PDA

View Full Version : Charles Lindbergh



colonel hogan
12-22-2008, 01:44 AM
Was lindberg as american as we thought or was he a nazi sympethzer?

flamethrowerguy
12-22-2008, 06:29 AM
Was lindberg as american as we thought or was he a nazi sympethzer?

What's a "sympethzer"?

Rising Sun*
12-22-2008, 06:41 AM
What's a "sympethzer"?

It is a musical instrument with a keyboard like a piano or, on the deluxe model, a Stalin Organ.

It senses your mood and the keys operate all by themselves to create soothing music to lift your mood or, in the case of the Stalin Organ model, to blow you away.

flamethrowerguy
12-22-2008, 06:43 AM
It is a musical instrument with a keyboard like a piano or, on the deluxe model, a Stalin Organ.

It senses your mood and the keys operate all by themselves to create soothing music to lift your mood or, in the case of the Stalin Organ model, to blow you away.

I see. Then again, what exactly are the originalities of a "Nazi sympethzer"?

Nickdfresh
12-22-2008, 06:45 AM
Was lindberg as american as we thought or was he a nazi sympethzer?

Off the top of my head, he shared some of the theories with the Nazis regarding the crude, pseudo-science of early 20th century racial Eugenics and he was very much a diehard Isolationist.

However, it should be noted (and few mention this) that he helped make technical adjustments on the fuel system (I think) of the P-38 making it far more effective later in the War and extending its service life in the the PTO to almost the end of the War. He is also the only civilian pilot to register a combat kill as he shot down a Japanese fighter while (illegally) flying missions...

http://www.charleslindbergh.com/history/b24.asp

From: http://www.plane-crazy.net/links/p38.htm


Lindbergh Connection

Charles Lindbergh was given permission by Colonel Robert Morrissey to travel to Nadzah, New Guinea, and become familiar with the P-38. On the 15th of June, 1944 Lindbergh arrived and was soon spending time behind a P-38. His first flight was rather interesting because once he landed, a brake malfunction resulted in a blown tyre, but there was no damage. Soon Lindbergh felt comfortable with the aircraft, and on the 26th of June he took off to join up with the 475th Fighter Group. He flew on combat missions as an observer, and quickly calculated that the combat radius could be extended by 30%. A standard technique at the time was cruising at 2200 - 2400 rpm's in auto-rich at low manifold pressure. Lindbergh called for only 1600 rpm in an auto-lean mixture with a high manifold pressure. This reduced fuel consumption to 70 U.S. gallons (265 liters) per hour, and resulted in a cruising speed of 185 mph (298 km/h). By comparison in July 1944, P-38s would fly a five-hour mission and come back on fumes, but after taking Lindbergh's advice they completed long missions with fuel to spare.

navyson
12-22-2008, 06:46 AM
Off the top of my head, wasn't he more of a pro-isolationist? Meaning that he didn't want America's involvement in the war?

P.S. Wasn't the sympethzyr used heavily in '80's music?:D

Rising Sun*
12-22-2008, 06:46 AM
Was lindberg as american as we thought or was he a nazi sympethzer?

BTW, it's Lindbergh.

And I rather hope that this isn't the trolling post it strikes me as.

So how about clarifying your question to specify exactly what it is you want to discuss about him?

Nickdfresh
12-22-2008, 06:50 AM
Yeah, threads answered by a simple Google search are getting old...

Rising Sun*
12-22-2008, 07:20 AM
I see. Then again, what exactly are the originalities of a "Nazi sympethzer"?

The keyboard on the 'Nazi sympethzer' has had all the schwarz keys removed.

It always plays a whiter shade of pale.

redcoat
12-22-2008, 04:17 PM
However, it should be noted (and few mention this) that he helped make technical adjustments on the fuel system (I think) of the P-38 making it far more effective later in the War and extending its service life in the the PTO to almost the end of the War. He is also the only civilian pilot to register a combat kill as he shot down a Japanese fighter while (illegally) flying missions...Lindbergh shared the Nazi's views on race, especially in relation to the Jews, and thought that the Nazi's would win in Europe as the Nazi regime was superior to the 'corrupt and weak' democratic nations.
However he was a loyal American, and once the Axis nations had attacked the USA, he did support the US war effort as much as he could.

ps; It was quite common for the same people who shared the Nazi's racist views to be the most patriotic when their nations were attacked by the Nazi's,

Nickdfresh
12-22-2008, 09:10 PM
Lindbergh shared the Nazi's views on race, especially in relation to the Jews, and thought that the Nazi's would win in Europe as the Nazi regime was superior to the 'corrupt and weak' democratic nations.
However he was a loyal American, and once the Axis nations had attacked the USA, he did support the US war effort as much as he could.

ps; It was quite common for the same people who shared the Nazi's racist views to be the most patriotic when their nations were attacked by the Nazi's,


I haven't read about Lindbergh in depth, but he seemed an odd character. But he was a loyal American. As far as his views, it's been a while since I read or saw anything regarding them that were concrete. However, I think it should be noted that Antisemitism was almost institutionally accepted in both the US and UK, to a lesser and lessor extent up until after WWII. I believe that he was a product of his time, which as now, were members of a class that would accept conspiratorial views and certainly were racists to a certain extent. But that applies to a broad spectrum.

When you say "he shared" the Nazis racist views, I think there are varying shades of gray. Just as I would say that a lot of former Marxist-Leninists "shared" many of Stalin's views does not mean that they went to the extremes that he did, and they probably would have been horrified if they saw the institutional horrors taking place.

I also tend to think that some misinterpret the very powerful strain of Isolationism in the US, and the extremes many went to in order to rationalize why the United States should never enter war to save Europe or defend the British Empire. He was certainly not alone, however, I think it might me tough to find his core beliefs in ancillary statements he made. And as with the former US ambassador to Britain, Joseph Kennedy, if some of their comments are largely misinterpreted as pro-German/Nazi when in many cases they were desperately anti-war...

Bear in mind that I am not a huge Charles Lindbergh fan, but I do want to be fair to him...

Carl Schwamberger
12-29-2008, 08:35 PM
Lindberg made a 1930s trip to Germany where he fell for the bright and shining propaganda Goebbels organization put up. Nothing unusal there a lot of people did. His many pro German and pro Facist remarks derive from that visit.

Nighthawke
01-05-2009, 03:00 PM
Lindy was a Yankee, Red- White- and Blue-Blooded. His Autobiographer clarified the Nazi issue by remarking that "Charles was inexperienced in his political maneuverings that he was easily portrayed as one."

Lindy did the "50 Mission Crush" while in the Pacific while being a civilian consultant for various companies.
If it were not for FDR and his Cabinet, he would have made full General by Iwo Jima.