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tankgeezer
05-05-2008, 06:04 PM
I have been traveling around my area, taking pics of different weapons that have been turned into monuments. Towns, and cities have them to commemorate the different wars, and those who fought them, and the veterans organizations,(Veterans of foreign wars,American Legion, etc.) have them at their posts, (bars) . So, I though it a good idea to gather these images to share with you all. Even though its already posted, I'll include the Japanese type 98 A.A. gun. Enjoy, I'll continue to add to this as new pieces become available.
The modern Howitzer is a 155m.m. U.S. model, sitting in front of a National Guard armory just down the road from the Japanese A.A. gun.Then there is the type 98 A.A. gun, as pointed out it is in front of a private home, where it has been for 40+ yrs.
Next are these fine specimens from the American Civil War, placed at Cuttler park in the city of Waukesha. (most place names in my area are of American Indian origin, and there are a few mounds in the park built by some of the older bands that lived here about 2,000 yrs ago.) I dont know the names of these guns, no names were cast into them, though they could be Dahlgrens, (anyone have an idea?)and are of 8 inch caliber. the small bronze gun is of 2 inch caliber, and seems to have been a presentation gun, though it may well have seen action in that war.
The Flagpole monument bears a plaque about the original founder of the city, and I have placed my glove in picture to provide a size comparison for the round shot placed in the base.

tankgeezer
05-06-2008, 04:17 PM
These pics are from an american Legion post in a town to the south, it is unusual for a post to have a tank, and a field piece too.
The Tank is an M-60A3, (The wind speed/direction sensor on the turret gives that away.)
The howitzer is I think the same model as in the first post.a 155m.m. gun.

Panzerknacker
05-06-2008, 08:17 PM
Beautiful town, nice pics.

I want this one for blank firing in importat dates like independence day, xmas, etc...that big bore should be great to anoy late bed neighbours :)

http://img404.imageshack.us/img404/5129/monument20weapons20018yy6.jpg

tankgeezer
05-07-2008, 11:17 AM
It surely would my friend, and you could really load the thing to,, no small charge,, even the civil war guns could handle a couple pounds of black powder. Oh the ringing ears!! But that is the fourth of July in America, good fun!

Panzerknacker
05-07-2008, 12:13 PM
Well, we have two dates , the 25 of may and july 9th.

I have something llike that but in small scale, the gun in the pictures is definately Major Leagues. :D

tankgeezer
05-07-2008, 12:45 PM
Well, we have two dates , the 25 of may and july 9th.

I have something llike that but in small scale, the gun in the pictures is definately Major Leagues. :D
To be sure my friend, an 8 inch gun is a formidable weapon, you could stuff alot of black Powder into it, and really wake the neighbors.
I have a small Barney salute cannon, I dont know how old it is, it has a 3/4 inch bore, and weighs in pretty heavy. 60-70 lbs. All cast Iron. It will safely hold a charge of 70 grains of FF black powder. Its lots of fun to shoot.

Panzerknacker
05-07-2008, 12:49 PM
Nice piece4 ! the mine is 17,5 mm, turned from a solid SAE 1038, it shoot great but have no wheels.

My skills with wood are very limited :neutral:

tankgeezer
05-07-2008, 01:46 PM
Nice piece4 ! the mine is 17,5 mm, turned from a solid SAE 1038, it shoot great but have no wheels.

My skills with wood are very limited :neutral:
You can always turn some wheels from brass, or steel,, many naval carriages had iron wheels, you might go that route.
ply wood will make a nice wheel if you prefer a field carriage, just layout the disk, to show thw spokes etc, and saw out the uneeded wood to form the details. a little varnish, or paint, and you're in business..
I once made a Spanish howitzer from a 125mm piece of 4340 moly steel, Took a long time on the lathe, turning the outer details, (re-inforces etc) then came the drilling/boring.
My largest bit was 2-1/4 inches,so I used a boring bar to open out the the finish size of 3-1/16 inch. This also incorporated a sub chamber to hold the powder charge. (up to 4 ounces.)
Sadly, I sold that one to a man with alot of money,, It would have been fun to shoot it.

Panzerknacker
05-07-2008, 06:55 PM
Thanks , you are giving me some ideas for a project.


I sold that one to a man with alot of money


Wich is a lot better than sold it to a man with little money. :cool:

tankgeezer
05-07-2008, 07:54 PM
Thanks , you are giving me some ideas for a project.




Wich is a lot better than sold it to a man with little money. :cool:
Oh, so true my friend, I'm glad it went to someone who appreciated it for the fun, and usable model it was.
I constructed another gun in the 80's, a full scale Coehorn mortar, The gun itself I bought from Hern Iron works in Idaho, and I built the bed according to plans I found in a catalog. I used ash for the timber parts, and made my own iron parts, (the plus side of having a blacksmith shop) It was true to the original, I never fired it, I kept it as furniture for years. It was the only such model I regret selling.
Gun modeling is a great hobby, so let your creativity loose, and make what you like, as you like it. Just be sure the local laws dont interfere, especially if you decide to make a breech loader.

