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George Eller
05-02-2008, 04:35 PM
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I have been tossing the idea around of starting a thread based on newspaper articles (or other sources) from World War II. Not the headliners, but the lesser known stories on a more personal level that might be found deeper in the papers. Stories that may be almost forgotten by modern readers, but nevertheless would be very touching and interesting if they could be brought back to our attention. Especially considering the broad audience that we have now with the Internet.

I don't have anything yet, but if anyone would like to start posting be my guest :)

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Chevan
05-02-2008, 04:46 PM
I think the problem with of most of that "newspaper forgoten stories" could be the utter propogandic material, that is absolutly usial during the wars in any countries.
The more importaint and truly are the personal recollections of veterans,or peoples whose relatives did fight at the front.

George Eller
05-02-2008, 07:59 PM
I think the problem with of most of that "newspaper forgoten stories" could be the utter propogandic material, that is absolutly usial during the wars in any countries.
The more importaint and truly are the personal recollections of veterans,or peoples whose relatives did fight at the front.
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Thanks for the input Chevan. Not sure if that would always be the case with the smaller stories, although it could happen. I think period newspapers could still be interesting, even with some propaganda elements, as it gives the reader some sense of the mood and emotions of the times.

But personal recollections of veterans, their families or anyone that lived through the war, including civilians, would be fine also.

I won't limit it to just newspapers or magazines. :)

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albatrosdva
05-04-2008, 07:24 PM
Well I'll be glad to start it out. Ernie Pyle once wrote about a co-pilot who hated the flak jackets because of their weight. One time he took his jacket off and dropped it on his feet. Not 5 minutes later a piece of flak slammed into the jacket and probably kept him from loosing his leg. He kept the bent plate in the jacket and one of his buddies kept the piece of flak. Needless to say he always after that wore the jacket without complaint.

George Eller
05-05-2008, 12:54 AM
Well I'll be glad to start it out. Ernie Pyle once wrote about a co-pilot who hated the flak jackets because of their weight. One time he took his jacket off and dropped it on his feet. Not 5 minutes later a piece of flak slammed into the jacket and probably kept him from loosing his leg. He kept the bent plate in the jacket and one of his buddies kept the piece of flak. Needless to say he always after that wore the jacket without complaint.
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Thanks albatrosdva - Ernie Pyle wrote such great stories :)

That bent plate and piece of flak became stern reminders...

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George Eller
05-05-2008, 02:47 AM
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From Best Little Stories From World War II, by C. Brian Kelly, ISBN 0-9624875-0-3, Montpelier Publishing, 1989, pp 89-92

Brave Trigger's Last Patrol.

http://img521.imageshack.us/img521/5686/bravetrigger01mk3.jpg

http://img504.imageshack.us/img504/1718/bravetrigger02vt9.jpg

http://img151.imageshack.us/img151/255/bravetrigger03rh7.jpg

http://img504.imageshack.us/img504/2919/bravetrigger04ot3.jpg

http://img183.imageshack.us/img183/5788/bravetrigger05ay9.jpg

http://img225.imageshack.us/img225/7637/bravetrigger07sv5.jpg
In memory of the Trigger (SS-237)
Photo courtesy of Tom Kermen.

http://img183.imageshack.us/img183/1436/bravetrigger06vd5.jpg
Trigger (SS-237) returns to Guam, 17 November 1944
USN photo courtesy of Rick Connole, son of Commander David R. Connole,
K.I.A. while commanding the Trigger (SS-237), 28 March 1945.

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USS Trigger (SS-237)

http://www.csp.navy.mil/ww2boats/trigger.htm

http://www.oneternalpatrol.com/uss-trigger-237.htm

http://www.atule.com/USS_Trigger_SS_237.htm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Trigger_%28SS-237%29

http://www.history.navy.mil/danfs/t8/trigger-i.htm

http://www.navsource.org/archives/08/08237.htm

http://hazegray.org/danfs/submar/ss237.txt

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The stories found in the book Best Little Stories From World War II remind me somewhat of the stories told by American radio personality Paul Harvey in his radio show The Rest Of The Story.

Paul Harvey
http://www.paulharvey.com/index.aspx?id=3193
http://www.paulharvey.com/index.aspx

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Harvey

On May 10, 1976, ABC Radio Networks premiered The Rest Of The Story as a separate series which provided endless surprises as Harvey dug into stories behind the stories of famous events and people.

Paul Harvey's The Rest Of The Story
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_Harvey%27s_The_Rest_of_the_Story
http://www.amazon.com/Paul-Harveys-Rest-Story-Aurandt/dp/0553259628


Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Paul Harvey is the most listened-to radio personality in America. Millions of loyal listeners tune in every week to hear his unique blend of news and views. Now, in Paul Harvey's The Rest Of The Story you'll find eighty-two astonishing true stories of the famous and infamous, the outrageous and the unknown. Each unforgettable tale has for its startling punch line the wild and wonderful solution to a real-life mystery. The 1950's presidential candidate who killed a teenage girl. The governor of New York who dressed up like a woman--at taxpayer's expense. The queen whose secret photo collection--if exposed--would shock the world. The American founding father who kept his wife locked in the cellar. The best-selling mystery writer who tried to get away . . . with murder! From present-day shockers to historical puzzlers, Paul Harvey's The Rest Of The Story reveals the untold story behind some of history's strangest little-known facts.

