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gumalangi
03-02-2008, 08:27 AM
Lets starts a quiz of someone who was important, influental and/or greatly acknowledged by both side of the warring parties.
And please keep it as General as possible as this might help people likes me to know on who did what that time.

Hint: He fought and lost, and his country was lost, but he kept fighting

gumalangi
03-11-2008, 08:08 AM
Seems no one fond of Mr Wladyslaw Anders from Poland,..

perhaps the next one,.. a big name for pacific theatre

Major Walter Schmidt
03-11-2008, 09:11 AM
Nimitz?

George Eller
03-11-2008, 01:04 PM
-

Admiral Raymond Ames Spruance

-

George Eller
03-11-2008, 01:14 PM
-

Member of Admiral Nimitz staff (CINCPAC) in PTO:

http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/1723/emelr3.jpg

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gumalangi
03-11-2008, 04:58 PM
Yes Indeed,.. Admiral Raymond Spruance,. he was suggesting to contfront Yamato with American's battleships during the final stage of War in Pacific,. but was turned downed in favor to aerial attack,. supposed to be the last great sea battle,.

next one,.. a big name in inteligent world (no,. he is not james bond)

Drake
03-11-2008, 05:05 PM
Wilhelm Canaris, Head of the Abwehr ;)

gumalangi
03-12-2008, 03:24 AM
oops,.. fast finger virus,.. sorry for the ignorance george,.. guys lets stick with the fine looking gentlement posted by George Eller,..

gumalangi
03-13-2008, 03:17 AM
hey george,. any other hint perhaps,.. ;)

George Eller
03-13-2008, 08:36 AM
hey george,. any other hint perhaps,.. ;)
-

Hi gumalangi,

That was a hard one as he was not a prominent public figure while he served for three years on the staff of Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, Commander in Chief, United States Pacific Fleet (CINCPAC), as Assistant Gunnery and Anti-submarine Training Officer. In addition, he analyzed actions and wrote CINCPAC’s war reports during the first part of this tour of duty.
(He had the rank of Captain during that time).

Rear Admiral Ernest M. Eller
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_M._Eller

http://img137.imageshack.us/img137/1723/emelr3.jpg


Ernest McNeill Eller (born in Marion, Virginia, on 23 January 1903 - died in Annapolis, Maryland on 30 July 1992), was a Rear Admiral in the United States Navy, who served as Director of Naval History, Naval History Division, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations from 1956 to 1970.

Naval career

Graduated and commissioned an Ensign on 4 June 1925, Eller rose to the rank of Captain in 1944, to date from 20 July 1943, and served in the temporary rank of Commodore from 30 September 1946 until 1 December 1947. On 1 April 1954 he was transferred to the Retired List of the US Navy as a Rear Admiral.

He served in USS Utah until 14 June 1926, when he reported to the Naval Torpedo Station, Newport, Rhode Island, for instruction. On 3 January 1927 he joined USS Texas and served on board that battleship until 28 May 1927. Following instruction in submarines at the Submarine Base, New London, Connecticut, he served successively from February 1928 to April 1932 in USS S-33 and USS Utah For the next three years he had duty at the United States Naval Academy in the Department of English and History and the Executive Department. During that period, he earned a Master of Arts degree in Psychology at George Washington University, Washington, DC.

During his next period of sea duty, he organized and conducted the Fleet Machine Gun School in USS Utah, in which he served until May 1938. He then returned to the Naval Academy for duty in the Departments of English and History, and Ordnance and Gunnery. From September 1940 until May 1941 he served as Assistant Naval Attaché in London, England, and as Observer with the British Home Fleet for radar, anti-aircraft, and other wartime technical developments.

After brief duty in the Fleet Training Division and Bureau of Ordnance, developing anti-aircraft training and weapons, he was ordered to USS Saratoga (CV-3), and served as her gunnery officer until May 1942. He was on board that aircraft carrier when she made her high-speed run from San Diego, California, to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, with urgently needed plane and pilot replacements immediately after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. He was also on board when USS Saratoga (CV-3) was torpedoed in January 1942 while on her third operational foray into the Marshall Islands and Midway Island areas.

He served for the next three years on the staff Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, Commander in Chief, United States Pacific Fleet (CINCPAC), as Assistant Gunnery and Anti-submarine Training Officer. In addition, he analyzed actions and wrote CINCPAC’s war reports during the first part of this tour of duty.

He was awarded the Legion of Merit with Combat “V.” The citation follows in part:

For exceptionally meritorious conduct…while attached to the staff of the Commander in Chief, United States Pacific Fleet and Pacific Ocean Areas, during operations against enemy Japanese forces in the Pacific War Area from May 1942 to April 1945. Analyzing war reports and developing, expanding and supervising all types of training, particularly anti-aircraft, anti-submarine, amphibious and shore bombardment, (he) participated in landings on Makin and Okinawa and in other combat operations which led to improved methods and development of new weapons. In his constant attention to improvements in weapons and armament of his ships and in his supervision of Fleet ammunition supply, he rendered vital service in developing and maintaining the combat readiness of the Fleet…

During the summer and fall of 1945, he commanded the attack transport USS Clay, participating in three occupation moves into Japan and China. From late in December 1945 until March 1946, he served as District Public Information Officer, Twelfth Naval District, San Francisco, California. He reported in April 1946 to the Office of Public Information, Navy Department, Washington, DC, to serve as Deputy Director and on 31 July 1946 assumed the duties of Director of Public Information. He was promoted to the temporary rank of Commodore on 30 September 1946.

Selected to attend the course at the National War College, Washington, DC, which convened on 30 August 1948, he completed the course and reported in June 1949 for duty in the Staff Planning Section of the Joint Staff, Joint Chiefs of Staff. In this duty he accompanied the Joint Chiefs of Staff to the member countries of NATO establishing plans for the military structure of that organization. A year later, at the outbreak of the Korean War, he became Commander, Middle East Force, in the Persian Gulf – Indian Ocean area. He assumed command of USS Albany (CA-123) on 14 May 1951, and in April 1952 he was assigned to the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, International Affairs Division. Late in 1953 he was hospitalized and on 1 April 1954 was transferred to the Retired List of the Navy.

On 15 September 1956 he was recalled to active duty as Director of Naval History, Naval History Division and Curator of the Navy Department, Washington, DC, and served as such until relieved of active duty on 23 January 1970.

-

This one is probably easier.

http://img228.imageshack.us/img228/7530/doaej7.jpg

A prominent Italian political and military figure during the 1930's and early WWII.

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gumalangi
03-13-2008, 12:47 PM
Prince Amedeo

i knew him,. as i remember ,..lion of the dessert,.. he was the recce pilot for Marshall Graziani yes?;)

George Eller
03-13-2008, 01:23 PM
Prince Amedeo

i knew him,. as i remember ,..lion of the dessert,.. he was the recce pilot for Marshall Graziani yes?;)
-

You are correct :)

Prince Amedeo, 3rd Duke of Aosta
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amedeo%2C_3rd_Duke_of_Aosta

He was featured in the movie Lion of the Desert, but I am not sure if he was the recce pilot...good movie though.

Your turn. :)

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gumalangi
03-13-2008, 03:19 PM
I thought i saw him reporting to graziani when his plane has landed,..

but anyway,. this person is one of the most decorated Japanese skippers,.. (the display over his chest is quite self-explain :) )

Major Walter Schmidt
03-13-2008, 04:04 PM
Yamamoto?

George Eller
03-13-2008, 05:07 PM
Prince Amedeo

i knew him,. as i remember ,..lion of the dessert,.. he was the recce pilot for Marshall Graziani yes?;)
-

You are correct :)

Prince Amedeo, 3rd Duke of Aosta
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amedeo%2C_3rd_Duke_of_Aosta

He was featured in the movie Lion of the Desert, but I am not sure if he was the recce pilot...good movie though.

Your turn. :)

-

I thought i saw him reporting to graziani when his plane has landed,..

but anyway,. this person is one of the most decorated Japanese skippers,.. (the display over his chest is quite self-explain :) )
-

Hi gumalangi,

Prince Amedeo may have been the recce pilot in the movie Lion of the Desert...it's just been so long since I watched the movie that I can't say for sure, but you may be right. :)

I'll watch it again (I have the DVD). ;)

-

gumalangi
03-14-2008, 03:28 AM
Yamamoto?


No Major,.. he is not him,.. he was a skipper,. not a Grand Admiral:mrgreen:

gumalangi
03-16-2008, 03:34 AM
Mochitsura Hashimoto


Hashimoto commanded of the Japanese submarine I-58 which sank the USS Indianapolis (CA-35) on July 30, 1945. The sinking of the Indianapolis ultimately cost the lives of 879 of the cruiser's 1,196-man crew — the worst single at-sea loss of life in the history of the U.S. Navy

Next one:

Red Army has two big names,. the other guy and this guy.. who is possibly this guy

Major Walter Schmidt
03-16-2008, 03:43 AM
Whas it K-something?

gumalangi
03-16-2008, 04:04 AM
if you think,. you have it in mind,. let it out man,..