Panzerknacker
05-07-2008, 08:02 PM
The only law that run todays in the workshop is the lunch, If I dont eat something decent by 12.45 I get REALLY pissed. ;)

In other hand the black powder guns are completely registration and legislation free, so far.

tankgeezer
05-08-2008, 12:57 AM
The only law that run todays in the workshop is the lunch, If I dont eat something decent by 12.45 I get REALLY pissed. ;)

In other hand the black powder guns are completely registration and legislation free, so far.
I like that shop rule,, a good and hale lunch everyday.
The laws concerning black powder muzzle loading guns are the same here, no matter the bore size, 6mm, or 400mm, all the same. But a breech loader with a bore dia. of more than .500 inch must be papered like a machinegun.

Chevan
05-08-2008, 06:44 AM
Excellent thread mate tankgeezer:)
Tomorrow we will selebrate the Victory in the Great Patriotic War.
http://soviettech.ucoz.ru/_ph/11/2/606040849.jpg
This is not in my city , but we have in Krasnodar and area a dozen simular.

tankgeezer
05-08-2008, 03:14 PM
Hello Chevan, I'm a fan of the T-34 series, an excellent vehicle for the conditions it worked in. And a hale celebration your Victory day should be! so celebrate well! (but not too well, mind your liver now,, we all want you healthy) :)

Panzerknacker
05-08-2008, 07:19 PM
The laws concerning black powder muzzle loading guns are the same here, no matter the bore size, 6mm, or 400mm, all the same. But a breech loader with a bore dia. of more than .500 inch must be papered like a machinegun.

That mean a .52 caliber Spencer or a .54 Sharp is in the same level as an UZI ??

For some reason that does not sound logic, but of course logic is not the usual prerrogative of gun law makers. :roll:

George Eller
05-08-2008, 11:48 PM
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http://img341.imageshack.us/img341/8402/65mmfrenchmountaingun01er2.jpg
A picture that I took in Tiberias, Israel in 1979. IIRC, it was a French made 65mm mountain gun used by the Israelis against the Syrians in the 1948 Middle East War.

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tankgeezer
05-09-2008, 12:55 AM
That mean a .52 caliber Spencer or a .54 Sharp is in the same level as an UZI ??

For some reason that does not sound logic, but of course logic is not the usual prerrogative of gun law makers. :roll:

Good catch my friend! I had forgotten about those rifles, regular type firearms, like the different types of original, and reproduction, rifles & carbines are not considered destructive devices, even being breech loaders over .500 inch,they are in a different catagory of anitique, curio, or relic.but a breech loading cannon, even a small scale model is considered a D.D. if the bore is .510 " or larger. Then there is the question of it being a short barreled rifle,or shotgun, if rifled, and chambered for anything larger than a pistol cartridge, the BBL length must be greater than 16" (including chamber I believe)and for a shot shell chamber with smooth bore, greater than 18" Some salute cannon are exempt from this general rule, so its always better to check before building. Like you say, logic is forbidden in the making of laws.
There is a site on the web that deals in model cannon, and parts, so you might find ideas, or things you might purchase from them, cannonmania.com its fun just to have a look through their site, very cool stuff.

Panzerknacker
05-09-2008, 06:26 PM
Destructive device ? that sounds sinister hehe thanks for the legal info TankG :)

Nice Pictures George, I remeber vaguely a History Channel program of the series "Tales of the gun" in wich some like that was showed, it seems that the IAF destroyed an arab tank in 1948 with the old french guns..

Panzerknacker
05-09-2008, 06:37 PM
One mine, hehe, German field howitzer Krupp M1910 cal. 75 mm depicted in Molinari, some 65 km from home.

http://img466.imageshack.us/img466/8836/caon25he.jpg



Our beautiful national crest engraved on the breech: "Modelo Argentino serial 493"

http://img229.imageshack.us/img229/1405/krupp75mm1lr.jpg

The pictures was taken in december, that explains my "summer uniform" :cool:

tankgeezer
05-09-2008, 07:35 PM
Great Crest on that howitzer, don't see them like that anymore,, That would make another fine holiday salute cannon :)

George Eller
05-09-2008, 10:22 PM
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http://img341.imageshack.us/img341/8402/65mmfrenchmountaingun01er2.jpg
A picture that I took in Tiberias, Israel in 1979. IIRC, it was a French made 65mm mountain gun used by the Israelis against the Syrians in the 1948 Middle East War.

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Nice Pictures George, I remember vaguely a History Channel program of the series "Tales of the gun" in which some like that was showed, it seems that the IAF destroyed an arab tank in 1948 with the old french guns..

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Thanks Panzerknacker,

IIRC, four of the French made 65mm guns were positioned on the high ground west of the Jordan Valley
where they helped to hold the Syrians back.