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albatrosdva
05-05-2008, 11:51 AM
I met a fellow one time that flew B-24s in Europe. He was stationed in France after the invasion and ran into a rather comical instance. He had just finished his bombing run and had been very shot up. The plane was still flying but slower then he thought because the instruments were not working right. What made the situation all the more interesting was the thick fog which came up after the run. After the right amount of time (had he been going the speed he thought he was) he spotted an airfield and landed. The Germans were totally surprised when he landed at their field but lucky for him he realized his mistake and got back up in the fog and headed home before the could get a good shot at him.

snebold
05-07-2008, 05:10 AM
I know one who married a German woman whose father was a pilot during the war. He told that at a time late in the war (late 1944 I think) he was tasked with dropping thousands of false £ (pound) notes in the Bodensee (a lake in southern Germany).

Unfortunately I know no details.

Rising Sun*
05-07-2008, 06:48 AM
As wounded Staff Sgt. John Hill was helped from his B-17 bomber after a raid on Jan. 13, 1943, the commander of the 305th Bomb Group, Col. Curtis LeMay came up and said:

"Don't worry, that bullet didn't have your name on it."

"No," replied Hill, "but it had 'To whom it may concern' on it." http://www.taphilo.com/history/8thaf/8aflosses.shtml

albatrosdva
05-07-2008, 10:33 PM
There was a fixit man serving in North Africa, I forget which unit now (its another Ernie Pyle story) that always was working on stuff. His particular love was for clocks. One day he was out on patrol in the desert and he got shot in the back pocket. He was uninjured because he had a small alarm clock there. He was much more distraught about the clock being destroyed then the fact that he had been almost shot.

Bill Mauldin wrote one time about going into a town in Italy in a jeep. They were a little disoriented so that actually were not sure where the front line was. As they went around a curve in the road they came right in front of a German tank in the road. Mauldin said he never knew that a jeep could go from 45 mph straight into reverse. It turns out that the town had already been taken and the tank was no threat but they didnt know that.

snebold
05-27-2008, 03:02 PM
Fritz Sauckel, gauleiter of Thuringia joined one the first u-boat to go on patrol in British waters as a stowaway (mainly as a public relations stunt).

He is better known for his policies as plenipotentiary for labour mobilization, a position he held from 21 March 1942.


As a child I read that at least two persons during WWII survived free falls from above 5000m without parachutes (at least one landing in snow). Anybody heard about such wartime incidents?

Warpig
05-27-2008, 04:16 PM
Well, my grandmother was making some awesome jam and smuggling Jews during WW2, soon though she ran out of Jews to smuggle and was just making jam.

Egorka
05-27-2008, 06:24 PM
Well, my grandmother was making some awesome jam and smuggling Jews during WW2, soon though she ran out of Jews to smuggle and was just making jam.
oynk-oynk

the_librarian
06-06-2008, 01:51 PM
Would something like this be an option:

http://journalism.indiana.edu/resources/erniepyle/wartime-columns/

I have some more stories, tons actually, but I'm not sure about copyright and posting entire columns up.....trying to figure out that stuff gives me a headache as I run similar themes on my history blog, but it's hard to quote just part of a story and get the idea across....gosh, better stop ranting! :) Hope everyone likes the Ernie columns.....

George Eller
06-06-2008, 03:14 PM
Would something like this be an option:

http://journalism.indiana.edu/resources/erniepyle/wartime-columns/

I have some more stories, tons actually, but I'm not sure about copyright and posting entire columns up.....trying to figure out that stuff gives me a headache as I run similar themes on my history blog, but it's hard to quote just part of a story and get the idea across....gosh, better stop ranting! :) Hope everyone likes the Ernie columns.....
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Great material...I like Ernie Pyle. :)

These are the types of stories that I had in mind.

Thanks Tony.

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labdarugo
06-08-2008, 12:49 AM
[/URL]
Fritz Sauckel, gauleiter of Thuringia joined one the first u-boat to go on patrol in British waters as a stowaway (mainly as a public relations stunt).

He is better known for his policies as plenipotentiary for labour mobilization, a position he held from 21 March 1942.


As a child I read that at least two persons during WWII survived free falls from above 5000m without parachutes (at least one landing in snow). Anybody heard about such wartime incidents?

One of them must have been Nicholas Alkemade:
[url]http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-2954.html (http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/archive/index.php/t-2954.html)

snebold
06-10-2008, 03:18 PM
Thanks!

It seems that if you want to survive a free fall from attitude, in WWII or nowadays, it´s a good idea to become unconscious before landing...

Hysteria__
07-15-2008, 11:15 AM
Good thread idea. I've got a few books packed with stories like these, one being 'Bizarre Tales From WW2', maybe about 60 or 70 3 or 4 page stories from the war, I'll post a few up in a bit.

imi
07-15-2008, 11:57 AM
One of my old friend,who died a few years ago,tell me some story about Stalingrad:
My old friend and he's squad marching in the snow and left a hill,and they see a shocking view:many soldier frozen into death,or shoot down,and some "funny" soldier,is stand up lot of the hard frozen corpses,and put into the corpses to the snow,conversely head to the ground,along two side of the snowy footpath.It would be a sick view.
Another story:
In the field on the front the Red army has been score victory,and the axis forces fall back foot,and the lucky ones on a truck.Some soldiers try to jump into the truck,but the truck is full,and some of try to hang on in the truck side.The weight was too much,and the soldiers who became demented the stress of war,hit and cut their own kameraden hands,and fingers down with a spade.

the_librarian
08-24-2008, 01:50 AM
I stumbled across the Veteran's Project over at the LOC tonight and found a facinating story about Cognac, Girls and the Battle of the Bulge!

