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Egorka
09-04-2008, 10:59 AM
http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff124/sarmata_2007/m1910_policja.jpg

AirdefMike
09-04-2008, 12:07 PM
Looks like WW1 German stormtroopers to me.

Edit. The place would be the Western Front but that's just a guess.

Egorka
09-04-2008, 12:20 PM
Looks like WW1 German stormtroopers to me.

Edit. The place would be the Western Front but that's just a guess.he he... Wrong both place and time... :)

AirdefMike
09-04-2008, 12:26 PM
he he... Wrong both place and time... :)

Oh bugger! :)

pdf27
09-04-2008, 01:29 PM
Freikorps? That would put them in any of a few years from 1919 onward.

Egorka
09-04-2008, 03:03 PM
Freikorps? That would put them in any of a few years from 1919 onward.
Nicht!!! Ich nicht ein Berliner! :)
These StarWars like fellows are not Germans...

flamethrowerguy
09-04-2008, 03:20 PM
If it wasn't for the gun I'd say they just stood up from the Round Table, Camelot, about 500 AD.

Amrit
09-04-2008, 03:31 PM
1930s Irish army? In civil defence role?

Egorka
09-04-2008, 03:54 PM
1930s Irish army? In civil defence role?
nope!

Ok... the first letter of the country is ... "P"

pdf27
09-04-2008, 04:05 PM
Hmmm.... list of countries starting with "P":

Pakistan – Islamic Republic of Pakistan
Palau – Republic of Palau
Palestine – Palestinian Territories[35]
Panama – Republic of Panama
Papua New Guinea – Independent State of Papua New Guinea
Paraguay – Republic of Paraguay
Peru – Republic of Peru
Philippines – Republic of the Philippines
Pitcairn Islands
Poland – Republic of Poland
Portugal – Portuguese Republic

Of these, the following are plausible:

Paraguay – Republic of Paraguay
Peru – Republic of Peru
Poland – Republic of Poland
Portugal – Portuguese Republic
If I had to bet, I'd go for Paraguay. Rather a lot of transplanted Germans ended up there at one time or another. Second bet would be Poland pre-1939. That appears to be either a WW1 design Stahlhelm, and IIRC I've seen body armour similar to that in some WW1 images as well (to protect against shrapnel). The shield is a new one on me, but is presumably riot gear.
It's unlikely to be Portugal as they were on the allied side in WW1 so would wear either Brodie or Adrian helmets if they weren't wearing one of their own design.

Egorka
09-04-2008, 05:10 PM
Second bet would be Poland pre-1939.

A wise man talking.
Indeed. Polish police in 1930s.

http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff124/sarmata_2007/policja8xl.jpg
http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff124/sarmata_2007/policja8xl.jpg

http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff124/sarmata_2007/polski467.jpg
http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff124/sarmata_2007/polski467.jpg

http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff124/sarmata_2007/025a.jpg
http://i243.photobucket.com/albums/ff124/sarmata_2007/025a.jpg

pdf27
09-07-2008, 11:59 AM
More helmet fun. Where does this one come from?

ww11freak34
10-06-2008, 07:40 PM
germany

aly j
10-06-2008, 07:55 PM
germany

Germany sounds like an too easy answer. There was other countries that had the same heltmet as Germany did.

pdf27
10-07-2008, 03:00 AM
Indeed. It isn't Germany, as the badge on the front should make obvious. As a big, big hint this country didn't even exist during WW1.

aly j
10-07-2008, 08:25 AM
Indeed. It isn't Germany, as the badge on the front should make obvious. As a big, big hint this country didn't even exist during WW1.
Is is Albania or Hungary?
How about west or east Germany?

Egorka
11-06-2008, 03:29 AM
Is is Albania or Hungary?
How about west or east Germany?
Please try to read the thread through... :)

pdf27
11-06-2008, 04:36 AM
Come on guys, this was supposed to be an easy one.
As another hint, I've recently rebuked RS* for swearing in the language of this country on the board!

Rising Sun*
11-06-2008, 06:41 AM
Come on guys, this was supposed to be an easy one.
As another hint, I've recently rebuked RS* for swearing in the language of this country on the board!

Given my linguistic versatility in the swearing area and the mod rebukes it has earned me, that doesn't necessarily narrow it down. :D

Anyway, I'm off for Guinness now.

kamehouse
11-06-2008, 06:09 PM
Czech?

Egorka
11-06-2008, 06:22 PM
Czech?
No. Poland. 1930s. Police force.

pdf27
11-06-2008, 06:23 PM
I think he means my helmet, and the answer is no.

kamehouse
11-06-2008, 06:27 PM
I think he means my helmet, and the answer is no.
OK,I tried.
:(
Could it be one of the Baltic countries?

pdf27
11-06-2008, 06:40 PM
Nope. Definately the wrong side of Europe!

kamehouse
11-07-2008, 11:00 AM
***Ireland?***

pdf27
11-07-2008, 11:25 AM
Bingo!
The Irish got German-style helmets because they didn't look like British ones, and they still use that badge for their armed forces.

kamehouse
11-07-2008, 04:36 PM
My turn then?
So where and when?It's easy I know.
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee44/kamehouse-uk/AXIS%20pictures/10101.jpg

flamethrowerguy
11-11-2008, 12:47 PM
Mmmh, Panzer II, early Panzer IV and Panzer 38 (t) in great numbers...I'll go for France, maybe the Somme area, late May or early June 1940.

kamehouse
11-11-2008, 02:47 PM
Some says this is around the Meuse area and that it is the 7.PzDiv but France 1940 is enough for me.
Your turn then.

flamethrowerguy
11-11-2008, 04:47 PM
Allright then, next one:

2966

navyson
11-12-2008, 03:07 PM
Summer of 1942, Stalingrad. Germans communicating over the Volga River?

Or it could just be a soldier making fun of Hitlers speeches!:D

flamethrowerguy
11-12-2008, 04:42 PM
Summer of 1942, Stalingrad. Germans communicating over the Volga River?

Or it could just be a soldier making fun of Hitlers speeches!:D

No. Neither...nor.;)
Hint: there is a term for this stage of the war in every language of the involved parties.

navyson
11-12-2008, 08:32 PM
German/French border, 1940, "sitzkrieg"?

flamethrowerguy
11-12-2008, 08:45 PM
German/French border, 1940, "sitzkrieg"?

BINGO!!!:D
The "Sitzkrieg" (sit war) respectively "Phoney War" respectively "Drôle de guerre".
Photo was taken -as you wrote- at the german-french border, the Upper Rhine area in spring of 1940 (certainly before May 10). The soldiers belong to the 4th SS-Polizei-Grenadier-Division, still wearing common Wehrmacht uniforms.
You're next!

navyson
11-12-2008, 08:49 PM
FINALLY....FINALLY...Got an answer right on something in the quiz section. Problem is I won't have time to look up and post something in the next few days (out of town). So, would someone else do the honor for me to bump the thread? Thanks!

navyson
11-15-2008, 09:01 AM
Let's see if I can get this uploaded.
2971

navyson
11-25-2008, 07:51 AM
Bump! No, I ain't aly j;)

flamethrowerguy
11-25-2008, 10:13 AM
Let's see if I can get this uploaded.
2971

I can't get much more info on this one as "Germany, 1944" :(

pdf27
11-25-2008, 06:11 PM
Isn't that Hitler inspecting the aftermath of the briefcase bomb assassination attempt?

gunner-B
11-25-2008, 07:46 PM
Is it Hitler inspecting the bomb damage caused by the first RAF raid on Berlin in 1940. Which, in turn, made him switch his Luftwaffe raids from the airfields to Bombing London.

Paul

navyson
11-25-2008, 10:55 PM
I suppose with so many cities in Germany being bombed, Flamethrowerguy came closest to the answer without God knows how many guesses (Hopefully I'm not caving in too soon.)
It is Hamburg, Germany 1944.

You want to do the next one FTG?

flamethrowerguy
11-26-2008, 09:52 AM
Allright, I'll go on:
Where and when is this?
Note: Just country and year would be insufficient on that one!:mrgreen:

3011

RifleMan20
11-26-2008, 12:23 PM
France, 1945? Just a wild guess mostly because of the sand.

gunner-B
11-26-2008, 05:09 PM
Germany 1945: the Rhine crossing

Paul

flamethrowerguy
11-26-2008, 05:29 PM
Germany 1945: the Rhine crossing

Paul

Give me the month and you made it!:mrgreen:

gunner-B
11-26-2008, 05:58 PM
It has to be the end of March

Paul

flamethrowerguy
11-26-2008, 06:31 PM
Exactly, Paul, your turn!

navyson
12-05-2008, 09:38 PM
Bump!

navyson
01-18-2009, 04:19 PM
gunner-b must have forgotten it's his turn.

How about this:
3132

Egorka
01-18-2009, 05:16 PM
Budapest, March 1945.

navyson
01-18-2009, 07:38 PM
Budapest, March 1945.
I knew you would get it, I "borrowed" it from you!:mrgreen:
http://community.livejournal.com/ww2_photographs/
Anyway, keeps the quiz going, your turn. Please.

Egorka
01-19-2009, 06:06 AM
OK, no much time for finding .... lets try the one I already have...

NO READING!!! :)

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3017/2884844596_73913b1432_m.jpg
click (http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3017/2884844596_4d52dc0f26_o.jpg)

navyson
01-21-2009, 07:40 AM
France, 1944. Looks like German POW's, and civilians making fun of them.

