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aly j
10-18-2008, 10:46 PM
What was their military profession/occupation?

Major Walter Schmidt
10-19-2008, 08:41 AM
Not exactly military but my grandfather made aircraft parts for Kamikaze planes (or so he was told) in WWII.

navyson
10-19-2008, 08:47 AM
Not exactly military but my grandfather made aircraft parts for Kamikaze planes (or so he was told) in WWII.
Well, that would make for a cool story! My dad was in the US Navy in the PTO during WW2 and he was on the gun crew of twin 40mm AA. They shot at quite a few planes.
http://www.ww2incolor.com/d/83631-2/Destroyer+2 (http://www.ww2incolor.com/us-navy/Destroyer+2.html)
Those are the twin 40mm guns on the platform above the larger gun.

Rising Sun*
10-19-2008, 08:48 AM
What was their military profession/occupation?

How about starting with what yours did?

aly j
10-19-2008, 09:44 AM
How about starting with what yours did?

My gandparents had boring jobs in ww2.

My grandma was a house wife.
My other grandma was an officeworker in the war office.
My granddad work in a steel factory{dont know what he was making}
My other granddad was a tank repairer.

pretty dispointing.

Major Walter Schmidt
10-19-2008, 01:19 PM
[QUOTE=aly j;139358]
My other granddad was a tank repairer.
[QUOTE]

Thats pretty cool! Are there any photos? Id love to see some Armour.

flamethrowerguy
10-19-2008, 01:52 PM
Not exactly military but my grandfather made aircraft parts for Kamikaze planes (or so he was told) in WWII.

Major, you used to make quite a secret about your origin. Maybe you just gave away that your japanese? ;)

Richie B
10-19-2008, 03:32 PM
My father was in the Royal Engineers following a spell in a Heavy Rescue Squad.

Landed in at Port en Bessin in Normandy on June 12th 1944.

Stayed in the Army until 1947.

My mother worked in the Post Office - suffered the Blitz and did some fire watching.

Richie

Nickdfresh
10-19-2008, 05:00 PM
Major, you used to make quite a secret about your origin. Maybe you just gave away that your japanese? ;)

I believe he's hinted that's he's an American of Japanese decent in the past...

kiwimac
10-19-2008, 05:59 PM
My father was an RSM in the NZ Armoured Division and later transferred to Radar on secondment to the RNZ Navy. He served from 1939-1947.

Churchill
10-19-2008, 07:07 PM
My great uncle served in Italy with the Canadians.

This may not be WWII, but in WWI, one of my great-granddads fought against Germany(the French one), and another one fought against Italy(the Hungarian one).

Major Walter Schmidt
10-19-2008, 07:17 PM
I believe he's hinted that's he's an American of Japanese decent in the past...

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/systems/ship/images/loose-lips-sink-ships-1.jpg
:mrgreen::mrgreen:

Oh shit they broke the Purple Code!!!

Major Walter Schmidt
10-19-2008, 09:54 PM
Well, that would make for a cool story! My dad was in the US Navy in the PTO during WW2 and he was on the gun crew of twin 20mm AA. They shot at quite a few planes.
Maybe your dad shot down some planes my Grandfather made parts for...
Quite possible you know.

According to him, he was at the train station when a F6F (I think) started to shoot at the nearby explosives bunker(warehouse? or factory). He dived under a train car, then ran away. If he had stayed there, he would have been torn to bits by the fighter or blown up by the explosion of the explosives bunker. He could actualy see the pilots face, the goggles and everything.... He also saw the pilot grinning like hell, which sends a chill down my spine evrytime I hear it.
Oh yeah, and he survived the war in one piece.

gunner-B
10-19-2008, 11:35 PM
My dear old Dad ‘bless him’ started out as a ARP driver in 1940. Seeing as he was born & bred in the East End of London , you can appreciate that he witnessed first hand the devastation of the Blitz.
His recollections of this period were harrowing, funny, ‘yes, funny‘ extra-ordinary & gruesome.

In April 1941 he got his call-up papers and was enlisted as a Driver-Gunner in the 12th Anti-Aircraft Division, based in Scotland, his battery (3.7 A.A Guns)were sent to Northern Ireland.
In September 1942 the division was disbanded and my dad went into the Royal Hampshire regiment, with which he saw action in North Africa, Sicily & Italy. His frontline fighting came to an end at the commencement of the Gothic line assault. Not because of a wound, but an injury that came about whilst playing football. He had dislocated his ankle, which in turn weakened the joint so much that it would dislocate easily (It also finished his football career with Leyton Orient Football Club, the team he played For, pre-war)and was
deemed no longer fit for front line duty.

He spent the rest of the war destroying ammunitions, first by dumping it in the Adriatic. Then with the help of just himself, a German Engineers Officer and a dozen Italian civilians, by blowing it up in the mountains. He was demobbed in 1946.
Oh yes! Just for the record; His demob suit was a double breasted dark brown pinstripe, three piece. With a dark brown trilby, tie & leather shoes. ( he still had the shoes when he died on the 20th June 1983)

My Mum had a young family to look after so didn’t do any war work. Her husband was away on active service. My mum divorced in 1945 & married my dad in November 1947.
Mum went on to have 6 children with dad, 4 Boys 2 Girls, me being the youngest, my sister the oldest.
Mums still alive, though frail, and is three months away from her 92nd birthday, and I love her dearly.

aly j
10-20-2008, 02:03 AM
[QUOTE=aly j;139358]
My other granddad was a tank repairer.
[QUOTE]

Thats pretty cool! Are there any photos? Id love to see some Armour.

Unforturnaly, grandpa did not want photographs of the tanks he was repairing.
There were body parts everywhere, It made him think how lucky he was not to be fighting in the war. I wish i had photographs so you guys would believe me.

Rising Sun*
10-20-2008, 05:03 AM
Unforturnaly, grandpa did not want photographs of the tanks he was repairing.
There were body parts everywhere, It made him think how lucky he was not to be fighting in the war. I wish i had photographs so you guys would believe me.

Where was he repairing tanks?

With which army?

aly j
10-20-2008, 09:00 AM
Where was he repairing tanks?

With which army?

British Army, He was an engineer before the war started.
RS why do you have to contradict me all the time?

aly j
10-20-2008, 09:05 AM
RS- If you dont mind me asking, What was youre dads Military Profession/Occupation during ww2?

herman2
10-20-2008, 10:20 AM
My Grandfather was an Air Raid Warden for Altona Hamburg.He survived the war. My other Grandfather died on the Russian Front on a Horse. He was an ordinary soldier I believe. My grandfathers had several children each and some were in the war. 3 of my Uncles died and my dad had 2 cousins in the S.S. One of my Uncles was imprisonned in Russia for several years after the war. He told me of the hard cruel treatment he received on the Russian Labour camp. he's still kicking though, which is hard to beleive.

Egorka
10-21-2008, 07:20 AM
1a. Grandmother - Home front, taking care of the refugee relative's kids.
1b. Grandfather - Eighty-eighth Separate Work Battalion of the Fifth Shock Army of the Third Ukrainian Front. His memoirs (http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6713).

2a. Grandmother - nurse in the 1st Engineer brigade. More... (http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showpost.php?p=92933&postcount=87)
2b. Grandfather - Military post office in the 1st Engineer brigade. More... (http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?p=93086)

Egorka
10-21-2008, 07:39 AM
One of my Uncles was imprisonned in Russia for several years after the war. He told me of the hard cruel treatment he received on the Russian Labour camp. he's still kicking though, which is hard to beleive.
I wonder if your uncle read any of these books. And if he did what does he think of it?

http://www.elimbo.de/EAB0000qetk-willy_birkemeyer:_jugend_hinter_stacheldraht.htm
http://www.amazon.de/Gefangen-Stalingrad-1943-bis-1946/dp/3850683524


What place in USSR was he in captivity? POW camp number? I could try do dig some info about it...

Rising Sun*
10-21-2008, 08:10 AM
British Army, He was an engineer before the war started.

Where was he repairing tanks?

Given your comments elsewhere about Japanese brutality, I wondered if it might be because of his experiences with the Japanese, which would suggest that he was in Burma or Malaya.

If so, do you know where he was and when was he there?



RS why do you have to contradict me all the time?

I don't, apart from rare instances like the preceding two words.

Mostly I challenge you, which is different, because I think you're a fraud and a troll.

However, in this thread I merely asked questions. A request for information is not a contradiction.



P.S. Pussy cat, please note that you are slipping badly. As a purported semi-literate who consistently demonstrates inconsistencies in you semi-literate endeavours, you have just produced two sentences with correct spelling which, even more remarkably, spell engineer and contradict correctly.

And this from someone who uses wast for wasn't!

Yeah! Right! :rolleyes:

Rising Sun*
10-21-2008, 08:33 AM
RS- If you dont mind me asking, What was youre dads Military Profession/Occupation during ww2?

He was a radio operator in the RACV's tank repair section.



Pussy cat! Pussy cat! O! My mewing little pussy cat!

How is it that you can spell the following four words correctly when you can't manage simpler ones?

Military Profession/Occupation during

And, astonishingly, after consisently using juring for during as at
#82 http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8056&highlight=juring&page=6 and #118 at http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?p=138626&highlight=juring#post138626 and #18 http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?p=138459&highlight=juring#post138459 and so on, all of a sudden you can spell it correctly after managing to spell military, profession and occupation correctly.

Kitty kat, your litter tray is way past full.

herman2
10-21-2008, 08:43 AM
I wonder if your uncle read any of these books. And if he did what does he think of it?

http://www.elimbo.de/EAB0000qetk-willy_birkemeyer:_jugend_hinter_stacheldraht.htm
http://www.amazon.de/Gefangen-Stalingrad-1943-bis-1946/dp/3850683524


What place in USSR was he in captivity? POW camp number? I could try do dig some info about it...

Oh I wouldn't know Egorka,
The guy is like 86 yrs old and speaks no english. With my broken German it was a wonder how I could have stayed with him for 2 weeks before I visited my other relatives in Hamburg. All I kinow is that he spoke very little about it and he was on disability pendion after the war. He said the russian Labor camp was pretty rough. He never said he hated the Russians though. I always remember him saying that he hated Hitler for failing Germany.He was an ordaniry soldier, nothing fancy. I don't know why they would keep him, considering he wasn't an officer or anything like that.

herman2
10-21-2008, 08:46 AM
He was a radio operator in the RACV's tank repair section.



Pussy cat! Pussy cat! O! My mewing little pussy cat!

How is it that you can spell the following four words correctly when you can't manage simpler ones?

Military Profession/Occupation during

And, astonishingly, after consisently using juring for during as at
#82 http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?t=8056&highlight=juring&page=6 and #118 at http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?p=138626&highlight=juring#post138626 and #18 http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?p=138459&highlight=juring#post138459 and so on, all of a sudden you can spell it correctly after managing to spell military, profession and occupation correctly.

Kitty kat, your litter tray is way past full.

I Like Kitty Kay..Leave her Alone:)

2917

Rising Sun*
10-21-2008, 08:51 AM
I Like Kitty Kay..Leave her Alone:)

I will, when she stops pretending to be a dunce and stops posting crap.

herman2
10-21-2008, 08:53 AM
Then just ignore her, like the way you ignore me?...anyways, you make me laugh with your kitty kat stuff..LOL!

Rising Sun*
10-21-2008, 09:03 AM
Then just ignore her, like the way you ignore me?...anyways, you make me laugh with your kitty kat stuff..LOL!

If I ignored you, would I have responded to your last post?

I just don't respond to you the same way I used to when you were obsessed with nuking the Axis powers (and possibly the planets as far out as Jupiter) before, during and after WWII. :D

If I, and others, hadn't responded to you on those issues and helped you to understand the very liberal rules of acceptable conduct on this site, would you still be here?