Major Walter Schmidt
03-16-2008, 05:38 PM
Konstantin Rokossovsky?
Ivan Konev?

gumalangi
03-16-2008, 11:57 PM
it is the second name,. your turn

Major Walter Schmidt
03-17-2008, 10:05 AM
Note the helmet.

gumalangi
03-18-2008, 07:57 AM
I gave up on the helmet,.. ;)

Major Walter Schmidt
03-18-2008, 09:45 AM
Hint: the aircraft is german. The plane is a prototype.

Major Walter Schmidt
03-18-2008, 03:06 PM
BIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIG hint: The aircraft is the Ho229 V2.

Panzerknacker
03-18-2008, 09:36 PM
Teorically a helmet for high altitude flying....:roll:

gumalangi
03-18-2008, 09:57 PM
i know the aircraft is

Rising Sun*
03-19-2008, 12:40 AM
Erwin Ziller, test pilot who died testing it.

Major Walter Schmidt
03-19-2008, 10:11 AM
yes. it is ziller. RS* ou go next.

Rising Sun*
03-19-2008, 06:02 PM
http://img411.imageshack.us/img411/8076/quiznj8.jpg

gumalangi
03-20-2008, 02:57 AM
Colonel Tsuji Masanobu, was a tactical genius and a master of improvisation

Rising Sun*
03-20-2008, 04:50 AM
Colonel Tsuji Masanobu, was a tactical genius and a master of improvisation

Well done.

In addition to what you say, Tsuji was also very brave; hugely energetic; committed to the IJA's "fascist" (not necessarily Japan's) cause and interests; treacherous (in plotting to murder PM Konoye); brutal (such as reportedly eating livers of dead enemy and being involved in directing the murder of thousands of Singapore Chinese); deceitful (notably pretending higher command had ordered executions of American prisoners in the Philippines when he passed those supposed orders on to officers senior to him), very, very dangerous; all over the SWPA in the early part of the war and from Nomonhan to Burma and everywhere in between in the whole war with China and the Allies; one of the nastiest pieces of work to come out of the IJA with extraordinary influence for his relatively low rank; and duly rewarded by being overwhelmingly elected to the Diet after spending a few years in hiding to avoid trial as a war criminal.

But he wasn't always as good as is sometimes claimed. For example, Yamashita double checked Tsuji's analysis of bridges in Malaya by sending in another officer who showed that Tsuji had badly underestimated the number of bridges, with river crossings crucial to the Japanese advance, and he buggered up a major operation in Guadalcanal very nicely.

Your turn.

gumalangi
03-20-2008, 10:17 AM
Hint: One of the bloodiest battles in Europe

Major Walter Schmidt
03-21-2008, 07:53 PM
skorzeny?

gumalangi
03-21-2008, 08:22 PM
no man,. look at the attributes,..
another Hint: this not a german in enemy's uniform ;)

gumalangi
03-23-2008, 05:42 AM
General Henry Duncan Graham "Harry" Crerar was the commander of 1st Canadian Army, and participated in the Falaise Pocket.

Next one:

Hint: Commander of a 'unique' and yet outstanding Axis division

Librarian
04-03-2008, 08:15 AM
General Agustín Muñoz Grandes, commander of the Blue Division (Division Azul), my dear Mr. Gumalangi. Please, just follow this link:

http://www.flamesofwar.com/Portals/0/all_images/Historical/Stalingrad/Espana-Azul-Grandes.jpg

And here you have something more about aforementioned unit, with a number of additional pictures as well:

http://sweb.cz/fremd/c4.htm

gumalangi
04-04-2008, 04:28 AM
Much of thanks for the links,. very informative I would say,.

Please have your turn.. :)

Librarian
04-04-2008, 08:11 AM
Oh, not at all, my dear Mr. Gumalangi – you know, this short intellectual games actually are representing an almost perfect way for factual improvement and recapitulation of your knowledge about certain issues. :)

Therefore tell me, please: who is this person?

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/0005.jpg

gumalangi
04-04-2008, 10:06 AM
May I have a hint?

I think he was a russian pilot,. and is it a Hero of Soviet union star? Does the picture being edited part of his attributes? I thought I saw a victoria cross down there.

Thanks

gumalangi
04-04-2008, 10:09 AM
Oh, not at all, my dear Mr. Gumalangi – you know, this short intellectual games actually are representing an almost perfect way for factual improvement and recapitulation of your knowledge about certain issues. :)

Therefore tell me, please: who is this person?

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/0005.jpg


I meant the pictures,.. very nice

Librarian
04-07-2008, 12:22 PM
No, my dear Mr. Gumalangi – he is not a pilot! On the contrary, all his life this personality brilliantly served in the Soviet armored units… ;)

gumalangi
04-13-2008, 11:55 PM
Mikhail Katukov

The most talented tactician of sovyet armoured commander

Librarian
04-14-2008, 02:30 AM
Bravo, my dear Mr. Gumalangi! Presented personality really is Mikhail Efimovich Katukov. My sincerest congratulations! Please, proceed. :D

gumalangi
04-15-2008, 03:37 AM
He lost his battle,.. but it was a graveyard to the victor

Librarian
04-16-2008, 09:27 AM
And the answer is: General Bernard Cyril Freyberg. Here you have his I WW photo, taken back there in France, when he was just a colonel within Worcestershire Regiment:

http://www.worcestershireregiment.com/img/Colonel_Freyberg_VC.jpg

gumalangi
04-16-2008, 10:03 AM
You are correct Sir,.. have your turn

Librarian
04-17-2008, 10:11 AM
Thank you, my dear Mr. Gumalangi. So here we have another exploratory task: who is this WW 2 celebrity? Yes - a German officer that gave us an everlasting example that pure knowledge, unrestrained astuteness, and rationally based intuition are much more important elements of the national war effort than implausible strategic speculations, or incessant pondering about tactics.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/00008.jpg

Churchill
04-17-2008, 04:30 PM
A guy with a Hitler mustach... Hahaha...

Librarian
04-17-2008, 04:51 PM
But much more deeply admired and truly respected by British officers and different governmental professionals, my dear Mr. Prime Minister, than any other political personality in Germany… A real-life example of an principled German officer and a true Gentleman! ;)

Churchill
04-18-2008, 03:17 PM
Sounds like Rommel, but his picture must have been posted here many, many times before, so I'm guessing it's not him... And I'm undoubtably correct... =)

Librarian
04-22-2008, 12:29 PM
No, definitely not, my dear Mr. Prime Minister – Rommel never served within German Air Force, and this personality actually fits in category "Luftwaffe generals and leaders". :)

Librarian
04-25-2008, 05:20 PM
Please, my dear gentlemen: don’t be overwhelmed with these basically amusing historical tasks! We are here because we do have some fun trying to separate the personal ropes, which the history had tied together, if I may say so. Otherwise… the game is not worth the candle!

Anyhow, here is another tip for you: just listen very carefully to that refrain contained in this old, once upon a time highly popular German song that has caught on. Proper enlightenment will be almost immediately available. Therefore here is the link: just listen, think about… Nuremberg in March of 1944… and - enjoy the game! :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wYwZ77qLMUM&feature=related

Churchill
04-27-2008, 09:23 PM
No, definitely not, my dear Mr. Prime Minister – Rommel never served within German Air Force, and this personality actually fits in category "Luftwaffe generals and leaders". :)

Thanks for the hint, I can't tell by the uniforms, they look mostly the same to me...

gumalangi
04-28-2008, 01:46 AM
I listened the song over and over again,. despite that it is a nice song,. comparable to edith piaf i would say,.. i still cant get a clue,..

Cheers

gumalangi
04-29-2008, 05:55 AM
My kind Sir,.. would you mind put us out of misery, and have a next person,.. not to difficult if i may request,.. :)

Churchill
04-29-2008, 03:14 PM
Yeah, I agree with you.

Librarian
05-28-2008, 09:20 PM
Oh, my dear Mr. Gumalangi – so sorry for the late reply, as well as for all those inconveniences you have been through. :(

Here is the answer: General Wolfgang Martini, commanding German Air Force Signals and Radar (General der Luftnachrichtentruppe), described by prominent Sir Robert Watson Wat as a ..."shy, modest, charming, very perfect gentleman". Here you have the link:

http://books.google.hu/books?id=uYgsr3exvS4C&pg=PA78&lpg=PA78&dq=General+Wolfgang+Martini&source=web&ots=AlJzH8oeIG&sig=uNAhpZGvcsE39mje8_qwhdfP2sI&hl=en

Your turn! Please, proceed. ;)

gumalangi
05-29-2008, 11:48 PM
Mr Librarian,.. as we were surrender on your previous person,. you still have the honor to pose your next person,..