Egorka
01-21-2009, 11:33 AM
Dunkerque, 1945. It was one of the last places where Germans surrendered.
Here they march through the city to the POaw camp.
The local kids play war.

navyson
08-12-2009, 10:25 AM
Where and when:

3464

navyson
08-12-2009, 10:26 AM
Whoa! Sorry for the sizing!:oops:

dbloge
08-15-2009, 03:21 AM
Dunkerque june 1940


dieter

navyson
08-15-2009, 07:53 AM
Dunkerque june 1940


dieter
Correct! I thought I'd be a little humorous since post #52 showed the Germans as POW's leaving Dunkerque. Your turn, care to post a picture?

dbloge
08-17-2009, 10:04 PM
ok...this is way too easy

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e35/dbloge/misc/ww2115vr4.jpg

flamethrowerguy
08-18-2009, 05:35 AM
ok...this is way too easy

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e35/dbloge/misc/ww2115vr4.jpg

US 1st Army personnel at Ludendorff-Bridge at Remagen/Germany, March 11, 1945.

dbloge
08-19-2009, 10:33 AM
correct.....its all yours now


dieter

flamethrowerguy
08-19-2009, 02:29 PM
Thankie! Next one:

3527
I'd like to hear the exact date and place on this one (otherwise it would probably be too easy)!

dbloge
08-20-2009, 02:45 AM
is that speer and doenitz?

flamethrowerguy
08-20-2009, 05:21 AM
Speer, Dönitz and Jodl...I think I can take responsibility for that hint.;)

dbloge
08-23-2009, 01:21 PM
the mg gunner has alot of power in his hands



dieter

flamethrowerguy
08-23-2009, 02:36 PM
I feel like another hint is needed...the incident on the photo occured shortly after the war had ended in the ETO.

navyson
08-27-2009, 08:33 PM
May 23, 1945 in Flensburg, Germany?

flamethrowerguy
08-27-2009, 08:38 PM
May 23, 1945 in Flensburg, Germany?

Finally, yes!;)

navyson
08-27-2009, 08:43 PM
Finally, yes!;)

That took some doing, let me tell you. I don't know how people get answers so fast on some of these other quiz threads. Let's see if I can come up with something. I have some good ones for the other threads if I could get some right. :)

navyson
08-27-2009, 08:47 PM
I feel like another hint is needed...the incident on the photo occured shortly after the war had ended in the ETO.
Here's another picture from that time that clued me in:3539
Now let me find something to continue.

navyson
08-27-2009, 09:00 PM
Here:3540

flamethrowerguy
10-12-2009, 03:39 PM
To resurrect this one and since nobody else gives it a try...G.I.'s of 116th Infantry (29th Infantry Division) crossing the Siegfried Line southwards of Aachen, September 1944.

navyson
10-15-2009, 07:23 AM
To resurrect this one and since nobody else gives it a try...G.I.'s of 116th Infantry (29th Infantry Division) crossing the Siegfried Line southwards of Aachen, September 1944.

Sorry for the delayed response, I've been out of town. Yes, that's correct. Actually that's more information than the photo caption had! The photo caption told me American forces moving across the Siegfried Line 1944. Your turn!

flamethrowerguy
10-16-2009, 04:30 PM
Here we go then:

3689

navyson
10-18-2009, 02:01 PM
An odd mixture of vehicles and uniforms....

flamethrowerguy
10-18-2009, 02:14 PM
An odd mixture of vehicles and uniforms....

Isn't it?;)
That should be one clue, also take a look at the facial expression of the opponents.

Egorka
10-18-2009, 04:36 PM
Isn't it?;)
That should be one clue, also take a look at the facial expression of the opponents.
Me thinks it the photo is taken post May 1945. The German is POW.
That is all folks. :)

Nurnberg?

flamethrowerguy
10-18-2009, 04:48 PM
Me thinks it the photo is taken post May 1945.
Replace "post" with "early"


The German is POW.
No, not yet!;)


Nurnberg?

No, another German major city...

Egorka
10-18-2009, 04:51 PM
Replace "post" with "early"

No, not yet!;)

No, another German major city...
A-ha!

"A second Act of Military Surrender was signed shortly after midnight Central European time on May 8[3] at the seat of the Soviet Military Administration in Berlin-Karlshorst, now the location of the German-Russian Museum Berlin-Karlshorst."
http://www.museum-karlshorst.de/

flamethrowerguy
10-18-2009, 04:56 PM
A-ha!

"A second Act of Military Surrender was signed shortly after midnight Central European time on May 8[3] at the seat of the Soviet Military Administration in Berlin-Karlshorst, now the location of the German-Russian Museum Berlin-Karlshorst."
http://www.museum-karlshorst.de/

It's not the German total capitulation, no.:D

rudeerude
10-20-2009, 12:10 AM
Guessing by the American vehicles in the background my first guess is in the American zone of occupation city of Frankfurt??

flamethrowerguy
10-20-2009, 06:22 AM
Guessing by the American vehicles in the background my first guess is in the American zone of occupation city of Frankfurt??

Nope, these would be Lend & Lease vehicles.

flamethrowerguy
10-29-2009, 05:04 PM
Bump!

A German general...a Soviet sentry...Lend & Lease jeeps...early May, 1945...German major city...anyone?:shock:

wingsofwrath
10-31-2009, 06:41 AM
Well, unfortunately, both the photograph and the "extra clues" are still to unexplicit to lead to any exact identification - in May of 1945 there were scores of German generals surrendering to the Soviets in any major town imaginable (most in and around Berlin) and lend-lease jeeps were commonplace.

The picture is of a poor enough quality that the facial features of the general are almost indistinguishable - there is a hint of spectacles and maybe a light coloured moustache, but can I really be sure?- and the uniform and background don't reveal any major clues - the only thing I can be fairly certain about is that the town doesn't appear to have sustained heavy bombardment, so the scene is probably not set in Berlin.

Bearing that in mind, could you please help us by offering any of the following: Name of the General; Unit (if not, at least branch of service); Area where this is happening (doesn't have to be the exact town); approximate time (week if not the actual day)

Also, as a shot in the dark: Chemnitz?

flamethrowerguy
10-31-2009, 09:22 AM
Nah, I guess it's time to solve it. It's indeed Berlin -which definitely was heavily bombed. The German general is General der Infanterie Hans Krebs (1898-1945) on his way to the surrender negotiations of encircled Berlin on May 1, 1945. He was about to meet Soviet General Chuikov of 8th Guard Army. Krebs -who committed suicide shortly after that- was chosen to lead the negotiations because of the fact that he spoke the Russian language fluently since he had been German assistant military attaché in Moscow in 1933/34.
Anyone feel free to jump in and place the next riddle.

wingsofwrath
10-31-2009, 11:09 AM
Ah yes. Now that you mention it, I know of this incident, but I've never seen a photo of the man...

Ok then, here is another, hopefully easier, enigma- Where and then is this scene located? (approximate date and place)

http://img203.imageshack.us/img203/7743/guess5.jpg


Hint: look closely at the photo - there are several unusual details that will lead you straight to the answer. These people are not what they seem to be.

wingsofwrath
11-20-2009, 03:31 AM
Since it's painfully obvious no one has any idea whatsoever where to start on this, I will start giving clues, hopefully leading to a hasty resolution of this enigma:

1) Despite the US uniforms, these men belong to a nation not commonly known to have taken part in WW2.

2) The setting of this photograph is Italy, and the year is 1944.

Rising Sun*
11-20-2009, 07:36 AM
Since it's painfully obvious no one has any idea whatsoever where to start on this, I will start giving clues, hopefully leading to a hasty resolution of this enigma:

1) Despite the US uniforms, these men belong to a nation not commonly known to have taken part in WW2.

2) The setting of this photograph is Italy, and the year is 1944.

That would make them troops of the Brazilian Expeditionary Force, which performed quite well in Italy.

Beyond that, I have no idea who the people in the picture are.

wingsofwrath
11-20-2009, 06:01 PM
Yes, the people in the photograph are indeed officers of the Brazilian Expeditionary Force, near Monte Castello, in November-December 1944.

Your turn up to bat.

Rising Sun*
11-21-2009, 06:33 AM
Yes, the people in the photograph are indeed officers of the Brazilian Expeditionary Force, near Monte Castello, in November-December 1944.

Your turn up to bat.

Thanks.

That was easier than I expected. I thought I'd have to know who they were and where they were.

This one doesn't require identification of the people, or perhaps even the vessel, but it does require identification in a general sense of the people being rescued and the event which led to it.

http://img175.imageshack.us/img175/1900/mysteryi.jpg

Moreheaddriller
11-22-2009, 11:13 PM
midway?

Rising Sun*
11-23-2009, 05:20 AM
midway?

No, but you're correct in locating it in the war against Japan.

And the people being rescued aren't Americans. Nor were they on an American ship.

rudeerude
11-23-2009, 06:30 PM
The sinking of the Rakuyo Maru,British and Australian survivors rescued by the USS Sealion on Second War Patrol. September 1944.Thought I throw this in for extra credit.