Kit-Kat could end up in the same position if she got her finger out of her fundament and started using it to post something approaching sense in accordance with the rather better intellect which is behind the idiot she tries to portray with most of her posts.

herman2
10-21-2008, 10:10 AM
Not exactly military but my grandfather made aircraft parts for Kamikaze planes (or so he was told) in WWII.

Major Walter, I always thought your grandfather made parts for the Zepplin and your grandmother made cup cakes..LOL..(Refrring to your previous name logo.haha)

aly j
10-21-2008, 10:25 AM
I will, when she stops pretending to be a dunce and stops posting crap.

Im not pretending to be dunce, it comes naturally.;)

I can not tell you where he was when he was repairing tanks. I'll have to go and look it up for you.
And with my spelling,I dont know why im inconsistant with my spelling.
I really dont know why.
Why you always challaging me all the time.
Youre a well educated mature man, and im a young uneducated girl,theres no need to challage me.

gunner-B
10-22-2008, 01:03 AM
As a follow on:

Two of my Dads brothers were captured in Greece, one of whom was nearly executed by the Germans for destroying his fleet of trucks & other vehicles. ( He was in the Royal Corps of Transport) His other two brothers were in the London Fire Brigade throughout the war.
My Mums brother lost his hand in an industrial accident when he was an apprentice in a pre war engineering firm he stayed with the firm throughout & beyond the war. Her two sisters were both employed in the armaments industry. Both are still alive, and are aged 101 & 98 respectively

Paul

kamehouse
10-22-2008, 12:38 PM
This may not be WWII, but in WWI, one of my great-granddads fought against Germany(the French one), and another one fought against Italy(the Hungarian one).
Both my parents were either too young or not born yet but my father's father was in the 40 eme regiment d'infanterie and fought at Verdun then moved to Salonika and fought in Yugoslavia.I have read his soldier's book and his first homeleave was September 1918.Although he was mobilised in 1940 ,he didn't fight due either to his age or the fact that France lost already.
My hometown is on the border close to Italy so they got invaded in 1940(the famous Italian stab in the back) but they got difficulties to pass through the Maginot line between St Agnes and Roquebrune.My family had to move to some relatives near Toulon until things got back to "normal"
My father was too young to remember this happening but it does remember that Italians soldiers in the border were mean and German ones were giving sweets to little kids like him.He was also wounded(shrapnel in the head) when an American ship shelled the city by mistake (a German self propelled gun was firing from one hill to another giving the impression of a much bigger force).
From my mother side,they all come from the French Ardennes so they were occupied during WW1(saw some pictures of the German army taking (read stealing)the bell from my mother's village church for metal and some showing some soldiers bathing in a pool in a leisure center of some sort.
WW2 was even worse as the village is in a triangle between Charleville-Meziere, Stonne and Rethel.
So on both side they became refugees.
I think that's it for me.

Krad42
10-23-2008, 11:00 AM
My paternal grandparents died young and were already deceased by the time that WW2 started. My maternal grandfather was a local politician, serving in the town council. He also had a radio show where he played music and discussed political issues. My maternal grandmother was a housewife. My parents were young during WW2. My father served in the US Army during the Korean war, but saw no combat as he was taken to an unit in Panama. I do have relatives in Spain that fought during the Spanish Civil War and one distant cousin that fought in the Blue Division.

Carl Schwamberger
10-24-2008, 09:56 PM
My father was the only son in his family making him elgible for exemption from service. But, he had attended a university with Reserve Officer Training Corps assistance in the late 1930s. So he accepted a officers comission in early 1941. Trained as a aircraft ordinance specialist he spent the war supervising attending to the bombs and machine guns of a medium (B26 type) bomber Squadron (555) and then for the Group. This was in Europe. It was a fairly easy war for him. Like most Americans sent to Europe he worried about submairne torpedos while crossing the Atlantic. In England his airfield was occasionally bombed. Later in December 1944 during Ardennes battle a lost plane load of German partroopers fell near his airfield. He spent the day leading his ordinance technicians about the French countryside searching for the German paras. In the hope of rescuing them from anoyed Frenchmen I suspose.

In very early 1945 he volunteered to serve as a air liasion officer to a ground combat unit. After a few days training he was sent to ride along with a Tank Destroyer battalion. There were no air liasion duties, but he did speak some German so his primary task was to shout at the enemy soldiers they encountered and persuade them to surrender. They usually did. In early April the liasion mission was terminated. He & his comrades found a ride back to their airbase in a convoy of empty trucks returning west for more cargo. Then occured one of the events he recalled most clearly. The roads were lined with tens of thousands of laborers and former prisoners leaving Germany. He and another officer persuaded the convoy commander to give some of the refugees a ride. The trucks were loaded with hundreds of men and some women in shabby coveralls and broken shoes. Wet in the April rain sharing the American cigarettes and conversing slowly in half dozen laguages they rode along across the broken countryside towards their future.

Carl Schwamberger
10-24-2008, 10:08 PM
Many of my fathers cousins served. One of them he saw by chance in a passing convoy in England. They waved and did not see each other for another year. Another cousin was serving as a clerk in a divsion HQ during the battle on Okinawa. One day he noticed on a roster of arriving infantry replacements the name of another cousin. He resolved to seach him out soon. But just 48 hours later the same mans name appeared on the casualty roster for the previous day. He had lasted just one day of combat before being badly wounded. By nightfall he was off the island to a hospital ship.

Carl Schwamberger
10-24-2008, 10:24 PM
Two other stories from people who were not of my family. One was a young girl perhaps six years old, living in London. In late 1944 here father came home on leave she knew who he was but could not recall ever seeing him before in her life. A few days later her parent were walking along a street with her brother & her, when they abruptly therew the children to the ground falling on them. She was stunned and sat there on the sidewalk as her parents stood up. They bade her sit there with her brother and helped some people who came out of a house to lay sheets over the others who had been walking along the street. Eventually she came to understand one of the V bombs had exploded nearby killing the others.

One of my sergeants was born in Germany in 1941. His earliest memory was of sitting in a bomb shelter. He saw a jet of flame come out of a vent opening at the other end of the room and wash over the people sitting near it. He was just able to comprehend that they must be in some sort of serious trouble from this.

pdf27
10-25-2008, 04:26 AM
No direct ancestors in WW2, but a couple of great uncles did - one at Alamein (pretty sure he survived the war) and another with Bomber Command (died in a training accident in the UK - flew into a mountain in bad weather).

ptimms
10-26-2008, 05:01 AM
View my profile to see my Grandfather a Coldstreamer who served in Italy and Greece, he received a bayonet wound in 44 we believe at Cassino, also wounded by a mortar shell. My Gran was a house wife in rural Oxfordshire. The Wifes Father was in the SAS and SOE and his father was in the French resistance.

gb308
11-27-2008, 11:22 PM
Hello!
This is actually my first post on here as I just joined today. I am putting together a military history for my Father and I found your site with the WWII pics.

My Father served in the Army during WWII and fought on Okinawa. He was part of the 382d Infantry, Company E and was an automatic rifleman (B.A.R.).

My Father was wounded on May 16, 1945 during the battle at the Shuri line. He was on the battle front and was one of four men in his company who volunteered to be the first men to attempt reaching the ridge of the hill called "**** Right" or more commonly called "**** Hill".

He came face to face with two Japanese soldiers who walked around from behind a boulder as he was approaching the ridge. My Father's rife misfired twice (he later found out that the ammunition had gotten wet, but no one had bothered to remove it from the supply or warn the riflemen). He was hit with a hand grenade that was thrown by one of the two Japanese soldiers and he spent 15 months in military hospitals having surgeries and recovering.

I have pictures of this battle and also of my Father's company approaching this hill, but I can't get them to "copy and paste" into this post. Do I need to do something specific to get this to work?

Thanks!

Major Walter Schmidt
11-28-2008, 10:32 AM
Do "Go advanced" and then, scroll below, you can see "attach files" and there you can upload files from your computer.

Moreheaddriller
11-28-2008, 12:02 PM
Melvin Hill 32nd Infantry

Major Walter Schmidt
11-28-2008, 12:21 PM
Hello!
This is actually my first post on here as I just joined today. I am putting together a military history for my Father and I found your site with the WWII pics.

My Father served in the Army during WWII and fought on Okinawa. He was part of the 382d Infantry, Company E and was an automatic rifleman (B.A.R.).

My Father was wounded on May 16, 1945 during the battle at the Shuri line. He was on the battle front and was one of four men in his company who volunteered to be the first men to attempt reaching the ridge of the hill called "**** Right" or more commonly called "**** Hill".

He came face to face with two Japanese soldiers who walked around from behind a boulder as he was approaching the ridge. My Father's rife misfired twice (he later found out that the ammunition had gotten wet, but no one had bothered to remove it from the supply or warn the riflemen). He was hit with a hand grenade that was thrown by one of the two Japanese soldiers and he spent 15 months in military hospitals having surgeries and recovering.

I have pictures of this battle and also of my Father's company approaching this hill, but I can't get them to "copy and paste" into this post. Do I need to do something specific to get this to work?

Thanks!
Ive been to Okinawa.. I wonder if i went to the same location your father was...

gb308
11-28-2008, 03:32 PM
Major Walter Schmidt,

Thanks for the help....I'll try it and let you know how I do... :) I am becoming somewhat more computer literate. One step at a time, I guess!
Thanks again.

gb308
11-28-2008, 04:36 PM
Major Schmidt,
My Father was in the Southern end of Okinawa and was wounded near Shuri. Here are some pictures (if I post them corrrectly) of my Dad's troop on the slop of the hill he was wounded on, then an arial of what the area looked like back then (1945), and then a picture taken in 1985 of the same area. Was this near the area you visited when you were in Okinawa?

gb308
11-28-2008, 04:41 PM
Mr. Hill (Moreheaddriller),
Were you in the 32nd Infantry back when it fought in WWII (the New Guinea Campaign, Philippines and Battle of Lazon) or are you currently a member of the newly formed (in 1967 from the deactivated 32nd) 32nd Infantry Brigade?

navyson
11-28-2008, 04:50 PM
Mr. Hill (Moreheaddriller),
Were you in the 32nd Infantry back when it fought in WWII (the New Guinea Campaign, Philippines and Battle of Lazon) or are you currently a member of the newly formed (in 1967 from the deactivated 32nd) 32nd Infantry Brigade?
I think morehead is still in high school. You can click on moniker and go to each members profile. Most people put some info about themselves on there.......

Moreheaddriller
11-29-2008, 01:41 PM
no my great grandpa was though

gb308
11-30-2008, 11:44 AM
Moreheaddriller,
Which campaigns did he fight in?

Moreheaddriller
12-02-2008, 07:07 AM
Not sure but ill ask my dad today he's bound to know

Cpt_Prahl
12-13-2008, 04:01 PM
My Great Uncle on Moms side was OSS her father Bomb Squad he was a combat enginer in WWI (meaning he dug trenches), My Grandfather an Officer in The BRO, his brother an enlisted man in the texas 36th DIV (wounded Monte Casion DOW 1958), and my Grandfathers Brother inlaw was a CRAF pilot (Crashed in the Channel tipping V-1's DOW 1956) , and my Aussie relatives I havent researched them yet, here is a Photo of my Grandfather and one of his men Pvt Filberton the tankers jacket he is wearing belonged to my Grandfather he gave it to Filberton because he had no warm clothes. Notice the lack of winter gear 2nd bat 16th IR didnt recive winter equipment exept a few items, Notice standard rubber overshoes and wool pants some men aquiered tankers pants but for the most part they had a large mix of early equiptment ranging from 1939 issue to 1943 issue.The photo was taken in Schoppen after they took the town during a blizzard they caught the germans asleep in their barracs, The TD belogs to the 634th TD bat.
http://www.postimage.org/aV1ok9H9.jpg (http://www.postimage.org/image.php?v=aV1ok9H9)

flamethrowerguy
12-21-2008, 01:50 PM
Not exactly parents/grandparents but I was lucky enough to discover this one today in my grandmother's living room cupboard:

3057

My grand-uncle Arnold (upper row right in the center, killed December 1941) with comrades of the 90th Light Africa-Divison in Libya, 1941, wearing DAK uniform including the unpopular tropical helmet and the common odd-looking high tropical boots.

navyson
12-21-2008, 02:04 PM
Hi Flame,
Is he the one of your relatives that was killed when ship was torpedoed?

flamethrowerguy
12-21-2008, 03:20 PM
Hi Flame,
Is he the one of your relatives that was killed when ship was torpedoed?