Cheers
G

Librarian
05-30-2008, 12:01 PM
Thank you, my dear Mr. Gumalangi. Your presented benevolence testifies to the esteem in which you are held by your fellow Forum members. :)

As a token of appreciation for your kindness to me, here is another, this time probably more straightforward and amply decipherable classification assignment.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/00012.jpg

This officer probably was one of the greatest naval tacticians in WW 2, and without any doubt one of the war's most capable officers, personality endowed with both ingenuity and courage, character capable to achieve the impossible, in spite of enemy’s advantage in force, surprise, and technology. A true gentleman - deeply admired by his enemies, and vastly ill-liked by his colleagues and superiors due to his honest and truthful criticism.

gumalangi
05-30-2008, 02:43 PM
ok,.. the face is reminding me of mitsuo fuchida,. however,. strory,. chuichi nagumo,.
so he must be not one of them,. :)

lemme do some googling,. however Mr Rising Sun, provided he is around and checked on this quiz,. should able to solve this person in a matter of minutes,.

Cheers
G

B5N2KATE
06-01-2008, 05:20 AM
Genda?

gumalangi
06-01-2008, 12:03 PM
I think he is not Minoru San

gumalangi
06-02-2008, 02:11 PM
perhaps,. mineichi koga

Librarian
06-02-2008, 07:41 PM
Alas - no, my dear gentlemen. Here is a hint for you: our mysterious guest was directly connected with light units of the Imperial Japanese Navy. :)

gumalangi
06-03-2008, 09:35 PM
Raizo Tanaka
was a bonafide genius, probably one of the finest squadron commanders of the entire war to serve on either side. He routinely defeated superior Allied forces in the Solomons

Librarian
06-06-2008, 08:55 AM
Indeed, my dear Mr. Gumalangi – our special guest star was Rear-Admiral Raizo Tanaka, one of the greatest naval tacticians in the WW 2. Your turn again! :)

gumalangi
06-06-2008, 01:25 PM
Thank you sir,

Can you please tell me on who is the next personality,.. also,. respected by both side,. almost,..

Librarian
06-08-2008, 07:13 PM
An officer in the active service during the WW2 wearing a double breasted frock-coat with capped collar? Are you absolutely sure, my dear Mr. Gumalangi? :-?

gumalangi
06-08-2008, 10:58 PM
He was active on both war,. and few other wars,. he was a military leader and political leader as well,..

another clue; in WW2 he led a country to fight against the country he fought for in WW1

Librarian
06-09-2008, 02:28 AM
I see. Well, let me guess… perhaps our mysterious personality is Baron Carl Gustav Emil Mannerheim as a Lieutenant in Russian army, wearing, naturally, the old - imperial uniform? :)

gumalangi
06-09-2008, 01:29 PM
well done Herr Librarian!,.

Have it your go

G

Librarian
06-11-2008, 03:32 AM
Vielen Dank, my dear Mr. Gumalangi!

Well, here we have an officer who personified military decisiveness and initiative, who always believed in leading from the front, who never asked his men to do something he would not do himself. A truly incomparable battle-leader, a hero and a military organizer who always kept his promise with a good sense of humor!

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/00009-1.jpg

gumalangi
06-30-2008, 10:13 AM
could it be Archibald Wavell

Cheers
G

sceadugenga
07-01-2008, 02:51 AM
Simon Fraser, Brigadier The Lord Lovat.

Librarian
07-01-2008, 02:10 PM
Indeed, my dear Mr. Sceadugenga: our special guest star was The Right Honorable Simon Christopher Joseph Fraser, 17th Lord Lovat - an noble and charmingly eccentric British officer educated at Ampleforth College and Oxford University who formed the Special Service Brigade and effectively fulfilled all his combat duties by hauling his rolled up umbrella right onto the Sword Beach, being accompanied with his piper who played the traditional Lovats' march to war, "Spaidsearachd Mhic Shimidh".

An Officer and a Gentlemen immortalized by the words he reportedly used when he approached positions of the Sixth Airborne Divison around Caen Canal - "Sorry Gentlemen we were two and a half minutes late." :D

Please, proceed – it is your turn now! ;)

pdf27
07-01-2008, 05:00 PM
Ping! I knew I recognised the face from somewhere, but just couldn't place it. For some reason I was thinking Belgium/Holland...

sceadugenga
07-02-2008, 12:11 AM
Amazingly I "recognized" him because Peter Lawford actually looked a bit like him while playing Lovat in "The Longest Day".
I'm not sure my skills are up to you guys standard but I'll have a go. (I don't suppose a picture of my Mother in her WAF uniform in 1941 would do? :-) )

sceadugenga
07-02-2008, 12:31 AM
This guy was unpopular with both the conquered people he ruled and his own government.

pdf27
07-02-2008, 01:36 AM
Looks a bit like Edward VIII!

sceadugenga
07-03-2008, 12:43 AM
Another shot.

Librarian
07-03-2008, 01:24 PM
Oh, our ill-fated attorney colleague, Dr Arthur Seyß-Inquart? But as far as I know he newer was a military leader, my dear Mr. Sceadugenga.:-?

sceadugenga
07-04-2008, 12:54 AM
Ahh.. does the mystery guest have to be a military leader? This gentleman held the rank of Reichskommissar and certainly had several thousand troops under his command including secret police but had no power over the occupying troops where he ruled.
His role would have possibly been more of a military nature than Seyss-Inquart.
Should you think he doesn't qualify I'll disqualify myself.
A final clue, the puppet head of the country he ruled is far better known than him.

Rising Sun*
07-04-2008, 04:50 AM
Josef Terboven.

Ran Norway as a Nazi civil dictator but lacked power over German troops in Norway who remained under military control.

Antagonised both Norwegians and various elements of the German leadership.

Quisling is the puppet you mentioned in your last post.

Librarian
07-04-2008, 03:51 PM
Excellent analyses, my dear Mr. Rising Sun! Please proceed – I am eager to see your personal preferentials among WW2 military leaders. :D

sceadugenga
07-05-2008, 12:48 AM
My congratulations Rising Sun.
When the war ended he committed suicide in spectacular fashion with a large amount of explosive.
The term Quisling, of course, entered the English language as an alternative to traitor to his country.

Rising Sun*
07-05-2008, 06:52 AM
He turned the tide against Japan and altered the course of Japan's intended war.


http://img366.imageshack.us/img366/7475/noanswerhereio6.jpg (http://img366.imageshack.us/my.php?image=noanswerhereio6.jpg)

Major Walter Schmidt
07-05-2008, 07:29 AM
Nmitz?

Rising Sun*
07-05-2008, 08:03 AM
Nmitz?

No.

Not even an admiral.

sceadugenga
07-05-2008, 08:48 PM
Richard Halsey Best
Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy?

Rising Sun*
07-05-2008, 10:20 PM
Richard Halsey Best
Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy?

No, but he was a Commander, USN.

Librarian
07-06-2008, 04:14 PM
Perhaps our mysterious guest is Lt. Cdr. Robert E. Dixon, who was in charge of dive bombers on the carrier Lexington in the Battle of the Coral Sea? He actually planted one of a dozen bombs that, with seven torpedoes as well, sank the ill-fated Japanese carrier Shoho.

Rising Sun*
07-06-2008, 05:18 PM
Perhaps our mysterious guest is Lt. Cdr. Robert E. Dixon, who was in charge of dive bombers on the carrier Lexington in the Battle of the Coral Sea? He actually planted one of a dozen bombs that, with seven torpedoes as well, sank the ill-fated Japanese carrier Shoho.

No.

He was a commander, not lieutenant commander, but he was pivotal to the Battle of the Coral Sea, among other events.

Librarian
07-06-2008, 08:32 PM
Well then… Perhaps that notorious air group commander on the USS Enterprise, Clarence Wade McClusky Jr, who was promoted into the rank of the Air Group Commander in April of 1942.

During the Battle of Midway, while leading his air group's bombers on June 4, 1942 he made the critical tactical decision that led to the destruction of the Japanese aircraft carriers Kaga and Akagi, thus making a vital contribution to the outcome of that pivotal battle.

On the other hand his fundamental role in the Battle of the Coral Sea is pretty questionable, because that encounter was over before USS Enterprise arrived…:-?

Another possibility is that our mysterious personality is Executive Officer of the U.S.S. LEXINGTON (CV-2), Commander Morton T. Seligman. His role in previously mentioned battle indeed was significant, and his rank is harmonized with all previously mentioned conditions.

Rising Sun*
07-06-2008, 09:53 PM
Well then… Perhaps that notorious air group commander on the USS Enterprise, Clarence Wade McClusky Jr, who was promoted into the rank of the Air Group Commander in April of 1942.

During the Battle of Midway, while leading his air group's bombers on June 4, 1942 he made the critical tactical decision that led to the destruction of the Japanese aircraft carriers Kaga and Akagi, thus making a vital contribution to the outcome of that pivotal battle.

No, not him, although the mystery man also made a vital contribution to that pivotal battle, without which McClusky would have had nothing to bomb.


On the other hand his fundamental role in the Battle of the Coral Sea is pretty questionable, because that encounter was over before USS Enterprise arrived…:-?

The mystery man wasn't at the battles of Midway or Coral Sea. He was on land at the time, making a vastly bigger contribution than he could have as a sea going officer.


Another possibility is that our mysterious personality is Executive Officer of the U.S.S. LEXINGTON (CV-2), Commander Morton T. Seligman. His role in previously mentioned battle indeed was significant, and his rank is harmonized with all previously mentioned conditions.