On September 4th, 2,218 Australian and British prisoners of war, who had survived the building of the Death Railway, were marched the three miles from the Valley Road camp in Singapore to the docks to board the two twenty-three year old passenger/cargo ships Rakuyo Maru (9,500 tons) and the Kachidoki Maru (10,500 tons). The Kachidoki Maru was the ex US ship President Harrison which had ran aground at Sha Wai Shan in China and was captured and salvaged by the Japanese. Both vessels were bound for Formosa. In the South China Sea, the twelve ship convoy, including three transports, two tankers and four escorting destroyers, was attacked by three American submarines, the Growler, Sealion and the Pampanito. The Rakuyo and Kachidoki were both sunk by torpedoes 300 miles west of Cape Bojeador, Luzon. A total of 1,144 British and Australian POW's lost their lives. Among those lost were thirty-three men from HMAS Perth. All told there were 1,074 survivors, 141 were picked up by the three submarines. The USS Queenfish and USS Barb arrived later and in heavy seas rescued another thirty-two before heading for Saipan. The Japanese destroyers rescued 520 British prisoners from the Kachidoki (488 POW's and crew had died) and 277 British and Australians from the Rakuyo, to again become Prisoners of War.

Rising Sun*
11-23-2009, 06:54 PM
The sinking of the Rakuyo Maru,British and Australian survivors rescued by the USS Sealion on Second War Patrol. September 1944.Thought I throw this in for extra credit.

100%

Your turn.

rudeerude
11-23-2009, 10:12 PM
Ok here is my offer,where and when.
3802

Moreheaddriller
11-23-2009, 10:54 PM
for some reason i wana say russian but maybe its an expeditionary force of some kind as of place? maybe the alpes

rudeerude
11-24-2009, 09:16 PM
for some reason i wana say russian but maybe its an expeditionary force of some kind as of place? maybe the alpes

Not Russian,lower left corner should should be a clue on nation?

Rising Sun*
11-24-2009, 11:17 PM
Vegetation could be anywhere, but Sicily or Italy seem good possibilities.

Looks like a second wave of American paratroops landing after the first wave has gone, and LZ maybe has been hit with artillery, which could be either Sicily or Italy.

Or it could be the Pacific for all I know.

rudeerude
11-25-2009, 04:32 PM
Vegetation could be anywhere, but Sicily or Italy seem good possibilities.


Looks like a second wave of American paratroops landing after the first wave has gone, and LZ maybe has been hit with artillery, which could be either Sicily or Italy.
That would be the obvious choice looking at the terrain.


Or it could be the Pacific for all I know.
But this puts you in the right theater,Pacific.

Rising Sun*
11-25-2009, 07:03 PM
But this puts you in the right theater,Pacific.

Thanks.

Pacific was my first impression but closer examination told me to go for Italy / Sicily in preference. So much for closer examination!

I'll exclude drops in Burma as that wasn't in the Pacific Theatre.

I doubt it's New Guinea where American (and Australian) paratroopers dropped into the Markham Valley as the terrain there was fairly flat and grassy.

The Philippines drops are a strong possibility.

On the basis that the photo indicates a drop has already occurred and those troops have left the area when a second drop is coming in, and given that the LZ appears to have been shelled before the first drop otherwise the chutes on the ground would be damaged, that is consistent with the pre-drop bombing and shelling and two drops about three hours apart on Topside on Corregidor on 16 Feb 1945.

rudeerude
11-25-2009, 09:31 PM
Thanks.
The Philippines drops are a strong possibility.

On the basis that the photo indicates a drop has already occurred and those troops have left the area when a second drop is coming in, and given that the LZ appears to have been shelled before the first drop otherwise the chutes on the ground would be damaged, that is consistent with the pre-drop bombing and shelling and two drops about three hours apart on Topside on Corregidor on 16 Feb 1945.

Correct,Corregidor on February 16 1945,jump by the 503rd.Probably one of the lesser know PIR during WW2.Your turn.

Rising Sun*
11-25-2009, 10:54 PM
Correct,Corregidor on February 16 1945,jump by the 503rd.Probably one of the lesser know PIR during WW2.Your turn.

Thanks.

This will be dead easy for someone who knows about it, or very hard to work out for those who don't.


http://img22.imageshack.us/img22/4985/mysteryn.jpg

navyson
11-26-2009, 08:19 AM
Well, the guy on the gurney looks like Gary Cooper, but I couldn't find that he served in the military. Still looking.

Rising Sun*
11-26-2009, 08:30 AM
Well, the guy on the gurney looks like Gary Cooper, but I couldn't find that he served in the military. Still looking.

Not Gary Cooper.

The guy on the gurney isn't famous for anything except what he did on it.

Rising Sun*
11-27-2009, 06:39 AM
Here's another view of what happened.

The significance isn't in who did it but why it was done, and for whom.

http://img526.imageshack.us/img526/3849/mystery2q.jpg

pdf27
11-27-2009, 06:44 AM
Is that the guy who had himself deliberately infected with Malaria?

Rising Sun*
11-27-2009, 07:01 AM
Is that the guy who had himself deliberately infected with Malaria?

No.

It was actually the reverse.

He gave his blood to save someone many people wanted dead. And who died because of, but not from, the blood transfusion.

Rising Sun*
11-30-2009, 05:44 AM
This happened after VJ Day.

rudeerude
11-30-2009, 09:17 PM
This happened after VJ Day.
I should have posted this guess before this clue.Just by the picture the only clues I could come up with was Army? by the double buckle boot which would date it late 44 or 45.The Khaki uniform,Pacific.Was the blood transfusion for Tojo?

Rising Sun*
11-30-2009, 10:41 PM
Was the blood transfusion for Tojo?

That's it. Well done.

For general info: Tojo tried to commit suicide to avoid arrest as a war criminal but was saved by a blood transfusion from Sgt Jack Archinal, allowing Tojo to stand trial and be executed as a war criminal. http://www.lifestylesover50.com/index2.php?option=com_content&do_pdf=1&id=211

Your turn.

wingsofwrath
12-01-2009, 08:45 AM
nevermind - I was answering to an old photo - that's what happens when you don't refresh the page enough times...

rudeerude
12-02-2009, 05:35 PM
Here is my offer..
3816
Good luck..

Rising Sun*
12-02-2009, 06:55 PM
Evacuation by sea of wounded from Tunisia during Operation Torch?

rudeerude
12-02-2009, 10:16 PM
Evacuation by sea of wounded from Tunisia during Operation Torch?
The men in the stretcher are the focus of this event.It is not Tunisia or the MTO.

Rising Sun*
12-02-2009, 11:55 PM
The men in the stretcher are the focus of this event.It is not Tunisia or the MTO.


Thanks.

Are they wearing pyjamas?

Or Indian (as in India) type clothes?

rudeerude
12-03-2009, 07:32 PM
Thanks.


Are they wearing pyjamas?
Yes,these men mostly suffered from exposer.


Or Indian (as in India) type clothes?
Theater is Pacific.

Rising Sun*
12-06-2009, 06:21 AM
Would they be survivors of the sinking of the USS Indianapolis sunk 30 July 1945 and those not taken by sharks left in the water for four to five days, probably due largely to various USN stuff ups for which the captain was probably unfairly blamed?

rudeerude
12-06-2009, 04:54 PM
Would they be survivors of the sinking of the USS Indianapolis sunk 30 July 1945 and those not taken by sharks left in the water for four to five days, probably due largely to various USN stuff ups for which the captain was probably unfairly blamed?

Correct RS,I thought I was going to have to give more clues.317 survivors were rescued of the 880 that survived the sinking.This photo was taken on Guam August 1945.And a couple of other notes.

The non-arrival of that vessel on schedule was known at once to Lieutenant Gibson who not only failed to investigate the matter but made no immediate report of the fact to his superiors.
While Indianapolis sent distress calls before sinking, the Navy long claimed that they were never received because the ship was operating under a policy of radio silence. Declassified records show that three SOS messages were received separately, but none was acted upon because one commander was drunk, another had ordered his men not to disturb him and a third thought it was a Japanese prank.
Your up RS

Rising Sun*
12-08-2009, 04:28 AM
Correct RS,I thought I was going to have to give more clues.317 survivors were rescued of the 880 that survived the sinking.This photo was taken on Guam August 1945.And a couple of other notes.

Your up RS

Thanks.

This is a 'Where (in a general sense) are they, who (in a general sense) are they, and what are they doing?.


http://img710.imageshack.us/img710/9117/mystery3.jpg

flamethrowerguy
12-08-2009, 05:18 AM
My guess would be: New Zealand soldiers (2nd Division maybe?) doing some Haka in North Africa?

Rising Sun*
12-08-2009, 06:03 AM
My guess would be: New Zealand soldiers (2nd Division maybe?) doing some Haka in North Africa?

A very accurate guess. More here: http://www.28maoribattalion.org.nz/

The Kiwis still do the Haka. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rDoV0EBu44

Your turn.

flamethrowerguy
12-08-2009, 06:13 AM
The Kiwis still do the Haka. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-rDoV0EBu44

This is indeed scary and surely serves its purpose but why the falsetto guy as the leader?:D

Rising Sun*
12-08-2009, 06:15 AM
This is indeed scary and surely serves its purpose but why the falsetto guy as the leader?:D

Because the falsetto guy is a woman.

Which should give you a new respect for Maori women. ;) :D

flamethrowerguy
12-08-2009, 06:23 AM
Because the falsetto guy is a woman.

Really?;)


Which should give you a new respect for Maori women. ;) :D

I'll keep that in mind if I'll ever meet one, chances are pretty low though.

Rising Sun*
12-08-2009, 06:43 AM
This is indeed scary ...

You think those recruits are scary?

