her away from the one person that cared about her..

Oh, not only her ambition, my dear Mr. 32 Bravo. You see, the main problem actually was that typically modern cost-effective manifestation of love-as- attachment philosophy. If I remembered that correctly, Phillip Shawer, Cindy Hazan and Donna Bradshaw have created surprisingly successful theory of human intimacy in which they established a category of a so called secure lovers – lovers who don’t worry about being abandoned or about having someone get too close to them – and avoidant, or anxious/ambivalent lovers.

Avoidant lovers are always uncomfortable in being too close to someone else, and they always have trouble trusting someone completely, thus being insecure about their relationships. Now, if you add to these inherited psychological fundamentals that frequently discredited societal fact that love is very often only a substitute for someone’s personal identity (nonhuman primates are demonstrating this same behavior in their infancy!), as well as a constant need for assured economic security in a constantly timid world (read: pay envelope is first !), her truly sad destiny was almost inevitable… :(

But enough with this vacant psychology! We have another candidate on our list: almost forgotten masterpiece of Mr. John Sturges – "Bad Day at Black Rock"! Although being a thriller, this film definitely incorporates certain elements of the Western, especially the theme of individual integrity of a human being in socially adverse environment.

Spencer Tracy achieved a brilliant role in this film, knocking out even one of the most full-bodied actors of Holywood, otherwise exceptional artist Mr. Ernest Borgnine:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MhUBH6gpXV8&feature=related

Enjoy! ;)

32Bravo
01-23-2009, 03:14 AM
Oh, not only her ambition, my dear Mr. 32 Bravo. You see, the main problem actually was that typically modern cost-effective manifestation of love-as- attachment philosophy. If I remembered that correctly, Phillip Shawer, Cindy Hazan and Donna Bradshaw have created surprisingly successful theory of human intimacy in which they established a category of a so called secure lovers – lovers who don’t worry about being abandoned or about having someone get too close to them – and avoidant, or anxious/ambivalent lovers.

Avoidant lovers are always uncomfortable in being too close to someone else, and they always have trouble trusting someone completely, thus being insecure about their relationships. Now, if you add to these inherited psychological fundamentals that frequently discredited societal fact that love is very often only a substitute for someone’s personal identity (nonhuman primates are demonstrating this same behavior in their infancy!), as well as a constant need for assured economic security in a constantly timid world (read: pay envelope is first !), her truly sad destiny was almost inevitable… :(

But enough with this vacant psychology! We have another candidate on our list: almost forgotten masterpiece of Mr. John Sturges – "Bad Day at Black Rock"! Although being a thriller, this film definitely incorporates certain elements of the Western, especially the theme of individual integrity of a human being in socially adverse environment.

being a bit of layperson I don't do socialogy/psychology-speak, old chap, but I do have a fairly rounded grasp of the human experience - cause and effect etc. - and its complexities. Maralyn's would have been as of nothing if not for her sexuality and her hunger for fame...Volenti non fit injuria!

Byron
01-23-2009, 09:23 AM
Chato's Land was a good one, although I think it was Charles Bronson who made it so. Didn't Burt Lancaster make a similar film - Apache or something?

He did, but I haven't seen that one.

I think Chato's Land just had a really good, if simple, story to it. All the characters were well done and Bronson was great--even though he never spoke, or spoke very little, as I recall! :mrgreen:

32Bravo
01-23-2009, 09:51 AM
He did, but I haven't seen that one.

I think Chato's Land just had a really good, if simple, story to it. All the characters were well done and Bronson was great--even though he never spoke, or spoke very little, as I recall! :mrgreen:

I think I saw this film around 1972?...anyway, particularly remember the scene in which he throws a rattler at some chap - rather good! :)

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51C5SK1F5CL._SL500_AA280_.jpg

Burt lancaster - Apache:

http://www.timeout.com/film/img/dvd/75258/cover.w200.jpg

Librarian
01-23-2009, 01:00 PM
being a bit of layperson I don't do socialogy/psychology-speak, old chap, but I do have a fairly rounded grasp of the human experience - cause and effect etc. - and its complexities. Maralyn's would have been as of nothing if not for her sexuality and her hunger for fame...

Well, in that case I think that the most functional conclusion of this case is: Don’t take your partner for granted, Marylin, open your eyes – and make some money first. You know, maintaining love isn't automatic. :neutral:


Volenti non fit injuria!

Unusquisque tantum iuris habet, quantum potentia valere creditur, carissime amice! Cetteram censeo amare et saperre vix deo conceditur. ;)

And now, back to our main theme. I was always truly amazed by the fact that probably the best example of poetic allegory in Western genre, unfairly overlooked film created by Mr. Nicholas Ray – "Johnny Guitar"!

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/JohnnyGuitar.jpg

Sterling Hayden as Johnny "Guitar" Logan

By watching this film you will be able to understand why Joan Crawford always will remain a vivid reminder of the true glamour that made Hollywood great, while Sterling Hayden’s strong, rugged features, determined yet kindly, emanated this otherwise fascinating character (seaman, maritime historian, volunteer of the USMC, Silver Star wearer, and card-equipped member of the Communist Party of the USA) into an ideal "pioneer type" – the super-all-American-boy capable to defeat any kind of enemy.

An excellent short-clip from this film is available here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=41Cxr7wBtnI&feature=related

Enjoy! :D

HAWKEYE
01-24-2009, 01:33 PM
Of interest, especially on this board is Sterling Hayden's war record. If you haven't checked it out here's a piece:


he left Hollywood to serve as an undercover agent with William J. Donovan's COI office. He remained there after it became the OSS. Hayden also joined the Marines under the name John Hamilton (which was never his legal name). His World War II service included running guns through German lines to the Yugoslav partisans and parachuting into fascist Croatia. He won the Silver Star and a commendation from Yugoslavia's Marshal Tito.

Librarian
01-24-2009, 07:31 PM
Thank you for that information, my dear Mr. Hawkeye. Right now I am unable to find that pretty unknown photo of Mr. Hayden taken during the war in Yugoslavia, but I shall try to bring to light this forgotten piece of history as soon as possible. It was printed in a Yugoslav book some 32 years ago…

Of course, you can expect further presentations about forgotten Western film masterpieces as well. The only problem is that my scanner is a little bit overheated these days… But next week surely will bring into being another shipment of color snapshots connected with this intriguing theme.