Not him, either.

sceadugenga
07-07-2008, 02:46 AM
Commander Eric Feldt?

sceadugenga
07-07-2008, 02:52 AM
Sorry he's RAN.

Rising Sun*
07-07-2008, 03:52 AM
Commander Eric Feldt?

You might be having one of those moments where you get elements of a name you're thinking of, but can't pull the correct one out of the memory bank.

There was indeed a RAN commander, first name Eric, whose work in the SWPA parallelled the mystery man's in the USN.

RAN Eric (being RN Eric serving with the RAN) is unknown even in many Australian military history circles. His USN mystery man counterpart is much better known but, as this question demonstrates, still generally overlooked.

Neither had anything to do with coastwatching, but they were both watchers of a sort and doing the same sort of work. And both deposed by rivals in the USN who, in RAN Eric's case, wanted him returned to the RN.

Librarian
07-07-2008, 02:09 PM
Thank you very much for that key-sentence …Neither had anything to do with coastwatching, but they were both watchers of a sort..., my dear Mr. Rising Sun. That was completely sufficient for my internal lamps. Our special guest was brilliant American naval cryptanalyst, captain Joseph John Rochefort. Bravo – that was indeed intriguing task. Besides, I am deeply rejoiced that we do share strong inclination toward intellectual achievements in war. :)

If I was right, I think that I will have certain… crypto-mathematical surprises for you. You see, actually there was someone else in this world of unobserved masterminds, who was much, much more fundamental for the Allied war effort... ;)

Rising Sun*
07-07-2008, 04:45 PM
Thank you very much for that key-sentence …Neither had anything to do with coastwatching, but they were both watchers of a sort..., my dear Mr. Rising Sun. That was completely sufficient for my internal lamps. Our special guest was brilliant American naval cryptanalyst, captain Joseph John Rochefort.

Correct.

And his reward was dismissal. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3926/is_200007/ai_n8906181/pg_1

His RAN counterpart was Eric Nave. http://www.gould.com.au/Man-of-Intelligence-Eric-Nave-p/rsn012.htm

Your turn.

Librarian
07-07-2008, 05:06 PM
Thank you. So here we have the brilliant mind outfitted with a rank of Colonel General, whose intensive, 15 years long, faithful and arduous intellectual service was beyond a shadow of a doubt truly essential for the concluding success of his country and for the entire multinational war effort.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/00019.gif

Rising Sun*
07-07-2008, 08:11 PM
Ivan Volosok, who developed the WWII Soviet cryptographic machine?

Librarian
07-08-2008, 04:30 PM
No Sir. This man indeed was a Soviet general, but he was not affianced with the cryptography. Nevertheless, his mathematical ability was truly outstanding. After all – he possessed a PhD that was accomplished and successfully defended within the branch of Systems theory. :)

sceadugenga
07-09-2008, 12:30 AM
Markian Mikhailovich Popov?

Rising Sun*
07-09-2008, 06:01 AM
My dear Librarian,

I have no idea who it is, and neither does Google. :D

I've been working on the basis of your clues that it's someone who made a major contribution leading up and during the war, culminating in the Manchurian assault in 1945, which was the biggest assault undertaken by the USSR, but in a non-battle area such as strategy or doctrine with a mathematical or systems flavour. Perhaps intelligence analysis, massed artillery assaults, logistics, or something else which brought force to bear on the enemy without being a battlefield commander or staff officer in that conflict.

Am I going in vaguely the right direction?

Librarian
07-09-2008, 05:49 PM
Markian Mikhailovich Popov?

Alas – no, my dear Mr. Sceadugenga.


I have no idea who it is, and neither does Google.

That was a good one, My dear Mr. Rising Sun! But don’t worry – our current situation in this thread is solvable! You know, like in that old Australian rhyme: Hinkle, Hinkle, Little star - Sixteens days and here you are! :D

And yes - you actually are on the right track: our mysterious personality newer was a field commander. He was a scientist who served in Army. And what he did? Well... as you know, army - as well as state - from the mathematicl point of view represents an open system, connected by dependable and always somehow interrupted transformation process of incoming resources to outcoming artifacts or actions. In a war you always do have improvisation under pressure – a constant conflict between the requirements of rational long-term policy of solutions and the daily urgency of getting by.

Burden of analyses and computation - as means for reaching the proper solution - is especially heavy in this case. However, if you know what your key performance indicators are – you will be able to make right decisions without limits of infertile and dangerous waste of time.

Basically, he mathematicaly explained how successfully decisionmakers are able to break free of past patterns, to mobilize new information, to re-examine the situation, and to chart a sound new course of action – in a word - to make optimal decision within a given system, a choice with the aim of discarding other available options that are incapable to lead to a better outcome. Huh! :roll:

In addition, it has to be said that for some mysterious reasons he was pretty undeservedly remembered in public only as a prolific mechanical engineer. Yes, it surely is a historical fact that out of some 140.000 pieces of certain… military hardware 120.000 pieces were made from his designs, but from the purely scientific point of view previously described employment was significantly more important. ;)

BTW – a couple of years ago I have had a pleasure of working with a very best scientific collaborator in my entire intellectual life. He was an Aussie - a brilliant, gifted and so old-fashionably honest personality… Mansel Ismay was his name. I don’t know what happened with him. If you have some information, my dear Mr. Rising Sun, just launch a tiny note by our PM. I am assuring yoy that that piece of information will be highly appreciated. ;)

Rising Sun*
07-10-2008, 08:31 AM
That was a good one, My dear Mr. Rising Sun! But don’t worry – our current situation in this thread is solvable! You know, like in that old Australian rhyme: Hinkle, Hinkle, Little star - Sixteens days and here you are! :D

And yes - you actually are on the right track: our mysterious personality newer was a field commander. He was a scientist who served in Army. And what he did? Well... as you know, army - as well as state - from the mathematicl point of view represents an open system, connected by dependable and always somehow interrupted transformation process of incoming resources to outcoming artifacts or actions. In a war you always do have improvisation under pressure – a constant conflict between the requirements of rational long-term policy of solutions and the daily urgency of getting by.

Burden of analyses and computation - as means for reaching the proper solution - is especially heavy in this case. However, if you know what your key performance indicators are – you will be able to make right decisions without limits of infertile and dangerous waste of time.

Basically, he mathematicaly explained how successfully decisionmakers are able to break free of past patterns, to mobilize new information, to re-examine the situation, and to chart a sound new course of action – in a word - to make optimal decision within a given system, a choice with the aim of discarding other available options that are incapable to lead to a better outcome. Huh! :roll:

In addition, it has to be said that for some mysterious reasons he was pretty undeservedly remembered in public only as a prolific mechanical engineer. Yes, it surely is a historical fact that out of some 140.000 pieces of certain… military hardware 120.000 pieces were made from his designs, but from the purely scientific point of view previously described employment was significantly more important. ;)

My dear Librarian,

I'm trying to reason this out, from a position of total ignorance (which is my preferred position as it allows me to speculate uninhibited by distracting nuisances, such as facts. :D ).

I need more clues to solve what I suspect will be, for me, an insoluble problem as my knowledge of RKKA back room boys is even worse than my knowledge of RKKA front room boys, although I have heard of somebody called Zhukov. :D

I'm focusing on the number of pieces for a clue, but I can't find a nice neat production figure for any specific item.

Using 'piece' generally could refer to vehicles or grenades or spoons or anything else, but with 140,000 pieces in an army of roughly 35 million during the war it's got to be something not very widely distributed.

'Piece' suggests artillery but I can't find anything in field guns, rocketry etc that meets that number, nor mortars.

Field radios of some sort seem a bit more probable for a mathematician but I can't find any production numbers. Or it could be AA direction systems or radar or optics or various other possibilities.

Your other clues would suggest that he designed a computer of some sort, but I can't see 140,000 of them being issued for a disproportionately small number of divisional, corps and army staffs likely to use them or, more probably, written formulae or processes for rational analysis of a problem. But that would be in some sort of document, which would not be a 'piece' in general usage of that term and would still suffer the problem of there being rather more documents created than people who needed to use them, unless an awful lot were made for training. Anyway, documents don't qualify as hardware.

So I discount these possibilities and think I need to find 140,000 items of something of a military hardware nature produced by the Soviets during The Great Patriotic War, of which 120,000 were designed by the mystery man.

Is that a reasonable deduction?


BTW – a couple of years ago I have had a pleasure of working with a very best scientific collaborator in my entire intellectual life. He was an Aussie - a brilliant, gifted and so old-fashionably honest personality… Mansel Ismay was his name. I don’t know what happened with him. If you have some information, my dear Mr. Rising Sun, just launch a tiny note by our PM. I am assuring yoy that that piece of information will be highly appreciated. ;)

It's not a name I know. I am afraid that searching Google Australia did not reduce my ingorance, which must be one of the rare occasions that has happened. :D

Librarian
07-10-2008, 06:43 PM
I need more clues to solve what I suspect will be, for me, an insoluble problem as my knowledge of RKKA back room boys is even worse than my knowledge of RKKA front room boys, although I have heard of somebody called Zhukov.