Here's a peacekeeping mission just saying goodbye to the folks.
http://vids.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=vids.individual&VideoID=4406334
http://vids.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=vids.individual&videoid=4406551

And here's the sort of welcome another outgoing peacekeeping unit gives to their replacement unit. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VqM8IGwM4C8&feature=related

Imagine how blokes like that behave when they find an enemy!

flamethrowerguy
12-08-2009, 04:09 PM
Impressive, I'm a big fan of this Haka thing and if there will ever be an evening course I'm the first one to apply. Until now, however, all we got is a lousy Didgeridoo workshop...I didn't get a single sound of this cudgel.:confused:

Anyway, here's the next mystery. What's this mess about?

3843

Egorka
12-08-2009, 05:36 PM
Impressive, I'm a big fan of this Haka thing...Jodle is spookier! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpV5InLw52U)

Judging from the long table plate destroyed on one side... The place after an assasination attempt on Hitler in Sommer 1944.

tankgeezer
12-09-2009, 12:21 AM
Hitler was known to be rather flatulent, so it is possible that there was an open flame in the room...:mrgreen:

Rising Sun*
12-09-2009, 01:50 AM
Hitler was known to be rather flatulent, so it is possible that there was an open flame in the room...:mrgreen:

Probably not.

After the assassination attempt Hitler developed a tremor in his arm, not his arse. :D

flamethrowerguy
12-09-2009, 10:39 AM
Jodle is spookier! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpV5InLw52U)

It's just LSD I guess.:D


Judging from the long table plate destroyed on one side... The place after an assasination attempt on Hitler in Sommer 1944.

Right, actually THE assassination attempt from July 20, 1944. Photo shows the conference room of Hitler's HQ "Wolfsschanze" at Rastenburg/East Prussia.

Egorka
12-10-2009, 03:57 AM
Ok... here is my offer to you:

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 05:15 AM
A British unit engaged in some sort of fumigation in a war destroyed area?

flamethrowerguy
12-10-2009, 05:56 AM
I'd go for the crossing of the Lower Rhine in March 1945. The British put up a 100 km bench of artificial smoke to cover the river crossing...and poisoned a lot of their own guys with that stuff.

Egorka
12-10-2009, 01:41 PM
I'd go for the crossing of the Lower Rhine in March 1945. The British put up a 100 km bench of artificial smoke to cover the river crossing...and poisoned a lot of their own guys with that stuff.
Yes, this is correct.

Nickdfresh
12-10-2009, 02:48 PM
Well, British smoke-inhalation? or German lead-poisoning? Difficult choice. :)

flamethrowerguy
12-10-2009, 05:55 PM
Well, British smoke-inhalation? or German lead-poisoning? Difficult choice. :)

I once read that this huge smoke action was more or less unnecessary since there were few or no German troops left on the eastern banks who could have endangered the landings.

Next one:

3854
Hint: this is not an apparatus gymnastics contest.

rudeerude
12-10-2009, 06:43 PM
Hint: this is not an apparatus gymnastics contest.

Or the local meat market :) Dutch collaboraters ?1944

flamethrowerguy
12-10-2009, 07:06 PM
Or the local meat market :) Dutch collaboraters ?1944


Nope, this was done by apparently more hot-blooded people than the regular Dutch.

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 07:33 PM
City Square, Milan, around April 29 1945.

Mussolini on the left and his mistress Clara Petacci on his left. There were more bodies originally hung than shown in the picture - about 12 other Fascists I think - but I can't recall who they were.

flamethrowerguy
12-10-2009, 07:38 PM
Exactly. I would have to hit the books myself to identify the other unlucky ones.

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 07:44 PM
Exactly. I would have to hit the books myself to identify the other unlucky ones.

Mussolini might have survived if Italian partisans had been sufficiently patriotic to stick to Italian weapons.


On April 28, 1945, Mussolini and his mistress Clara Petacci, were arrested again by Italian partisans by Lake Como. Walter Audisio (1909-1973), who was once pardoned by Mussolini for a jail term in 1934, took custody of Mussolini and Petacci. Mussolini, realizing he was going to killed, opened up his shirt and asked to be shot in the chest. Audisio complied and attempted to shoot the pair with an Italian submachine gun, but it would not fire. He then pulled out an Italian pistol and again it would not fire. In desperation he grabbed a French weapon, a MAS 7.65, from a fellow partisan and killed them both. Their bodies were strung upside down the next day for all to see. http://www.comandosupremo.com/Mussolini.html

Rising Sun*
12-10-2009, 08:01 PM
This might be a bit too obscure even for Australians, so feel free to ask for clues.


http://img14.imageshack.us/img14/9955/sandakan.jpg

rudeerude
12-11-2009, 08:38 PM
This might be a bit too obscure even for Australians, so feel free to ask for clues.


http://img14.imageshack.us/img14/9955/sandakan.jpg

Could this be the would be prisoners of the Sandakan death march that saw the death of over 2000 Australian and British troops? Just a wild guess useing the name of the picture as a clue..

Rising Sun*
12-11-2009, 11:16 PM
Yep.

I am an idiot. I went to the trouble of removing the Australian War Memorial identifying data from the bottom of the picture and forgot to rename the photo.

The men third, fourth and fifth from the left are three of the six Australian POWs who survived. None of the British POWs survived.

Your turn.

Rising Sun*
12-12-2009, 09:33 AM
For general info on Sandakan survivors.

Detail on the earlier picture. http://cas.awm.gov.au/photograph/OG3553



Different kind of torture for Sandakan survivors


By Alan Ramsey
August 6, 2003

Keith Botterill, a Katoomba textile printer, was 19 when he enlisted in the army at Sydney's Victoria Barracks on August 7, 1941. Six months later, after the fall of Singapore, Botterill was a prisoner of the Japanese in Changi.

In July 1942 he was shipped to the Sandakan POW camp in North Borneo. Somehow he would survive the next three years. He would also survive the infamous Sandakan death marches in January-February and May-June, 1945.

Volume four of the official war histories says, at page 604, that "some 2500 British and Australian prisoners" died at Sandakan, Ranua or during the 100-kilometre death marches between the two. The exact number, as recorded by the Australian War Memorial, is 2428 "known" dead: 1787 Australians and 641 Brits. Botterill was one of only six POWs, all Australians, who survived.

Botterill's is a remarkable story. So is that of the other five Sandakan survivors. Gunner Owen Campbell, a Brisbane labourer aged 24 when he enlisted in 1940, was picked up near Ranua by an Allied guerilla party in July 1945 after almost 3 years of captivity, beatings, starvation and illness. A second guerilla party found four others a month later. They had escaped after a friendly Japanese guard warned them that all surviving POWs at Ranua were to be shot. Botterill was one of the four.

The other three were: Private Nelson Short, of Enfield, Sydney, aged 22 when he enlisted on July 11, 1940; Lance-Bombardier Bill Moxham, a 28-year-old station overseer from Toongabbie, NSW; and Warrant Officer Bill Sticpewich, a meat inspector from Wickham, NSW, the leader of the escape group. The sixth Sandakan survivor was Bombardier James Richard Braithwaite, of Brisbane, 23 when he enlisted in June 1940, who would later write of Sandakan in the journal Stand-To.

Braithwaite had escaped from Ranua on June 8, 1945, and was rescued a week later by an American PT boat. The official war history records: "These six men were the only survivors of some 2500 British and Australian prisoners at Sandakan after the transfer of their officers to Kuching [in September 1942] ... All were dead by August 15 [1945]." Three weeks earlier, when Sticpewich, Botterill, Short and Moxham slipped away from Ranua camp, "only 32 were then alive, six of them unconscious".

Half a century later, in her book Sandakan: A Conspiracy of Silence, a terrible story of official obfuscation over an aborted proposal to liberate the Sandakan POWs in early 1945, author Lynette Silver records what happened to all six Sandakan survivors. Sticpewich, after living through the worst of POW bestiality for three years, was knocked down and killed in Melbourne in 1977 "while crossing the road".

Moxham, who "thrived on living dangerously" before the war was "so profoundly affected" by his POW years that he committed suicide in 1961, not yet 50. Braithwaite died of cancer in 1986. Short did not survive a heart attack in 1995. Botterill lived to see Silver complete her book before dying of emphysema on the eve of Australia Day 1997. At the time of publication, Campbell, the last of the Sandakan Six, was a recluse. He died a month ago.

It is a melancholy closure to a terrible period of Australia's military history. Silver records in her book: "The POWs, sent from Singapore in 1942-43 to work on airfield construction, endured frequent beatings and other, more diabolical punishment. Many died of malnutrition, maltreatment and disease. In 1945, in response to an order from the Japanese High Command that no prisoners were to survive the war, those still able to walk were sent on a series of death marches into the interior. In late 1944 the Allies, aware that POWs were being 'eliminated', had evolved a plan for their rescue - a rescue which, after months of bungling, was finally cancelled in April 1945 in the erroneous belief the Sandakan camp had been evacuated.

"Gross incompetence was to blame for the failed attempt. When it was realised that mistakes and stupidity were responsible, those at the highest level shifted the blame before embarking on a policy of wilful and deliberate suppression."

At Sydney's Burwood Park three days ago a commemoration ceremony was held at the Sandakan Memorial and its roll of honour, dedicated by the Keating government 10 years ago. The ceremony got four paragraphs in this newspaper the following morning. I thought you should have a thumb sketch of the terrible history behind those four paragraphs. http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2003/08/05/1060064186644.html

Egorka
12-12-2009, 03:14 PM
Very interesting.
6 out of 3069... Incredible and terrible!

rudeerude
12-13-2009, 04:45 PM
After much difficulty of trying to find and decide on photo here is my offer,good luck
3861

Rising Sun*
12-19-2009, 10:00 AM
After much difficulty of trying to find and decide on photo here is my offer,good luck
3861

Well, after much thought, I've narrowed it down to something involving the Japanese. ;) :D

Which puts it somewhere between India, Hawaii, the Aleutians, Australia and Guadalcanal.