Till then, as always – all the best. :)

Moreheaddriller
01-25-2009, 07:32 PM
Quantrill's raiders

HAWKEYE
01-26-2009, 12:24 AM
Looking for more on Hayden I found this very interesing article, not trying to hijack the thread but this is too good. Hayden had a very very interesting military career.

http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USMC/USMC-OSS/USMC-OSS-6.html

Does anyone know why all the OSS agents in Yugoslavia were US Marines??

32Bravo
01-26-2009, 03:05 AM
Well, in that case I think that the most functional conclusion of this case is: Don’t take your partner for granted, Marylin, open your eyes – and make some money first.
Or sort out your priorities first.


You know, maintaining love isn't automatic. :neutral: Well, thank you, Dr Love, for your pearls of wisdom!




Unusquisque tantum iuris habet, quantum potentia valere creditur, carissime amice! Cetteram censeo amare et saperre vix deo conceditur. ;)

I have trouble agreeing with that.

Would that be Spinoza or Nietzche?

George Eller
01-26-2009, 04:11 PM
-

My all time favorite western would have to be the TV miniseries "Lonesome Dove"

Lonesome Dove
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lonesome_Dove

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5c/Robert_Duvall_in_Lonesome_Dove.jpg
Actor Robert Duvall portraying Augustus "Gus" McCrae.

Lonesome Dove series
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lonesome_Dove_series

-

Nickdfresh
01-26-2009, 07:09 PM
Well, who can forget the classic Mel Brooks comedy "Blazing Saddles?" A film that comically addressed race relations and skewered the cliches of Western films at the same time...

I think my favorite part of the film is Brook's rendition of fearless leader Governor William J. Lepetomane and his "assistant."

http://www.cinematographers.nl/GreatDoPh/Films/BlazingSaddles2.jpg

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071230/

George Eller
01-26-2009, 07:32 PM
Well, who can forget the classic Mel Brooks comedy "Blazing Saddles?" A film that comically addressed race relations and skewered the cliches of Western films at the same time...

I think my favorite part of the film is Brook's rendition of fearless leader Governor William J. Lepetomane and his "assistant."

http://www.cinematographers.nl/GreatDoPh/Films/BlazingSaddles2.jpg

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0071230/
-

George shakes his head and grins...:D

-

HAWKEYE
01-27-2009, 02:07 AM
"Work, work, work, work, work, work, work, hello boys, get a good nights rest?, I missed you"

"We'll work up a number 6 on 'em"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-UM9GjnTFIM&feature=related

32Bravo
01-27-2009, 11:00 AM
-

My all time favorite western would have to be the TV miniseries "Lonesome Dove"

Lonesome Dove
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lonesome_Dove

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/5/5c/Robert_Duvall_in_Lonesome_Dove.jpg
Actor Robert Duvall portraying Augustus "Gus" McCrae.

Lonesome Dove series
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lonesome_Dove_series

-

The first series of Lonsome Dove was brilliant, particularly, for me, on account of Robert Duval. But I think Open Range has it beat on accountof the addition of the very gorgeous Annette Benning:

http://www3.sympatico.ca/chris.irie/images/infotainment/open_range.jpg

youtube - Open Range final shootout part 1:
http://tw.youtube.com/watch?v=lq3zjTmVLbM&feature=related

DavidW
01-27-2009, 12:50 PM
In no particular order.

Silverado.

The Good, the bad & the ugly.

Once upon a time in the west.

Dances with Wolves.

My name is Nobody.

Great Scout & Cathouse Tuesday.

Librarian
01-27-2009, 06:53 PM
Yet again, after a busy day we are finaly able to continue with our tasks here and to answer certain questions. Therefore - here we go! :D


Or sort out your priorities first.

Absolutely, my dear Mr 32 Bravo. And above all: stop to indulge yourself in the illusions of discounted hope, and especially stop listening to the song of that siren of easy success that transforms us into empty creatures, Marilyn!

Having arrived in California, Norma Jean Dougherty managed to get a decent job at Radioplane as an assembler on the OQ-3 production line. Her rise to fame and subsequent demise might be said to have properly begun on 26th of June 1945, when a photographer David Conover was sent to "Radioplane" by his commanding officer, one Captain Ronald Reagan, to photograph new heroes of the Free World – women war workers.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/radioplane_marilyn_1_500.jpg

Norma Jean Dougherty as Rosie the Riveter, "Yank" - August, 1945

The camera and the photographer loved Norma Jean and he persuaded her to model for more photos, which soon were circulating in Hollywood. A screen test, a change of name and a career very different from assembling robot planes quickly followed. The rest, as they say, is history…


Well, thank you, Dr Love, for your pearls of wisdom!

Oh, not at all, my dear young man. I always will be at your service. :)

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/DrLove-1.jpg

Heterosexuality, (William H. Masters, Virginia E. Johnson & Robert C. Kolodny), Harper & Collins - 1994, p. 15

But… honestly, I never liked that quite a preposterous claim. Therefore, please - just call me Doc, as everyone else. ;)


Would that be Spinoza or Nietzche?

Eminentissime Amice,
Ex literis tuis de datis elementer intelleximus, que tibi per exploratorum significationem de rebus iuris et occurentis innoterunt, quam diligentiam tuam probamui et gratiose suscipimus te requirentes, omni que deinde statim est - tamen dixi quod volui, amice. Specta Google - esse potest qemadmodum iste significatio extradeat tibi publicae! :D

And now, back on our main theme in this thread – good old Westerns.

Therefore, how about the "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral", honorable ladies and gentlemen? Although director John Sturges has been accused of being to sentimental a director in his relation to real history, there was always real power behind that sentiment. The camera placement, the simple yet effective symbolism, and the flair for spectacle, as in the brilliantly handled action scenes, the real "feel" of the old, dusty but still glamourized West have earned Mr. Sturges a reputation as one of the great directors.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/GFOKC-1.jpg

For the most part Gunfight at the O. K. Corral offers high-powered drama, rather than straightforward action. Nevertheless, two main actors have successfully achieved excellent roles. Especially Mr. Kirk Douglas was very capable in picturing basically imperfect man as a composite, but undoubtedly positive, morally firm human being.