Here are some more pictures that I took in Israel in 1979-80:

http://img140.imageshack.us/img140/8333/frenchtank194801ve6.jpg
A knocked-out Syrian tank from the 1948 War located near the entrance to Kibbutz Degania Aleph.
The tank is a French built Renault R-35. (Syria had been a French mandate after the First World War).
It was knocked out by “Molotov cocktails". I have seen more recent pictures of this tank with it's
main gun reinstalled. http://www.degania.org.il/eng/tour3.htm

http://img392.imageshack.us/img392/9718/frenchtank194802ef0.jpg
A plaque near the knocked-out Syrian tank from the 1948 war.
This is located at Kibbutz Degania Aleph near the southern tip of Lake Kineret (Sea of Galilee).

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Kibbutz Degania Aleph
http://www.degania.org.il/eng/general.htm

http://www.degania.org.il/eng/history3.htm


On the 15th of May, 1948, in the evening, car lights were seen moving from Kfar Hareb (today Kfar Haruv) along the Golan Heights. This was the Syrian invasion force. Facing a reinforced Syrian brigade assisted by an armored battalion and an artillery battalion, stood the units of the “Barak” battalion of the Golani Brigade as well as men from the settlements.

After shelling and bombarding the settlements, part of the Syrian force descended and took position at Tel-el-Kasr (Tel Katzir of today) and from there advanced under the cover of artillery towards the military camp near Tzemach (Kibbutz Ma’agan of today) and towards the new quarantine, east of Kibbutz Ma’agan. The Syrian advance was not decisive and the battle for the Tzemach police station was delayed for as long as the kibbutzim Sha’ar Hagolan and Massada held out. However at daybreak of May 19th, after the inhabitants of Massada and Sha’ar Hagolan were evacuated, the way was open before the Syrian army and after heavy fighting it gained control of Tzemach.

http://img216.imageshack.us/img216/5092/frenchtank194803vt7.jpghttp://img166.imageshack.us/img166/6359/frenchtank194804kj4.jpg
The Syrian tank at Degania's gates - 1948

On the morning of the 20th of May a delegation from the two “Deganias” arrived in Tel Aviv, demanding reinforcements from the high command for the defence of the settlements. Yigael Yadin, then Chief Operations Officer of the General Staff, said: “there is no way out but to let the Arabs draw 20-30 meters closer to the gates of Degania and then fight face to face against their armour”.

The attack on Degania started on the 20th of May at 04:30 hours. Its main objective was the Jordan River bridge north of Degania. Five tanks moved forward under artillery cover, along with several armored cars and a company of infantry.

The armor, deployed before the bridge, gave the infantry cover and hit the positions along the perimeter fence. The defenders evacuated them and deployed in the communications ditches, alongside the fence. There were about seventy of them - Degania members, people from the surrounding settlements, remnants of the “Barak” battalion and additional reinforcements. Some of the Syrian armor was hit by a 20 mm cannon located in the Beit Yerach area, and some continued moving up to the fence. One tank even succeeded in breaking throught it. The defenders hit this tank with “Molotov cocktails” and caused heavy casualties to the infantry behind the armor. The failed attempts and high casualties eroded the confidence of the Syrian army and on the night of the 21st of May the soldiers of the Syrian brigade withdrew from the Degania line and returned to their opening positions at Tel-el-Kasr. The defenders took position again at Tzemach and served as a buffer between the defenders of Degania and the Syrians on the Tel (hill). The Syrians abandoned Tel-el-Kasr in the wake of the Armistice agreements.

Sixty seven of the fallen in the battle for the Jordan Valley are buried in the military cemetery at Degania ‘A’, among them eight members and sons of Degania.

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Panzerknacker
05-10-2008, 06:55 PM
Good one, the part I remember was that this tank was first hit with the 65 mm and then finally killed with molotovs.

George Eller
05-11-2008, 03:08 AM
Good one, the part I remember was that this tank was first hit with the 65 mm and then finally killed with molotovs.
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Thanks Panzerknacker,

Some additional information about the French made 65mm mountain guns used by Israel during the 1948 Middle East War:

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Canon de 65 M(montagne) modele 1906
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canon_de_65_M%28montagne%29_modele_1906


The Canon de 65 M(montagne) modele 1906 (65 mm mle.1906) was a French mountain gun which entered the regiments d'artillerie de montagne in 1906. By 1939, the weapon was generally used as an infantry support gun. This was one of the first soft-recoil guns. After 1940, the Germans would use these as 6.5cm GebK 221(f). The gun was also used by Albania, Greece, Israel (1948 Arab-Israeli War, as Napoleonchik) and Poland.

Specifications:

Calibre: 65 mm
Elevation: −9°30′ to +35°
Muzzle velocity: 330 m/s
Range: 6.5 km
Traverse: 6°
Weight: 400 kg
Shell weight: 4.4 kg

http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/1251/65mmfrenchmountaingun02wh1.jpg

French Canon de 65 M(montagne) modele 1906 Schneider-Ducrest (known in Israel as Napoleonchik - a little Napoleon). Yad Mordechai Museum.