Care to narrow it down a bit? :D

Is the man in the white important?

(I don't think he's Wainwright.)

rudeerude
12-20-2009, 01:24 AM
Well, after much thought, I've narrowed it down to something involving the Japanese. ;) :D

Which puts it somewhere between India, Hawaii, the Aleutians, Australia and Guadalcanal.

Care to narrow it down a bit? :D

Is the man in the white important?

(I don't think he's Wainwright.)

I thought it was about time to post a clue, but I have been wondering off looking for Battle of the Bulge pictures for the photo section lately with my time.Well the individuals are not named in the photo but Wainwrigth puts you spot on for these surrendering Americans.

Rising Sun*
12-20-2009, 01:55 AM
I thought it was about time to post a clue, but I have been wondering off looking for Battle of the Bulge pictures for the photo section lately with my time.Well the individuals are not named in the photo but Wainwrigth puts you spot on for these surrendering Americans.

Is that Wainwright in the white?

It doesn't look like other pictures I found of him.

rudeerude
12-20-2009, 02:12 AM
Is that Wainwright in the white?

It doesn't look like other pictures I found of him.
Wainwright is not pictured, but was in command at this time of surrender ;)

rudeerude
12-22-2009, 07:07 PM
Did I loose you RS? I thought you were going in the right direction mentioning Wainwright.Wainwright and surrender key words along with new clue the rock.

Rising Sun*
12-23-2009, 05:58 AM
Did I loose you RS? I thought you were going in the right direction mentioning Wainwright.Wainwright and surrender key words along with new clue the rock.

So it's Corregidor, but I can't recognise anyone in the picture or work out its significance.

rudeerude
12-23-2009, 07:40 PM
So it's Corregidor, but I can't recognise anyone in the picture or work out its significance.

Ya no one is named in the picture.I found the picture using google images,surrender of Corregidor are the key words for this image to pop up.When you mentioned Wainwright I tried to lead you to the answer,but the rock did it.Your up.

Rising Sun*
12-24-2009, 08:05 AM
Ya no one is named in the picture.I found the picture using google images,surrender of Corregidor are the key words for this image to pop up.When you mentioned Wainwright I tried to lead you to the answer,but the rock did it.Your up.

Thanks.

I don't deserve it as you spoon fed me all the way, but here goes for something different.

And it ain't a Christmas turkey!


http://img40.imageshack.us/img40/7674/mysterywk.jpg

rudeerude
12-24-2009, 04:24 PM
Thanks.

I don't deserve it as you spoon fed me all the way, but here goes for something different.

And it ain't a Christmas turkey!


http://img40.imageshack.us/img40/7674/mysterywk.jpg

This looks like WWI famous pigeon "Cher Ami" who saved the lives of the 77th ID.This picture shows the left leg missing but it was the right.This picture is transposed.

Rising Sun*
12-25-2009, 08:16 AM
This looks like WWI famous pigeon "Cher Ami" who saved the lives of the 77th ID.This picture shows the left leg missing but it was the right.This picture is transposed.

Correctomundo!

Your turn.

P.S. This isn't the rudeerude and RS show. Anyone else is welcome to have a go at answering the questions.

rudeerude
12-27-2009, 11:34 PM
Correctomundo!

Your turn.

P.S. This isn't the rudeerude and RS show. Anyone else is welcome to have a go at answering the questions.

I have to admit RS I am a former pigeon fancier.I used to raise and race racing/homing/carrier pigeons.A bird can do 600 miles in a day with favorable weather conditions.I've experienced these type of races.So a few other famous birds from WWII G.I Joe and Paddy.I still need to find a picture,but for others here is some info on "Cher Ami"


Probably the most famous of all the carrier pigeons was one named Cher Ami, two French words meaning "Dear Friend". Cher Ami was several months on the front lines during the Fall of 1918. He flew 12 important missions to deliver messages. Perhaps the most important was the message he carried on October 4, 1918.

Mr. Charles Whittlesey was a lawyer in New York, but when the United States called for soldiers to help France regain its freedom, Whittlesey joined the Army and went to Europe to help. He was made the commander of a battalion of soldiers in the 77th Infantry Division, known as "The Liberty Division" because most of the men came from New York and wore a bright blue patch on their shoulders that had on it the STATUE OF LIBERTY.

On October 3, 1918 Major Whittlesey and more than 500 men were trapped in a small depression on the side of the hill. Surrounded by enemy soldiers, many were killed and wounded in the first day. By the second day only a little more than 200 men were still alive or unwounded.

Major Whittlesey sent out several pigeons to tell his commanders where he was, and how bad the trap was. The next afternoon he had only one pigeon left, Cher Ami.

During the afternoon the American Artillery tried to send some protection by firing hundreds of big artillery rounds into the ravine where the Germans surrounded Major Whittlesey and his men. Unfortunately, the American commanders didn't know exactly where the American soldiers were, and started dropping the big shells right on top of them. It was a horrible situation that might have resulted in Major Whittlesey and all his men getting killed--by their own army.

Major Whittlesey called for his last pigeon, Cher Ami. He wrote a quick and simple note, telling the men who directed the artillery guns where the Americans were located and asking them to stop. The note that was put in the canister on Cher Ami's left leg simply said:

"We are along the road parallel to 276.4.
"Our own artillery is dropping a barrage directly on us.
"For heaven's sake, stop it."


As Cher Ami tried to fly back home, the Germans saw him rising out of the brush and opened fire. For several minutes, bullets zipped through the air all around him. For a minute it looked like the little pigeon was going to fall, that he wasn't going to make it. The doomed American infantrymen were crushed, their last home was plummeting to earth against a very heavy attack from German bullets.

Somehow Cher Ami managed to spread his wings and start climbing again, higher and higher beyond the range of the enemy guns. The little bird flew 25 miles in only 25 minutes to deliver his message. The shelling stopped, and more than 200 American lives were saved...all because the little bird would never quit trying.

On his last mission, Cher Ami was badly wounded. When he finally reached his coop, he could fly no longer, and the soldier that answered the sound of the bell found the little bird laying on his back, covered in blood. He had been blinded in one eye, and a bullet had hit his breastbone, making a hole the size of a quarter. From that awful hole, hanging by just a few tendons, was the almost severed leg of the brave little bird. Attached to that leg was a silver canister, with the all-important message. Once again, Cher Ami wouldn't quit until he had finished his job.


Cher Ami became the hero of the 77th Infantry Division, and the medics worked long and hard to patch him up. When the French soldiers that the Americans were fighting to help learned they story of Cher Ami's bravery and determination, they gave him one of their own country's great honors. Cher Ami, the brave carrier pigeon was presented a medal called the French Croix de guerre with a palm leaf.


Though the dedicated medics saved Cher Ami's life, they couldn't save his leg. The men of the Division were careful to take care of the little bird that had saved 200 of their friends, and even carved a small wooden leg for him. When Cher Ami was well enough to travel, the little one-legged hero was put on a boat to the United States. The commander of all of the United States Army, the great General John J. Pershing, personally saw Cher Ami off as he departed France.

Back in the United States the story of Cher Ami was told again and again. The little bird was in the newspapers, magazines, and it seemed that everyone knew his name. He became one of the most famous heroes of World War I.

rudeerude
12-28-2009, 12:00 AM
Well here is my offer,good luck
3872

Rising Sun*
12-28-2009, 06:20 AM
Well here is my offer,good luck
3872

Well, here is my demonstration of my photo interpretation skills, and I'll need all the luck I can get. :D

The man at rear left looks like an American soldier.

The man second from right looks like he has a rather nasty broken arm related to other chest or shoulder injuries. Or he has an abnormally wide chest on his left which has been penetrated by a rather large shell which failed to explode and caused necrosis of the surrounding tissue which, unusually, went white instead of black. :D

The leather coats on the latter man and the man front left look rather European.

The ground is wet, indicating winter or, of course, rain in the other three seasons.

From all this I deduce that I have no idea what it is all about, but I'm guessing that it's somewhere in Europe towards or perhaps after (the man front left looks like he has a mix of German officer's leather coat and civilian clothing) the end of the war and that the man with the cast is either a captured German or an Allied serviceman - probably airman, but don't ask me why I think that- of some note.

flamethrowerguy
12-28-2009, 07:37 AM
Basing on Rising Sun's perceptions I conclude it's Wernher von Braun and some other German scientists (Dornberger, Axter, Lindenberg) while being arrested by US troops in Bavaria in early May 1945.

Rising Sun*
12-28-2009, 08:18 AM
Basing on Rising Sun's perceptions I conclude it's Wernher von Braun ... .

Yes, he qualifies as a German airman, although not a conventional one.

Rising Sun*
12-28-2009, 09:16 AM
Basing on Rising Sun's perceptions I conclude it's Wernher von Braun and some other German scientists (Dornberger, Axter, Lindenberg) while being arrested by US troops in Bavaria in early May 1945.

I'm going out on a limb here, but I think FTG might be getting warm. ;) :D

http://images.google.com.au/images?hl=en&client=firefox-a&rls=org.mozilla%3Aen-US%3Aofficial&um=1&sa=1&q=von+Braun%2C+Dornberger%2C+Axter%2C+Lindenberg&btnG=Search&aq=f&oq=&start=0

In which case it is FTG's turn.

rudeerude
12-28-2009, 02:15 PM
Basing on Rising Sun's perceptions I conclude it's Wernher von Braun and some other German scientists (Dornberger, Axter, Lindenberg) while being arrested by US troops in Bavaria in early May 1945.