Here's the link, have fun!

http://lcweb2.loc.gov/diglib/vhp/story/loc.natlib.afc2001001.01768/

kuuk
08-28-2008, 12:19 AM
Here is a short story from the days of Operation Market Garden:
On 20/09/1944 we watched some of the 82nd Airborne landing on Dropzone "N" south of Groesbeek in the Netherlands, from the dike along the river Maas (Meuse) approx. 2km's away from the action. After about 30 minutes too much firing came our way as planes and gliders continued to pass right over us. Some of the planes were on fire and crashed. Back to the cellar for protection. The next morning two para's came to our town. (They actually had jumped after their Dakota had turned around.) Later that day two very tall para's were spotted walking towards our town but across the river. Several Underground men then took a rowboat across to pick them up. After meeting with several more Underground men -including my Father- they were rowed back across the river to return to their unit. No sooner had they started to walk back, a German patrol spotted them. Luckily for them, the rowers noticed their plight, and they rowed back to shore to retrieve the para's. When in the boat again, they rowed with everything they had to escape the firing from the Germans that by then had started. The para's then decided to dump all their equipment overboard to lighten the load, and they eventually landed safely on our more friendly shore. The two returned to their unit via another route the next day. In the nineteen-eightys, while diving for evidence of remnants of a Roman bridge, one of the divers found a knife on the bottom of the river, which later was positively identified as a special improvised knife carried by some of the para troopers to cut their lines should it be necessary. As no other paratroopers were known to have crossed the river, it is certain that it was one of the items discarded by the two tall Americans while fleeing from the Germans!

flamethrowerguy
09-18-2008, 06:51 AM
2nd Lieutenant Friedrich Lengfeld (*September 29, 1921; +November 12, 1944) was a company leader of the 2nd company/Füsilierbataillon of german 275. Infanterie-Division.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/22/Friedrich_Lengfeld.jpg

Lt. Lengfeld was mortally wounded on November 12, 1944 during an attempt to rescue a wounded G.I. from the minefield "Wilde Sau" (wild boar) in Hurtgenforest.
Hubert Gees from Salzkotten/Eastern Westphalia was a soldier in Lengfelds company by the time of the incident. He reports:
"With Lt. Lengefeld I lost the best superior I ever had. In the previous hard weeks he meant much to me and gave me a lot of inner strength. He was an exemplary company leader and he claimed never more from us as he was willing to give by himself.
Led by him I was on patrol straight into the american forward outposts. When the american observation ammunition detonated on trees with a flogging bang and we got the impression that the enemy broke into our positions he never said "Go and check" but "Follow me".
On November 12, 1944 when the soldiers of the 12th US Infantry Regiment had re-taken the forester's house of Hürtgen just to lose it again in the forenoon, our company severe loss.
In the early forenoon an obviously heavy wounded G.I. was crying for help in a beseeching way. He was lying in the middle of the minefield "Wilde Sau" at the edge of the embankment of the eastern side of the road, in no man's land. My Co, Lt. Lengfeld, sent me to our MG position to deliver the order "not to shoot if american corpsmen will show up to salvage the seriously injured". Since the heartrending cries for help lasted for hours Lt. Lengfeld ordered our corpsmen to put together a rescue squad. This must have been around 10:30 am.
Lt. Lengfeld went on top of the resque squad on our side of the road. The road itself was secured with anti-tank mines whose positions were relatively easy to locate. Just when the Lieutenant wanted to change the side of the road approaching the G.I. he was taken down by an anti-personal mine. In a great hurry he was taken back to our command post to be given First Aid. Two holes in his back with the size of a coin suggested severe internal injuries. Lt. Lengfeld moaned in great pain. Led by a lightly wounded NCO he was brought back to casualty station "Lukasmühle". The same evening he died from his severe injuries on the main casualty station at Froitzheim"
Today Friedrich Lengfeld is buried on the cemetery in Düren-Rölsdorf.

On the military cemerery in Hürtgen the only memorial for a german soldier has been erected by the former enemy for Lt. Friedrich Lengfeld:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/de/6/6f/Lengfeld_memorial.jpg

http://www.ehrenmale-kreis-dueren.de/Dueren%20-%20Roelsdorf%202003_0910%20Bild2.jpg

http://www.ehrenmale-kreis-dueren.de/Dueren%20-%20Roelsdorf%202003_0910%20Bild3.jpg

navyson
09-18-2008, 06:57 AM
That's a cool story flame, thanks for posting. I see you even got pictures of the grave.:)

flamethrowerguy
09-18-2008, 07:05 AM
That's a cool story flame, thanks for posting. I see you even got pictures of the grave.:)

Right, bro, a little dismal sight for a "hero's" grave, isn't it?

navyson
09-18-2008, 07:09 AM
Right, bro, a little dismal sight for a "hero's" grave, isn't it?
Yeah it is actually. Did they install the memorial plaque close to the grave at least so peopl might pay respects? (the others should get respect also).

flamethrowerguy
09-18-2008, 08:41 AM
Yeah it is actually. Did they install the memorial plaque close to the grave at least so peopl might pay respects? (the others should get respect also).