ALSO:
http://www.artillerie.info/FAQ/Canon%20de%20montagne%20de%2065%20Mle.pdf

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Canon de montagne de 65 mm Mle 1906 - Schneider-Ducrest 65 mm M. 1906 mountain gun
http://www.artillerie.info/FAQ/canondemontagned.html


The French 65 mm mountain gun model 1906, official French designation Canon de montagne Mle 1906, succeeded to the older designed 80 mm de Bange mountain gun model 1878, officially known as Canon de 80 mm de montagne Mle 1878.
Like its counterparts, this type of guns was more often used as a light gun as well in North-Africa as in the other French colonies. The naval museum in Haifa (Israel) exhibit is showing an excellent state of conservation albeit missing the rear section of the trail.

http://img371.imageshack.us/img371/1283/65mmfrenchmountaingun04bz9.jpg

http://img106.imageshack.us/img106/2480/65mmfrenchmountaingun03qo7.jpg

Cartridge (complete blow) of the gun of mountain of 65 mm Mle 1906.
Manufacture ARS 1918
Dimensions of the casing: approximately 65 X 175 mm.

Cartouche (coup complet) du canon de montagne de 65 mm Mle 1906.
Fabrication ARS 1918
Dimensions de la douille : environ 65 x 175 mm.

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http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=ru&u=http://www.waronline.org/forum/viewtopic.php%3Fstart%3D50%26t%3D3738&sa=X&oi=translate&resnum=3&ct=result&prev=/search%3Fq%3D%252265mm%2Bmountain%2Bgun%2522%2B194 8%26as_st%3Dy%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DG


A few months ago I spotted a beautiful little French Mountain Gun [c.1910]
displayed in the garden outside the door of the Manager's office in a Tel Aviv public park.
[In my ignorance at the time I thought that perhaps it was an old piece bought in for some later scrap].

Chris, your first information was spot-on; 65mm. The maker's plaque on the chassis says
"Manufacture
1910 No.114 1910 No.114
D'Armes de Tulle" D'Armes de Tulle "

There in also an inscription on the left side near the breach, however this may have been added later when the French left it behind [?] "Canon de 65 Ml [partly obscured] De Montaine No.10 ABS 1919"

The gun occupies a place of honour in the garden outside of the park manager's office [however its condition is not being helped by the sprinkler system for the flowers]. The gardeners refer to it as their 'little Napoleon.'

The park itself occupies an area of the northern bank of the Nahr el-'Auja [Yarkon] which saw action in 1917. At that time "it was in Turkish hands. During the night of 20-21 December 1917 the British 52nd Division commanded by Maj-Gen Hill, forced a surprise crossing at three different points. At daybreak pontoon bridges were thrown over the 'Auja, and a barrel bridge, previously assembled in the Wadi el-Musrara [Nahr el-Baride on British maps] was floated into the 'Auja and completed on the morning of the 22nd."

Gen Hill commemorated the success by setting up an inscribed broken pillar, a monument which is still in place today.

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65mm mountain gun M1906

This is a light gun introduced before World war 1 and used by the French into the 1940's. This is a light gun introduced before World war 1 and used by the French into the 1940's. It was designed as a light weight field gun for use by mountain troops and could be broken down into pack loads for transport by pack animal.

The M1906 used a peculiar recoil system, the barrel was held at full recoil until fired, when the gun was triggered the barrel would move forward and the round would fire just before the barrel reached the full forward position causing the force of the shell to stop forward movement of the barrel before it reached the end of its travel, the remaining force was used to move the barrel backward into it prefiring position, this allowed the use of a much lighter recoil system reducing the weight of the gun. The drawback to this system is that if the round was a dud the gun could tip over onto the bore from the forward movement of the barrel, if the crew was having a particularly bad day the round might hang fire, tipping the gun downward into the ground and then a few seconds later the round would go off firing the shell into the ground with predictable results.

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tankgeezer
05-11-2008, 06:00 PM
those are some awsome pics guys,, especially the tank,, not often do you find them knacked in situ, very nifty! The French artillery pieces are nice too. There is one not too far away, in a park, so when I get over that way, I'll get some pics of it.

George Eller
05-11-2008, 10:39 PM
those are some awsome pics guys,, especially the tank,, not often do you find them knacked in situ, very nifty! The French artillery pieces are nice too. There is one not too far away, in a park, so when I get over that way, I'll get some pics of it.
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Thanks Tankgeezer,

The old bunkers from that war were still there, but the trenches had long since been filled in. IIRC, in a different area of that region that I visited, there were even some old Turkish blockhouses that once guarded some segments of now abandoned Ottoman Empire rail lines from the First World War.

I look forward to your pics.

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Panzerknacker
05-12-2008, 07:05 PM
Nice info mister Eller, with shell and all :)

A nice Bofors 105mm extracted from an argentine destroyer, now is gate guardian in Cordoba shooting Range.

http://img91.imageshack.us/img91/5746/img022dq8.jpg

http://img218.imageshack.us/img218/8549/img023oq1.jpg

George Eller
05-13-2008, 02:02 PM
Nice info mister Eller, with shell and all :)

A nice Bofors 105mm extracted from an argentine destroyer, now is gate guardian in Cordoba shooting Range.

http://img91.imageshack.us/img91/5746/img022dq8.jpg

http://img218.imageshack.us/img218/8549/img023oq1.jpg
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Nice pic Panzerknacker :)

A 4.1 inch naval gun.