Correct FTG.Photo description from my book,from left to right are Major Gen.Walter Dornberger,commander of the V-2 laboratory;Lieut Col. Berbert Axter,scientist;Professor Wernher von Braun,inventor of the V-2 rocket; and Hans Lindenberg;scientist.von Braun broke his arm in auto accident.After the war von Braun came to the United States and became a citizen.


Von Braun worked on the American intermediate range ballistic missile (IRBM) program before joining NASA, where he served as director of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the chief architect of the Saturn V launch vehicle, the superbooster that propelled the Apollo spacecraft to the Moon.[3] In the words of NASA, he is "without doubt, the greatest rocket scientist in history. His crowning achievement ... was to lead the development of the Saturn V booster rocket that helped land the first men on the Moon in July 1969."[4] He received the 1975 National Medal of Science.

Your up

flamethrowerguy
12-28-2009, 05:43 PM
Next one:

3873

Nickdfresh
12-28-2009, 05:51 PM
Next one:

3873

Singapore, 1941: The conclusion of the ill fated, ignominious Malaysian Campaign (for the British that is. For the Japanese, it went swimmingly)...

*Correction: the surrender was at the beginning of 1942...

flamethrowerguy
12-28-2009, 06:01 PM
Bleeeh, the riddle was 8 minutes young and the attached photo had about 0 views until you answered...

Anyway, you're right. The guy on the left (holding the white flag) would be one Major Wild on the way to the capitulation.

Nickdfresh
12-28-2009, 06:08 PM
Sorry. :D

This one might be a bit on the easy side, but pay close attention to the leggings of the man under the crate...

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y240/Nickdfresh/Ranger_led_the_way.jpg

Egorka
12-28-2009, 06:30 PM
Dieppe Raid
"Bodies of Canadian soldiers and U.S. Army Ranger Eston Blaine lying among damaged Tank Landing Craft-5 and Calgary Regiment "Churchill" tanks BLOSSOM behind and BLOODY on the right following Operation "Jubilee"[11]
Credit: Library and Archives Canada / C-014160"
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dieppe_Raid

Nickdfresh
12-28-2009, 07:20 PM
Ha! Very good. I suspected that it wouldn't last long and was hoping some might mistake it for Anzio. LT. Blaine actually commanded the beach for a bit, before he was killed like most of the Canadian officers before him...

Egorka
12-28-2009, 08:21 PM
Hello!
I want to put out a bit unconventional picture for this thread. I think it could be fun.

Tell the year, the country and, and the purpose of the shown structure.

outside:
3874

and inside:
3875

Rising Sun*
12-29-2009, 06:25 AM
Something to do with the Manhattan Project.

It's a site in America. Maybe Oak Ridge, Tennessee or Hanford, Washington State, in view of the snow on the ground.

It's a stack of graphite blocks, presumably around uranium.

Probably 1943 as it's a pretty primitive set up and Fermi had already demonstrated fission with a more sophisticated set up in Chicago in December 1942 and Hanford and Oak Ridge didn't get going until 1943.

Egorka
12-29-2009, 07:03 AM
Something to do with the Manhattan Project.
It's a site in America. Maybe Oak Ridge, Tennessee or Hanford, Washington State, in view of the snow on the ground.
It's a stack of graphite blocks, presumably around uranium.
Probably 1943 as it's a pretty primitive set up and Fermi had already demonstrated fission with a more sophisticated set up in Chicago in December 1942 and Hanford and Oak Ridge didn't get going until 1943.I am impressed.
The year is right - 1943.
The rest is not completely right, but very warm! :)

Rising Sun*
12-29-2009, 07:22 AM
I am impressed.
The year is right - 1943.
The rest is not completely right, but very warm! :)

pdf27 can work it out from here on, because he knows about that stuff.

I'm going to have a beer instead, or I will hurt my brain by trying to work out stuff I know nothing about. :D

Rising Sun*
12-29-2009, 07:53 AM
Ummm, I've had a beer and it's occurred to me that there was a debate about whether to go for fusion or fission early in the Manhattan Project.

Is this something to do with a fusion experiment?

If so, is the inked number "1" to the cellar door in the second picture the refuge for when the atmosphere catches fire? :)

Librarian
12-29-2009, 09:56 AM
Here are the answers, my dear Mr. Egorka: 1943, Soviet Union, Kurchatov-tent (Палатка Kурчатова), officially Laboratory No.2 for experiments with nuclear fission (also known as Dedushka). :D

Fortunately, some old books written by И. B. Петряанов-Соколов even today are in attendance in my good old library. ;)

Rising Sun*
12-29-2009, 10:08 AM
Here are the answers, my dear Mr. Egorka: 1943, Soviet Union, Kurchatov-tent (Палатка Kурчатова), officially Laboratory No.2 for experiments with nuclear fission (also known as Dedushka). :D

Fortunately, some old books written by И. B. Петряанов-Соколов even today are in attendance in my good old library. ;)

That makes sense, and much more so with the 'Shroud of Rasputin' image on the board leaning against the stack. ;) :D

Egorka
12-29-2009, 12:00 PM
Here are the answers, my dear Mr. Egorka: 1943, Soviet Union, Kurchatov-tent (Палатка Kурчатова), officially Laboratory No.2 for experiments with nuclear fission (also known as Dedushka). :D

Fortunately, some old books written by И. B. Петряанов-Соколов even today are in attendance in my good old library. ;)
Bingo! :)
Despite the Rising Sun's titanic and impressivly close shot, you are 101% right in here. Your turn.

Librarian
12-29-2009, 03:15 PM
Excellent! In that case, honorable ladies and gentlemen, here it is:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Mystery1.jpg

In accordance with our standard practice in this thread, your task will be correct identification of time, place, and object.

In the meantime, as always – all the best! :)

rudeerude
12-30-2009, 10:48 PM
Can we eliminate US Navy and Royal Navy,not a 100% percent on RN though ?Those torpedo tubes and single smoke stack are what I have been using for clues.Still searching.

Librarian
12-31-2009, 06:17 AM
Yes, my dear Mr. Rudeerude – without any doubt, you can eliminate the USN. But the Royal Navy definitely cannot be excluded from this story! :)

rudeerude
01-05-2010, 07:50 PM
Excellent! In that case, honorable ladies and gentlemen, here it is:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/Mystery1.jpg

In accordance with our standard practice in this thread, your task will be correct identification of time, place, and object.

In the meantime, as always – all the best! :)

Looks like we need some clues Librarian? Is this ship a J,K class Destroyer from the RN? Is this ship in ruff seas or listing

Librarian
01-06-2010, 02:06 PM
You are on the right track, my dear Mr. Ruderude: yes, this sinking ship indeed was a K-class destroyer, furthermore – a famous flotilla leader, whose well-known and truly outstanding commander was a member of the House of Lords! ;)

pdf27
01-06-2010, 04:07 PM
Would this particular aristocrat be the son of the chap who was forced to resign as First Sea Lord for being excessively German during WW1? If so, that hint is a bit too good!

rudeerude
01-06-2010, 05:43 PM
This is the sinking of HMS Kelly commanded by Lord Louis Mountbatten.Lost in action during the Battle of Crete,and some more info courtesy of wikipedia.


On 23 May 1941, during the evacuation of Crete, Kelly was bombed and sunk, with half her crew killed. Kelly did succeed in shooting down one of the attacking Stukas immediately, while another was badly damaged and crashed upon returning to base.The survivors were deeply affected by the loss of their ship; Mountbatten shared their loss and tried to console the ship's company by reminding them all that "we didn't leave the Kelly, the Kelly left us!"

HMS Kelly (pennant number F01) was a K-class destroyer of the British Royal Navy, and flotilla leader of her class.She was named after Admiral of the Fleet Sir John Kelly. She served through the early years of the Second World War; in Home Waters, off Norway and in the Mediterranean. Throughout her service, Kelly was commanded by Lord Louis Mountbatten. She was lost in action in 1941 during the Battle of Crete. In addition, Mountbatten served as commander (Captain (D)) of the 5th Destroyer Flotilla.

Librarian
01-07-2010, 04:14 PM
Well, my dear Mr. Pdf 27, although father of our fellow was forced to give up his job as early as 1914, it seems to me that this tiny hint was quite sufficient for our esteemed Mr. Rudeerude, who successfully solved this photographic mystery. :)

BTW: Certain traditionally well informed personalities were absolutely sure in those times that his destiny actually was induced by some kind of his quite perplex prodigality - especially his inclination to keep porcelain that graced the place of the Celestial Emperor cheek by jowl with the finest china of Meissen and Sèvres. The English, as they commonly do with things they enjoy but are ashamed of, spoke of it as a French invention called Haute Intrigue, or dissemination of pure, unadulterated nonsense – not lies, not truth, not lies mingled with truth, but simply a mass of chaotic words in which the lonely figure of honor, like our beloved Prince Louis Alexander of Battenberg, was obliged to sink and drown in the constantly upward-streaming society. Well, that's life... :(

Of course, this is a completely different thread. Therefore, yet again – my sincerest congratulations, Mr. Rudeerude. We are awaiting your kind offer. ;)

pdf27
01-07-2010, 05:04 PM
Oh, I knew who it was, I just didn't want to risk having to put a photo up ;)

rudeerude
01-07-2010, 10:35 PM
Here is my offer
3884

Rising Sun*
01-08-2010, 02:36 AM
Here is my offer
3884

Hideki Tojo at his home, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan, 11 September 1945, after shooting himself in the chest in an unsuccessful suicide attempt when Americans came to arrest him.