The memorial is actually on another cemetary (at the village of Hürtgen, one of the two german main cemetaries of the battles in hurtgenforest), about 4 miles away from Lengfelds grave,

flamethrowerguy
11-11-2008, 08:21 AM
A poster from Russia uploaded this one on the picture site. Somehow there was not much of feedback to it there but I find it too interesting to be ignored completely.

http://www.ww2incolor.com/d/69406-2/____________+__________________+__________________ __________+____+____________+______________+______ +________________

The poster called it "The Prediction. 1952". These sheets are supposed to be found by a woman called Galina Belevich from Chekanovskiy in the abandoned POW camp "Ozerlag" for german and -mostly- japanese soldiers near the city of Bratsk in Siberia.
Unfortunately it's quite difficult to read but I'll translate what I am able to decipher:
"Written on July 2, 1952.
Camp 043, July 2, 1952.
Prediction
Communism will cease itself in the years 1952 -1955. Stalin is going to die in the year 1953, in the month of March, 4th or 5th (Stalin actually died March 5, 1953 - FTG). His friend, the commander of the camps, B. (= Lavrentij Pavlovič Berija - FTG) will also be sidelined...powerless. The overthrow in Czechoslovakia and the side changing of Tito was foreseen by me in dreams. A. K. (? - FTG)"

George Eller
11-11-2008, 01:03 PM
2nd Lieutenant Friedrich Lengfeld (*September 29, 1921; +November 12, 1944) was a company leader of the 2nd company/Füsilierbataillon of german 275. Infanterie-Division.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/22/Friedrich_Lengfeld.jpg

Lt. Lengfeld was mortally wounded on November 12, 1944 during an attempt to rescue a wounded G.I. from the minefield "Wilde Sau" (wild boar) in Hurtgenforest.
Hubert Gees from Salzkotten/Eastern Westphalia was a soldier in Lengfelds company by the time of the incident. He reports:
"With Lt. Lengefeld I lost the best superior I ever had. In the previous hard weeks he meant much to me and gave me a lot of inner strength. He was an exemplary company leader and he claimed never more from us as he was willing to give by himself.
Led by him I was on patrol straight into the american forward outposts. When the american observation ammunition detonated on trees with a flogging bang and we got the impression that the enemy broke into our positions he never said "Go and check" but "Follow me".
On November 12, 1944 when the soldiers of the 12th US Infantry Regiment had re-taken the forester's house of Hürtgen just to lose it again in the forenoon, our company severe loss.
In the early forenoon an obviously heavy wounded G.I. was crying for help in a beseeching way. He was lying in the middle of the minefield "Wilde Sau" at the edge of the embankment of the eastern side of the road, in no man's land. My Co, Lt. Lengfeld, sent me to our MG position to deliver the order "not to shoot if american corpsmen will show up to salvage the seriously injured". Since the heartrending cries for help lasted for hours Lt. Lengfeld ordered our corpsmen to put together a rescue squad. This must have been around 10:30 am.
Lt. Lengfeld went on top of the resque squad on our side of the road. The road itself was secured with anti-tank mines whose positions were relatively easy to locate. Just when the Lieutenant wanted to change the side of the road approaching the G.I. he was taken down by an anti-personal mine. In a great hurry he was taken back to our command post to be given First Aid. Two holes in his back with the size of a coin suggested severe internal injuries. Lt. Lengfeld moaned in great pain. Led by a lightly wounded NCO he was brought back to casualty station "Lukasmühle". The same evening he died from his severe injuries on the main casualty station at Froitzheim"
Today Friedrich Lengfeld is buried on the cemetery in Düren-Rölsdorf.

On the military cemerery in Hürtgen the only memorial for a german soldier has been erected by the former enemy for Lt. Friedrich Lengfeld:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/de/6/6f/Lengfeld_memorial.jpg

http://www.ehrenmale-kreis-dueren.de/Dueren%20-%20Roelsdorf%202003_0910%20Bild2.jpg

http://www.ehrenmale-kreis-dueren.de/Dueren%20-%20Roelsdorf%202003_0910%20Bild3.jpg
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Great story Flame,

War can also bring out the best in people...

It would be interesting to know if the American soldier that Lt. Lengfeld attempted to rescue survived or if he also died from his injuries.

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flamethrowerguy
11-11-2008, 01:29 PM
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Great story Flame,

War can also bring out the best in people...

It would be interesting to know if the American soldier that Lt. Lengfeld attempted to rescue survived or if he also died from his injuries.

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Thank you, George.
That is indeed an interesting question. I just re-directed it to the Twenty Second United States Infantry Society.
I hope they'll answer and are able to give that precious information!

Krad42
11-11-2008, 02:22 PM
Right, bro, a little dismal sight for a "hero's" grave, isn't it?

Indeed, it is! There are many heroes on all sides who just like him were buried in inconspicous graves amidst anonymity. There are many who probably lie somewhere, in foregin lands, with nothing marking their resting place. It is a very unfortunate aspect of war and a very sad one. The story is a very nice one, though, and one that I wasn't aware of. Thank you so much for sharing it! I'm glad that his sacrifice was at least recognized by the Americans.

Krad42
11-11-2008, 02:43 PM
The prediction is rather interesting, especially assuming that it was written by a German POW. Tito's views were indeed very independent and, in spite of being a communist, his regime was known for having big differences with other communist countries. He remained fairly neutral during the Cold War and didn't accept Stalin's attempts to control him. So, obviously, the person who predicted this was right on the money with that. Of course, communism as a whole didn't cease in 1952-55 and the Cold War was already at work., although it would have been nice to see communism end then. The prediction about Stalin's death is quite remarkable as well.

flamethrowerguy
11-27-2008, 06:25 PM
3014

The little story behind this memento:
"I belonged to the 13th Company of Panzergrenadier-Regiment 25 of the "Hitlerjugend" Division. After the first battles in Normandy, where we occupied a position in the Ardenne monastery, we, together with a light infantry gun platoon, were attached to a reinforced company, Battle Group Schrott. One evening we were called to the commander and six of us received the Iron Cross 2nd Class. I wanted to send it home but did not get round to it for some reason or other. I put the Iron Cross in my wallet which I always carried in my back pocket. A few days later, we had to repulse an Allied bridgehead. I was at that time leading the Signals section of the light infantry gun platoon. After starting to attack by the first houses of a village, the attack was then brought to a halt by artillery fire from which I got a shell splinter in my shoulder but which was not serious, and another one on my wallet directly where the Iron Cross was. I later lost the splinter. Getting out of this critical situation was difficult with healthy legs but with shot-up legs perhaps impossible. After this incident I was convinced that I should return home from the war."

by Paul Maus in "Wenn alle Brüder schweigen"

PIKZAK
11-27-2008, 11:39 PM
Hello.