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Panzerknacker
05-13-2008, 08:26 PM
Beautiful indeed, not far away there is a 155 mm Puteaux field gun but I had run out of batteries :), the next time maybe.

George Eller
05-13-2008, 11:54 PM
Beautiful indeed, not far away there is a 155 mm Puteaux field gun but I had run out of batteries :), the next time maybe.
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I look forward to seeing that :)

Here are some pics that I took in July 2001 at Fort Pulaski, Georgia.

American Civil War - Fort Pulaski - near Savannah, Georgia.
Some of the seacoast guns mounted on carriages on the parapets and some casemate guns in the fort.

Photographs taken July 2001.
Posing in pictures are my nephew (wearing confederate kepi), my younger brother (wearing bluejeans and blue cap),
and a friend (wearing white cap and shorts).
http://img440.imageshack.us/img440/8035/fortpulaski02sp8.jpg
http://img118.imageshack.us/img118/2853/fortpulaski03gx6.jpg
http://img118.imageshack.us/img118/2508/fortpulaski01ka9.jpg
Above: my younger brother posing beside some casemate guns.

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Fort Pulaski National Monument

http://img118.imageshack.us/img118/2628/fortpulaski04gj1.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Pulaski_National_Monument

http://www.nps.gov/fopu/

http://www.generalatomic.com/PerrysSaints/chapter6.html

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SEE ALSO: (Civil War cannons)

http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showpost.php?p=113434&postcount=5

http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?p=113528#post113528

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tankgeezer
05-14-2008, 11:16 AM
It was a nice warm day, and the bike said, "Lets go for a ride" so we went to the City of Racine, south of my town, where there are two nice monument guns, just a stone's throw apart.
The first, a French howitzer, is part of a small park, and has been there for some time. The park people maintain it, and it seems well preserved. I looked for a maker's mark, but found only military nomenclature,
10cm-M-14-FH-Nr.573-1916
A french gun is unusual in these parts, so this is a treat.

Next there is a cemetary just across from the park, and there is a complete Gun, and Limber from the American Civil War. It looks to be a 12 pdr, about 3 inch bore, in very nice condition, well maintained you could shoot this one,but be wary of old cast iron guns, they can fly apart with out warning.
There was no visible nomenclature, or dates, (painted over I'm thinking) so this could be a later model rolled wrought iron gun. hard to say. So, enjoy the pics.

Panzerknacker
05-14-2008, 07:56 PM
You gotta love those old big guns, thank guys for the pictures, is nice to there is a cannon in every corner. :)

George Eller
05-14-2008, 11:48 PM
It was a nice warm day, and the bike said, "Lets go for a ride" so we went to the City of Racine, south of my town, where there are two nice monument guns, just a stone's throw apart.
The first, a French howitzer, is part of a small park, and has been there for some time. The park people maintain it, and it seems well preserved. I looked for a maker's mark, but found only military nomenclature,
10cm-M-14-FH-Nr.573-1916
A french gun is unusual in these parts, so this is a treat.

http://img180.imageshack.us/img180/5245/monument20weapons20034ik5.jpg
http://img180.imageshack.us/img180/4144/monument20weapons20035rh4.jpg
http://img291.imageshack.us/img291/4425/monument20weapons20036jl6.jpg

Next there is a cemetary just across from the park, and there is a complete Gun, and Limber from the American Civil War. It looks to be a 12 pdr, about 3 inch bore, in very nice condition, well maintained you could shoot this one,but be wary of old cast iron guns, they can fly apart with out warning.
There was no visible nomenclature, or dates, (painted over I'm thinking) so this could be a later model rolled wrought iron gun. hard to say. So, enjoy the pics.
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Beautiful pics Tankgeezer :)

I think that the 10cm-M-14-FH may have been war booty taken by the French. It appears to be an Austro-Hungarian cannon - 10cm Feldhaubitze M.14. It is a beautiful cannon nonetheless. I like the Civil War Cannon also.

Artillery of the Great War
http://www.landships.freeservers.com/new_pages/artillery.htm

Austro-Hungarian 10cm Feldhaubitze M.14
http://www.landships.freeservers.com/10cm_feldhaubitze_m14_walkaround.htm


When the word Austro-Hungarian Artillery is mentioned, most of us thinks of the huge 30.5cm Skoda Mortars - a feared and spectacular weapon, used also by the German Army - and we tend to forget all those standard pieces, that made the backbone of that nations Artillery arm. They were the 8cm M5/8 Feldkanone (the standard Field Gun), the 7.5cm M15 Gebirgskanone (the standard Mountain Gun), the 15cm M.14 Feldhaubitze (the standard Heavy Howitzer) and this gun: the 10cm M.14 Feldhaubitze, the standard Light Field Howitzer.