BTW: Mr. Douglas – although not a WW2 hero – was a very dear guest of the former SFRY, and he met president Tito in numerous occasions. This one originates from 1969.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/TitoKirkDouglas1969.jpg

Josip Broz Tito and Mr. Kirk Douglas, Brioni – 1969

Well, that’s all for today. In the meantime, honorable ladies and gentlemen – all the best! ;)

George Eller
01-27-2009, 09:49 PM
The first series of Lonesome Dove was brilliant, particularly, for me, on account of Robert Duval. But I think Open Range has it beat on account of the addition of the very gorgeous Annette Benning:

http://www3.sympatico.ca/chris.irie/images/infotainment/open_range.jpg

youtube - Open Range final shootout part 1:
http://tw.youtube.com/watch?v=lq3zjTmVLbM&feature=related
-

http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showpost.php?p=148857&postcount=71

I enjoyed "Open Range" too. Another great western with Robert Duvall :)
The later westerns like "Lonesome Dove" and "Open Range" have put a lot more emphasis on authenticity. Great costumes and sound...

I remember Robert Duvall being asked in an interview once if he had a favorite role from all the movies of his career and his response was Gus McCrae in Lonesome Dove.

I think Diane Lane (Lorena in Lonesome Dove) gave the lovely Annette Benning a good run for the money...

For me Lonesome Dove is an epic classic.

Lonesome Dove - Theme Song
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHTvbfJQIxY

Lonesome Dove - What's a poke?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYzZPiqjqww
Diane Lane and Robert Duvall

Lonesome Dove - the leaving
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBXxI2rXl9A

Lonesome Dove: Some Old Men Get Respect
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pVBjBClBSao

Lonesome Dove - Call fights with Army Scout
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WEwADbas7L0

Lonesome Dove Shot
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=23UhypY-pUg

Lonesome Dove - Gus Dies
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=deV68rbsNyQ

Lonesome Dove - Captain Call takes Gus's body back to Texas for burial
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohI2Km8POh4

Lonesome Dove - Ending
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uBSr4xPh2fA

-

MORE - Lonesome Dove
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_type=&search_query=lonesome+dove&aq=f

-




youtube - Open Range final shootout part 1:
http://tw.youtube.com/watch?v=lq3zjTmVLbM&feature=related

-

Broken Trail (2006) another great western TV miniseries starring Robert Duvall.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broken_Trail

Broken Trail - Last Gun Fight
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WMPV22-j2fs

Broken Trail - Ending and Credits
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=usAArRKDH4s

"We're all travelers in this world, from the sweet grass to the packing house,
birth till death, we travel between the eternities..." from the movie.

-

32Bravo
01-28-2009, 02:55 AM
-

The later westerns like "Lonesome Dove" and "Open Range" have put a lot more emphasis on authenticity. Great costumes and sound...

Yes, do like it.




I think Diane Lane (Lorena in Lonesome Dove) gave the lovely Annette Benning a good run for the money...


Not bad, George http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g133/llad12/lorena.jpg


but for a mature woman, and looks, Annette has the edge - only my opinion, George.

32Bravo
01-28-2009, 07:30 AM
Oh, not at all, my dear young man. I always will be at your service. :)



Happily, happily passed those days!
While the cheerful Jumblies staid;
They danced in circlets all night long,
To the plaintive pipe of the lively Dong,
In moonlight, shine, or shade.
For day and night he was always there
By the side of the Jumbly Girl so fair,
With her sky-blue hands, and her sea-green hair.
Till the morning came of that hateful day
When the Jumblies sailed in their sieve away,
And the Dong was left on the cruel shore
Gazing--gazing for evermore,--
Ever keeping his weary eyes on
That pea-green sail on the far horizon,--
Singing the Jumbly Chorus still
As he sate all day on the grassy hill,--
'Far and few, far and few,
Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue
And they went to sea in a sieve.'

George Eller
01-28-2009, 09:29 AM
-

The later westerns like "Lonesome Dove" and "Open Range" have put a lot more emphasis on authenticity. Great costumes and sound...

Yes, do like it.




I think Diane Lane (Lorena in Lonesome Dove) gave the lovely Annette Benning a good run for the money...


Not bad, George http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g133/llad12/lorena.jpg


but for a mature woman, and looks, Annette has the edge - only my opinion, George.
-

Not a problem 32Bravo ;)

I think they are both attractive women, it's difficult for me to choose between them...

http://www3.sympatico.ca/chris.irie/images/infotainment/open_range.jpg
Annette Benning (Open Range)

-

http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g133/llad12/lorena.jpg
Diane Lane (Lonesome Dove)

http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showpost.php?p=148901&postcount=74

http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showpost.php?p=148857&postcount=71

-

32Bravo
01-28-2009, 10:59 AM
Lovely jubiley...that's my girl!


-


http://www3.sympatico.ca/chris.irie/images/infotainment/open_range.jpg
Annette Benning (Open Range)



Fools rush in...
definately a potential Victoria's Secrets model... in fact I think I prefer this shot and the outfit to anything I've seen of Victoria's Secrets, including the current commercial offers :) - Mmmmmh !



http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g133/llad12/lorena.jpg


Thank you, George!

Librarian
01-28-2009, 04:33 PM
Their heads are green, and their hands are blue
And they went to sea in a sieve.'

There was a brave damsel of Brighton,
Whom nothing could possibly frighten;
She plunged in the sea,
And, with infinite glee,
Sailed away on the back of a Triton. :(

32Bravo
01-29-2009, 02:54 AM
There was a brave damsel of Brighton,
Whom nothing could possibly frighten;
She plunged in the sea,
And, with infinite glee,
Sailed away on the back of a Triton. :(

I call you bad, my little child,
Upon the title page,
Because a manner rude and wild
Is common at your age.

Librarian
01-29-2009, 04:14 AM
There once was a young man with a fad,
’Twas nothing so dreadfully bad,
But his benevolent friends thought it silly
When in full Piccadilly
He youdled because he was glad. :)

DavidW
01-29-2009, 05:08 AM
Great westerns topic, or lousy limericks topic!

32Bravo
01-29-2009, 05:17 AM
Great westerns topic, or lousy limericks topic!

Would you care to contribute to..?

DavidW
01-29-2009, 05:27 AM
There was a young sailor from Wales.
An expert at pissing in gales.
He could pee from a bar.
On the topgallent spar.
Without even wetting the sails!

32Bravo
01-29-2009, 05:36 AM
There was a young sailor from Wales.
An expert at pissing in gales.
He could pee from a bar.
On the topgallent spar.
Without even wetting the sails!

Now, he was obviously a great western!