No problem, my dear Mr. Rising Sun – that’s why we are at this juncture! ;)

So here is another clue for you: our mysterious personality was also – amongst numerous additional duties! – a highly distinguished professor at the Bauman Moscow State Technical University, one of the oldest, largest and most distinguished technical universities on this planet. As a matter of fact, I think that he actually is mentioned somewhere on the university's home page:

http://www.bmstu.ru/


So I discount these possibilities and think I need to find 140,000 items of something of a military hardware nature produced by the Soviets during The Great Patriotic War, of which 120,000 were designed by the mystery man.

Is that a reasonable deduction?

Absolutely, my dear Mr. Rising Sun! And here is another tip for you: The use of those previously mentioned "pieces" dates to the early 14th century. ;)


I am afraid that searching Google Australia did not reduce my ingorance, which must be one of the rare occasions that has happened.

Oh, well… Never mind. You know, sometimes our inquiry upon our dearly beloved Google looks like that old story about the old man from Khartoum, who kept two black sheep in his room. "They remind me" – he said – "of two friends who are dead". But he never would tell us of whom... :roll:

In the meantime, as always – all the best! :)

sceadugenga
07-11-2008, 01:07 AM
Semyon Lavochkin:confused:

Rising Sun*
07-11-2008, 01:33 AM
Semyon Lavochkin:confused:

Maybe.

I've been working on the basis from the last clue that the mystery man was involved with rockets and that his design saw 120,000 units produced of a total of 140,000.

There aren't enough aircraft of a given type to get near those figures. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_production_during_World_War_II#Military_a ircraft_of_all_types , so if it's Lavochkin he must also have designed something other than aircraft.

Chevan
07-11-2008, 02:05 AM
Sorry to interrupt you , honorable intellectuals.
Who can say me who is that guy in SS-form?
http://img503.imageshack.us/img503/923/pzfinalkf1.jpg
:D

sceadugenga
07-11-2008, 06:01 AM
Gunter Grass.

Librarian
07-11-2008, 01:42 PM
No, my dear Mr. Sceadugenga – our military VIP celebrity is not Mr. Semyon Lavochkin. Mr. Rising Sun was absolutely correct in his utterly rational calculation: There aren't enough aircraft of a given type to get near those figures, so if it's Lavochkin he must also have designed something other than aircraft. :)

And no, my dear Mr. Rising Sun – not rockets but something else was introduced back there in 14th century, more precisely in 1346 in the famous battle of Crecy. ;)

However, our mysterious guest was deeply connected with the development of the Soviet solid propellant long range ballistic missiles. Nevertheless, that intellectual triumph occured only in january of 1959. :D

sceadugenga
07-12-2008, 12:20 AM
Vasiliy Gavrilovich Grabin? or Grabbin?

pdf27
07-12-2008, 04:05 AM
Spot on!
http://www.peoples.ru/military/design/vasiliy_grabin/

Rising Sun*
07-12-2008, 05:53 AM
Spot on!
http://www.peoples.ru/military/design/vasiliy_grabin/

Why?

I can't read your Russian link, but from what I can find I don't think he fits Librarian's criteria.

pdf27
07-12-2008, 05:57 AM
The text is irrelevant, look at the photos!

http://www.peoples.ru/military/design/vasiliy_grabin/grabin_35081_s.jpg
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/00019.gif

Now, they aren't identical but I think that's within the range of variation to be expected with age. Grabin was also responsible for the first Soviet solid-fuel rocket, and led an artillery design bureau during WW2.

Rising Sun*
07-12-2008, 06:09 AM
OOPS!

I deleted my last post, which preceded pdf27's post, while editing and, apparently, while pdf27 was posting his last post.

For the information of other members who might be mystified by pdf27 responding to voices he's hearing :D, I questioned whether Grabin met all of Librarian's criteria.

pdf27
07-12-2008, 06:36 AM
Not any more - using my mod superpowers I restored it :D

Rising Sun*
07-12-2008, 07:34 AM
Not any more - using my mod superpowers I restored it :D

Mein Gott!

Der ModFuhrer can turn back time!

Das ist truly the power of a superpower of the super superpower variety, or an UberModFuhrer.

Which leaves one wondering what powers might be exercised by Firefly, as the Uber UberModFuhrer mit Knight's Cross with Golden Oak Leaves, Swords, and Diamonds?

Best not to find out, methinks. :D

sceadugenga
07-12-2008, 07:42 AM
So do I get two goes for getting Gunter Grass right as well?

Rising Sun*
07-12-2008, 08:22 AM
Sorry to interrupt you , honorable intellectuals.
Who can say me who is that guy in SS-form?
http://img503.imageshack.us/img503/923/pzfinalkf1.jpg
:D

He bears a disturbing resemblance to PK, and little to the few wartime photos I've seen of Gunter Grass.

Is this a fun photo, or am I missing something here?

pdf27
07-12-2008, 08:41 AM
Is this a fun photo, or am I missing something here?
It's excellent Photoshop work by Chevan, relating to an ongoing spat in PMs. And it has nothing whatsoever to do with Günter Grass.

Rising Sun*
07-12-2008, 08:54 AM
It's excellent Photoshop work by Chevan, relating to an ongoing spat in PMs. And it has nothing whatsoever to do with Günter Grass.

Say no more!

A nod's as good as a wink to blind horse.

Know what I mean?

Nudge! Nudge!

Wink! Wink! ;)

Rising Sun*
07-12-2008, 09:14 AM
P.S.

I think this must mean that sceadugenga doesn't get bonus points for wrongly identifying PK as Gunter Grass. ;)

Anybody who makes such a bad mistake should be sent for eye testing. :)

sceadugenga
07-12-2008, 09:20 AM
Looks like him to me.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b6/Grass.JPG/200px-Grass.JPG

Rising Sun*
07-12-2008, 09:36 AM
Looks like him to me.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b6/Grass.JPG/200px-Grass.JPG



If Chevan's posted photo was actually Grass, how does it differ from what is currently known or believed of Grass and what is represented in Chevan's photo?

Rising Sun*
07-12-2008, 09:39 AM
It's excellent Photoshop work by Chevan, relating to an ongoing spat in PMs. And it has nothing whatsoever to do with Günter Grass.

How did you get the umlaut over u in Gunter?

Rising Sun*
07-12-2008, 09:45 AM
The text is irrelevant, look at the photos!

http://www.peoples.ru/military/design/vasiliy_grabin/grabin_35081_s.jpg
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/00019.gif

Now, they aren't identical but I think that's within the range of variation to be expected with age. Grabin was also responsible for the first Soviet solid-fuel rocket, and led an artillery design bureau during WW2.

Now, my dear Librarian, is this correct?

I rather hope not, because I was hoping it was a bit more obscure. (I say that largely because I haven't worked out the mystery man's identity with such confidence. :( )

pdf27
07-12-2008, 10:11 AM
How did you get the umlaut over u in Gunter?
I'd love to say it was my awesome mod superpowers, but sadly it's far more prosaic. I googled his hame, and copy-pasted his name complete with umlaut. Rather boring really.

Rising Sun*
07-12-2008, 10:46 AM
I'd love to say it was my awesome mod superpowers, but sadly it's far more prosaic. I googled his hame, and copy-pasted his name complete with umlaut. Rather boring really.

Well, dear boy, I think it might have been rather better had you not disclosed this. :D

After all, an umlaut is not something one finds on the roadside. ;)

And there I was thinking your UberMod powers had matured to a point approaching ominpotence. :rolleyes:

Librarian
07-12-2008, 04:02 PM
Now, my dear Librarian, is this correct?

Completely correct, my dear Mr. Rising Sun! Hurrah for our Mr. Sceadugenga! :D

Here you have the original snapshot that was used by me:

http://www.russia-today.ru/2005/no_04/04_victory.htm

And here, for example, is the reference about the exact number of those previously mentioned "pieces":

http://books.google.hu/books?id=dQeahlZdM7sC&pg=RA6-PA665&lpg=RA6-PA665&dq=Vasiliy+Gavrilovich+Grabin&source=web&ots=MyvnZRKtit&sig=wptZh-QCKzszwbrTYHle0A7Rsd4&hl=en&sa=X&oi=book_result&resnum=7&ct=result

All other facts are also available upon the WWW – the only thing you have to do is to use certain Bull operators during your investigation. ;)

Indeed excellent work, my dear Mr. Sceadugenga! And now, please - submit your task for us! :D

sceadugenga
07-13-2008, 06:50 AM
A whiskery one.

Rising Sun*
07-13-2008, 07:09 AM
Orde Wingate.

sceadugenga
07-13-2008, 07:45 AM
It was a bit easy wasn't it?

Rising Sun*
07-13-2008, 08:46 AM
It was a bit easy wasn't it?

Only because he happens to be in the small number of WWII people I can recognise immediately. It's hard to forget a nutcase like Wingate. :D

The new mystery man is in the centre in the front row, surrounded by his men. They distinguished themselves in their small field of military endeavour.

http://img211.imageshack.us/img211/3854/mysterymanet1.jpg

Nickdfresh
07-13-2008, 11:01 AM
He bears a disturbing resemblance to PK, and little to the few wartime photos I've seen of Gunter Grass.