The design was sound, although pretty standard for its time. The barrel was made of bronze, the breech was of the Wedge-type, closing horisontally, and the recoil system of the standard hydro-pneumatic type. The charges were of the cartridge-type, and the charges had six steps: five standard and one extra. It was fired using a contact trigger (Wiederspannung-abzug) with the breech having a special mechanism preventing any discharge if the breech was not completely closed. It was served by a crew of six, who could use the gun to fire up to 20 shells a minute. Six horses were needed to move it.

The 10cm Feld-Haubitze M.14 was employed in the Field Howitzer Regiments of the Austro-Hungarian Army (Feldhaubitz-Regiment). These Field Howitzer Regiments consisted of 4 batteries of 6 guns each, i.e. 24 howitzers per regiment. Most Army Corps had one of these regiments assigned to them (together with three Field Gun Regiments - Feldkanoneregiment). During 1915 the artillery was reorganized, and these field howitzer regiments were instead organically attached to the Infantry Divisions. There were at least 36 of these Field Howitzer Regiments in service during the Great War. After the War, a modified version of this gun (the vz 14/19) was manufactured in Czechoslavakia by Skoda, and found service in Greece, Hungary, Poland, Yugoslavia and Italy.

The webpage also contains historical and many walk around photos.
http://img132.imageshack.us/img132/593/10cmm142ke1.jpghttp://img132.imageshack.us/img132/7717/10cmm143kk8.jpg

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http://www.landships.freeservers.com/10cm_feldhaubitze_m14_walkaround.htm
The guns below are on display at the big Military Cemetery in Pavé in Verdun, a town that needs no further presentation in this context - the hills in the background are actually the Battlefield of 1916, most of it overgrown by woods, but still bearing the horrible scars of the fighting. Note that there are two marks of this gun to be seen here, distinguished by slightly different barrels. How these two Austro-Hungarian guns (plus one 8cm M.15) came to end up in this place in France I have no idea.


http://img410.imageshack.us/img410/5913/10cmfeldhaubitzem14verdcx5.jpg
http://img132.imageshack.us/img132/8660/10cmfeldhaubitzem14verdfr4.jpg
http://img254.imageshack.us/img254/7095/10cmfeldhaubitzem14verdtp9.jpg

See Also:
http://www.landships.freeservers.com/adh_germart3_fieldarty.htm

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tankgeezer
05-15-2008, 01:18 AM
That does appear to be the beast, a noble looking gun, I'm glad it found its way here, there are not many foreign WW1 guns around here as monuments.

Panzerknacker
12-14-2008, 06:38 PM
Blank shooting of a 76mm muzzleloader in the city of Rosario, Argentina. Note the guy emerging from the smoke, try that with schrapnel :mrgreen:

http://es.youtube.com/watch?v=pWvTCX94I1k

tankgeezer
12-14-2008, 07:45 PM
Blank shooting of a 76mm muzzleloader in the city of Rosario, Argentina. Note the guy emerging from the smoke, try that with schrapnel :mrgreen:

http://es.youtube.com/watch?v=pWvTCX94I1k those are lots of fun to shoot,, in the day, a bag full of nails would do if no grape, or canister were available.

Panzerknacker
12-15-2008, 04:34 PM
If sometime I manage to get that type of wheels I swear I going to fabricate something like that in my workshop. No more small shots. :)

tankgeezer
12-16-2008, 09:13 PM
Next time you go on vacation to wine country, look for a grape wagon, then you'll have wheels. you might also look here, Hern ironworks.com

forager
02-01-2009, 12:11 AM
Great thread.
This is a hobby of mine as well.
Here are a couple.

kamehouse
02-01-2009, 09:21 AM
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee44/kamehouse-uk/La%20Gleize%20museum/BattleofthebulgeMuseums142.jpg
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee44/kamehouse-uk/La%20Gleize%20museum/BattleofthebulgeMuseums141.jpg
Sherman of the 7th Armored division in Stavelot,Belgium.The plaque speaks of the battle at St Vith but if my memory serves me well,I am pretty sure the picture was in Stavelot.
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee44/kamehouse-uk/La%20Gleize%20museum/BattleofthebulgeMuseums378.jpg
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee44/kamehouse-uk/La%20Gleize%20museum/BattleofthebulgeMuseums381.jpg
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee44/kamehouse-uk/La%20Gleize%20museum/BattleofthebulgeMuseums384.jpg
The Tiger II from Kampfgruppe Peiper in la Gleize.
My silly dad in the second picture.

kamehouse
02-01-2009, 09:33 AM
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee44/kamehouse-uk/Clervaux%20Museum/BattleofthebulgeMuseums110.jpg
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee44/kamehouse-uk/Clervaux%20Museum/BattleofthebulgeMuseums109.jpg
PAK 43/41 L-71 from the 2. Pz Division in the village of Clervaux, Luxemburg.
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee44/kamehouse-uk/Clervaux%20Museum/BattleofthebulgeMuseums108.jpg
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee44/kamehouse-uk/Clervaux%20Museum/BattleofthebulgeMuseums107.jpg
Sherman in the same village.