Ummm…

This is something like navyson’s post, in his WW1 thread Unusual Events/Uncommon Valor, where someone goes out into no man’s land to help another human being. I wanted to post it there but according to navyson this is apparently the right place. If this is not the type of story that belongs in this thread please forward all negative comments to navyson.


I'll tell you a story and this is all you ever need to know about
war. We were at Ortona and there were places where their lines
and ours were fairly close together. Ortona is in Italy, over towards
the Adriatic side. There was some terrible fighting there.
we'd send out patrols, they'd send out patrols. At night. If
we got a chance, we'd grab a couple of them if we met, ambush,
and they'd try the same. Or we'd try and knock a few over, and so
would they. Or, and this happened, almost by gentlemen's agreement,
we'd pass by. Like ships passing in the night. Nobody
wanted to kill that night.
One night we had two patrols out and we knew they did,
and about two in the morning we hear this terrible screaming. It's
a guy screaming. On and on. I'm sure you could hear it for miles.
Up and down, high and low, screaming, screaming. I can hear it
now. Our lieutenant is with us and he says, "The poor bugger's
taken some in the belly."
Now, I'm telling you this. It went on for two hours and it
seemed like ten. You see, we thought he'd die. Not often did they
last that long. But this one wouldn't die.
Finally a guy says he's going out there. He's an Indian, and
I think he was from around Cochrane, near Calgary, or maybe his
name is Cochrane. An Indian-he gets killed about a month later.
Anyway, the lieutenant doesn't say anything and so this Indian slips.
out and Jeezus! it is one dark night and I ask the lieutenant if we
should ask for a couple of flares, just to help him, and he says no.
In about fifteen minutes, all of a sudden the screaming
stops. Just like that. Like shutting off a tap. A light switch. In
about five minutes this Cochrane comes back and he says, "Damn
it to hell. What a shitty way to earn a living."
The sergeant after a while asks who it was out there, and
Cochrane says he doesn't know. Well, was it one of our guys?
Cochrane says he doesn't know. Was it a German? He says how the
hell should he know.

Then-and you might not think there are some very
moving moments in a war in the mud and wet and shit-but
Cochrane says, "All I know was that there was a dying soldier out
there and I just put my hand on his forehead and said a little
prayer and then I put the knife right into his throat. I was just
helping a poor soldier along the way."

flamethrowerguy
12-17-2008, 06:02 PM
3046

A unique document of a rare jumping accident: On jumping out of a He 111, the jumper caught on th tail wheel of the machine when his chute opened. The jumper was carried hanging by his chute behind the plane and nobody on it could help him. A rope of ripcords wound together was pulled up higher by the air than the jumper could reach. Finally a second machine, an old two-engined Dornier 23 with a large and open cockpit in the middle was flown underneath the jumper. The crew was able to hold the man, cut him loose and pull him into the cockpit. He was lucky to be alive.

Dixie Devil
12-18-2008, 08:02 AM
Impressive flying on the part of the Dornier 23 pilot. Were the Fallschirmjägers not equipped with a reserve chute as the American Paratroopers were?

Laconia
12-29-2008, 01:35 PM
I read a story in a 1945 issue of life magazine about a soldier who was declared dead, his wife remarried, and you guessed it he showed up home when the war was over. What a bummer!

Egorka
01-05-2009, 04:01 PM
I know an other story about love during WW2...

It is told by RKKA infantry man Boris Petrovich Yzovchak : http://www.iremember.ru/content/view/696/2/lang,ru/


"I remember an incident that occured on our floor while I was in the hospital in 1942. There was a guy who lost both legs. I think he was wrom Siberia or Ural region. In one word, his wife came to visit him. But it seem he did not inform her of his condition, because when she saw him she immidiatly said:
- It is all over. I have to find a new huband.
- Well, as you wish... just kiss me farewell...
She leaned over to him and the guy bit off her nose...
- Now, you can go and get your self a new husband."

Nickdfresh
01-05-2009, 04:32 PM
I read a story in a 1945 issue of life magazine about a soldier who was declared dead, his wife remarried, and you guessed it he showed up home when the war was over. What a bummer!

That happened to Captain (later Lieutenant Colonel) Speers of "Band of Brothers'" fame. He married a British Widow only to find out later that her husband had been captured by the Germans and not killed as she had beend told. She went back to him after the War and Speers' marriage was annulled. I guess he took it pretty well and they were on good terms as he continued a relationship with their children and he was even considered to be an uncle by the other guy's children...

namvet
01-05-2009, 09:45 PM
the Trigger story brings to lite the faulty torpedoes the Americans used. it turned out to be a weak firing pin. also Running depth and the magnetic exploders problems. but it took the Navy a long time to convice the manufacture they were at fault. they, in turn, insisted the fish were fine. the sub crews didn't have enough courage. this argument almost started a seperate war.