Is this a fun photo, or am I missing something here?

BTW, does anyone have any more questions about why I don't want my pic on the net?

Chevan
07-13-2008, 12:23 PM
BTW, does anyone have any more questions about why I don't want my pic on the net?
Yes, me.
I still have a question why you don't want post your pics?:)
Panzerknacker like to post his pics constantly, and what's wrong with him?
Hey PZ are you all right?:)Has something happend wrong with you?May be you can't sleep any more or have lose any interes at forum?Or may be you have lost your love to Tigers and Panthers?No
You see Nick , nothing terrible happend, when you post you pics..

Chevan
07-13-2008, 12:31 PM
It's excellent Photoshop work by Chevan, relating to an ongoing spat in PMs. And it has nothing whatsoever to do with Günter Grass.
You , chap, has spoiled me all the fun:)
who did ask you to unmask it before time?
I was starting to believe myself it is a real Günter Grass's ( as said sceadugengaon) on the photo:)
I don't know how much PZ is Aryan , but he in SS uniform looks great, well except may be his strabismuss. But it wasn't my evil will, it was a original photo:)

Librarian
07-13-2008, 05:35 PM
It seems to me that our mysterious personality is Lieutenant-Colonel Ivan Lyon - DSO, MBE.

The very same photo, previously presented by you, as well as a highly recommended reading is available here:

http://www.btinternet.com/~m.a.christie/jaywicka.htm

Rising Sun*
07-13-2008, 06:11 PM
It seems to me that our mysterious personality is Lieutenant-Colonel Ivan Lyon - DSO, MBE.

The very same photo, previously presented by you, as well as a highly recommended reading is available here:

http://www.btinternet.com/~m.a.christie/jaywicka.htm

Correct.

Your turn.

Librarian
07-13-2008, 06:52 PM
Thank you, my dear Mr. Rising Sun. So here we have an officer with an unblemished career who retired being respected by everyone in his native country, who deeply esteemed his duty, who was a real tactical genius, who never hesitated to disobey direct orders if lives of his soldiers were jeopardized, and who won unambiguous admiration of his adversaries.

gumalangi
07-13-2008, 07:13 PM
Gotthard heinrici

Librarian
07-13-2008, 07:33 PM
Bravo, my dear Mr. Gumalangi! I think that your result has established a new record here! My sincerest congratulations – please, proceed. It’s your turn now. ;)

sceadugenga
07-14-2008, 12:14 AM
You , chap, has spoiled me all the fun:)
who did ask you to unmask it before time?
I was starting to believe myself it is a real Günter Grass's ( as said sceadugengan) on the photo:)
I don't know how much PZ is Aryan , but he in SS uniform looks great, well except may be his strabismuss. But it wasn't my evil will, it was a original photo:)

My dear Chevan, sceadugengan is the plural of sceadugenga and, as far as I know, there is only one of me.
Maybe the ability of a sceadugenga to shape shift causes confusion. ;)

gumalangi
07-14-2008, 12:14 AM
An honourable commander,.
he carried a suicide mission against much bigger force,.

sceadugenga
07-14-2008, 06:36 AM
James Doolittle?

gumalangi
07-14-2008, 08:08 AM
this time the resemblance from movie (alec baldwin) as the Jimmy Doolitle does not solve the mistery man,. :)

Rising Sun*
07-14-2008, 08:21 AM
this time the resemblance from movie (alec baldwin) as the Jimmy Doolitle does not solve the mistery man,. :)

I have no idea what Alec Baldwin has to do with Doolittle, but I do know who Baldwin is and if I was him I'd be offended by being mistaken for the mystery man.

Just to narrow things down, is the mystery man an Italian, or at least in an Italian uniform?

Librarian
07-14-2008, 04:29 PM
No, my dear Mr. Rising Sun, our special guest is not wearing Italian naval uniform – he is an officer of the Royal Netherlands Navy, more precisely he is Rear Admiral Karel Willem Frederick Marie Doorman.

Am I right, Mr. Gumalangi? You see, although those collar tabs are... not so highly visible on this uploaded photo we have in front of us here, his profile is sufficiently distinctive. ;)

sceadugenga
07-14-2008, 07:46 PM
this time the resemblance from movie (alec baldwin) as the Jimmy Doolitle does not solve the mistery man,. :)
Spencer Tracy played Doolittle in "Thirty Seconds over Tokyo" which was the only movie worthy of the operation.
Wiki claims the Japanese killed 250,000 Chinese while searching for downed American airmen after the raid. :shock:

flamethrowerguy
07-14-2008, 08:12 PM
I have no idea what Alec Baldwin has to do with Doolittle, but I do know who Baldwin is and if I was him I'd be offended by being mistaken for the mystery man.

Just to narrow things down, is the mystery man an Italian, or at least in an Italian uniform?

Alec Baldwin played James Doolittle in Michael Bay's movie "Pearl Harbor" from 2001

gumalangi
07-15-2008, 09:54 AM
No, my dear Mr. Rising Sun, our special guest is not wearing Italian naval uniform – he is an officer of the Royal Netherlands Navy, more precisely he is Rear Admiral Karel Willem Frederick Marie Doorman.

Am I right, Mr. Gumalangi? You see, although those collar tabs are... not so highly visible on this uploaded photo we have in front of us here, his profile is sufficiently distinctive. ;)

:),. as again,. Herr Librarian solved the unsolvable,. :),..
be honest,. i am not good with photoshop,. or anything like it,.;P

Librarian
07-15-2008, 04:50 PM
Thank you, my dear Mr. Gumalangi. You know, uniforms are sometimes my only clue during this intriguing assignment. That’s why I think that this task will be much easier for you. After many a days we finally do have a rare color photo for our guidance! :)

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/000030.jpg

Our mysterious personality always possessed truly elevated mental power, indubitable personal courage, innovative spirit and skilfull leadership during the war, but all these virtues were insufficent, because he never got a chance to receive the credit which was his due.

sceadugenga
07-16-2008, 09:48 PM
That uniform looks like something out of the Crimean War.

Librarian
07-16-2008, 10:35 PM
Oh, my goodness! Well… it seems to me that full dress uniforms, as a special military outfits reserved for parades or other ceremonial occasions are not so widely known, even if they were photographed in 1943. :)

pdf27
07-17-2008, 01:28 AM
The gold braid, etc. looks rather French, but I thought they were all blue rather than red. Sadly, the face means nothing at all to me.

Librarian
07-17-2008, 06:57 PM
My Lord, what happened with this world of Yours? Genuine Englishmen are no longer capable to recognize their own landmarks, eternal symbols of the fertile Empire, everlasting pride of the times when foxes or hares have had the honor of being chased by so accomplished hunters, unseen from the time of Nimrod to the present… :cry:

Bold remnants of the age when …the road was just a gypsy's ribbon, looping the purple moor.The redcoat troops came marching, marching, the redcoat troops came marching up to the old inn door."

O tempora, o mores! :roll:

gumalangi
07-17-2008, 09:08 PM
The Person's face reminds me of bruce willis :)

this definetely not from the movie Die Hard,. :)

pdf27
07-18-2008, 01:29 AM
My Lord, what happened with this world of Yours? Genuine Englishmen are no longer capable to recognize their own landmarks, eternal symbols of the fertile Empire, everlasting pride of the times when foxes or hares have had the honor of being chased by so accomplished hunters, unseen from the time of Nimrod to the present… :cry:
Hmmm... that's an unsubtle hint if ever I saw one. Still, I've not seen No.1 dress with collar boards like that on a British uniform before, although I have seen very similar ones on some French uniforms.

Rising Sun*
07-18-2008, 06:43 AM
The photo isn't like others I've seen of him and the features aren't all quite the same but, allowing for lighting and angles and a studio portrait, the drooping right eyelid is reminiscent of Bill Slim. So I'll offer Bill Slim as the answer.

Rising Sun*
07-18-2008, 09:43 AM
Hmmm... that's an unsubtle hint if ever I saw one. Still, I've not seen No.1 dress with collar boards like that on a British uniform before, although I have seen very similar ones on some French uniforms.

Whoever it is might be wearing a uniform of a British officer in some other guise, such as a Viceroy or lesser personage in India or some other place where Britain ruled or had a presence.

Librarian
07-18-2008, 02:23 PM
Hmmm... that's an unsubtle hint if ever I saw one.

Oh, thank you, my dear Mr. Pdf 27, although I have to admit - fairly and squarely! – that you are excessively generous. You know, actually I was inspired by certain judgments previously revealed by late Oliver St. John Gogarty, who – like myself – was subjected to the ultimate rigors of orthodoxy in education. :roll:


Still, I've not seen No.1 dress with collar boards like that on a British uniform before

Well, in that case just compare those magnificent gold collar tendrils with these, which are accessible here:

http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Image:Viscount_Garnet_Joseph_Wolseley.jpeg

I’m sure that everything will be much more comprehensible. :)


So I'll offer Bill Slim as the answer.