kamehouse
02-01-2009, 09:39 AM
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee44/kamehouse-uk/Diekirch%20museum/Houffalize%20Panther/BattleofthebulgeMuseums155.jpg
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee44/kamehouse-uk/Diekirch%20museum/Houffalize%20Panther/BattleofthebulgeMuseums145.jpg
http://i235.photobucket.com/albums/ee44/kamehouse-uk/Diekirch%20museum/Houffalize%20Panther/BattleofthebulgeMuseums144.jpg
Panther from the 116. Pz Division in the town of Houffalize near Bastogne.

flamethrowerguy
02-01-2009, 10:01 AM
...and the La Gleize/Belgian Ardennes Tiger II of "Kampfgruppe Peiper", once again but painted:

http://www.white-star.nl/images/Ardennes/LaGleizeTigerFront.jpg

http://www.white-star.nl/images/Ardennes/LaGleizeTigerLeft0.jpg

http://www.white-star.nl/ardennes.htm

flamethrowerguy
02-01-2009, 10:29 AM
Some Soviet monuments on former GDR soil (yes, these are still there):

http://www.sozialistische-gedenkstaetten.de/b/Tiergarten/b-bs03.jpg
T-34/76 at Berlin-Tiergarten

http://www.sozialistische-gedenkstaetten.de/b/Karlshorst/karlshorst09.jpg
T-34/85 at Berlin-Karlshorst

and from Bashtanka/Ukraine: "Katyusha" with strange (?) painting and unknown hippie:
http://www.sozialistische-gedenkstaetten.de/A_Sowjetunion/Baschtanka/Katjuscha2.jpg

http://www.sozialistische-gedenkstaetten.de/start.shtml

forager
02-01-2009, 10:33 AM
few more

Nickdfresh
02-01-2009, 11:50 AM
Great pics!

As far as the tanks, especially the German ones, I'd like to know if anyone can tell me if they are "gutted" or still have internal components such as engines inside their blocks?

The static displays around here are in front of veterans organizations such as the VFW and American Legion with something of an "arms race" of who has the coolest, most extensive displays developing. There's a nearby former "Nike Base" that's now a town recreational facility with a VFW Hall across the street. For many years, they had a sole 8" howitzer out front. Now they have an AH-1S Apache, M-48A5 Patton, and plans to add an A-4 I think! There are at least three more halls with similar displays, including one with an M-60A3, within 20 km's...

Panzerknacker
02-01-2009, 01:40 PM
Excellent pictures, thank you very much lads. :cool:

flamethrowerguy
02-01-2009, 04:48 PM
Another quite interesting one: The Tiger I of Vimoutiers, Basse-Normandie/France:

http://www.normandybattlefields.com/mapphotos/25-tiger_tank.jpg
www.normandybattlefields.com/

http://s23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/jgfive/Falaise07/Falaise07036.jpg
http://www.ww2f.com/modelling/21929-fov-extreme-metal-1-16-tiger-i-villers-bocage.html

During the retreat from Normandy the tank ran out of gas. The crew attempted to disable the tank with mines but it was only slightly damaged. Afterwards the Tiger was pushed into the road ditch by the advancing US Forces. In that ditch the tank remained until 1975 (!) before it became a memorial/monument.

Post war pictures:
http://www.ww2incolor.com/d/11763-5/knocked-out-tiger.jpg (http://www.ww2incolor.com/modern/knocked-out-tiger.jpg.html)http://mw2.google.com/mw-panoramio/photos/medium/3522099.jpg
http://pix.nofrag.com/e/a/d/8187598cb7a84a7d8d48520e64d0b.jpg

Panzerknacker
03-17-2009, 10:03 PM
Naval bronze gun in the city of Rosario. Made in Seville, Spain in 1804.

http://i39.tinypic.com/10n71bm.jpg

http://i41.tinypic.com/es0sv4.jpg

tankgeezer
03-18-2009, 06:21 PM
very sweet Bronze gun, they are the best.. I am surprised that the Tiger sat until the 70's its a valuable machine, much in demand by collectors, and museums..

Panzerknacker
03-19-2009, 07:39 PM
I am surprised that the Tiger sat until the 70's its a valuable machine, much in demand by collectors, and museums..

Probably because you need some piece of machinery to move it...:)

Nickdfresh
03-19-2009, 07:48 PM
I imagine the engine was torn out and probably a good deal of the wiring...

I am surprised that no one scrapped it first...

Panzerknacker
03-19-2009, 08:01 PM
The 75mm and 76mm bullet couldnt scrape it so....:mrgreen:

Only a torch with O2 and acetilene, but I guess it was a bit clumsy to carry all that in the field.

tankgeezer
03-20-2009, 09:26 AM
There are people who make a living at searching out stuff like this for collectors, and museums, and even if its been stripped, the remains would still be quite valuable on that market. A good thing it wasnt scrapped. We could have got a couple soccer, or Rugby teams together, and have a rope tug to get it out of the ditch..