Judgment
"It is sadly true that each modern torpedo type sent to war by the United States Navy was defective. ... The failure to test this crucial weapon prior to hostilities created the greatest technological failure in the history of American military." -- "Fire in the Sky" by Eric Bergerud.



source (source)

CliSwe
01-07-2009, 11:23 AM
Here's a story which never made the papers, but is true nonetheless. A British Army WO, wounded in the leg, mans the Vickers to cover his company's withdrawal outside Dunkirk in 1940. Taken prisoner, spends the rest of the war in a POW camp. A 6'3", 203lb (14.5st/92.3kgs) heavyweight boxer, he is reduced to leopard-crawling to the back of the German staff kitchen to retrieve potato-peelings to supplement starvation rations. He returns home at war's end a sick, embittered man, weighing 140lbs (10st/64kgs) ... to find his wife has set up house with a well-fed young Italian POW. Mayhem ensues: even in his starved condition, he is still able to throw the Italian boy out of the house. A week later, he breaks his brooding silence to tell his wife he forgives her. Their marriage is repaired; he becomes a successful businessman, and they stay together till the end (both now I think deceased).

Cheers,
Cliff

Egorka
01-16-2009, 05:16 PM
Continuing the issue of relashioships during the war.
Here is an account of a British POW in German captivity:

http://www.pegasusarchive.org/pow/frames.htm
"It was always wonderful to get a letter from home but one sad part of this was for those with wives and fiances was the prospect that they might write them a ‘Dear John’ letter. This was obviously depressing for some as they were powerless to do anything about it. Even so there was a dark humour of sorts in this situation, the funniest letter I heard of went something like this - Dear John, We hope you are well and getting along O K I’m now staying with your father, we married a couple of weeks ago. Love mum."

:)

Schuultz
01-16-2009, 07:30 PM
I remember a wartime story my old parish priest told me once:

As far as I know, he was around 19, without any battle experience when he walked through an occupied town in France, 1944, and saw something suspicious in a tree just at the outskirts. When he moved in closer, he saw that there was a scout sitting in the tree, observing the road leading towards the town center.
When my Priest moved up to get a closer look at the guy sitting in the tree, the American scout heard him and, when he realized that there was a German soldier watching him, turned around and moved to grab his sidearm. My Priest, in a reflex move, fired his rifle at the American without really aiming. Hit in the leg, the man slipped of the branch he was sitting on and fell off the tree.
Lying on the floor, the soldier begged for mercy, but my Priest was only horrified at what he did to the soldiers leg, which, I assume, was bleeding pretty badly. He walked up to the soldier, kneed down next to him, and took care of the American's wound with his First-Aid kit.
He then surrendered to the wounded American, because, as Father Blesi explained to me, he knew that the Americans were soon going to crush their little outpost and he didn't believe in the War. Following this, he practically carried him back to the American HQ, where the GIs were stunned to see an armed, healthy German soldier carrying a wounded and unarmed GI to whom he had surrendered.
Thinking about it, it was pretty stupid from him to keep his rifle, he could have easily been shot by some trigger-happy Idiot who only saw a German with a rifle.

Of course I have no idea how accurate that story is, of course it's possible that he just made up the entire story, but I simply don't see a reason why old Father Blesi should have ever lied to me about that...

Valkyrie
06-23-2010, 06:37 PM
There is the story of the SS Ardmore a ship with cattle that sailed from Cork,Ireland in November,1940.It tragically sunk with the loss of all hands after hitting a mine.The Ardmore was enroute to Fishguard.I would invite anyone to research this story,it is fascinating.Only three bodies were ever recovered.One man who was due to sail on the Ardmore was asked by a friend could he take his place as he needed extra money,the man agreed,and his friend went down with the ship.There are many more personal stories attached to the sinking.

forager
07-13-2010, 07:44 AM
Friend of mine was 517th Airborne during the war and was assigned to some laison folks at the end.

They flew to Denmark and oversaw some Luftwaffe surrender.
"there was a field full of brand new jets."
They re-armed the Germans to keep order among a bunch of released Russian POWs who were causing problems.

They had lots of trouble with Russians in Berlin and a number of firefights.
They fished 37 dead Russians out of the river one morning. .
When contacted, their CO responded he did not want to be bothered with such things.

I grew up surrounded by vets and old timers, family and neighbors
Listening to them encouraged me to get out and have adventures of my own.
A practice I highly recommend.

royal744
07-15-2010, 06:33 PM
In the 1950s, a classmate stood up and told the rest of the class that his father was a fighter pilot during WW2, and that he would fire his guns at the church bells in villages to warn the villagers that he was about to start a strafing run. Even back then as a young student I recognized this as a huge load of horse puckey palmed off by a father on his child. In my experience, many people who actually experienced war first hand really don't like to talk about it much.

muscogeemike
09-30-2010, 11:10 PM
There is a Photo of a Sgt. Manuel Alcantara, who is credited with jumping into N. Africa and Sicily with the 82d Airborne then being discharged from the US Army to serve in the Mexican Air Force in the Philippines during WWII. I have tried to get more info on him (must have a hell of a story) but have had no luck.

“If people concentrated on the really important things in life, there’d be a shortage of fishing poles.” Doug Larson

muscogeemike
09-30-2010, 11:37 PM
Ah, our Russian allies! In early 1945 Russian Yak 9's attacked a flight of US P-38's (I think over Rumania)-score P-38's 7, Yak's 2. Read about OSS agents jumping into Manchuria at the end of the war and their dealings with the Japanese and Russians.

“The only crime worse than burning books is not reading them” -and Less than 60% of Americans will read a book this year (1999).

bradleyl30
05-22-2012, 12:32 PM
This was a story that was posted as a link on the picture site. The link doesn't seem to work, anymore.

The person being interviewed below is a recently promoted young Captain of the 1st SS Liebstandarte Panzer Division.