Librarian
01-29-2009, 06:01 AM
Great westerns topic, or lousy limericks topic!

Both, my dear Mr. David, although those original (and sadly misinterpreted!:() gems of British poetry, originally composed by the Rev. Charles Inge, were acknowledged as the best poems in this specific field by a renowned professor Langford Reed in his significant study "The Origin, History and Achievements of the Limerick" (Jarrolds Publishers, London. – 1925, p. 38).

Nevertheless, let’s go back to the original theme of this thread. Here is my latest offer, honorable ladies and gentlemen: "The Untamed" from 1920. Yes, I know – many of us are too young to remember those far – away days, and the pre-Vitaphone film era. Hence, of all the Western stars who have ridden across the Hollywood sagebrush since movies began, there has never been much doubt that Mr. Tom Mix was amongst the greatest.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/TomMix-TheUntamed.jpg

"The Untamed", 1920 – Tom Mix

Mr. Mix brought authenticity, pep, escapism and – above all! – true showmanship to the western genre. And in the process he developed a popularity and a box office value equaled by no other Western star, perhaps not even by Mr. John Wayne.

A rugged adventurere, Mr. Mix had been a soldier, bronc-buster for the British during the Boer War, western marshal, and rodeo-performer before the films called him. Furthermore, he often wrote and directed them as well! Some of these early westerns had moments of real hell-for-leather action. His films were all pep and energy, and had the same spirit of boyish fun as the early Douglas Fairbanks films. Being a tough westerner himself, his performance naturally carried authority, but otherwise they were cheerful, breezy, aimed at wide audience, careful not to contain elements that might disturb children, and – thank God! – free of romantic entanglements. Mix’s screen hero never drank, smoked or cursed, and always eschewed unnecessary violence.

Probably we have never quite realized what good films he was making, movies that would retain their appeal and merit long after films hailed as great at the time. All he wanted to do was to put on a darned good show – and I am assuring you that he always did! :D

And now, please - present us your film preferences!:D

32Bravo
01-29-2009, 07:25 AM
Tom Mix?...now, you're really going back, my father used to rave about him.

If we're talking individual characters then we cannot ignore Hoppy!

The ring of the silver spurs...
http://www.hopalong.com/home.asp

Rising Sun*
01-29-2009, 08:20 AM
Tom Mix?...now, you're really going back, my father used to rave about him.

If we're talking individual characters then we cannot ignore Hoppy!

The ring of the silver spurs...
http://www.hopalong.com/home.asp

Which leads us to Roy Rogers (vomit).

The Cisco Kid. (Ah, Pancho. Ah, Cisco. Latin laughter. Fade as silly short legged ponies clatter into the distance.)

The Texas Rangers. Not too bad as a kid.

The Lone Ranger. (Hi Ho Silver. What a punce! Preferred but never televised version: LR and Tonto are surrounded by attacking Indians. LR says to Tonto "We're in big trouble." Tonto replies "What's this 'we', white man?")

Wagon Train. Yawn.

Rawhide. Yawn, except for Rowdy Yates who went on to give the greatest performance in the history of cinema in the greatest western film ever made, being The Outlaw Josey Wales.

Bonanza. Yawn, apart from the burning map at the start, which unfortunately failed to burn the set and cast before the show could be broadcast.

Hec Ramsay. Great. One of the best TV westerns ever made.

?Paladin?, also with Richard Boone and also pretty good.

Rifleman. Yawn verging on vomit.

The Marshal Dillon / Miss Kitty / Chester the whining cripple show, the name of which I cannot recall and of which I do not wish to be reminded.

Riverboat. Yawn.

Cheyenne. Passable at times.

I actually saw Hopalong Cassidy at Myers department store when I was about five or six years old, which was a bit of a concession on my part as I was spending most of my time running around in a Davey Crockett suit at the time. Hoppy's horse could do arithmetic, clumping it's hoof to give the answer. It took me a while, but I worked out later that it probably wasn't the real Hoppy and that the horse's arithmetic was a set up. Admittedly, I was in my forties before I had that blinding flash of cosmic insight, but I bet some of the other kids still think they saw the real Hoppy and that his nag could count.

Librarian
01-29-2009, 01:39 PM
Tom Mix?...now, you're really going back, my father used to rave about him.

Completely deservedly, my dear Mr. 32 Bravo. Tom never let his public down! :)

If nothing else, Mr. Mix certainly used a double less than any western star, and since most of his stunts were photographed relatively close up, there can be no doubt about it. What's more - Mr. Mix always liked to bring modern touches into his westerns – like car racing.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/TomMix-TheRoadDemon.jpg

Tom Mix – The Road Demon, 1921

Furthermore, action there was in plenty, but never of a vicious nature. Tom would never shoot a villain if he could subdue him by other means – and since those other means usually entailed fancy work with a lariat, or a helter-skelter chase climaxed with a fistic fracas, nobody missed the blood. :rolleyes:

Today’s blood-splattered westerns might take note of Tom’s approach to it.

Nevertheless, if we have to talk about the Old Stars who have galloped over the California landscape, William Surrey Hart is without any doubt the most important – and actually the most beloved! Bronco Billy Anderson literally created the Western Star – from him all else sprang. Tom Mix gave the western showmanship, color and excitement. But the greatest of the silent screen epoch, William S. Hart, brought realism and a rugged poetry to the "horse opera." He arrived on the scene in 1914 as an actor, and later as a director, to breathe new and vigorous life into what were literally the first adult westerns. And even today, they remain the best adult westerns!

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WilliamHart-DrawEgan.jpg

William Surrey Hart – The Return of Draw Egan, 1916

Mr. Hart traveled the West as a youngster. He grew up with Indians and trail herders, and acquired deep love of the West, which was to remain with him all his life. But stardom in westerns arrived relatively late – he spent 20 years first on the Broadway as a Shakespearean actor! Drifting into westerns in 1914, he played heavy, good badman roles. He was a tremendously sentimental man, and also a man so devoted to the lore of the West that nothing but the real thing would do for him. His rugged adventures had an almost documentary-like realism to them.