Alas, my dear Mr. Rising Sun, our mysterious personality is not The Right Honuorable Sir William Slim. However, your favorite and mine are evenly sharing the very same military rank. ;)

gumalangi
07-18-2008, 07:44 PM
John Vereker, 6th Viscount Gort

sceadugenga
07-21-2008, 01:26 AM
So two days later we still don't know.

Librarian
07-21-2008, 03:56 PM
So sorry for my late reply, honorable ladies and gentlemen, but due to some unknown technical reasons this web-site was completely unaccesible for me in last 48 hours! :-?

And yes – Mr. Gumalangi was absolutely right: late Field Marshal John Standish Surtees Prendergast Vereker, The Right Honorable 6th Viscount Gort was our mysterious personality.

It is your turn now, my dear Mr. Gumalangi – please, proceed! ;)

gumalangi
07-21-2008, 10:59 PM
One of the most resourceful and able commanders of his military formation,..

sceadugenga
07-22-2008, 12:50 AM
Obersturmbannführer Otto Skorzeny?

Rising Sun*
07-22-2008, 01:29 AM
Bruno Bräuer?

gumalangi
07-22-2008, 08:09 AM
no sirs,.

neither both of them,..

his formation one of the most notorious yet formidable,..

Rising Sun*
07-22-2008, 08:18 AM
no sirs,.

neither both of them,..

his formation one of the most notorious yet formidable,..

Was his formation German?

Are you using formation in the sense of a division or bigger?

gumalangi
07-22-2008, 09:32 AM
Was his formation German?

Are you using formation in the sense of a division or bigger?

definetely bigger,. it is rather a branch,. the 5th of armed branch i would say
other than army, navy, airforce and police force,..

gumalangi
07-22-2008, 10:12 AM
Was his formation German?

Are you using formation in the sense of a division or bigger?

and yes,. it was german

flamethrowerguy
07-22-2008, 12:57 PM
Is it SS-Brigadeführer Kurt Meyer called "Panzermeyer"?

Librarian
07-22-2008, 04:02 PM
No, my dear Mr. Flamethrowerguy: our mysterious personality is SS Obersturmbannführer Max Wünsche. Here you have the original snapshot:

http://img73.imageshack.us/img73/8004/escanear00039eg.jpg

From left to the right: Kurt "Panzer" Meyer, Fritz Witt, Max Wünsche.

flamethrowerguy
07-22-2008, 04:21 PM
Allright, but I was very close (-:

gumalangi
07-22-2008, 10:05 PM
very well then sir,. have it your turn,..

Librarian
07-23-2008, 04:07 PM
Thank you, my dear Mr. Gumalangi. Well, honorable ladies and gentlemen, do you recognize this undeservedly forgotten personality, whose patriotic devotion, innovative aptitude and daring goodliness had indemnified numerous significant deficiencies of the IJN?

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/000034.jpg

sceadugenga
07-24-2008, 01:23 AM
Sōkichi Takagi ?

gumalangi
07-24-2008, 02:58 AM
sadamichi kajioka

Librarian
07-24-2008, 03:06 PM
Alas, honorable gentlemen, nobody guessed it. Here is another hint for you: at the end of the WWII our special guest possesed the rank of a Rear Admiral.

gumalangi
07-24-2008, 03:44 PM
Sadatoshi Tomioka

Librarian
07-25-2008, 04:46 PM
Yet again - thumbs down, my dear Mr. Gumalangi. So sorry.:(

flamethrowerguy
07-25-2008, 04:53 PM
Nagano Osami

sceadugenga
07-25-2008, 10:52 PM
No, not much resemblance. He ordered the attack on Pearl as well, hardly "daring goodliness".

sceadugenga
07-25-2008, 10:56 PM
Shigeyoshi Inoue?

Rising Sun*
07-26-2008, 08:12 AM
Takijiro Onishi.

pdf27
07-26-2008, 08:49 AM
Burt Kwouk?

flamethrowerguy
07-26-2008, 02:56 PM
Shigeyoshi Inoue?

Well, even less resemblance. Furthermore Shigeyoshi Inoue was Full Admiral by the end of the war not Rear Admiral as Librarian's hint told.

Librarian
07-26-2008, 04:41 PM
Sorry, honorable gentlemen, but our mysterious personality still is unnamed. However, here is another tip for you – our man was a highly important personal factor within the Third department of the Imperial Naval General Staff. ;)

flamethrowerguy
07-26-2008, 05:15 PM
Toshitane Takata

Librarian
07-26-2008, 05:38 PM
No, my dear Mr. Flamethrowerguy – our celebrity is not mentioned in the open catalog of the interrogated officials of the IJN. :)

Of course, he was interrogated, but his name was publically mentioned only in 1960, and almost candidly praised in a book that was printed for the first time in 1977, which, however, always represented some kind of a… painful opprobrium for the US officials.

flamethrowerguy
07-26-2008, 05:40 PM
I am really trying to do some serious research (-: My heads already smoking, it's a tough one!

flamethrowerguy
08-14-2008, 07:17 PM
I guess we have to surrender on that one, Mr. Librarian. Please redeem us!

Librarian
08-19-2008, 04:16 PM
So sorry for my protracted silence, honorable ladies and gentlemen, but unavoidable professional obligations really are a "killing factor" for my personal participation in this highly intriguing game. :(

So here is the answer: our mysterious personality was a rear admiral of the IJN, a master spy and utterly capable organizer of secret operations, Rear-admiral Kanji Ogawa.

His achievements were almost openly praised in a book The Pearl Harbor Cover-Up, by Robin Moore and Frank Schuler (published by Pinnacle Books, New York – 1976). I think that this book still is offered by Amazon.

flamethrowerguy
08-23-2008, 04:19 AM
I allow myself to continue on this game and I hope this one won't be too easy. Who's that elderly fella on the picture little more than 30 years after his military climax? One hint: he's not Marlon Brando in "The Godfather".

http://img223.imageshack.us/img223/742/agwh2.jpg

Rising Sun*
08-23-2008, 04:58 AM
Adolf Galland.

Rising Sun*
08-25-2008, 09:30 AM
Galland, or not?

pdf27
08-25-2008, 09:40 AM
Either him or his identical twin brother. You're up!

flamethrowerguy
08-25-2008, 04:15 PM
Of course you're right, RS*, Adolf Galland in 1977 aged 65. Sorry for the delay.

Rising Sun*
08-26-2008, 12:08 AM
Of course you're right, RS*, Adolf Galland in 1977 aged 65. Sorry for the delay.

No worries.

I'm looking for a photo of the man I want, but I think he might have been the invisible man.

Rising Sun*
08-26-2008, 06:01 AM
http://img529.imageshack.us/img529/9064/mystery2wo4.jpg

Not the bloke I wanted, but from the same lot so he'll do.

A man of immense power and influence in his sphere, but not a commander.

Rising Sun*
08-29-2008, 08:11 AM
In response to the overwhelming interest in this question :rolleyes:, I shall surrender to the incessant demands for a clue ;) :D.

He was an éminence grise whose influence declined after he imported his mistress into his commander's domain.

flamethrowerguy
08-29-2008, 08:17 AM
In response to the overwhelming interest in this quesion :rolleyes:, I shall surrender to the incessant demands for a clue ;) :D.

He was an éminence grise whose influence declined after he imported his mistress into his commander's domain.

I can only speak for my self but my silence had nothing to do with disinterest, at least for me it's a tough nut.
My first vague assumption of Colonel Robert E. Hogan of "Hogan's Heroes" has now been disproven by your hint. :(

Rising Sun*
08-29-2008, 08:22 AM
I can only speak for my self but my silence had nothing to do with disinterest, at least for me it's a tough nut.
My first vague assumption of Colonel Robert E. Hogan of "Hogan's Heroes" has now been disproven by your hint. :(

Stand by. I'll find and post another picture of him, at an earlier stage of the war. Might take a while to find, crop, and upload.

The faded area on the right in the photo I'll post isn't an attempt to conceal his badges of rank, but just the way the photo is.

He's of general rank.

Rising Sun*
08-29-2008, 08:32 AM
Here he is, a few years earlier.

Before his **** got him in a bit of a wringer with his boss.

http://img529.imageshack.us/img529/5801/mysterysecondcluecroprl1.jpg

navyson
08-29-2008, 08:41 AM
Here he is, a few years earlier.

Before his **** got him in a bit of a wringer with his boss.

http://img529.imageshack.us/img529/5801/mysterysecondcluecroprl1.jpg
Sorry, I'm looking just not knowing. These quiz threads are tough. And I thought I paid attention in history class;):)

Rising Sun*
08-29-2008, 09:09 AM
Sorry, I'm looking just not knowing. These quiz threads are tough. And I thought I paid attention in history class;):)

Don't apologise! ;)

None of the questions in this thread are likely to have come up in any history class, anywhere.