Right, that's him.

grenadier99
12-29-2008, 06:04 PM
my grandfather served on the battleship massachusetts during the war.he always told me the story of the battle with the jean bart a vichy french battleship in operation torch in 1942.he told me they blew a hole as large as a truck in her side.i should also mention the jean bart was tied up at dock at the time. my other grandfather served on a lst (large slow target)in the south pacific.he never talked about it. 3087

3088

Lambo
12-29-2008, 11:12 PM
My grandfather was in the 5th pioneer battalion, 5th Marine Division. He survived the battle of Iwo Jima, and served with the occupation forces in Sasebo Japan after the war.

Schuultz
01-02-2009, 07:24 PM
Neither of my grandparents were old enough to fight, in the war (luckily for them, if you ask me), but i know that at least three of my grand-uncles were Fallschirmjaeger (German paratroopers).

They all survived the war, with one having spent most of the time in the hospital after being heavily wounded by a grenade in Poland.

Another one was a Oberfeldwebel (translation?) at the eastern front, awarded with a War Merit Medal sadly he died before I ever gained real interest in the war.

About the last one I know almost nothing other than the fact that he was a Fallschirmjaeger and was awarded a War Merit Medal, too.

My Great-Grandfather was killed in France, 1944 when the ammo-train he guarded was bombed.

I am in fact going to try to squeeze some more information out of my grand-uncles/their wives this summer when I visit them. Wish me luck ^^

fastmongrel
01-05-2009, 05:39 AM
My maternal grandfather was a fireman in Middlesbrough he was rejected for military service because he had had tuberculosis as a teenager but he managed to serve six years as a fireman.

My paternal grandfather worked on the docks in Liverpool, he always told me he never went into an air raid shelter when the bombs started falling because he used to get claustrophobic.

namvet
01-05-2009, 09:56 PM
I have this on here somewhere else.
after my dad took off for the war my mom worked for a year in a factory that built the P-47 thunderbolt engine. a year later she transferred to a larger plant that built the B-25 mitchell bomber. this plant is still there today and turns out cars for GM. in fairfax ks
her dad, my late grand dad, was a supervisor in a munitions plant. lake city arsenal. yeah its still there today to, still making bullets.

Schuultz
01-06-2009, 07:44 AM
[...]this plant is still there today and turns out cars for GM. in fairfax ks
Yeah, that plant probably won't survive for long, considering it's GM :mrgreen:

yeah its still there today to, still making bullets.
This on the other hand....;)

bootneck
01-10-2009, 08:45 AM
My Grand father was a infantryman in the Lancashire fusilier, during ww1 and my day was a anti tank man in the Duke of Wellington Reg, both him and his brother a morter man with the Devon and Dorset went ashore on D day as I recall. He had a lovely bullet wound right through him from action around Falaise

flamethrowerguy
01-13-2009, 06:58 AM
...just because it's one of my favourites:

My grandfather looking somewhat exhausted after one of the infamous marches in Basic Training:
http://www.ww2incolor.com/d/27609-5/R_003 (http://www.ww2incolor.com/ancestor-photos/R_003.html)

saffer
01-13-2009, 07:27 AM
My Grandad fought with 1st British Expaditionary Force (BEF) in North Africa. He was with the 2nd South African Infantary regiment. He fought in both battles for Tobruk and was captured at the end of the second battle. He was a prisoner of war until the British captured their prison somewhere west of tobruk in December 1942. He was sent home and took no further part in the war. He was a Bren gunner and he died in 1982.

Schuultz
01-13-2009, 08:07 AM
My Grandad fought with 1st British Expaditionary Force (BEF) in North Africa. He was with the 2nd South African Infantary regiment. He fought in both battles for Tobruk and was captured at the end of the second battle. He was a prisoner of war until the British captured their prison somewhere west of tobruk in December 1942. He was sent home and took no further part in the war. He was a Bren gunner and he died in 1982.

Did he ever mention how he was treated? I know that while the Axis treated soldiers in the West relatively well and with respect, they completely mistreated their Russians prisoners.

How did they treat the prisoners in North Africa?

saffer
01-13-2009, 09:04 AM
Did he ever mention how he was treated? I know that while the Axis treated soldiers in the West relatively well and with respect, they completely mistreated their Russians prisoners.

How did they treat the prisoners in North Africa?

Truth is he didn't speak a lot about the war at all - some stories yes but not often and I regret to admit at the time I didn't really pay too much attention (how I wish I did now). I can say he never had anything bad to say about the Germans and actually when I think about it he even seemed almost respectful of them, so i would have to say no - he wasn't ill treated. The only thing that seemed to effect him was that he contracted Dysentery and Malaria at the same time in captivity and he never really ever fully recovered. I do recall that he did not have a lot of time for the Italians - can't tell you why however.

Schuultz
01-13-2009, 09:11 AM
Truth is he didn't speak a lot about the war at all - some stories yes but not often and I regret to admit at the time I didn't really pay too much attention (how I wish I did now). I can say he never had anything bad to say about the Germans and actually when I think about it he even seemed almost respectful of them, so i would have to say no - he wasn't ill treated. The only thing that seemed to effect him was that he contracted Dysentery and Malaria at the same time in captivity and he never really ever fully recovered. I do recall that he did not have a lot of time for the Italians - can't tell you why however.

I know how you feel, Saffer... I had a couple of grand - uncles who served in the German Army as Paratroopers and just died 3 - 4 years ago, with the exception of one of them. They were the kind of people who actually wanted to talk about what they experienced as some sort of "Group Therapy" or something like that. Dumb as I was, I didn't give a rat's *** back then, and now I am just pissed at myself.

Major Walter Schmidt
01-13-2009, 10:28 PM
Major Schmidt,
My Father was in the Southern end of Okinawa and was wounded near Shuri. Here are some pictures (if I post them corrrectly) of my Dad's troop on the slop of the hill he was wounded on, then an arial of what the area looked like back then (1945), and then a picture taken in 1985 of the same area. Was this near the area you visited when you were in Okinawa?
Yeah, Ive been there I think....

Major Walter Schmidt
01-13-2009, 10:31 PM
Also, Ive heard that some other distant relatives fought for japan.
One of them did basic training, and then the war ended, luckily for him.

Schuultz
01-14-2009, 08:09 AM
Just wondering, Schmidt, if you're Japanese, then why does your location say Antarctica?

I mean, it's obvious you're not living there :mrgreen:, but did you confuse it with some other place, or did you choose that bit of ice-desert for a reason?

flamethrowerguy
01-14-2009, 08:20 AM
Also, Ive heard that some other distant relatives fought for japan.
One of them did basic training, and then the war ended, luckily for him.


Actually he's got a long history of extravagant locations. His real one should have a much milder climate though.;)

Schuultz
01-14-2009, 09:55 AM
Actually he's got a long history of extravagant locations. His real one should have a much milder climate though.;)

Is that so? Where else did he "live" before??

jcompton
01-14-2009, 10:13 AM
My Grandfather was a radio operator with the 1st Armored Division. He fought in North Africa and Italy. He was POW for a short time but he would never say much about that time. You can watch a video of him telling a story about when they suffered their first casualty at this link www.witness-to-war.org/content/view. He got me interested in WW11 history at a very young age and i have been soaking up every bit of information ever since. He joined in 41, right after Pearl Harbor, and didn't come home until sometime in 45.

Schuultz
01-14-2009, 10:20 AM
My Grandfather was a radio operator with the 1st Armored Division. He fought in North Africa and Italy. He was POW for a short time but he would never say much about that time. You can watch a video of him telling a story about when they suffered their first casualty at this link www.witness-to-war.org/content/view. He got me interested in WW11 history at a very young age and i have been soaking up every bit of information ever since. He joined in 41, right after Pearl Harbor, and didn't come home until sometime in 45.

WW11? In Canada, we haven't even reached WW3 yet!:mrgreen:

(Sorry for giving you a hard time, but was just too good to pass up!):D

Major Walter Schmidt
01-14-2009, 10:40 AM
Is that so? Where else did he "live" before??
-Valkyrie IV Spacestation
-NeuBerlin, Neuschwabenland
-Eastern front
-LZ140 Zeppelin "Adolf Hitler"
:D

Schuultz
01-14-2009, 10:43 AM
-Valkyrie IV Spacestation
-NeuBerlin, Neuschwabenland
-Eastern front
-LZ140 Zeppelin "Adolf Hitler"
:D

You sure get around a lot, Schmidt ;)

jcompton
01-14-2009, 11:00 AM
WW11? In Canada, we haven't even reached WW3 yet!:mrgreen:

(Sorry for giving you a hard time, but was just too good to pass up!):D

So sorry... WWII. That better Schultz?

Schuultz
01-14-2009, 11:08 AM
Very nice jcompton ;)

jcompton
01-14-2009, 11:12 AM
Hey thanks... I'll get it right one of these days.

Iron Yeoman
02-09-2009, 04:25 PM
I had a great uncle serving on HMS Exeter, one great grandfather was a s/sgt in the 17/21st lancers, another was in the Navy until he got a medical discharge and became a Bevan boy.

Schuultz
02-09-2009, 04:31 PM
What's a Bevan Boy?

Iron Yeoman
02-09-2009, 04:41 PM
Lord Bevan was a minister in Churchill's wartime cabinet he conscripted thousands to go down the mines rather than fight in order to keep war production going.

Schuultz
02-09-2009, 04:48 PM
So he became a Miner? Would he still have kept his military rank/position, or would he have become a civilian in the employment of the government?

Iron Yeoman
02-09-2009, 04:49 PM
He got a medical discharge so no military rank.

Schuultz
02-09-2009, 05:03 PM
He got a medical discharge so no military rank.

That sucks for him, I guess... But what did he have that disqualifies him as a soldier but allows him to go into mining, if you don't mind me asking?

Iron Yeoman
02-09-2009, 05:06 PM
His eyes were buggered, everytime he went to sea he got blisters in them - nice eh?

Schuultz
02-09-2009, 05:15 PM
That sounds extremely painful and annoying for a Brit, but no hindrance for a pilot or a simple ground soldier...

Iron Yeoman
02-09-2009, 05:18 PM
Hence the conscription bit, wasn't exactly popular. While all your mates are off being soldiers, seeing the world etc, you're digging coal in some dark, damp mine. Not exactly the most exciting way to see out the war.

Schuultz
02-09-2009, 05:19 PM
Worst of all, it wasn't even the safest ;)

Uyraell
02-09-2009, 05:35 PM
Bevan Boys were also, rightly or wrongly seen as Marxists, and puppets of Moscow.
(And certainly, unionist personnel who were Moscow-leaning did infiltrate Bevan Boy workplaces.)
The attitudes of many Bevan conscripts was later to overflow into the work stoppages at places like British Leyland, which eventually destroyed that conglomerate, (though arguably, no bad thing, since it was essentially producing oversized steel Trabants: both quality and build of the products was shoddy in the extreme.)
In NZ, similar happened, with similar result, and I'm reasonably sure the same with Aussie.
All in all, labour conscription was viewed as being "as bad as the buggers we're supposed to be fighting against" and basically forced or slave labour, since wages were at best, criminally minimal.
Regards, Uyraell.

Schuultz
02-09-2009, 05:40 PM
So would they have guards watching the labourers or how would they make sure the boys didn't run off and sign up, possibly under a different name?