There was nothing glamorous about Hart’s West, with its shabby wooden-shack towns, dusty exteriors, and practical, rather than colorful costumes. Despite his sentimental streak, Hart was a big, rugged fellow too, and took his chances in the fight and ridding scenes along with his loyal crew, and his bellowed little pinto pony, Fritz.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WilliamHart-PintoBen.jpg

Pinto Ben, 1915 - William Surrey Hart and his Fritz

His last screen appearance was in 1939, in a spoken prologue of reissued Tumbleweeds. His fine, old voice, with the range and emotion that comes only from years of stage work, boomed out as he told of the early days of the West, of his love of the west, and his love of motion pictures. Probably it was the most moving 8 minutes ever put on film – literally a man delivering his own epitaph! :shock:

It is a pity that an actor as fine as hart never had a chance to star in talkies. Had he been a little younger, he might well have occupied the position that Gary Cooper assumed in the mid-thirties... :(

HAWKEYE
01-30-2009, 01:03 AM
There once was a girl from Nizais
who had tits of two different sizes
one was so small
it was nothing at all
the other was large and won prizes

There once was a couple named Kelly
who went around belly to belly
because in their haste
they used library paste
instead of petroleum jelly

HAWKEYE
01-30-2009, 01:04 AM
Tom Mix and William S. Hart were both pallbearers at Wyatt Earps funeral.....

Tom Mix wept...........

32Bravo
01-30-2009, 02:52 AM
Tom Mix wept...........

So did Jesus, apparently.

32Bravo
01-30-2009, 03:01 AM
Completely deservedly, my dear Mr. 32 Bravo. Tom never let his public down! :)

If nothing else, Mr. Mix certainly used a double less than any western star, and since most of his stunts were photographed relatively close up, there can be no doubt about it. What's more - Mr. Mix always liked to bring modern touches into his westerns – like car racing.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/TomMix-TheRoadDemon.jpg

Tom Mix – The Road Demon, 1921

Furthermore, action there was in plenty, but never of a vicious nature. Tom would never shoot a villain if he could subdue him by other means – and since those other means usually entailed fancy work with a lariat, or a helter-skelter chase climaxed with a fistic fracas, nobody missed the blood. :rolleyes:

Today’s blood-splattered westerns might take note of Tom’s approach to it.

Nevertheless, if we have to talk about the Old Stars who have galloped over the California landscape, William Surrey Hart is without any doubt the most important – and actually the most beloved! Bronco Billy Anderson literally created the Western Star – from him all else sprang. Tom Mix gave the western showmanship, color and excitement. But the greatest of the silent screen epoch, William S. Hart, brought realism and a rugged poetry to the "horse opera." He arrived on the scene in 1914 as an actor, and later as a director, to breathe new and vigorous life into what were literally the first adult westerns. And even today, they remain the best adult westerns!

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WilliamHart-DrawEgan.jpg

William Surrey Hart – The Return of Draw Egan, 1916

Mr. Hart traveled the West as a youngster. He grew up with Indians and trail herders, and acquired deep love of the West, which was to remain with him all his life. But stardom in westerns arrived relatively late – he spent 20 years first on the Broadway as a Shakespearean actor! Drifting into westerns in 1914, he played heavy, good badman roles. He was a tremendously sentimental man, and also a man so devoted to the lore of the West that nothing but the real thing would do for him. His rugged adventures had an almost documentary-like realism to them.

There was nothing glamorous about Hart’s West, with its shabby wooden-shack towns, dusty exteriors, and practical, rather than colorful costumes. Despite his sentimental streak, Hart was a big, rugged fellow too, and took his chances in the fight and ridding scenes along with his loyal crew, and his bellowed little pinto pony, Fritz.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/WilliamHart-PintoBen.jpg

Pinto Ben, 1915 - William Surrey Hart and his Fritz

His last screen appearance was in 1939, in a spoken prologue of reissued Tumbleweeds. His fine, old voice, with the range and emotion that comes only from years of stage work, boomed out as he told of the early days of the West, of his love of the west, and his love of motion pictures. Probably it was the most moving 8 minutes ever put on film – literally a man delivering his own epitaph! :shock:

It is a pity that an actor as fine as hart never had a chance to star in talkies. Had he been a little younger, he might well have occupied the position that Gary Cooper assumed in the mid-thirties... :(

Okay, you've persuaded me - to look at them, at least - I'll reserve my opinion until then.

here are some DVD's: http://turnerclassic.moviesunlimited.com/browse_list.asp?cid=si&dept=Tom+Mix&media=d

HAWKEYE
01-31-2009, 05:39 AM
No discussion of great westerns can be complete without mentioning Ben Johnson.

Ben has always been one of my favorite cowboys, like Hart and others he was a real cowboy. He was a ranchhand who Howard Hughes hired to move a herd of horses to California in 1940 to use in making The Outlaw. He decided to stay and work in the movies because of the pay ("I'd been making a dollar a day as a cowboy, and my first check in Hollywood was for $300. After that, you couldn't have driven me back to Oklahoma with a club."). Only once was he tapped to play a leading role and that was still as a cowboy of sorts in Mighty Joe Young. Handsome and tall at 6'2" with a great western drawl to his voice Ben was an addition to any western. Laconic discribes how I see Ben in his roles. His "Sgt. Tyree" and "Trooper Tyree" in She Wore a Yellow Ribbon and Rio Grande typlifies Ben at his best. Ben was in many of the greats, including The Wild Bunch and Hang 'em High where he saved Clint's bacon by cutting his hang rope. He must have liked Clint's character's name because he right afterward played "Jed Cooper" on The Virginian. Ben was the only actor to ever quit the movie business and return to cowboying, he took off for a year and won a world championship roping competition, but after only making enough to clear expenses he went back to Hollywood. Thank goodness for that, he went on to make 50 + more appearances in movies and TV shows for the next 40 years. So here's to Ben....I miss you.

http://www.nndb.com/people/425/000064233/ben-johnson-sized.jpg

George Eller
01-31-2009, 04:59 PM
-

Neville Brand who played Texas Ranger Reese Bennett in the western TV series Laredo which ran from 1965-1967.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neville_Brand

http://img512.imageshack.us/img512/2600/nevillebrand02ei1.jpg


LAREDO Actor Info
NEVILLE BRAND as Reese Bennett (a Texas Ranger)
http://www.williamsmith.org/brand.html

http://www.williamsmith.org/laredo.html

http://www.williamsmith.org/pilot.html

http://www.williamsmith.org/laredo1.html

http://www.williamsmith.org/laredo2.html

http://www.williamsmith.org/laredo3.html

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058819/

http://img504.imageshack.us/img504/7166/laradocast01qr5.jpg

Laredo (TV series)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laredo_(TV_series)
http://www.tv.com/show/4583/summary.html
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058819/

Laredo (TV series) - YouTube Video Clips:
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_type=&search_query=laredo+neville+brand&aq=0&oq=laredo+neville+b
http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=laredo+neville+brand&page=2

I remember watching the western series Larado on TV as a little kid in the 1960's - it was one of my favorites.