November 1944 - Michael D Wonsower

Part 1:

We received three fresh panzer from the train depot.
I still have my original crew from Normandy, but I have all fresh crews with the other two panzer.
They are kids.
The oldest is 17. I don't have time to get acquainted.
I stand them to attention and holler at them,
"Follow Orders! drivers, if you start taking hits and your commander chickens out drive behind me!
My front is always to the enemy! Understand?" They all snapped in unison, "Jawohl mine Hauptsturmfuhrer!"
I was terribly impressed. I would have to keep a close eye on my chicks and keep them safe.
I traded my experienced gunner and loader for the two young commanders who were obviously disappointed.
They would prove themselves first.
We drove out of the depot to the command post.
It was a large palatial mansion, Louis 14th or something. GeneralOberst "Sep" awaited with my orders.
From the road as we approached I could see him standing at the top of the steps to the entrance-way with map in hand.
There was a loop driveway obviously no one had driven a tank on before. Our tracks demolished the asphalt driveway and churned it up.
My driver skidded the 45 ton vehicle to park at the base of the steps.
"So much for the driveway." said generaloberst Sepp with his usual
"I don't give a ####" attitude.
My men started laughing and I just smiled. It was good they were laughing.
Sepp stepped up onto the track as my radio operator leaned out of his hatch to give him a hand up. He pulled himself on deck and came around the turret to the commanders cupola.
"How-ya doing kid?" said Sep with his gruff grandpa voice.
"Still here." I answered.
GeneralOberst Sepp looked at me and shook his head, "There ain't many left are there kid?" I just looked at him and shrugged my shoulders, "I was never very good at math, but this equation is simple; more and more of them and fewer and fewer of us."
Sepp gave me a tired glance, "You got that right kid." We heard an aircraft near by and everyone was heads up looking for it. Sepp continued, "....It wont be long now."
The general showed me the defencive position we had to hold. It was a bend in the road which came off a forested hill turning from North-South to East-west.
"You only have to hold them as long as you can, if they choose to come down this way. We think they are going to push straight east on the other side of the hill, but if they come this way it leads them back to the train depot, and what's left of 1st Panzer division is waiting to load.
They are in no shape for a fight, and we need to hold the depot until we can all get the hell out of here."
As we went down the road to our position a half-track overloaded with about 18 panzer-grenadiers, our infantry support pulled beside us.
Their commander was a captain I had served with in the east. He was a good man and a courageous officer.
I was glad he was along with us, and not surprised he was still alive.
We came to the turn in the road and right away my second tank, a brand new "Panther" breaks down with a failed transmission.
It's always the transmission! I order the crew to stay with the vehicle to cover our rear.
The half-track pulled off the road beside it for protection.
The panzer-grenadiers dismounted and their captain climbed up to me were I briefed him on our mission.
We turned into the forest as the grenadiers took cover on either side of the road.
They set up three machine-gun nests and laid out their "panzerfausts" which are hand held anti tank weapons.
These men were seasoned veterans.
They were gaunt and tired, but acted in a manner which showed me they still had fight in them.
I pulled the tanks behind a huge fallen tree which gave us a hull down firing position, facing the hill.
It was after seven A.M. From my experience if the Americans were going to attack, it would be exactly at the top of the hour, so it would be 8, or 9 o'clock.
I watched as the captain of the panzer-grenadiers distributed Benzedrine to his men. We had this in place of food.
About 7:30 it started to snow.
There was about an inch on the ground already, and we welcomed this as it was adding to our camouflage. This covered the evidence of our panzer-grenadiers having dug in.
I wanted it to snow harder. I wanted it to snow forever.
Snow had a way of stopping the world.
If they were planning to come this way, maybe they would call it off.
The captain of our infantry support waved to me and cupped his ear.
I listened intently and could hear the sound of vehicles coming from the top of the hill.
We all had a feeling of apprehension. It was a bad defensive position.
If the Americans took up position on the top of the hill and spotted us,
they could pick us off from there and we would be mince-meat.
I radioed the infantry captain to fire on my order,
and told the other panzer get ready for action.
I told the disabled vehicle on the road to stand by, any American vehicles that got passed us would be their target.
At 7:55 the Americans opened up with artillery.
105mm rounds began impacting and exploding before us at the base of the hill.
This was reassuring. They had not ranged us which meant they did not know we were here, yet!
At 8:00 the barrage ceased. Now it would begin.
I tipped my binoculars to view the top of the hill.
Marching down the hill in two columns were four platoons, about 80 men. Behind them, single file were four Sherman tanks.
The Americans supported their infantry with their tanks,
while we supported our tanks with our infantry.
I radioed the commander of my companion tank to target the lead Sherman, as we would target the one bringing up the rear,
thereby trapping the other two in the middle.
The first of the American infantry was almost upon my hidden panzer-grenadiers.
I gave the order to open fire.
The first platoon of Americans was completely cut down, while all the rest dove for cover on either side of the road.
The first Sherman tank had reached the base of the hill.
I ordered my loader armor piercing.
My companion panzer fired upon the lead Sherman with a high explosive round, blowing the sand bag protection off of it's hull.
A moment later it sent it an armor piercing sabot.
The Sherman tank blew completely to pieces, all it's ammo ignited at once. My gunner zeroed in on the Sherman bringing up the rear.
It was still on the hillside on an angle to us, displaying the thin armor of it's turret top and deck.
My gunner let loose the sabot which penetrated between the hull and turret.
The turret blew high into the air and fell on-top of the third Sherman.
The two remaining Sherman tried to escape by turning off the road, one to the left, one to the right.
The one on the right fell over on its side and rolled several times before coming to a stop upside down, it's tracks still rolling in the air like a helpless tortoise.
The one on the left tried to take up a firing position but was becoming bogged down as it's tracks churned up the soft earth of the hillside beneath it. It fired a wild round before my companion left it a burning wreck.
Our infantry was now engaged in a fierce fire fight with the remaining American infantry.
I can never forget what happened next.
The Americans opened up with artillery again.
The howitzer rounds fell short of our position, onto the Americans who were pinned down by our machine-guns.
Trying to run from their own artillery they were cut down.
I gave the order to cease fire.
It was horrendous to watch, but I had to.
When the barrage ended, it was silent, then the cries of the wounded drifted toward us.
I stood up in the copula and looked to my infantry captain.
He stood from his position and looked at me, just nodding his head in disbelief.
My head set crackled as my former gunner, and now commander alerted me to movement at the crest of the hill before us.
I looked up there with my binoculars and saw four more platoons on there way down, and four more Sherman tanks behind them.
I looked to my infantry captain who signaled he was ready once more, but running low on ammo.
I radioed my starboard panzer we would handle it the same way as before.
As the American infantry passed the burning wrecked Sherman tanks they began to slow down.
When they got to the base of the hill to find their fallen comrades they took cover at once,
taking up positions on either side of the road in the shell holes among the dead and wounded of the first wave.
The Sherman rolled forward, and when the first one got to the base of the hill my companion scored a hit on it and it just stopped in it's tracks without an explosion.
As its crew bailed out it was struck from behind by the second Sherman, which was crashed into by the third which was then struck from behind by the fourth.
I gave the order to fire at will and all four Sherman brewed up in a pyroclastic inferno.