Uyraell
02-09-2009, 07:35 PM
Oberfeldwebel would be effectively MasterSergeant. Feldwebel would be effectively Sergeant.
Gefreiter is rough = to LanceCorporal,and Obergefreiter rough = to Corporal.
In the SS it's slightly different, but I've given my understanding of that mentioned level of rank in the Wehrmacht, here.
Regards, Uyraell.

Schuultz
02-09-2009, 07:38 PM
Um, did I miss something or did you post that in the wrong thread, Uryaell?

Uyraell
02-09-2009, 07:50 PM
So would they have guards watching the labourers or how would they make sure the boys didn't run off and sign up, possibly under a different name?

Well, therein lies the irony. In NZ and Australia, the idea of an Armed Policeforce was anathema to the Governments of the day. At least officially such was the case. In fact they did arm certain policemen, but preserved the "unarmed police" fiction by designation of the armed types as "Special Constables" (and yes, irony, the Gestapo began much the same way, originally, which was why the "Specials" were nicknamed the "Gestapo", and if they heard you use the term as referring to them you were eligible for about 12 weeks jailtime). Other, and later units of "Special Constables" took to carrying (in addition to pistols and shotguns) baseball bats for breaking heads if needed, which seems on average to have been about every 5th week when the Bevan Boys went yet again out on strike.

Regards, Uyraell.

Uyraell
02-09-2009, 08:13 PM
Um, did I miss something or did you post that in the wrong thread, Uryaell?
My last post here was regarding your question about the Bevan Boys being guarded (by the "Special Constables") so they didn't "desert" or run off to enlist in the armed forces under another name.

Regards, Uyraell.

Schuultz
02-09-2009, 08:20 PM
I was actually referring to you explaining German military ranks in your last post on the previous page...

Uyraell
02-09-2009, 09:09 PM
I was actually referring to you explaining German military ranks in your last post on the previous page...

Hello Schuultz,
With the ranks details I was actually replying to your post, listed as #56 on this thread.
I'm sorry if I failed to make that sufficiently clear.:oops:

Regards, Uyraell.

Schuultz
02-09-2009, 09:14 PM
The 'Quote' function is your friend ;)

Uyraell
02-09-2009, 09:33 PM
The 'Quote' function is your friend ;)

:D Jawohl, Herr Stabstgefreiter! Zu Befehl! :D
You're right of course, though I was under the impression I had in fact employed the "Quote" function, so again, My apologies.:)

Regards, Uyraell.

Schuultz
02-09-2009, 09:50 PM
:D Jawohl, Herr Stabstgefreiter! Zu Befehl! :D
You're right of course, though I was under the impression I had in fact employed the "Quote" function, so again, My apologies.:)

Regards, Uyraell.

Haha, even if my plans work out, I probably won't be more than an Obergefreiter by next summer ;)

Nice to get some discipline in here, though :mrgreen:

Uyraell
02-10-2009, 01:34 AM
My Grandfather had fought at Passchendael (yes, I'm using the old spelling) in Oct of 1917. In WW2 he was a Machinist/Crane Operator at an Engineering factory in My city. The Govt. refused to take him into military service because he had been gassed with mustard gas in WW1 but survived same. The gassing was sufficient to disqualify him from military service because by then it had been determined that it would affect him for the rest of his life (it did, he died in 1953). However, because he was a projectionist, he was drafted to the engineering works to drive the cranes.
His wife, my Grandmother worked as a clerk in an insurance company. (Those details deal with the paternal side of my family, almost: more, later).

My mother's parents were both exempt, by virtue of her dad not only having lung cancer but being a father of 5 children (law had it that a father of three or more children was exempt because if he died, the government did not want to have to support the widow and children).

At this point, the narrative moves out of my immediate family to near relatives, and so is beyond the scope of this thread.

However, 2 WW2 incidents do come to mind. Neither directly relates to combat, but each shows part of what "the war, at Home" was like.

A: Two men cooked to death during the pressure testing of a boiler at the engineering works. My dad's father was present at that event (heard the boiler door slammed and locked, and the subsequent agonised screams), and he was a witness at the subsequent Court of Enquiry (Finding: "Accidental Death").

B: In May of 1942, and again in May of 1943, a Japanese high-altitude reconnaiscance plane (in each case a Seiun, launched from an I1400 Class submarine, because Japan had no land base nor carrier this far South) flew over My city, in daylight, and every high-angle gun the city had fired at it, including people on rooftops, with shotguns and rifles.
As the aircraft was cruising blythely at some 28,000 feet, it was relatively undisturbed by the numerous projectiles hurled towards it. Not so, various panes of glass around the city, which promptly departed this mortal earth in a shattered condition. There was also a substantial rain of various metals shortly thereafter, witnessed by Grandfather from atop the factory roof.

I can add more stuff about relatives who did serve offshore, and may well do so on another thread.

Regards, Uyraell.

Schuultz
02-10-2009, 07:42 AM
B: In May of 1942, and again in May of 1943, a Japanese high-altitude reconnaiscance plane (in each case a Seiun, launched from an I1400 Class submarine, because Japan had no land base nor carrier this far South) flew over My city, in daylight, and every high-angle gun the city had fired at it, including people on rooftops, with shotguns and rifles.
As the aircraft was cruising blythely at some 28,000 feet, it was relatively undisturbed by the numerous projectiles hurled towards it. Not so, various panes of glass around the city, which promptly departed this mortal earth in a shattered condition. There was also a substantial rain of various metals shortly thereafter, witnessed by Grandfather from atop the factory roof.


Well, as long as nobody was hit by the returning bullets, they're lucky. I have always been wondering why nobody ever seems to think of this (pretty simple) law of physics... They just shoot in the air, acting as if the bullet would fly forever.

Rising Sun*
02-10-2009, 08:27 AM
Well, as long as nobody was hit by the returning bullets, they're lucky. I have always been wondering why nobody ever seems to think of this (pretty simple) law of physics... They just shoot in the air, acting as if the bullet would fly forever.

The shooters in the Middle East and other places where undisciplined men fire guns into the sky as an act of anything from celebration to desperation have never struck me as people likely to be concerned with physics or anything else involving even a modicum of intelligent enquiry.

But it turns out that, contrary to my intuition, it might well be that bullets fired straight up don't do much damage on the way down, unlike bullets fired at an angle and coming to earth as their velocity is ovewhelmed by gravity.

Here's a fair summary of a Mythbusters episode I saw not too long ago on this.
http://kwc.org/mythbusters/2006/04/episode_50_bullets_fired_up_vo.html

Rising Sun*
02-10-2009, 08:35 AM
However, because he was a projectionist, he was drafted to the engineering works to drive the cranes.


The father of a mate of mine was unfit for military service. So, as he was a qualified cabinet maker, he was conscripted by the WWII Australian labour authorities to be re-trained as a metal worker, a trade he never mastered during the war and left as soon as he could. :confused:

No doubt there was a metal worker somewhere else who was conscripted to be a cabinet maker, and who never mastered that trade. :rolleyes:

Nickdfresh
02-10-2009, 05:22 PM
The shooters in the Middle East and other places where undisciplined men fire guns into the sky as an act of anything from celebration to desperation have never struck me as people likely to be concerned with physics or anything else involving even a modicum of intelligent enquiry.

But it turns out that, contrary to my intuition, it might well be that bullets fired straight up don't do much damage on the way down, unlike bullets fired at an angle and coming to earth as their velocity is ovewhelmed by gravity.

Here's a fair summary of a Mythbusters episode I saw not too long ago on this.
http://kwc.org/mythbusters/2006/04/episode_50_bullets_fired_up_vo.html

Unless their explosive AAA shells or incendiary .50 ammo, which was a major problem during the Pearl Harbor attack...

Uyraell
02-10-2009, 07:45 PM
The father of a mate of mine was unfit for military service. So, as he was a qualified cabinet maker, he was conscripted by the WWII Australian labour authorities to be re-trained as a metal worker, a trade he never mastered during the war and left as soon as he could. :confused:

No doubt there was a metal worker somewhere else who was conscripted to be a cabinet maker, and who never mastered that trade. :rolleyes:

Gods'n'Thunders, Rolling on the floor laughing here . . . you're so, so very right, dad says his dad watched that kind of thing happen.
One guy was a sailmaker, sent to "camouflage school", ended up pouring concrete. The other guy had driven steamshovels on building sites, sent to "camouflage school", ended up being taught to sew camouflage nets and canvas:shock::confused:;):lol:

Regards, Uyraell.

Uyraell
02-10-2009, 07:48 PM
Well, as long as nobody was hit by the returning bullets, they're lucky. I have always been wondering why nobody ever seems to think of this (pretty simple) law of physics... They just shoot in the air, acting as if the bullet would fly forever.

Thing was, it wasn't the falling metalware that was the issue:
people passing windows ended up in ER because of being diced by glass.
Glass did far more damage than metal.

Regards, Uyraell.

Uyraell
02-10-2009, 07:53 PM
Unless their explosive AAA shells or incendiary .50 ammo, which was a major problem during the Pearl Harbor attack...

Not entirely surprised, Nickdfresh,
though I'd suggest that in any environment where metal was flying about in those quantities a certain amount becomes a pure statistical likelihood of hitting some one, some how. Sheer volume would seem to guarantee that.

Regards, Uyraell.

Rising Sun*
02-10-2009, 08:12 PM
Not entirely surprised, Nickdfresh,
though I'd suggest that in any environment where metal was flying about in those quantities a certain amount becomes a pure statistical likelihood of hitting some one, some how. Sheer volume would seem to guarantee that.



I read somewhere ages ago that there was a death or deaths during, I think, the Battle of Britain, where the victim on the ground was hit by a 20mm shell casing ejected from an aircraft.

Schuultz
02-10-2009, 08:44 PM
'A' death? I'd think that people dying on the ground would be common.
Considering how many bullets were fired in the dogfights, I'd expect there to be a pretty high probability that a couple of people would get hit by them...

Uyraell
02-10-2009, 08:48 PM
I read somewhere ages ago that there was a death or deaths during, I think, the Battle of Britain, where the victim on the ground was hit by a 20mm shell casing ejected from an aircraft.

If it was a 20mm it's from an Me.109, because the Brits didn't have 20mm in operational service at the time, beyond perhaps 6 cannon-armed prototypes under operational testing. The shellcase in this story is said to be MGFF, which would make sense. Personally, I've always wondered about this story, and whether it later became fused with another similar story.

In the second tale, the cannon shell casing hits someone on the ground like an apple-corer, but through the top of the skull. The shellcase in this story is Brit, and the story dates from about Oct'44.

At any rate, I don't discount either tale, for assuredly, strange things did happen.

Regards, Uyraell.

Uyraell
02-10-2009, 09:05 PM
'A' death? I'd think that people dying on the ground would be common.
Considering how many bullets were fired in the dogfights, I'd expect there to be a pretty high probability that a couple of people would get hit by them...

The problem isn't truly in the death or injury rate of those on the ground.
The reality was: when any such injury was reported at all it was written up as shrapnel damage, which could include metal fragments originating everywhere from falling casings, falling shrapnel, exploding HE bombs, exploding Incendiary bombs, to mess tins doing a Mary Poppins::rolleyes: it was all reported as one item : shrapnel injury/shrapnel fatality.

(For the thinking, among you: Ever wondered why the US Army has a higher "Blue on Blue" stats rate than the Brit Army? It's because over 80% of the Brit "Blue on Blue" were deliberately reported as "Shrapnel Injury". In reality, the Brits were as prone to "Blue on Blue" errors as any other nation, they were just craftier with the bookwork.)

Regards, Uyraell.

forager
02-14-2009, 04:14 PM
My dad enlisted airborne after high school and was assigned to the 506th of the 101st just after D Day.
He spent the rest of the war with them and occupied Austria for a bit.
We had actual photos he took at a death camp.

He was quite affected and disliked Germans the rest of his life.