The whole aim is to post people that even most well-informed military history people aren't likely to know about, or can't recognise in context, so there's no shame in not being able to identify them. Most history teachers couldn't. Most of us can't. :D

This clue will be either distracting or helpful, depending upon the level of knowledge about my mystery man and where he operated, but if you can pick the photo below you'll know the surname of one of the cabal who operated with the mystery man in probably the longest and most enduringly successful operation of its type during WWII, which had nothing to do with the battlefield.

http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/811/mysteryyowiegg2.jpg

Rising Sun*
08-30-2008, 09:39 AM
http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/811/mysteryyowiegg2.jpg


Anyone pick Diller?

Phyllis, that is. http://www.wic.org/bio/pdiller.htm

Who, as far as I know, had nothing to do with her namesake who was a grand part of the cabal with the mystery man.

Rising Sun*
08-31-2008, 07:29 AM
I'll widen the scope to give a better clue. Although the pick Diller clue would have helped someone who knew about what obviously isn't as well known as I thought.

http://www.ww2incolor.com/d/45710-2/mystery+3 (http://www.ww2incolor.com/us-army/mystery+3.html)

Nickdfresh
08-31-2008, 09:39 AM
I'll widen the scope to give a better clue. Although the pick Diller clue would have helped someone who knew about what obviously isn't as well known as I thought.

http://www.ww2incolor.com/d/45710-2/mystery+3 (http://www.ww2incolor.com/us-army/mystery+3.html)


I actually recall hearing of someone that was a rising star in the US military until he openly pampered his girlfriend.

If he was smart like Ike, he's of made her his driver. ;)

Rising Sun*
08-31-2008, 10:30 AM
I actually recall hearing of someone that was a rising star in the US military until he openly pampered his girlfriend.

If he was smart like Ike, he's of made her his driver. ;)

Or his niblick, or putter. :D

sceadugenga
09-01-2008, 03:33 AM
Brigadier-General LeGrande Albert Diller?

Rising Sun*
09-01-2008, 06:35 AM
Brigadier-General LeGrande Albert Diller?

Also known as 'Pick' Diller. Well done.

Who was the bloke I wanted but I couldn't find his picture, on the internet or in books.

So, alas, it's not Pick Diller, but you've narrowed it down to someone in that small circle who also controlled the flow of incoming and outgoing information and, unlike Diller, also controlled access to the big boss and could make or break people with his power.

sceadugenga
09-01-2008, 10:47 PM
Major-general Richard Kerens Sutherland

Rising Sun*
09-01-2008, 11:22 PM
Major-general Richard Kerens Sutherland

Correct. Well done!

Your turn.

sceadugenga
09-02-2008, 01:01 AM
Another officer with a less than successful career.

sceadugenga
09-03-2008, 01:24 AM
Is anyone looking at this? Would you like a clue?
When and where this picture was taken it was cold.;)

Rising Sun*
09-03-2008, 10:08 AM
When and where this picture was taken it was cold.;)

I'd worked that out. ;) :D

A clue or clues would be nice.

Hat looks odd, but is he British?

sceadugenga
09-03-2008, 10:06 PM
He held the rank of ******* General and was dismissed from his final command after only a few days.
Rumors abounded he was drinking heavily but he always claimed it was political.
Unusually for a previously successful officer in a time of war, he wasn't demoted but removed from the officers list.

flamethrowerguy
09-04-2008, 04:22 AM
Rumors abounded he was drinking heavily but he always claimed it was political.


Dismissing a general because of a drinking problem?, Man, the "yankees" in the Civil War would have to dismiss some of their most capable generals, Grant as an example.

Rising Sun*
09-04-2008, 06:24 AM
Dismissing a general because of a drinking problem?, Man, the "yankees" in the Civil War would have to dismiss some of their most capable generals, Grant as an example.

Churchill was half pissed for most of WWII, and with very good reason.

If he'd been sober, he mightn't have done half as well. :D

Hitler, on the other hand, had continual problems with his gut, which Dr Morell attributed partly to Hitler's love of pastries. And a bit of stress. No idea what might have caused that. ;)

Maybe Hitler should have got on the piss and made some drunken decisions. They couldn't have been any worse than his sober ones. ;) :D

On topic, I have no idea who the mystery man is.

His coat looks British but I can't make out his hat. Could be an officer's cap in some special British regiment with a button down peak, or he could be Romanian for all I know.

Could we have some more clues, please, Mr sceadugenga?

sceadugenga
09-04-2008, 07:55 PM
He was a heavy political player and at one stage was involved in a coup against his government resulting in some jail time.
He fought for another country in WWI as a member of their armed forces.
He played little part in WW2 being dishonorably discharged in 1940.
His role is still interesting to those who follow the initial stages.

sceadugenga
09-06-2008, 02:18 AM
He enrolled in the Royal Prussian 27th Jäger Battalion to fight in WW1 and returned to his country, eventually successfully commanding an army as Major General against a superior invading force.
He had many political enemies and at one stage was charged with the kidnapping of his countries former president but cleared of all charges.
(Just noticed his birthday was one day before mine, but many years earlier!).

flamethrowerguy
09-06-2008, 05:30 AM
He enrolled in the Royal Prussian 27th Jäger Battalion to fight in WW1 and returned to his country, eventually successfully commanding an army as Major General against a superior invading force.
He had many political enemies and at one stage was charged with the kidnapping of his countries former president but cleared of all charges.
(Just noticed his birthday was one day before mine, but many years earlier!).

27. Königlich-Preußische Jägerbataillon in WW1 must mean he's a fin. This would match the uniform also...Kurt Martti Wallenius?

sceadugenga
09-07-2008, 12:45 AM
Excellent answer flamethrowerguy.
I was afraid he was a little too obscure after the first responses and may have been a tad too enthusiastic with the hints.

Many thanks to Admin for my promotion to Sergeant.:mrgreen:

flamethrowerguy
09-07-2008, 01:47 PM
Unfortunately I don't have the time to dig out something special right now. Have to stay in hospital for a couple of days. That's why I make this an easy one as a stopgap.

sceadugenga
09-11-2008, 06:44 AM
I've spent a lot of time looking at Signals but can't find him.
Benito Mussolini? It couldn't be that easy?

flamethrowerguy
09-12-2008, 11:09 AM
Well, I expected it to be. As you can see by the helmet the person is a german paratrooper. He was very popular but not due to miltary achievements.

ptimms
09-12-2008, 11:19 AM
Is it Max Schmeling the boxer and Fallschirmjager.

flamethrowerguy
09-12-2008, 11:20 AM
Bingo, Paul. Go ahead!

ptimms
09-12-2008, 11:21 AM
Signal No5 March 1941 at a guess.

ptimms
09-12-2008, 11:22 AM
I'll need some time. I'll post tonight.

ptimms
09-12-2008, 11:39 AM
Not the best pic I know.

ptimms
09-12-2008, 11:40 AM
And his initals aren't DC before you ask.

sceadugenga
09-13-2008, 08:15 AM
Generalleutnant Theodor Scherer?

ptimms
09-13-2008, 12:28 PM
'Fraid not.

flamethrowerguy
09-13-2008, 02:30 PM
I am not sure but the semi side-parting makes me suppose it's SS-Brigadeführer Hugo Kraas.

sceadugenga
09-13-2008, 11:28 PM
SS-Standartenführer Fritz Witt, former Hitlerjugend commander?

ptimms
09-14-2008, 02:22 AM
Sorry gents you are both wrong.

flamethrowerguy
09-14-2008, 05:04 AM
SS-Brigadeführer und Generalmajor der Waffen-SS Gustav Lombard.
I should have known, Paul.;)

ptimms
09-14-2008, 08:59 AM
It wasn't the most imaginative try, I thought you would be the one Flame. For those who don't know, Lombard was the Commander of 31st SS for it's short existence. Sep 44 to May 45.

flamethrowerguy
09-14-2008, 11:44 AM
I allow myself to continue. How about him?

pdf27
09-14-2008, 01:39 PM
Easy peasy - only one famous Frenchman who flew for the RAF in WW2!
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pierre_Clostermann

flamethrowerguy
09-14-2008, 03:05 PM
Cela est naturellement la réponse correcte, Monsieur pdfvingt-sept.
I thought this would be more difficult than Max Schmeling...

pdf27
09-14-2008, 04:19 PM
You should have done the guy in your signature, that would really have bamboozled me.
Right, next person to guess.

The person is shown as a junior naval officer during WW1. Who is he and what was his role during WW2?

flamethrowerguy
09-14-2008, 04:52 PM
You should have done the guy in your signature, that would really have bamboozled me.

Haha, this thread would have been blocked for eternity or at least until some elderly german member got lost to the thread.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0046671/

flamethrowerguy
09-17-2008, 11:39 AM
The person is shown as a junior naval officer during WW1. Who is he and what was his role during WW2?

pdf27, seems like another hint wouldn't hurt...:neutral:

navyson
09-17-2008, 12:03 PM
I didn't know Prince Charles was that old!:D (and yes i'm being stupid, sorry!)

pdf27
09-17-2008, 01:21 PM
OK. At the time he was known as "Bertie". Although as far as I know he didn't have a butler named "Jeeves".
Oh, and he held extremely high office during WW2.