He used a pistol because he didn't have an assistant present to behead him after cutting his abdomen open, although he had the swords available as shown here in a picture taken around the same time from a different angle:http://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/3062100/Hulton-Archive

He is reported to have said that he shot himself in the chest instead of the head, although other military leaders shot themselves in the head when they lacked an assistant for traditional suicide, because he "didn't want to mess up his head".

rudeerude
01-08-2010, 03:51 PM
Hideki Tojo at his home, Setagaya, Tokyo, Japan, 11 September 1945, after shooting himself in the chest in an unsuccessful suicide attempt when Americans came to arrest him.

He used a pistol because he didn't have an assistant present to behead him after cutting his abdomen open, although he had the swords available as shown here in a picture taken around the same time from a different angle:http://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/3062100/Hulton-Archive

He is reported to have said that he shot himself in the chest instead of the head, although other military leaders shot themselves in the head when they lacked an assistant for traditional suicide, because he "didn't want to mess up his head".
Correct RS your up.

Rising Sun*
01-09-2010, 06:41 AM
Correct RS your up.

Thanks.

It was a bit too easy for me after my earlier one about the American soldier who gave blood to Tojo. What gave it away for me was the recollection that Tojo had shot himself in the chest. I confess that I probably wouldn't have identified Tojo from the picture without the location of the injury and without the presence of Americans in the background.

Next mystery: What happened here was a turning point in the war.


http://img163.imageshack.us/img163/9707/mystery4.jpg

pdf27
01-09-2010, 06:59 AM
1) Western Front, WW1?
2) 1914 or 1918?

Rising Sun*
01-09-2010, 07:05 AM
1) Western Front, WW1?
2) 1914 or 1918?

Looks like it, doesn't it?

But no.

WWII.

And not Europe / Mediterranean.

They didn't use the white things on the trees in WWI for the purpose they were used here.

pdf27
01-09-2010, 07:07 AM
Which in turn probably makes it New Guinea...

Rising Sun*
01-09-2010, 07:10 AM
Which in turn probably makes it New Guinea...

Nope.

But the commander who was responsible for the victory in the photo recognised the significance of the Australian victory at Milne Bay in 1942 as showing that the Japanese could be defeated by steadfast forces, and then he went on to develop tactics in his own theatre which did that on a much larger scale.

pdf27
01-09-2010, 07:35 AM
Would the commander in question go on to be Governor-General of your unruly mob later in life?

This is turning from a photo quiz into twenty questions!

Rising Sun*
01-09-2010, 07:42 AM
Would the commander in question go on to be Governor-General of your unruly mob later in life?

He was a Governor-General of Australia after the war, but I am mystified by your reference to our unruly mob. ;) :D

pdf27
01-09-2010, 07:53 AM
Kohima?

Rising Sun*
01-09-2010, 08:17 AM
Kohima?

Yes, but for the 110% mark and the special prize of a jar of unbranded Oxford marmalade, what part of Kohima?

pdf27
01-09-2010, 10:01 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:IND_003698_Garrison_Hill_Kohima.jpg probably....

pdf27
01-09-2010, 10:37 AM
Next question. What is it and why is it important?
http://img297.imageshack.us/img297/7996/mysterywoodwork.jpg

Egorka
01-09-2010, 04:52 PM
My bet is that it's one of those German made landing obstacles that were deployed in Normandy in 1944 to prevent gliders and airplains landing onthe fields. Preserved up to our days as historical artifact.
What was their nick name? Something like "Goering fingers" or "Goering pikes"?

rudeerude
01-09-2010, 05:12 PM
My bet is that it's one of those German made landing obstacles that were deployed in Normandy in 1944 to prevent gliders and airplains landing onthe fields. Preserved up to our days as historical artifact.
What was their nick name? Something like "Goering fingers" or "Goering pikes"?

I think your talking about "Rommel asparagus" Egorka.I would think that it would be a little thicker? But sounds like a good guess to me.;)

pdf27
01-09-2010, 07:25 PM
Not even close - wrong war for a start. I've actually visited this location and it's a surprisingly moving monument.

Talking about Glider Pilots, and old gliding instructor of mine (sadly since deceased) came over to England as a PoW and as his home was in the former East Germany didn't fancy going back. He had also done a lot of gliding prewar, and did some of the first cross country flights in the UK postwar. Anyway, he's landed in a farmer's field and so Farmer Giles wanders over for a chat...

FG: Ooo Arr, you be lucky you didn't land here last week, we had those big metal spikes up to stop Germans landing in gliders.
SN: It seems you haff taken zem away a bit too suhn!

(I should point out that Siegfried had a very thick German accent when I knew him, over 50 years later!)

Librarian
01-09-2010, 09:06 PM
WW1, France, Somme, vicinity of Beaumont Hamel: The Danger Tree or the Tree of Death.

We are observing a preserved original WW 1 artifact, which probably marks the limit of the advance of the Newfoundland Regiment, which was part of the 88th Infantry Brigade within the 29th Division.

Direct link is located here:

http://www.ww1battlefields.co.uk/somme/images/newf/newf_dangertree.jpg

Rising Sun*
01-10-2010, 04:18 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:IND_003698_Garrison_Hill_Kohima.jpg probably....

That'll do it.

110%

The tennis court is supposed to be in there according to captions I've seen, but I don't know exactly where.

A virtual jar of marmalade will arrive shortly by electronic transmission. If it doesn't arrive, please contact my ISP as it's not my fault if it won't fit down the wire. :D

pdf27
01-10-2010, 04:52 AM
We are observing a preserved original WW 1 artifact, which probably marks the limit of the advance of the Newfoundland Regiment, which was part of the 88th Infantry Brigade within the 29th Division.
Spot on. I was at the battlefield over the summer (the whole place has been preserved) and it's incredibly moving. The danger tree is itself only 2-3 meters beyond the front line of the Newfoundland trench system, with that discoloured band of grass perhaps 10m in front marking the German front line. The line of trees in the background marks where the objective for the first day was - there is one cemetery within it, along with a memorial to the Scottish division who eventually took it, and just out of the photo there are two more cemeteries on the battlefield to left and right. In that one attack, the Newfoundland regiment took around 91% casualties - spectacularly bad, even allowing for the fact that this took place on the worst day in the history of the British Army.

Librarian
01-10-2010, 04:45 PM
And now – something completely different, honorable ladies and gentlemen:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/00555.jpg

Hopefully, all combat-pet fans will be delighted with this everlasting symbol of genuine and truly mutual friendliness and sincere gratitude. :)

Therefore be so kind and give us your answers concerning identity of previously presented characters, and submit the time and place of origin of this touching scene.

Egorka
01-10-2010, 05:17 PM
This is Wojtek.
a Syrian brown bear cub adopted by soldiers of the 22 Kompania Zaopatrywania Artylerii (22nd Artillery Supply Company) of the Polish II Corps. During the Battle of Monte Cassino, Wojtek helped to move ammunition.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wojtek_(soldier_bear)

Librarian
01-10-2010, 05:30 PM
Yes, my dear Mr. Egorka! Wojcieh, or Voytek the Battle Bear, who enjoyed a cigarette and a bottle of cold beer and who was capable to carry more mortar rounds than any other soldier indeed was our mysterius personality. :D

Additional information about this incredibly lovely personality you will be able to find here:

http://www.mailonsunday.co.uk/news/article-510452/The-hero-bear-went-war-loved-smoke-beer.html

You have your well-deserved turn again! :)

Egorka
01-11-2010, 06:48 AM
OK. Thank you.

Here is my next question:
3890

Year, place and maybe a bit on what those guy might have been doing during the war.

Librarian
01-11-2010, 10:02 AM
Well, we have to start with something... Therefore here is my first offer, my dear Mr. Egorka: The last unit of the Wehrmacht (Wettertrupp) to surrender in the 2nd world war, 4th of September 1945, Rijpfjorden, northernmost part of the Nordaustlandet, Svalbard (Spitzbergen). :)

Nickdfresh
01-11-2010, 10:13 AM
I'm going to take a stab in total darkness and guess that these were Wehrmacht weathermen rounded up in Greenland around late 1941 or early 1942 by the US Coast Guard...

Egorka
01-11-2010, 01:51 PM
Wow. Good both of you, guys.
But I have to say that honorable Nickedfresh is 100% right, which makes him the winner.
Mr.Librarian in the mean while get viewers sympaty prise and lot of affectionate glaces from the cheerleaders in cute skirts.

Egorka
01-15-2010, 02:22 AM
Nickedfresh, we await to be puzzled! :)

Nickdfresh
01-20-2010, 05:29 PM
Okay, fortunately I have a store of pics. Hopefully, they're not too easy this time. :)

Edit: I appear to have deleted most of them. :(

Nickdfresh
01-20-2010, 05:40 PM
Wait one!

:oops:

Okay, here:

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y240/Nickdfresh/10ok8it.jpg

Rising Sun*
01-20-2010, 07:42 PM
Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines, France.

Shortly before 10.04 a.m., 31 January 1945.

Execution of Eddie Slovik, the only American soldier executed for desertion in WWII.

Egorka
01-21-2010, 02:21 AM
Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines, France.

Shortly before 10.04 a.m., 31 January 1945.