My uncle was a seabee in the Pacific and another a Marine.

Both my grandfathers went to France in 1917 to help kick the Kaiser's ***.

All were volunteers.

Major Walter Schmidt
02-15-2009, 11:34 PM
...my great grandfather was a carpenter at a japanese air force base at Kanoya, i just found out.

Rising Sun*
02-16-2009, 03:31 AM
...my great grandfather was a carpenter at a japanese air force base at Kanoya, i just found out.

Well, thank God the Japanese only had wooden planes.

Imagine what they could have done with metal ones. ;) :D

Major Walter Schmidt
02-16-2009, 11:14 AM
Yup. If it had not been for our wooden planes, we would have polluted the earth!;)

Speaking of wooden planes, this one of yours quite excelled in its roles...
http://www.aviationshoppe.com/catalog/images/De-Havilland-Mosquito-NF-Mk-II.jpg
De-Havilland-Mosquito-NF-Mk-II

Uyraell
02-17-2009, 05:25 AM
Yup. If it had not been for our wooden planes, we would have polluted the earth!;)

Speaking of wooden planes, this one of yours quite excelled in its roles...
http://www.aviationshoppe.com/catalog/images/De-Havilland-Mosquito-NF-Mk-II.jpg
De-Havilland-Mosquito-NF-Mk-II

Wooden planes.... if it was late in the war, I'm thinking Nakajima Ka115, and the similar wooden derivative Ka116, those were interesting aircraft, if inclined to not have long service lifetimes.

Regards, Uyraell.

Rising Sun*
02-17-2009, 07:10 AM
Yup. If it had not been for our wooden planes, we would have polluted the earth!;)

Speaking of wooden planes, this one of yours quite excelled in its roles...
http://www.aviationshoppe.com/catalog/images/De-Havilland-Mosquito-NF-Mk-II.jpg
De-Havilland-Mosquito-NF-Mk-II

Alas, it wasn't one of ours (Australia being a touch short in the aeroplane making business, it not even having a car making capacity when the war started).

It was one of the Poms.

I don't know if it flew much in the Pacific (as distinct from the Burma / India)theatre, or if there was much it could have done in the Pacific where the Beaufighter performed perhaps the equivalent role, and other roles, and very well.

Someone is bound to provide information on the Mozzie in Aussie. :D

Uyraell
02-17-2009, 07:48 AM
Alas, it wasn't one of ours (Australia being a touch short in the aeroplane making business, it not even having a car making capacity when the war started).

It was one of the Poms.

I don't know if it flew much in the Pacific (as distinct from the Burma / India)theatre, or if there was much it could have done in the Pacific where the Beaufighter performed perhaps the equivalent role, and other roles, and very well.

Someone is bound to provide information on the Mozzie in Aussie. :D
Aussie had Mossie. A few were imported from the Poms about 1946. Some had been Canadian production. Aussie was also slated to produce Mossies, on the same pattern as Canadian, using Packard Merlins, and possibly Griffons at a later stage, though that detail has always remained tantalisingly unconfirmed.
As with the case of the Beaufighter and Mustang, the end of the War killed the production plans, and what few Mossies and Beaufighters Aussie had were flown for a few years then sold off or scrapped.
To this day I remain uncertain a Mossie was domestically produced in Aussie, though I know a few Beaufighters and Mustangs were.
Various fora and publications such as Classic Wings Downunder continue to debate these points.

Regards, Uyraell.

Major Walter Schmidt
02-17-2009, 10:43 AM
I meant Western allies in general, but oh well, i heard that the mossies came apart because the wood rotted in the humid parts of southeast Asia...

herman2
02-17-2009, 02:30 PM
My Grandfather on my dad’s side was an Air Raid Warden for Altona district in Hamburg. I think he was too old for the war so they stuck him with the job of Air Raid Warden. But my mother’s dad was on the Russian front, and I just noticed that he had a dagger with his uniform and the hat emblem I ascertained made him a lieutenant. He fought on horse. He died on the Russian front very early in the war. My parents were in Hitler Youth and too young for the war but my dad said he did shoot off a few shoots from a big cannon when the German Army retreated and soon enough the alied army were shooting back at him and he ran like hell! My grandparents had no special positions in the war but they are special in my heart!

Digger
02-22-2009, 12:37 AM
Did he ever mention how he was treated? I know that while the Axis treated soldiers in the West relatively well and with respect, they completely mistreated their Russians prisoners.

How did they treat the prisoners in North Africa?

My neighbour was a cook and was captured by an Italian patrol. Reckons he was treated well by the Italians while he was a POW. During the Italian surrender German forces occupied the camps and sent the prisoners back to Germany.

He reckoned the Germans were a lot tougher than the Italian guards and did not take any nonsense from the prisoners.

digger

Digger
02-22-2009, 12:42 AM
I read somewhere ages ago that there was a death or deaths during, I think, the Battle of Britain, where the victim on the ground was hit by a 20mm shell casing ejected from an aircraft.

Not only were bullets a problem, but also shell fragments from flak bursts and of course bits of crashing aircraft.

digger

malarz_russ@hotmail.com
02-22-2009, 11:22 PM
Hello, y'all!

Very interesting topic... it's fascinating reading these little snippets of history, more so when its family.

Here is my families involvement with WWII. My dad, his 2 older brothers, and their mother were still in Poland on September 1st, 1939. On hearing of the invasion, the two older brothers headed east towards the Polish / Soviet border, leaving my dad, who was only 11, and babka at home. They traveled on foot for a week until they heard that the Soviets were also invading, then they headed back home. Dad tells me that the Germans were actually very nice and polite.

As the war progressed, things changed. Middle brother, wujek Stash, got involved with the Polish Home Army. He was involved in some pretty heavy stuff. My dad was still too young to "play with the older boys" so he ran messages between villages, going as far as Krakow. Germans came to arrest Stash, he and my dad were out, so they arrested the eldest, who was tending the farm. This was sometime in late 1943. He disappeared, everyone thinking he had been shot. He came walking up the path to the house in late 1945, having walked back from Germany where he had been released from a concentration camp by the allies. They sold the farm and imigrated to the US shortly afterwards.

Dad didn't really get involved with any "wet work" tho' he didn't really talk about what he had done during the war. We (myself and my brother and sister) didn't really know any of this part of our family history until wujek Stash was out from Chicago visiting one summer. We were sitting in the livingroom watching a war flick on TV when Stash cryptically says, "Ah, the MG42. A very fine weapon". I also learned that night that a common tactic for the partisans was to sew a loop inside the collar of their coats, where they would put a small pistol. Stash said that the Germans always made them put their hands on top of their heads when they stopped them, and that the pistol and come in handy several times.

Dad was fascinated with WWII history and fiction. He didn't hate the Germans, didn't hate the Soviets (tho' wasn't very fond of them), but very much hated communists. He was drafted into the US Army in 1950, while still a resident alien. Because he spoke a Eastern European language, he was sent to Europe rather than Korea. Got granted his citizenship while on leave, and married my mom on leave.

On my mothers side, I had a grand uncle who was a Chief Petty Officer in the Navy, operating radars in PV-2's and PBY's out of Recife in squadron VPB-126. He got out in early 1946, and later ended up being one of the early employees of the Federal Aviation Agency.

Russ
Proud son of Rose and wes

DavisC12
02-28-2009, 09:56 PM
My grandfather was a Tech.Sergant at Cherry Point Airbase in N.C. during WWII.

flamethrowerguy
02-28-2009, 10:05 PM
My grandfather was a Tech.Sergant at Cherry Point Airbase in N.C. during WWII.

Yes, thank you, we got the point. It would be enough to post this information just once.

Canberra Man
03-02-2009, 05:01 PM
My father was called up in 1942 in the Royal Engineers. I left school at fourteen and was a Naval Messenger on the Grimsby naval base HMS Beaver. One day I was stood outside the Fleet Mail Office and a sloop was coming out through the lock gates, there was alot of signalling going on between the sloop and the Captains Bridge and I asked a petty officer what was being said, he replied, "There was an air raid last night and Kittywake is asking if jerry laid any mines in the river and the bridge answered, we'll soon know, your first out!" I did my share of service after the war, National Service in 1948 and in 1951, I joined the Royal Air Force, was with 617 squadron working on Lincolns and then Canberra's

Ken

BM59_Fan
03-12-2009, 04:47 PM
My paternal grandfather (John Lagoe) was a member of Merrils Marauders. Grandpa was Professional Army and was stationed somewhere in/around the IO on Dec 7, 1941. Before he died he gave me his combat knife he had carried all those years in the pacific. Leather handle had rotted but the knife was still just as sharp as when he carried it. I had the handle restacked with leather washers and shaped. When I asked about the history of his knife he said "Michael, This Knife is no virgin". I carried it in Combat during Desert Storm, and my youngest carried it in the initial combat as a Combat Medic with the 3rd BCT, 4th ID in the vacation spots of Samarra and Taji Iraq.

My maternal GF was 4F in WW2, legs damaged as a teenager in a farming accident in Danbury, Iowa. His father, my GGF, Peter Flammang, was German Army and a senior member of Kaiser Wilhelm's staff. GGF left abruptly and escaped Germany prior to WW1 with his family. The story as I remember hearing it was through France and Portugal and on the the US. The type of story movies are made of. My Mom remembers her GF being afraid that the German Secret Police were going to come looking for him.

My father was in the USN during the Korean war and was on a seaplane tender off the Korean coast.

My wifes father was a US Army Radioman and was in Korea.

Yosh1aki
05-20-2009, 03:06 AM
My mother was still at school when the war ended, but my maternal grandfather volunteered for the RAF in 1939 as soon as war broke out, and served as ground crew until he was invalided out 1943.
My maternal grandmother worked in a munitions factory for most of the war.

My father was conscripted into the British Army from 1944 until 1947 (in the RAMC).
His eldest brother volunteered for the Royal Navy but was killed in 1942 when his destroyer HMS Matabele was sunk on a convoy to Murmansk. The next brother then volunteered and rather carelessly had two destroyers sunk under him but survived the war.

My paternal grandfather was too old for service in WW2, but was in the Home Guard. He had been a 'regular' throughout the Boer War and WW1, in the Royal Horse Artillery. His brother, an infantryman (Kings Royal Rifles), died at Paschaendale, and the body was never recovered.

My Japanese father in law was always a little vague about his war service. He and his mother returned to Japan from Shanghai in late 1945 (they had been 'colonists' since the later thirties I believe). He was around 15 or 16, so old enough to perhaps have been pressed into some kind of military service, but I don't know, and he would not say.

+++
I presume my father in law returned from Shanghai wth his mum, but not his dad, because his dad was dead, or stayed over there, or something. I know the family had hard times back in Japan after 1945 as he was still at school and they depended on his mother alone for financial support. Apart from saying how hard things were, the would never discuss it with me. And whenever I ask my wife, she says she doesn't know anything about her paternal grandfather and never met him.
+++

My mother in law still has the rather nasty-looking and crudely made spear she was issued as a 10 year old girl. I remember her telling me some years ago that her unit of small children was meant to advance to the landing craft as soon as the Americans landed on the beach (she never named the beach where this was supposed to happen), stab someone and take their rifle and ammo belts back to the waiting adults who would then shoot the next waves of US toops with the American weapons.

Even as the sweet frail old grandma of my children, she was still adamant that ths plan would have worked because, as she pointed out, the Americans would have been shocked at being attacked by children and would not have fought back.

While my father in law was always hesitant about discussing Japan's role in the war, my mother in law seemed to think that Japan was the innocent victim of Western aggresion, and that an Allied attack on mainland Japan would have led to annihilation of the invasion force, and a complete Japanese victory.

Rising Sun*
05-20-2009, 08:18 AM
My Japanese father in law was always a little vague about his war service. He and his mother returned to Japan from Shanghai in late 1945 (they had been 'colonists' since the later thirties I believe). He was around 15 or 16, so old enough to perhaps have been pressed into some kind of military service, but I don't know, and he would not say.