-

IMDb
Biography for Neville Brand
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0104507/bio

Biography for Neville Brand
Date of Birth
13 August 1920, Griswold, Iowa, USA

Date of Death
16 April 1992, Sacramento, California, USA. (emphysema)

Height
5' 8" (1.73 m)


Mini Biography

Neville Brand joined the US Army in 1939, meaning to make a career in the military. It was while he was in the Army that he made his acting debut, in Army training films, and this experience apparently changed the direction of his life. Once a civilian again, he used his GI Bill education assistance to study drama with the American Theater Wing, then appeared in several Broadway plays. His first movie was 1950's D.O.A. (1950). Among his earliest films was the Oscar-winning Stalag 17 (1953). His heavy features and gravelly voice made Brand a natural tough guy: "With this kisser, I knew early in the game I wasn't going to make the world forget Clark Gable", he once told a reporter. He played Al Capone in The George Raft Story (1961), The Scarface Mob (1959) (TV), and TV's "The Untouchables" (1959). Among his other memorable roles are the sympathetic guard in Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) and the representative of rioting convicts in Riot in Cell Block 11 (1954). Perhaps his best-loved role was that of the soft-hearted, loud-mouthed, none-too-bright-but-very-effective Texas Ranger Reese Bennett of Backtrack! (1969), Three Guns for Texas (1968), and TV's "Laredo" (1965).

Spouse
Rae Brand (? - 16 April 1992) (his death) 2 children

Trivia

Neville Brand was regularly cited as the '4th most decorated soldier in WWII' but that information is incorrect and was denied by Brand before his death. He was, however, a recipient of, according to official military records the Silver Star, for gallantry in combat. His other awards and decorations are the Purple Heart, the Good Conduct Medal, the American Defense Service Ribbon, the European/African/Middle Eastern Theater Ribbon with three Battle Stars, one Overseas Service Bar, one Service Stripe, and the Combat Infantryman's Badge.

-

NEVILLE BRAND
Setting the Record Straight
by Robert E. Witter
http://www.jodavidsmeyer.com/combat/military/neville_brand.html

How many of you remember the tough, but compassionate prison guard Bull Ransom in the 1962 classic "The Birdman of Alcatraz?" What about Duke, the barely restrained prisoner of war in "Stalag 17" ? Well, Ransom, Duke, and dozens of other characters, shared the same craggy face and gravelly voice of one man — Mr. Neville Brand — an "actor's actor"1 and real life World War II hero. If you do a little searching, you'll find references to his acting career, but nearly every biographical account of his military service is just, plain wrong. As his brother, Bryce Brand, once put it, "There was a lot they printed about Nev that wasn't true." To illustrate his point, one example is a published account of how Neville Brand participated in (and barely survived) the ill-fated Dieppe Raid on the coast of Western Europe -- two years before he ever left the States!

One of seven children, Neville Brand was born to Leo and Helen Brand on August 135h, 1920, in Griswold, Iowa. At the age of seven, he and his family moved to Kewanee, Illinois, where he grew up, graduated from high school, and entered the Illinois National Guard on October 23rd, 1939, as a private with Company F, 129th Infantry. A year-and-a-half later, Corporal Brand was inducted into Federal service with the 129th, and assigned Army Serial Number 20602562.

After five weeks of infantry training, and an unsuccessful attempt at Officers Candidate School, the twenty-four-year-old former shoe salesman departed for the European Theater of Operations on December 9th, 1944, and arrived there on December 16th. Relatively little is known of his nine months and nineteen days overseas, but his official military records reflect that Neville Brand participated in the Ardennes, Rhineland, and Central European campaigns, and received the Silver star while convalescing at the 21st General Hospital for gallantry in combat. His other awards and decorations are the Purple Heart, the Good Conduct Medal, the American Defense Service Ribbon, the European/African/Middle Eastern Theater Ribbon with three Battle Stars, one Overseas Service Bar, one Service Stripe, and the Combat Infantryman's Badge. In a rare 1966 interview in which he consented to speak of his wartime service, Brand recalled how he earned his Silver Star when his unit came under intense fire from German machine guns located within a hunting lodge. "I must have flipped my lid," he said, for "I decided to go into that lodge." Disregarding his own safety, he worked his way around to the rear of the lodge/command post, burst in through the back and single-handedly dispatched the enemy within.

Later, on April 7th, 1945, exactly one month and a day before the official German surrender, Sergeant Brand was wounded in action by the Weser River. Felled by a gunshot to his upper right arm, and pinned down by withering enemy ground fire, Brand lay there slowly bleeding to death. "I knew I was dying," he said, "It was a lovely feeling, like being half-loaded." Rescued and treated, Brand was evacuated to a military hospital and, on September 17th, 1945, he departed for the United States. Less than a month later, Staff Sergeant Brand was honorably discharged from the U.S. Army at Fort Sheridan, Illinois.

After his discharge, Neville Brand studied acting under the G.I. Bill, and appeared in his first film as a sadistic hoodlum opposite Edmond O'Brien in the 1950 production of "D.O.A." Over the next thirty-five years, Neville Brand consistently delivered outstanding performances on the stage, television and film, winning the prestigious Sylvania Award in 1958 for his performance in "All the King's Men." Having performed with Mr. Brand in a 1964 episode of the television show Combat!, Mr. Richard Peabody (who played the part of "Littlejohn") recalled that, "He was sort of an actor's actor...his peers respected his work a great deal." Moreover, "He was one of the nicer guests we had on the show; extremely friendly, and very well liked by both the cast and the crew."

One of Neville Brand's passions was reading. Having once visited Mr. Brand's home in Malibu, co-star Richard Peabody remembers, "I saw all these book cases — I couldn't believe it, I've never seen such an array of books in anybody's private home in my life -- it looked like a library ... I was amazed about what an avid reader he was. You look at the titles, and his tastes were really eclectic — he was interested in everything."

Neville Brand's home was destroyed by fire, and most of his personal mementoes (and cherished books) were lost. Some years later, reclusive and enduring a protracted struggle with emphysema, Neville Brand passed away on April 16th, 1992, at Sutter General Hospital in Sacramento, California. His ashes are interred at East Lawn Memorial Park, Sacramento, California, in a vessel shaped like a book, with his name engraved on the spine.