bradleyl30
05-22-2012, 12:32 PM
Part 2:

Once again a firefight ensued.
The Americans this time began advancing on our position, stealthily moving forward crawling from shell hole to shell hole and using the uneven terrain as cover.
This time my infantry captain radioed me. They were out numbered four to one and were running out of ammunition.
I was about to order him to withdraw when to our astonishment the Americans opened up with artillery again.
They had ranged it closer to us this time, right on top of their own advancing infantry, all over again!
"My God!" I gasped over the radio for all to hear.
When the barrage lifted once more we were stunned by the horror of it.
We just could not sit there and do nothing, in silent agreement my tank crews dismounted and panzer-grenadiers rose from their positions and we went to the aid of the Americans.
By now the American artillery spotters on top of the hill saw what had happened.
They also saw that we were lending aid to their fallen comrades.
A jeep came down the hill flying a white flag of truce with several officers and medics, followed by two trucks with more medics and supplies.
It was sublime. German and American soldiers side by side aiding the wounded.
We shared cigarettes and my men were treated to c-rations, which was the first food we had in several days.
In the end we helped the Americans load their wounded.
They went up the hill and did not come back that day. Out of ammo, and exhausted, we abandoned the position.

When we tried to leave this position, first the brand new Panther tank on my left lost it's transmission going into reverse.
We managed to get our panzer onto the road.
As we pulled up to the panzer we had left on the road, the transmission on our own panzer failed.
It is a little known fact that more German tanks were lost during the Second World War due to mechanical failure, and not enemy fire.
We had to scuttle three brand new Panther Tanks.

royal744
06-04-2012, 09:29 PM
When I was a freshman in college, I had a summer job with Western Electric working in a small neighborhood Bell Telephone switch office. This was around 1962 or 63. There were only a few employees manning the office. I got to know the older employees during breaks. They would tell stories while we played dominoes. One of the older men said that he had served in the merchant marine during WWIi. He said the last time he served in the merchant marine was on a run to Murmansk. His ship was torpedoed. He jumped into the freezing water and was fished out minutes later by another ship in the convoy. That ship was torpedoed too and he went into the drink again. He was pulled out of the water by a destroyer or a corvette. He said that after that he was through with the merchant marine!

Liddo-kun
11-19-2012, 07:37 AM
Registered to post this. Some things my grandpa told me on his experiences during japanese occupation of the Philippines on WWII.

He said that he used to have a vegetable garden, and sometimes passing japanese soldiers would ask for some. I asked grandpa if the soldiers just took the vegetables. He said, "the japanese paid for them".

And there's another one. Sorry, I was only a grade schooler when he told me so I can only remember a tiny bit of it. Grandpa also told me when there's a time some american soldiers are passing a bridge, but they didn't know some japanese are waiting there to ambush them. The american soldiers passing that bridge were killed.

Vonss
12-22-2012, 07:09 AM
That a British company invested in an German bullet company. British company paid for those bullets to be made by Germans and used by German soldiers, whilst at the same time, the British government sent millions of British soldiers to face the Germans which was firing British paid bullets at the British. This is the biggest reason why my grandfather (after WWII) packed up my grandmother, my father, his sister and migrated to Australia from the UK. And he was very anti Royal too!

Cuts
06-13-2013, 01:07 AM
That a British company invested in an German bullet company. British company paid for those bullets to be made by Germans and used by German soldiers, whilst at the same time, the British government sent millions of British soldiers to face the Germans which was firing British paid bullets at the British. This is the biggest reason why my grandfather (after WWII) packed up my grandmother, my father, his sister and migrated to Australia from the UK. And he was very anti Royal too!

Fascinating.
Do you have any links to this story ?

pdf27
06-13-2013, 02:21 AM
Don't be silly, vonss (in her many incarnations) never has sources :P

Vonss
06-13-2013, 05:13 AM
Its true. My father told me that story. He has the details, I have to wait until he gets home.

Here some other stories (Not sure if my story is in there)

http://libcom.org/library/allied-multinationals-supply-nazi-germany-world-war-2