I may be telling you something you already know, but there was a substantial Japanese civil administration in China supporting the IJA and Japanese interests, so it was possible to serve Japan in China without being in the IJA.

I have a vague recollection that in at least one of the occupied areas (Singapore? Philippines?) some civil administrators wore a military type uniform which locals confused with military uniforms. Perhaps the same was true in China.

I also have a recollection that colonists, civil administrators and Japanese nationals were pressed into IJA service and military support labour in the dying days of the war in China.

So there were probably plenty of opportunities for your father in law to have been employed in some war-related tasks without actually being in the IJA.


Even as the sweet frail old grandma of my children, she was still adamant that ths plan would have worked because, as she pointed out, the Americans would have been shocked at being attacked by children and would not have fought back.

That would have changed after the first few Yanks were stabbed and killed, as it did in Vietnam when children were used by the VC.


While my father in law was always hesitant about discussing Japan's role in the war, my mother in law seemed to think that Japan was the innocent victim of Western aggresion, and that an Allied attack on mainland Japan would have led to annihilation of the invasion force, and a complete Japanese victory.

That fairly widespread view is testament to the insularity of many wartime Japanese and to the success of internal wartime propaganda and, perhaps, to post war distortions by the Japanese leadership.

seagull
05-20-2009, 09:05 AM
My maternal GF was in the Western Desert with the 8th Army, and later in Italy.
My maternal GM was bringing up the kids and making the occasional trip to the air raid shelter.

My paternal GF was too old for active service so in WW2, was a Fire Warden during the war. He was in the RMLI during WW1 serving on board HMS Iron Duke.

One of my Great Uncles was with Slim's Forgottten Army in Burma and had the misfortune to be in Kohima at the wrong time. He was in Burma for 4 years. In the 1970s he still wouldn't allow anything Japanese in the house.

robbielynne
05-24-2009, 07:03 PM
Hi everyone..my grandfather served in the army during WWII..He was stationed in the Phillipines..He never really talked that much about it..I found a copy of his military papers after he had passed away..He received a Purple Heart during his service there..My other grandfather was a farmer and didn't serve in the military...Take Care everyone and have a safe holiday weekend..remember our fallen soldiers tomorrow for without them we would not have the freedom that we have today.
regards,
Robbielynne Mcalister

nstoolman1
06-14-2009, 01:00 PM
My father was a senior in high school just before the war ended. The seniors wanted permission to graduate early so they could enlist. The school finally gave in and told them that if they could finish their senior year in 6 months time they could graduate so they could enlist. They did but not in time to actually see combat. Dad joined the navy and by the time he was out of training the war had ended. He was then sent out with Task Force 1 and went to the Marshal islands and participated in the Able and Baker atomic test shots. He is still alive at 82 and all seven of us kids are alive and doing fine. Even in the peacetime navy he still saw some things he didn't want to talk about. He told us about some funny things that happened but was very quiet about others. Mom was a registered nurse in Los Angeles. Grandpa Wagner was too old to reenlist so they gave him a truck-driving job delivering war surplus after it was collected for recycling. Grandma Wagner was a homemaker. My dad’s parents were living in Missouri at the time. Sorry about writing a book.

ubc
06-15-2009, 12:22 AM
Paternal GF was in Poland during WW-II and had a taxi company before the war. All I can get out of my dad is that he drove German trucks that were converted to run on wood. Several times that saved his life since when they were running out of fuel on a winter night , they just jumped out of the truck found some trees and cut enough wood to get to his destination.

Maternal GF was in the trenches of WW-I and took some German shrapnel from a mortar. It was too close to his spine so he spent the rest of WW-I and WW-II on home duties. Still smoked a pipe and rode a bike well into his eighties.

Mother was a teenager in Glasgow during the war so they were on the outside.

My dad had the most interesting war experience and didn't reveal much until a few years ago despite me pressing him on many occasions.

Turns out he was a young teen when the Germans invaded western Poland in 1939 and spent the first few years just occupied. During that period he said he was helping smuggle bread to POW camps filled with starving Russian soldiers .

He remembers being shocked in 1941 when the German engineer battalion built a road through his town eastward. It took no time at all and they couldn't figure out why on earth they would be going east.

In 1943 the Germans came to his school and declared them all to now be Germans and as such they had to choose between work in a labor camp or join the German army. To him labor camp was like the starvation camps he'd seen in 1939/40, but the army meant the eastern front. :shock:.

However he was told that if they were in the German army they would be posted to the west. Hitler had some idea that if they were posted to the eastern front they would defect to the soviets while if they were posted to the west they would fight. :confused:

So they went to France and were in a German infantry division that only lasted a couple of months before Patton’s army smashed it and he was able to surrender to the Americans. He wanted to join the Free Polish army but was prevented from doing so because he took hundreds of photos while in the German army. Instead he was sent to some Allied Intel center for debriefing and basically he's not allowed to speak much about the rest!

All I can get out of him is that he ended up some signals intercept unit because he was fluent in Polish, Russian, German, French and English and was familiar with some aspects of German military operations. He did let up once that he worked with some guy who intercepted the Bismarck’s radio transmissions that lead to its sinking.

Being brought up in the west, this was always awkward when we would watch some war movie or history show. He would always point out the other side of the history. But it did instill in me the understanding that there are always different sides to any historical event, and these really depend on your POV.

colmhain
09-26-2010, 03:13 AM
My grandad was in Normandy with an engineering unit. I forget which, I wrote it down but I can't find it right now. They built fuel pipelines to follow the advance. Had some problems with, believe it or not, French partisans, both nazi sympathysers and nationalists who didn't want ANYONE in thier country. Couldn't keep up with the advance, so they choked 3 lines down into 1. Got orders one day. The Germans broke through at the Ardennes, they were goin to the front lines. The squad he was with tied one on that night but good. Went to work the next day hungover from hell, terrible stomach ache! Was told to report to an aid station at noon or so. Next thing he remembers, he woke up in a hospital in England. Appendix burst! Served the rest of the war in good health. His wife was a "Rosie the Riveter", she installed seats in aircraft. Don't know what type. His older brother flew bombers up Italy.

Kregs
09-28-2010, 10:24 AM
My father served under Brigadier General Zygmunt Piasecki of brigade Karkowska during the September Campaign. He died on 4 September.

muscogeemike
09-30-2010, 09:54 PM
Both grandfathers were farmers and grandma’s were housewives - father, however, refurbished Douglas B-26’s in Tulsa, OK. during Korean war,

The only thing more accurate than incoming enemy fire is incoming friendly fire. Murphy’s 24th law of
combat

amisteratwisterandme
11-11-2010, 09:38 PM
I had multiple family members who served in the war, but I am still trying to get full information on all of them.

My Grandfather R was in the 3458th Ord Division where he worked on tanks, and fought in North Africa, and the Po Valley. Before he left the states, he was part of the 4th Army in San Francisco. He hadn't married yet, but my grandmother was still in high school.

My Grandfather J's main job was to take the orders to the front lines in Italy, Germany and France. His division was only 12 men, so I haven't been able to find much more on him, but I do know he was taking orders to the front line and ended up getting stuck during the Battle of the Bulge. His 17 year old bride was at home with a baby.


I had two Uncles on ships in the Pacific, but haven't started looking into which ones yet.

My Aunt was a nurse stationed in England. She met her husband when he was injured after his plane crashed. They married 4 days later, and he was a rear gunner off of the USS Enterprise.

and more that I don't know anything about yet

The Fiendish Red Baron
11-12-2010, 09:55 AM
Paternal Grandfather served pre-war with the Royal West Kents. Served in France 1940, rearguard to Dunkirk and evacuated from the beach. Hospitalised with severe shellshock for three years, released and went on to serve in Normandy until he was shot and paralysed from the waist down.

Maternal Grandfather served in the Royal West Kents from late '44 till end, then as part of the occupation forces in Berlin. Took part in several boxing competitions in Berlin, including one against a Russian boxer.

During the First World War the family served all over the place, from the Western Front to Mesopotamia.

Rising Sun*
11-12-2010, 10:10 AM
Paternal Grandfather served pre-war with the Royal West Kents. Served in France 1940, rearguard to Dunkirk and evacuated from the beach. Hospitalised with severe shellshock for three years, released and went on to serve in Normandy until he was shot and paralysed from the waist down.

That is profoundly sad and distressing.

It encapsulates the stupidity and wastefulness of war.

The Fiendish Red Baron
11-12-2010, 10:17 AM
Yup... Thats the way it goes.

He was a very bitter man after the war. Effected him very badly. We took him back to Dunkirk on the 40th Anniversary. Was an unpleasent experience for all concerned. Found out alot of things that were, at the end of the day, very disturbing.

That said though he never lost the fire and his temper! Was a bear of a man... I could easily imagine him having done half of what he told us. He was quite a scary person when old and confined to a wheelschair... Lord knows what he was like when he was able bodied. He was the only person I ever saw my father have any defference to.

Spoke to us on the day at Dunkirk, then never mentioned it again. Long dead now sadly.

Rising Sun*
11-12-2010, 10:37 AM
Yup... Thats the way it goes.

He was a very bitter man after the war. Effected him very badly.

As does war affect so many people in so many ways, almost none of them good for the betterment of mankind and the planet.

Spike Milligan (of 'Hitler: My part in his downfall' fame) spent the rest of his life trying to overcome his 'failure' or 'cowardice' in Italy rather than celebrating his long service before.

A man should be defined by all he does, not just his last momentary act.

Unless, of course, he's a complete ****, in which case it's a different issue.

The Fiendish Red Baron
11-12-2010, 10:45 AM
Well I think it was a series of traumatic events during 1940 that led to him cracking under the strain. We never really found out the whole truth but we know he shot unarmed prisoners, endured heavy fighting and air attack and eventually returned to England carrying his best friends head which had been severed in an air raid on Dunkirk beach. After that, Im not surprised he went a little nuts.

He was released but was clearly not suitable to go back to war. From what my Grandmother told us before she died, he had an utterly fatalistic attitude when he returned to service. I think he wanted to do his duty and didnt really seem to care if he lived or died.

After the war he became very bitter that he had been sent back to fight, and subsequently paralysed. Made him very bitter and he never got over that and it sadly effected everyones relationship with him. I think all the grandchildren dreaded going to the house. I know I did but he seemed to be different with me as I was fascinated by all his war memorabilia. He had a vast collection of medals that we used to spend alot of time looking through and talking about. I guess I was lucky to have an interest in the war and this allowed him to forget things for a while when we spent time together.

He stilled scared the crap outta me though! LOL!

stidham
11-12-2010, 03:29 PM
My father enlisted in the Navy in on Mother's day 1942. He turned 18 in February of '42. He was on a couple of different destroyers. The one I remember was the Madison DD-425. He was all over the world on that one. He spent time as a pharmecist's mate and he battle station was on one of the .50 cal mounts.

Za Rodinu
11-14-2010, 04:34 AM
Grandfather was a sniper-17 years old when he went to the front,2nd Grandfather was a captain,Great Grandfather a rank and file rifleman and was killed in 1942. Grandmother was a nurse. All in Soviet Army...

royal744
11-15-2010, 10:51 PM
My mother was a housewife in Holland. My father ferried downed US and British pilots from Holland to Spain. This was a hazardous occupation. My father rarely spoke of his wartime experiences. We had to pry it out with a jackhammer. He had a few close calls.That we do know. My Father-in-Law served on the Tahoma, a US Coast Guard Cutter during the war. At some point early on, the Coast Guard came under the orders of the Navy until after the war. He started the war in the Great Lakes and his ship served as a convoy escort to Greenland. Later he took part in the invasion of North Africa escorting troop ships. No wonder this generation counts WW2 as the most important time of their lives.