-

Combat! episode review
(078)Fly Away Home
http://www.jodavidsmeyer.com/combat/episodes/Fly_Away_Home.html

In his column in the Mountain Democrat, **** Peabody said, "The late Neville Brand was as interesting as any guest we had. He liked to drink, but wisely held off until the last scene was shot. We invited him to the bar in Vic's dressing room, and a couple of hours later everyone had left except Neville and myself." **** Peabody had to drive Brand to his Malibu home, where his wife invited him in for a drink. Peabody was impressed with the floor-to-ceiling bookshelves in every room of the house. "There were literally thousands of volumes," says Peabody. "His tastes were eclectic, since almost everything interested him. Neville's wife pointed to the books and said, 'He's read every one of them.'" A high-school drop-out, Neville Brand was self-educated.

-

SEE ALSO:

Neville Brand Biography
http://movies.yahoo.com/movie/contributor/1800036869/bio

Neville Brand Movies
http://www.bestprices.com/cgi-bin/vlink/actors/dvds-by-actor-Neville-Brand.html

Neville Brand (Actor)
Filmography
http://www.bestprices.com/cgi-bin/vlink/dvd_person?id=uu2MwYcT&p_id=P--8058
http://www.bestprices.com/cgi-bin/vlink/024543025443.html

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32Bravo
02-03-2009, 01:10 PM
George, I was an avid fan of Laredo, back in the Sixties.

I was looking at the pics in your post above and remembered that the trwo younger Rangers were quite muscular. One of them was especially familiar, and here he is:
http://www.williamsmith.org/image1Q3.JPG

http://www.imdb.com/media/rm412455936/nm0810342


Falconetti

http://www.imdb.com/media/rm496342016/nm0810342

32Bravo
02-03-2009, 01:11 PM
And, speaking of great westerns, how about Bronco Billy?

George Eller
02-05-2009, 07:32 PM
George, I was an avid fan of Laredo, back in the Sixties.

I was looking at the pics in your post above and remembered that the trwo younger Rangers were quite muscular. One of them was especially familiar, and here he is:
http://www.williamsmith.org/image1Q3.JPG

http://www.imdb.com/media/rm412455936/nm0810342


Falconetti

http://www.imdb.com/media/rm496342016/nm0810342
-

Yes, actor William Smith who played "Joe Riley" in the Laredo series was quite muscular. He was a body builder, but slimmed down before joining the cast.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Smith_(actor)
quote: "The physically imposing 6'2" actor was a lifelong bodybuilder and had the distinction of being the final Marlboro Man before the cigarette ads were discontinued on TV.

...Going against his rough-hewn image, Smith was also highly educated. He held a Bachelor of Arts from Syracuse and a Master's Degree in Russian Studies from UCLA. He even taught Russian at UCLA before abandoning his Ph.D. studies for an MGM contract. He also studied at the Sorbonne in Paris and the University of Munich while learning languages courtesy of the military. Smith is fluent in Russian, Serbo-Croatian, French, and German. During the Korean War he was a Russian Intercept Interrogator and was awarded a Purple Heart. He had both CIA and NSA clearance and intended to enter a classified position with the U.S. government, but married a French actress which meant he lost his security clearance."

I have seen William Smith as a character actor in later movies such as The Frisco Kid (1979) where he played the desperado "Matt Diggs", and in Red Dawn (1984), where he played Russian "Col. Strelnikov" (The Hunter) a specialist in counter-insurgency.

The other rangers Peter Brown as "Chad Cooper" and Neville Brand as "Reese Bennett" might also be recognized from movies they have appeared in. Peter Brown played Pvt. / Cpl. Rollo Burns in the movie Darby's Rangers (1958) and the sniper "Bullseye" in the movie Merrill's Marauders (1962). And Neville Brand played the bully character "Duke" - one of the American POW's in the movie Stalag 17 (1953) with actor William Holden.

-

LAREDO STAR INFO
WILLIAM SMITH as Joe Riley
http://www.williamsmith.org/smith.html

Laredo's Ranger JOE RILEY was an orphan raised by Indians. It was this childhood which helped him become the best tracker in the Rangers and made him deadly with the knife he always wore in a sheath on his pant leg. He also had an eagle eye for long-distance rifle fire.

Although Laredo was the story of three Rangers (2nd season four) it was Chad and Joe who were the real team. In fact, it was fortunate that William Smith and Peter Brown got along so well because their characters were essentially joined at the hip. In most episodes they were in almost every scene together, especially in the first year. Reese was often their foil, the butt of their jokes, the manipulated sucker or otherwise the comedy focal point.

Although in real life it was William Smith who was highly educated, in Laredo Peter Brown’s character Chad was the educated one who frequently used words Joe had to ask to be translated into English. The show took advantage of Peter Brown’s excellent Spanish but left Joe with only his uneducated English despite the fact that in real life Bill is a master of many languages. Joe was, however, the wild west equivalent of “street smart”.

Interaction with women was always fleeting on Laredo, but what there was went mostly to Chad or sometimes Reese and the Captain (and in year two, Erik Hunter) but rarely to Joe unless one counts his being the object of infatuation of the bloodthirsty Linda Littletrees.

Some descriptions of Laredo call William Smith a “gentle giant” but in fact he didn’t particularly stand out in size next to the wiry 6’ foot Peter Brown and the 6’6” heavily built Philip Carey, Although 6’2” with excellent musculature, Bill had slimmed down considerably from his previous body-builder days. (He would bulk up again for his future biker films in which he would rarely be referred to as "gentle").