Execution of Eddie Slovik, the only American soldier executed for desertion in WWII.
Opps... It was my first guess, but I thought he looked different and did not look it up...

http://www.lewrockwell.com/vance/slovik-grave.jpg
http://www.lewrockwell.com/vance/slovik-grave.jpg

Nickdfresh
01-21-2010, 10:22 AM
Gentlemen, you are incorrect. :)

Pvt. Eddie Slovik's story of his unjust execution is here. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddie_Slovik)

That's not Slovik...

Egorka
01-21-2010, 11:36 AM
Gentlemen, you are incorrect. :)

Pvt. Eddie Slovik's story of his unjust execution is here. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eddie_Slovik)

That's not Slovik...
Yeah!!! And waht did I tell you, huh!? :)


Well, this guy is one of 3 German paratroppers (Wilhelm Schmidt, Günther Billing and Manfred Pernass ) who used US uniform and was cought by the GIs.
Ardennes, 23 dec 1944.

http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?p=97632#post97632
http://img117.imageshack.us/img117/4400/execution2pm.jpg

Nickdfresh
01-22-2010, 12:49 PM
Yeah!!! And waht did I tell you, huh!? :)


Well, this guy is one of 3 German paratroppers (Wilhelm Schmidt, Günther Billing and Manfred Pernass ) who used US uniform and was cought by the GIs.
Ardennes, 23 dec 1944.

http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?p=97632#post97632
http://img117.imageshack.us/img117/4400/execution2pm.jpg

You are correct sir. Congratulations...

Operation Grief was the overall plan...

Egorka
01-23-2010, 02:57 PM
Ok. I hope I can puzzle you real good this time....
:)

3917

Egorka
01-25-2010, 10:55 AM
Common, guys! Anyone?
I promisse to be generous with clues... :)

Rising Sun*
01-25-2010, 11:09 AM
Common, guys! Anyone?
I promisse to be generous with clues... :)

If I knew anything about carriers I'd know what the deck sections mean as timber or steel and the arrangement, so I could at least identify the type of ship.

But as I don't and as there is no evidence of any attack on any of the ships in the picture and as the explosion beside the carrier is beyond anything much below an ammunition ship I'm guessing that it is a post-war set-piece related to a planned explosion or explosions testing or destroying the carrier.

tankgeezer
01-25-2010, 11:17 AM
Almost seems like a Sunday afternoon at Central park lagoon the locals do alot of model sailing there..

Egorka
01-25-2010, 02:24 PM
Ok. Christmass time - I am giving the clues away:
This photo was taken during one of the most decisive battles of the given TO.

rudeerude
01-25-2010, 07:44 PM
Ok. Christmass time - I am giving the clues away:
This photo was taken during one of the most decisive battles of the given TO.

I am going to guess that the carrier is the Yorktown listing and dead in the water after getting hit at the Battle of Midway.The explosion is from depth chargers that exploded after the destroyer USS Hammann was sunk by a Japanese Sub.Two torpedo's hit the Yorktown and one hit Hammann.

Egorka
01-26-2010, 05:01 AM
I am going to guess that the carrier is the Yorktown listing and dead in the water after getting hit at the Battle of Midway.The explosion is from depth chargers that exploded after the destroyer USS Hammann was sunk by a Japanese Sub.Two torpedo's hit the Yorktown and one hit Hammann.
Bingo! Exactly.
Your turn.

rudeerude
01-26-2010, 01:50 PM
Bingo! Exactly.
Your turn.

WooHoo.:D .Ever since you posted that picture I thought Yorktown,but that explosion through me off.I knew Yorktown was attacked by a sub after the battle but the explosion was too far off from the ship to be a direct hit.I re-read the torpedo incident and there it was.This picture on the net Egorka ? Its a tuff one to find with Yorktown as the key word.

Ok here is my offer

3921

flamethrowerguy
01-26-2010, 04:32 PM
In all fairness I was considering to back off from answering to that one but then again...;)

Ultimatum given to the encircled German troops at Aachen, October 10, 1944. Photo was taken at the Schönrathstraße (=street), the dark silhouette to the left of the white flag is the old city hall of Aachen's suburb Forst (today the building is used as a post office). The soldiers are 1st Lt. William Bohene from New York who acted as the interpreter, Pvt. Kenneth Kadin from La Grange/Illinois holding the flag and negotiator 1st Lt. Cedric A. Lafley from Enosburg Falls/Vermont.

rudeerude
01-26-2010, 04:44 PM
In all fairness I was considering to back off from answering to that one but then again...;)

Ultimatum given to the encircled German troops at Aachen, October 10, 1944. Photo was taken at the Schönrathstraße (=street), the dark silhouette to the left of the white flag is the old city hall of Aachen's suburb Forst (today the building is used as a post office). The soldiers are 1st Lt. William Bohene from New York who acted as the interpreter, Pvt. Kenneth Kadin from La Grange/Illinois holding the flag and negotiator 1st Lt. Cedric A. Lafley from Enosburg Falls/Vermont.

Darn I guess I cant sneak one by you FTG,correct

flamethrowerguy
01-26-2010, 05:06 PM
Darn I guess I cant sneak one by you FTG

No wonder, the next day it was all over the newspapers.;)

3922

P.S. new puzzle coming up soon.

flamethrowerguy
01-27-2010, 05:03 AM
Well then, what about this one?

3923

Egorka
01-27-2010, 07:12 AM
This is Yakov Dzhugashvili (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yakov_Dzhugashvili) - Stalin's son - in German captivity.

flamethrowerguy
01-27-2010, 07:34 AM
So far, so good, Igor, but the quiz is called "where and when is it?".:D

Egorka
01-27-2010, 03:17 PM
Ja, ja! Ordnung über alles!

:)

It is end of July or very beginning of August 1941, somewhere in vacinity of Prussian town of Prostken, where Yakov was relocated after identification.

flamethrowerguy
01-28-2010, 06:21 AM
Correct, Igor.

A little sidenote: the German Luftwaffe officer next to Yakov is one Major Walter Reuschle who was more or less coincidentally sitting there when Stalin's son was "presented" to the propaganda cameras. He wasn't released before 1955 because of this photo.

Egorka
01-28-2010, 06:52 AM
Correct, Igor.

A little sidenote: the German Luftwaffe officer next to Yakov is one Major Walter Reuschle who was more or less coincidentally sitting there when Stalin's son was "presented" to the propaganda cameras. He wasn't released before 1955 because of this photo.
This photo was used on the German propaganda leaflet dropped over the Soviet positions about 7th of August.
Here is the link to the leaflet image: http://pics.livejournal.com/sprachfuehrer/pic/001hgaes/s320x320

The new puzzle is coming ASAP.

Egorka
01-28-2010, 10:09 AM
OK. Here it is. I think you will find this one interesting at the end. :)

Please name:

Who are these men, their military profession. If you can name their unit - great, but I do not expect you to.
Time period, please try to justify the choice.
Approximate location (rather approximately).

3940

flamethrowerguy
01-29-2010, 02:36 AM
I'll have to do a little bit of guessing here...

According to their uniforms (collar patches) these men are "Sonderführer" (probably interpreters or members of Propaganda-Kompanie). If my eyes don't fool me there's the Yakov Dzhugashvili leaflet on the table, this would make the time period July/August 1941.
Concerning the location...I have not a clue by now since leaflet actions were done by mobile propaganda subunits. However it's possible that this particular leaflet was designed at the Propaganda-Ministerium (Reichsministerium für Volksaufklärung und Propaganda) at Berlin, Wilhelmplatz.

Egorka
01-29-2010, 09:25 AM
If my eyes don't fool me there's the Yakov Dzhugashvili leaflet on the table, this would make the time period July/August 1941.Excellent! :)
All correct. Good eyes! I thought it would be funny to use this one right after your puzzle about Yakov Dzhugashvili.
These interpreters PK 621 were working for 18th Army, Group "Nord".

Your turn.

flamethrowerguy
02-04-2010, 10:16 AM
Thanks, Igor, a lucky hit.:D
OK, it took me some time to find another appropriate one. Here we go:

3961

3962

I uploaded two photos to show that there's a lot of wrecked tonnage...

Rising Sun*
02-04-2010, 07:44 PM
Possibly Taranto, Toulon, or Mers-el-Kébir.

As the ships look like they're grounded in their berths, I'll go for the scuttling of the French Fleet at Toulon on 27 November 1942.

Egorka
02-05-2010, 02:52 PM
Yes, it must be Toulon, November 1942.
The second photo is IMO cruiser Colbert (. http://m.flickr.com/#/photos/mxw/2948933427/ )

flamethrowerguy
02-05-2010, 05:40 PM
Toulon is right of course which would make it RS' turn.

Rising Sun*
02-06-2010, 06:46 AM
Toulon is right of course which would make it RS' turn.

Thanks.

Here it is.



http://img189.imageshack.us/img189/8917/mysteryphoto1.jpg

Rising Sun*
02-09-2010, 04:24 AM
Time for a clue.

It's not a staff conference.

Digger
02-09-2010, 05:59 AM
Okay, it's a war crimes trial, but I can't remember the location or date:(

digger

Rising Sun*
02-09-2010, 07:00 AM
Okay, it's a war crimes trial, but I can't remember the location or date:(

digger

Yes, the absence of the location and date is a bit of an obstacle to getting the correct answer in a quiz entitled "Where and when is it?". ;) :D

However, you are correct that it is a war crimes trial.

And the biggest one run against the Japanese.