Timbo in Oz
11-30-2010, 05:48 PM
my dad went into the Royal Hampshire regiment, with which he saw action in North Africa, Sicily & Italy.

The "Terbouba Tigers" / Hamps!

Timbo in Oz
11-30-2010, 06:08 PM
I meant Western allies in general, but oh well, i heard that the mossies came apart because the wood rotted in the humid parts of southeast Asia...

They changed from casein based glues to epoxy resins.

I believe Mosquitos were made in Aussie during the war. DeHav's had a big presence here thereafter.

Uyraell
12-01-2010, 11:51 PM
DH fully intended producing Mosquitos in Australia.
They were set for full scale production in late 1944 going into 1946.

From memory, no more than about 100 Mosquitos were produced in Australia before the war ended, from an intended initial production run of some 240 aircraft. Of those, less than 12 survive as far as 1960, and five of those were T19 trainers, as sold to Israel in 1951/52.

In some cases, Packard Merlins would have powered the Australian produced Mosquitos, just as Packard Merlins would have powered Australian produced P51s. (Ironically: most of the surviving P51s in Australia are currently running RR Merlins.)

Respectful Regards, Uyraell.

tankgeezer
12-02-2010, 02:00 AM
My Dad was in the Pacific Theater, and was in something called the "Tokyo Trolley" he said only that he had something to do with radio, radar, and the throwing of chaff from planes on occasion. His Father was in the Austro-Hungarian Army, sometime around the turn of the last Century, as he came to the U.S. 1906. I have no info as to what his job in the military was.

Iron Yeoman
12-02-2010, 06:17 AM
My Dad was in the Pacific Theater, and was in something called the "Tokyo Trolley" he said only that he had something to do with radio, radar, and the throwing of chaff from planes on occasion. His Father was in the Austro-Hungarian Army, sometime around the turn of the last Century, as he came to the U.S. 1906. I have no info as to what his job in the military was.

If you're interested in the Austro-Hungarian army I highly suggest this place

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heeresgeschichtliches_Museum

Rising Sun*
12-02-2010, 07:49 AM
My Dad was in the Pacific Theater, and was in something called the "Tokyo Trolley" ...

Maybe related to his training period at Wendover Field?


A mock enemy city was constructed near the mountains on the base using salt from the nearby Bonneville Salt Flats. This made a fine practice target for the many bomber crews, as did the life-sized enemy battleships and other targets elsewhere on the range. Many of the targets were even electrically illuminated for night practice.

Various machine gun ranges allowed gunners to either fire at moving targets from stationary gun emplacements or fire at stationary targets from three machine guns mounted on a railroad car moving along a section of track at up to 40 miles per hour (Wendover's famous "Tokyo Trolley"). Wendover's realistic challenges for aerial gunners and bombardiers caused them to become the best trained in the world. http://www.hill.af.mil/library/factsheets/factsheet.asp?id=5955

tankgeezer
12-02-2010, 08:08 AM
He only ever mentioned being posted to Truax Field, located near Madison Wisconsin ,(where he met my mom,) and also being posted in Japan (I'm guessing after the capitulation) There are only a few small photos of him in Japan, as there was a fire, and his barracks were destroyed. He never would speak of it much ,beyond the foregoing, and showing me his patch which had a trolley on it.

Rising Sun*
12-02-2010, 08:30 AM
He never would speak of it much ,beyond the foregoing, and showing me his patch which had a trolley on it.

Could that be a trolley used to carry the bombs to the planes for loading?

But it seems a bit unlikely that ground crew would have specialised patches for their specific tasks rather than their rank or unit.

Or maybe a patch that the crew or group had made up as their own insignia, like the designs which some painted on their planes?

Ealdwita
12-02-2010, 10:58 AM
http://philcrowther.com/6thBG/6bgplane26A.html

Probably just a coincidence.

tankgeezer
12-02-2010, 05:17 PM
Could that be a trolley used to carry the bombs to the planes for loading?

But it seems a bit unlikely that ground crew would have specialized patches for their specific tasks rather than their rank or unit.

Or maybe a patch that the crew or group had made up as their own insignia, like the designs which some painted on their planes?

Its been maybe 50 yrs since I've seen the patch, but it had a stylized image of a street car, on rails, and was embroidered, said Tokyo Trolley among other things. Thats about all I remember about it. If it turns up sometime, I'll get a pic of it. I'm no expert on official patches, so it might have been something his unit, squadron, section, whatever made for themselves. He was very proud of it in any event, seldom brought it out of its box.

Rising Sun*
12-03-2010, 06:52 AM
Maybe there's a lead somewhere in the following.

Here's another plane called Tokyo Trolley http://www.flickr.com/photos/keleivis/4195895195/

And another http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/wwii-aaf-western-pacific-pilot-log-book-tokyo


375th TCG, 58th TCS—No reunions, but their scribe, Bill Woznek, keeps the members informed. In his last Newsletter he sent a copy of the front page of the “Tokyo Trolley” dated 30 August 1945. The various flight crewmembers describe their first sighting of Mt. Fujiyama, which made them realize that they were at last reaching home stretch. The many Japanese they saw were friendly and curious. One asked what “Tokyo Trolley” meant on the planes. Capt. Ringo answered, “It means that we’ve been on the way up here and this is the end of the line.” http://www.gregssandbox.com/54th/newsletter/dec04.htm


He was a pilot of the 58th Troop Carrier Squadron, 375th Troop Carrier Group, and 54th Wing known as the "Tokyo Trolleys". His tour of duty included the Asiatic-Pacific Theater of Operations with the mission of transporting troops, wounded soldiers, and cargo. His Curtiss-Wright C46 was the first allied aircraft onto Japanese soil at Atsugi air base the day after Emperor Hirohito's surrender speech on August 15, 1945, thus beginning his mission to transport the released POWs out of Japan. http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/azcentral/obituary.aspx?n=charles-robert-magadini&pid=146438377&fhid=6532


http://books.stonebooks.com/book/1004524/ http://books.stonebooks.com/book/1004524/

My father served in the 375th Troop Carrier Group (the "Tokyo Trolley"), where he flew C-46s and C-47s. He always told us "I was the smart one, the paratroopers jumped out of a perfectly good airplane!". Most of the time though he flew supplies around the different airfields from New Guinea, Biak, the Phillipines and Okinawa. after VJ day he spent almost a year flying supplies to areas of Japan that were no longer accessible by road or rail http://www.boardgamegeek.com/geeklist/summary/thing/912/page/3

Canberra Man
12-04-2010, 05:25 AM
Hi.
My father was with Royal Engineers based in Holland and he was in charge of one of the railway marshalling yards in 1944/5

Ken

Sapper
12-10-2010, 03:05 AM
My maternal Grandfather served in 1st Division 3rd Brigade starting with the RCASC, then RCOC, and from 1944 to war's end with the RCEME. He started as a MT driver then moved on to mechanic/driver mechanic. Also did some work as a fitter. He served from 1941 to 1945 and was active in the U.K., Sicily, Italy, France, Belgium, Holland, and Germany. Grandma was a stay at home mom. He is shown in my avatar.

My paternal Grandfather was active with the resistance in Holland. Like many adult males in Holland at that time, forced labor was the norm. They lived close to the German border and he spent large periods of time working in a Bonn munitions plant. He smuggled what he could out of Germany(said he made lots of extra money doing this) and also supplied information to resistance on activities in the area of Bonn. He was strafed on two different occasions by allied aircraft while riding his bicycle cart into the surrounding towns to deliver chickens and other foods. One was a typhoon that shot a couple rockets at him...he said he was just blown off his bike that time by the blast concussion. The other plane that strafed him missed but he was injured by shards of rocks thrown up by the bullet impacts. He had the scars all over him to prove it. He always seemed to be more perturbed that some of his chickens were killed during that episode. Apparently the Germans moved ammunition and the like in non-military transport. Most pilots had orders to shoot up whatever they deemed suspicious.

Grandma was a stay at home mom...had to take care of my dad and his six siblings who did their fair share of irritating the Germans at times.

There is lots more family history, but this is it in a nutshell.

Dale

karenlalaniz
12-14-2010, 10:07 PM
My dad was a radioman. He was part of a team that went in prior to the invasions of both Okinawa and Iwo Jima, breaking a code based on the Japanese language, called Katakana. He worked aboard submarines but when the communications was flooded at Oki, he was transfered to a ship where he broke the code on the deck. He is 89 and going strong. I'm so pleased to have found this board! ~Karen

flyerhell
12-15-2010, 01:45 AM
My maternal grandfather handled communications (morse code) as part of a team that flew planes from Montana to Alaska, where the Soviets would pick them up. His brother (my great uncle) served under Patton and being awarded the bronze star (he didn't talk about serving under Patton until the last year of his life, where he told my grandfather, who later relayed them to me, some horrific stories). I had another great uncle who served in the pacific (I never met him but from what I hear, it had a terrible effect on him for the rest of his life), another great uncle who helped guard ship convoys to Europe and yet another great uncle who was an advocate general (I think) in India.

By the way (this is a long thread so I am not sure if this was mentioned yet), some of your relatives are probably on the WWII registry (http://www.wwiimemorial.com/default.asp?page=registry.asp&subpage=intro). If not, you can add them in.

Scott
02-22-2011, 01:43 PM
Both grandfather of mine served in the British Army in the Far East. Both did not serve in the front line, hence did not see much action.

One served as a Medic in Alexander Hospital in Singapore. He was there when the hospital Massacre happened and was detained as a POW for the rest of the Japanese Occupation. I could not find out where he was held, probably Changi Prison? After the war, he settled down on the island for good. For all I remembered, he threw away all of his medals and did not say a single thing about what happened back then. He not only lost his mates, grandma seems to tell me he lost his soul then as well, just kept everything to himself. I remember accompanying him to War Memorials in the early 90's, he would silently weep every single time.

The other Gramp was an Army Clerk based in Port ****son, Malaya. He used to joke the only enemies he had to deal with was the heat, mosquitoes and boredom. Well, basically when the Japanese invasion starts, he was among the first to retreat. From Port ****son down to Singapore, and from Singapore he took a ship down to Australia. I guess the real fun for him begun when Japan surrendered. He was sent back to Singapore to assist and prepare for the signing of the official surrender documents. That was the first time he met the real enemy proper. He noted that the Japanese Generals had the aura of a murderers while at the same time, conduct themselves as tough soldiers till the very end. I think it was 3 years ago, he went back to Port ****son once again, under the Malaysian Government's Veteran Day program. He had to opportunity to march in the Freedom Square(sp) and visited his old office once more.

nstoolman1
03-27-2011, 04:12 AM
My father (and his classmates) due to his/their age were told by GP and GM/other parents he/they could not enlist till he/they finished high school. The school put all the seniors on a fast track to finish. He made it in about 4 months before the end of WWII. He joined the Navy and after boot camp was sent on Joint Task Force 1 under Admiral Blandy to the first Atom Tests at Bikini atoll. He was a part of Operations Crossroads. He is one of the Atomic Veterans. He died in his sleep at the age of 82 in Dec/2010. I am proud of his service even though it was unglamorous or exiting as some of you and your relatives.

Bucky
04-10-2011, 03:38 PM
My Dad - Combat Engineer, 65th Engineer BN 25th Div Pearl Harbor/Guadacanal/Soloman Islands

Mom - parts inspector m1 CARBINE Underwood Company Bridgeport ct

Grandfather (WW1 Vet) neighborhood air raid warden- Bridgeport CT

Kregs
04-12-2011, 01:19 AM
I'll give you a list of my family's military involvement, including my own service during the war:

My father served under Brigadier General Zygmunt Piasecki of brigade Karkowska during the September Campaign. He died on 4 September; my uncle, Karol, fought under Władysław Bortnowski in the infamous Bzura battle. He was captured by the Germans and sent to the Stalag, from where he was then sent to work in a civilian armaments plant in Germany. He died just a few months before the allies liberated the plant; my brother, who was four years older than me, escaped across the Romanian border and later joined the RAF, where he fought bravely against the German luftwaffe.