WILLIAM SMITH Laredo PIX: Joe & Co.
http://www.williamsmith.org/wsphoto.html
http://www.williamsmith.org/wsphoto2.html

-

[i]Laredo Episode Eleven 12-2-1965 (season 1)
"JINX"
http://www.williamsmith.org/jinx.html

Written by JOHN D. F. BLACK
Directed by PAUL STANLEY

Guest Cast:
ALBERT SALMI as Cletus Grogan
SHELLEY MORRISON as Linda Littletrees
JOHN ABBOTT as Mr. Irwing
RICHARD DEVON as Max Vander
RALPH MANZA as Blue Dog
ROY BARCROFT as Marshal Speaks
RICHARD COLLIER as Jones
X BRANDS as Randoe

When Reese’s friend Cletus comes to Laredo, things go wrong all around him - runaway horses, broken wagon wheels, busted feed sacks. Reese tries to show him he’s not a jinx by getting him signed up as a Ranger. When Chad hears about the jinx, his first thought is to figure how to use it in a card game to his advantage. However, when they're all assigned to hunt down Linda Littletrees' gang, the first thing Cletus does is disconnect Chad’s shoulder, driving thoughts of profit from Chad’s mind. Littletrees’ gang has robbed the bank in the first town the Rangers come to. While Chad sees the doctor, Joe’s attempt to track the gang is hampered by a freak rainstorm. The Littletrees gang watches Joe from a ridge. When the rain stops, Joe takes off his wet shirt. Linda’s eyes bulge at the sight. She’s in love — much to the dismay of her ardent suitor Blue Dog who is now determined to kill Joe. The gang sets a trap to capture Joe, He manages to fight them off until Linda hits him on the head with a rock. While the rest of the gang goes off to intercept the other Rangers, Linda proposes marriage to Joe. He’s rescued by the arrival of the other Rangers. During the gunfight, Reese sets it up so Cletus can rescue him, leading Cletus to believe the Jinx is gone. Cletus resigns from the Rangers to return to his waiting girlfriend, leaving disaster striking everywhere Reese walks.

http://img21.imageshack.us/img21/5183/lindalittletrees01dw6.jpg

NiteOwl Review:
Much as we disliked the stereotypical Indians in Laredo, there was something interesting about the Linda Littletrees persona. In her previous appearance she duped Martin Milner's character. Joe is not as easily manipulated. On the whole this was an amusing episode. Cast Note: Shelley Morrison later played a nun on The Flying Nun and in the 1999-2000 season joined the cast of the sitcom Will and Grace. Albert Salmi was another of the actors considered to replace Neville Brand due to Brand's on-going inability to cope with the heavy demands of series television. Production Note: Producers combined "Jinx" with 2 other Linda Littletrees episode "Yahoo" & "No Bugles, One Drum" to make the feature film "Three Guns for Texas" for overseas distribution.

SEE ALSO:
LAREDO Episode Fifty-Seven 4-7-1967 (season 3)
"Split the Difference" (last and final episode of the series)
http://www.williamsmith.org/split.html

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LAREDO Actor Info
PETER BROWN as CHAD COOPER
http://www.williamsmith.org/brown.html

http://www.williamsmith.org/pbphotos.html
http://www.williamsmith.org/pbphoto2.html

-

LAREDO Actor Info
PHILIP CAREY as Captain Edward Parmalee
http://www.williamsmith.org/carey.html

-

LAREDO Actor Info
NEVILLE BRAND as Reese Bennett
http://www.williamsmith.org/brand.html

-

LAREDO Star Info
ROBERT WOLDERS as Erik Hunter
http://www.williamsmith.org/wolders.html

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32Bravo
02-11-2009, 04:22 PM
Obviously, you are a bit of a fan, george. :)

I wouldn't have made the 'Kwai' connection with Peter brown, but, then, I haven't seen Laredo since the Sixities. Perhaps if I saw it again I might. I'll have to check out your links when I have a few moments.

Ta, la'!

George Eller
02-12-2009, 04:15 AM
Obviously, you are a bit of a fan, george. :)

I wouldn't have made the 'Kwai' connection with Peter brown, but, then, I haven't seen Laredo since the Sixities. Perhaps if I saw it again I might. I'll have to check out your links when I have a few moments.

Ta, la'!
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I'm sorry 32Bravo, my mistake.

It was actor Geoffrey Horne who played the Canadian Lieutenant Joyce in the movie Bridge on the River Kwai (1957).

Actor Peter Brown was close to the same age and played Pvt. / Cpl. Rollo Burns in the movie Darby's Rangers (1958) and the sniper "Bullseye" in the movie Merrill's Marauders (1962).

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Peter Brown
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Brown_(actor)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Darby%27s_Rangers_(1958_film)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merrill%27s_Marauders_(film)

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Geoffrey Horne
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_Horne

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bridge_on_the_river_kwai

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HAWKEYE
02-12-2009, 07:42 AM
I downloaded and watched 'part' of one episode the other night after reading this thread. I remember now why I wasn't that much of a 'fan' of the show. The Chad and Joe characters spent most of the first half of the show pulling juvenile tricks on the Reese character. It was silly and obviously geared for a younger audience. I turned it off about 1/2 way through.

George Eller
02-12-2009, 02:24 PM
I downloaded and watched 'part' of one episode the other night after reading this thread. I remember now why I wasn't that much of a 'fan' of the show. The Chad and Joe characters spent most of the first half of the show pulling juvenile tricks on the Reese character. It was silly and obviously geared for a younger audience. I turned it off about 1/2 way through.
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It probably was, I would have definitely fit the category of younger audience. I was about 5 years old when the series first came out. :)

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32Bravo
03-07-2009, 02:26 PM
Of course, one shouldn't forget the one about chaps behaving badly in Big Sky Country - won three oscars. :)

http://imagecache2.allposters.com/images/pic/AQUA/24-383~Brokeback-Mountain-Posters.jpg

Richie B
03-07-2009, 04:38 PM
Of course, one shouldn't forget the one about chaps behaving badly in Big Sky Country - won three oscars. :)

Is that the one where the gay cowboy rides into town ands shoots up the sherriff ? :shock:

32Bravo
03-08-2009, 03:14 AM
I don't recollect that happening...certainly explains why they're called Cowboys, and adds new meaning to 'The Cowboy Way'. :lol:



http://www.harpercollins.com/books/9780380788415/Cowboy_Way_The/index.aspx

A good read, actually, and nothing to do with chaps being naughty.

BriteLite
03-08-2009, 09:05 PM
I must mention another of the great western character actors: Slim Pickens

My favorite list in no order:

The Good The Bad and The Ugly
Josey Wales
The Searchers
The Shootist
Blazing Saddles
Tombstone
She Wore A Yellow Ribbon
I could list 20 more however others have named them and why bore you?

MY favorite western and all time movie is Little Big Man. Perhaps Dustin Hoffman's best performance in a stellar career of great performances. The movie is sweet and sour, a roller coaster history in the life of an Indian-White man. Hmm... maybe that's White-Indian man. If you saw the movie you know what I mean. If you have not viewed it you should.