Panzerknacker
03-20-2009, 07:36 PM
Rugby teams, hehe, that was quite an idea...:)

Breech of a Schneider 155 mm howitzer also placed in the city of Rosario.

http://i42.tinypic.com/28i2hs1.jpg

forager
03-21-2009, 01:11 PM
Very entertaining thread.

tankgeezer
05-03-2009, 08:15 PM
Alright Gents, I went looking around Knoxville (Tennessee) today, and visited one of the Union Army Forts there.
Called Fort ****erson, its an Earthwork fort on a hill top overlooking the town,located on Knox's south side. Its not very large, (at least the part they let you walk through) The upper most level is the Battery, holding maybe 10 guns, mostly U.S. 3" ordnance rifles of which there are 2 in place now.
Beneath the battery is a defensive/service trench with its berm There may be more to it, but this is all the public has access to now. Trees now obscure the fields of fire, but its high elevation would have made it difficult to move anything without those in the fort seeing it. There were a number of these forts built around knoxville to defend against the Confederate Gen. Longstreet.I have read that Longstreet's artillery tried to engage these forts, but due to the poor quality of his powder stores, his guns couldnt make the range to the targets.Also, rifled cannon were not often found in the confederate artillery.

Panzerknacker
05-15-2009, 01:13 PM
Is that the rock capital ? Nice guns and better looking forest :)

tankgeezer
05-15-2009, 09:50 PM
Lots of rocks there, Knoxville is in the foothills of the Smokey Mountains. There was a fair amount of action during the Civil War. There were 16 such forts in the area, The Largest was Ft. Sanders, which was located in what is now west Knoxville. Ft. ****erson is the only one left in any sort of condition. (most were built over as the city grew.)

Panzerknacker
05-15-2009, 09:57 PM
Looks like a very scenic place, I tought that In the US southern states the landscaped wast much green like this.
The gun have the perfect size to fit in my backyard next to the bbq grill.

http://i42.tinypic.com/wingh0.jpg

tankgeezer
05-15-2009, 11:13 PM
I was thinking that myself,,,,an interesting way to call your friends to dinner, (or keep them away from your wine cellar)
Two of the three guns are original, one is a replica, maybe made by Hern Ironworks in Idaho. Muzzle loading artillery is legal to own, and without any paperwork issues.
It is really green here, lots of large old trees,nearly jungle like. (and probably lots of stills in the hills)

Uyraell
05-16-2009, 12:22 PM
Very nice pictures TG, Interesting to see the way the Fort looks nowadays.
Have to say I'm surprised the weapons are in such good condition.

The difference in weight between two of the pieces made me pause a little, since, if I'm reading the markings correctly, both weapons fired the same weight of cannonball.
I'm guessing at different casting standards for each weapon as being the reason for the difference in weight.

Respectful Regards, Uyraell.

tankgeezer
05-17-2009, 01:11 AM
I think it was because one is rifled, and the other a smooth bore, but it could be due to the depth of the bore, relative to the length of the gun. Machining technology was a bit suspect in those days. As to the pieces on location, The carriages are new made, (2002) The guns in the pics are original, but the other has no markings, and must be a repro, Original U.S. or C.S.A. military guns had their nomenclature on the muzzle, at the trunnion, or at the breech re-enforcing band.(tho, guns imported from Europe may have them in other locations) There are a few shops in the U.S. that produce guns of this type in cast iron.

Uyraell
05-19-2009, 05:56 AM
Many Thanks, TG, I greatly appreciate the added info, which I find interesting. :)
Hadn't realised repro pieces were still made, nor carriages and trunnions.

Kind Regards, Uyraell.

tankgeezer
05-19-2009, 09:10 PM
There is an outfit in Southbend Indiana,dont recall the name, and there is Hern Ironworks in Idaho. good to peruse to research Civil War guns.

Uyraell
05-21-2009, 02:11 PM
Many Thanks, TG:), in recent years I've found an interest in the US Civil War which I hadn't anticipated evolving. :)

Small comment on Monument weapons in NZ.
In my youth there were many such to be seen, and they were in general reasonably well maintained. Then the 1980's arrived, and with it, a whole slew of "politically correct fascism" dressed-up as "forget the past". The result was many many Monument Weapons were dismounted, removed, and disappeared into obscurity, most likely were scrapped.
Anyone younger than about 35 would never even recall where most of those weapons had stood.
The loss of the associated markers of history, will cost this country part of it's identity in years to come, and render it increasingly bland and sterile, meaningless. That particular rot has already set in, and continues apace.

Kind Regards, Uyraell.

tankgeezer
05-21-2009, 11:06 PM
It is a shame, I agree. While it may be wise to look to the future, no one, a people, or a nation should ever forget the efforts, or remove the monuments to those who made their freedom possible.

Panzerknacker
11-22-2009, 10:57 PM
3 pounder and 6 pounder muzzleloaders, videos freshly uploaded by...me ...who else ?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnokSuw0yac

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5yXk9KQr1k