My story is different. My mother and I were forced out of our house, and sent to the General Government, the rump "Polish" state Hitler created for us, after the invasion. When we were deported, I'll never forget riding on that rickety wagon with my weeping mother, her face covered in her shawl, my father's birthday present to her, or the soldiers who threw my music box on the floor, smashing it into a million pieces, trying to hurry us up. But, that deportation was the least of our problems.

I joined the Polish resistance after I learned that my mother was to be sent to work on a farm in Germany, where I knew she would most certainly die. My life in the resistance was interesting to say the least: I blew up railway tracks, sent messages to other resistance fighters in the underground, and waited orders from the government. I eventually joined in the Warsaw uprising where I got injured falling down a a flight of stairs (more about that later).

That's my story.

woj
04-12-2011, 06:55 AM
Sapper, karenlalaniz, Scott, Kregs and all ---> very interesting stories !!! :)


My Grandfather (His photo is my avatar) was a Major of the Polish Army and commander of the 3rd battalion of the 29th Infantry Regiment
(29 Pułk Strzelców Kaniowskich).
He fought the battle of Bzura and the Battle of Młociny in September 1939 under the General Kutrzeba.
He was injured during the Siege of Warsaw and taken captive after Warsaw surrendered to the Germans. He died in January 1940 in the military hospital of Łódź.
But in fact his death is quite mysterious... nobody knows what happened to him exactly. My family identified at least two graves of him - one in Łódź, another one in Warsaw at the Powązki cemetery - we possess some German death certificates, one from Warsaw and three (!) from two different (!) hospitals of Łódź.
Only the date of death is the same. My Grandmother didn´t identify his corpse, saying: "it must be someone else..." and "what did you make with him?" A nurse answered: "you will find out after the war..."

He was a very experienced officer (he fought already the battle of Warsaw in 1920) and 1939 was not seriously wounded so I guess that he was smuggled, like many other soldiers, into the Polish underground organisation SZP. This procedure was often practised in the German POW hospitals during the first months of WWII and later. The Polish medical personnel forged official papers, made injuries longer heal, saw about the civilian clothes and got the patients ready to disappear. Nobody ever saw him... His son and my uncle was the Armia Krajowa soldier.

Kregs
04-13-2011, 01:33 AM
I eventually joined in the Warsaw uprising where I got injured falling down a a flight of stairs (more about that later).



I was hiding in a deserted storage building that had large glass windows (I'd say the windows were 47'' Tall x 16'' wide--in American metric units) with my Sten gun and knife in hand, waiting for more soldiers to come directly into view (our pistols kept misfiring or we kept running out of ammunition, so we had to shoot until they were directly proportional to us). We, a couple of AK guys and three civilians, were shooting for hours, some were throwing hand grenades until we ran out of ammunition and couldn't hold the building for more than two hours. The guys panicked at this point because we were through: our supply ran out (we had only 100 rounds of ammunition and about 80 hand grenades between us), and the Germans were surrounding the building. (In fact, to this day, I can still hear them approaching the building.)

So, before we could plan our escape and eventual surrender, we smelled some smoke and could feel the heat from the floors beneath us. We guessed that the Germans were burning the building down to bring us to our knees; they wanted, we guessed, to see us cower in fear before them, to see a couple of filthy Slavs trembling before their almighty superiority, and they were doing it correctly: we were panicking, and we were so weak before them. As soon as we smelled the smoke, we lost all sense of rationality and proportion. I attempted to escape, rather willy-nilly on my part, through one of the windows, but paused because I could see a soldier guarding the side exit, looking up at us (he was very cool and calm, even smoking). So, I rushed down a couple of stairs and eventually fell down the second flight, breaking my glasses and jawbone in the process (I could hear my jaw snap--this is the source of all of my extensive dental work today!)

I escaped through some windows to the east of the building, and ran as fast as my feet could carry me. I ran for nearly five miles and eventually hid with an elderly woman and her young daughter in a deserted, ruined building.

Wish I could tell you some more, but I'm getting sleepy and my hands are cramping up.

skorzeny57
04-13-2011, 03:56 PM
Kregs,
i just want to thank you for sharing with us the amazing stories of you and your family... May your parents rest in peace.

Kregs
04-25-2011, 12:03 AM
Kregs,
i just want to thank you for sharing with us the amazing stories of you and your family... May your parents rest in peace.

Thank you, skorzeny. Unfortunately, they did not live to tell their stories: God gave that responsibility to me.

colmhain
07-03-2011, 05:38 AM
SSG. Johm M. Fuller, ADSEC COMZONE G4 under General Ewart Plank passed away peacfully Monday, aged 87. Soldier, Architect, Father, Grandfather, Great Grandfather. Be at peace, you will be missed.

Evillittlekenny
07-03-2011, 05:10 PM
All of my grandparents have been kids of 10-16/17 years during the war. They did not do anything special except my grandfather from my mother's side.

As the others, he was a kid. And one day in 1944 or 1945, he painted a big red star on the front door of their house. He did this deliberatly to piss off the Nazis and Ustaše. Of course they noticed it and my great grandparents had a hard time to fend off an execution of the whole family. They could persuade them that he was only a child and "didn't know what he did" (although he bloody well did).
It is worth to note, that some years later he did the same with the communists in a very similar manner (though not using Nazi symbols).

All of them witnessed some brutal acts of both the Axis (in this area Germans, Ustaše and Četniks) and the Partisans. Especially during Operation Vlaška Mala...
First a mass slaughter by the Axis in our village, then by the partisans.
http://www.vojska.net/eng/world-war-2/operation/vlaska-mala-1945/



My grand uncle of my father's side was drafted under not entirely clear circumstances by the Germans in 1943 and was never heard of again.

Another grand uncle (or great cousin or so, I must admit I am not sure) was shot by Ustaše when the war was practically over (some day in May 1945) for resisting the draft into the HOS (Hrvatske oružane snage - Croatian armed forces). He was 16 years at this time. The Ustaše went from house to house to collect able men, with brutal force. When at the home of my unfortunate grand uncle, his parents begged this rotten Rakovac (some officer and diehard Ustaša who seems to have even survived the Operation Vlaška Mala) to spare their son, to do anything he wishes to them, but just to spare him. He said calmly that there is no need to be so upset, the boy shall answer himself whether he wants to go or not. My granduncle, shaken of fear, just shaked his head. This Rakovac then drew his pistol as fast as a lightning and shot him between his eyes, his mother was standing right behind him and was littered with his brains...
She never spoke a single word again.
To make it worse, he was listed as an Ustaše soldier, which meant some very harsh treatments for the family after the war. This didn't last long though, as his mother died soon after and his father a couple of years after that.

Now some more distant relatives. Some family members of the cousins of my father.

One was killed in May 1945 by partisans after torture, because some Ustaša who went into hiding slipped him some incriminating stuff (IIRC not more than a badge with Ustaša insignia). He died a really horrible death, it is said that they took his eyes out...

Another one was killed by the so called Križari ("Crusaders" - a partisan type force of former Ustaše and Army personell as well as people who supported the Ustaše otherwise, who kept fighting up to the fifties). The reasons remain unclear, probably he was just at the wrong time at the wrong place.







Not directly related to WW2, but a granduncle of mine was in Vietnam with the US forces as some kind of scout.

His father was forcibly recruited to the HOS (Hrvatske oružane snage - Croatian armed forces) in February 1945. He saw him a few times in the war after February but he did not return in the end. Unfortunately, some "bright guy" decided to brand his family as Ustaše supporters. Probably for not resisting the forced recruitment (the Ustaše btw threated to kill him if he would not come with them, or to kill family members, some 100 people were killed like that, like my other grand uncle).
Anyway, my granduncle was trying to prove himself in the new Yugoslavia. And when he was 17 there was some programme that boys could help with the harvest and receive an appropriate amount of flour. This would have helped his family, which was hit so hard all the time, a lot. And he worked like a horse. And earned the most. Theoretically. The guy who dealt the flour knew him and with a smile he didn't give him the flour, but gave him for each earned kilogram a single corn.
He was very bittered and didn't talk for days. And then he ran away. Everyone thought he committed suicide.
But he didn't. In fact, he fled. He managed to cross the border to Austria and went from there to Germany. He then went to the US. It is woth noting that he did not speak neither English nor German!
In the US, Šimun Klarić became Simon Clark. And when the Vietnam War started for the US, he volunteered. Apparently because of his hate of communism.
He was some kind of a scout, telling that he often hid of the Vietnamese who were walking only one meter away of him, not noticing him.
He also told how he had to drink his own urine to stay alive in some occasions.
And what really hurt him was the fate of the children there, left alone by everyone. When he found some, he took them with him to the next safe point, carrrying on occassions even up to three of them. In such cases, he was then even left by his squad!
We would not know anything of all this if he wouldn't have returned in the late 70ies or the beginning of the 80ies to Yugoslavia. Everyone was surprised that he was alive at all. He then told some of his stories to my family. My grandmother, his sister, was very concerned whether he did ever kill someone or did something bad, to which he only replied "I can sleep well at night as I know I never killed anyone."
But he was not popular among the police, who was observing him very carefully. Since he was now from the US. Although he did have an extra grant from Beograd that he could move freely. While he was in Yugoslavia on this visit, he said his hotel room was searched several times. And he found two bombs in his car. The first one not activated. The second one literally ticking. And with this one he went to the police station. Waiting neatly in the row. And when it was his turn, he put it on the table, saying "Gentlemen I found this in my car, I think this is yours."
The police station was panicking a little and after some time, one of the defused the bomb. The chief of the department had then a little conversation with him, promising to leave him alone then (which he did if you don't count the informers who were following carefully where he was going).
When my grandmother heard of this, she went furious, asking how he could do that, didn't he think that he could die. And he silenced her with his short reply "In Vietnam I died so many times, nothng can happen to me anymore."

After his visit he moved to Canada, where he died in 1996. Apparently he suffered from Leukemia, but he received some special medical treatment.

I am very sad that he passed away a long time ago now, long before I could have really made contact with him.




I know, it is a longer read, but I hope that some of you will find it interesting.

Kregs
07-05-2011, 02:19 AM
Apparently he suffered I know, it is a longer read, but I hope that some of you will find it interesting.

I found your post very interesting, Evillittlekenny, tears instantly came to my eyes when I read it. I suffered enormously during and after the war, but I managed to look my past in the eyes and come to the conclusion that I must start from scratch, everything must begin anew. After the Warsaw uprising, I realized that my past life was over. I no longer had a home to go to, I no longer had a father or a mother or brothers and sisters--they vanished or died, all of them lost to me. When two German soldiers holding large, menacing rifles, give you ten minutes to gather your belongings, you will see your past life ebbing away before your eyes. They will herd you like cattle to a crowded wagon, and you will watch your house through an old woman's open legs and a small hole in the wood, until you can barely make out the roof or the front porch of your beloved home. And your past life will come to you, as it always does: The very same house where you were born, where you learned to read and write your name, where you listened to "With Fire and Sword" and pretended to be interested, where you kept earthworms under your bed, will be inhabited by Baltic Germans and later destroyed by the retreating Nazis.

Thanks for sharing your story, Evillittlekenny.

Evillittlekenny
07-05-2011, 04:47 PM
I must say I am very impressed that you can talk so freely about your story. Many people could not.
I can surely talk much easier about it since I was not there, but when I talk to the elder people in my home village, you can see the fear in their eyes related to what happened there.

I feel very sorry for what happened to you and I would like to offer my sincere condolences to you for your family.

I thank you also for your interest in my family history.

Dobranoc Kregs.

Der Toten Kaiser
07-06-2011, 10:04 PM
My greatgranfather was a Private, a volunteer. He fighted from Tunisia to Monte Cassino and killed some jerries (any german here, don't take this as an offense!)