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Panzerknacker
10-10-2007, 09:26 PM
I was curious, the word "argie" used as derogatory to refer the argentines during the war...It born in 1982 or it was used earlier in UK.

1000ydstare
10-11-2007, 12:41 AM
Couldn't tell you when it started, highly likely went wide spread in '82, although Britain and Argentina were rivals in football prior to that.

It isn't derogatory. It is a shortened title of your countries name. If you notice many countries are shortened if it possible.

Brits, Ausies, Argies, Scots, Swedes, Finns, Danes. Not to be confused with the (mildly) derogatory names such as Frogs, Bosch, Eye-ties, etc.

Where you going with this? Infraction points for using my own language and it's colloqual nuances? I hazard to guess.

tankgeezer
10-11-2007, 06:59 AM
Much like the word "Boyo", or the words "Buster & Buddy" here in the states. Can be used in either context, friendly, or as a warning."watch it buddy" Its not always the word, sometimes its the intent and inflection of use that makes it derogatory. Sort of a Jekyll & Hyde thing.

Splinter54
10-11-2007, 07:35 AM
Because it fit's in here a bit, i have a question:

Germans Nicknames:

British said: Jerry (does it come from the Toon Series 'Tom & Jerry' ?)

But who said Kraut and Fritz - was it mixed up between all nations and/or how did it spread it's way from Russia - to the USA - or otherwise?

And where are the origins of those 'nicknames' ?

Thanks ;)

Cuts
10-11-2007, 10:14 AM
Because it fit's in here a bit, i have a question:

Germans Nicknames:

British said: Jerry (does it come from the Toon Series 'Tom & Jerry' ?)

But who said Kraut and Fritz - was it mixed up between all nations and/or how did it spread it's way from Russia - to the USA - or otherwise?

And where are the origins of those 'nicknames' ?

Thanks ;)

Jerry or Gerry.
I was given two origins for this, both many years ago. The first being that 'Gerry' is a diminutive for German, which seems quite plausible.

Equally plausible, and a lot funnier is the fact that a Jerry is a nickname for a chamber pot, the handled porcelain bowls used as toilets and stored under the bed.
One particular type was higher on one side than the other, which the Tommies of the Great War decided bore a similarity to an upturned German helmet, hence the helmets, and by extension those wearing them, being called Jerries.

Toilet humour has always appealed to both infants and infanteers.


Kraut
Chiefly transatlantic in use, it's use is first recorded Stateside in the middle of the C19. It stems from the popular German dish of Sauerkraut which is made from fermented cabbage and has a sour, but very pleasant taste.
(Devotees of Python will recall the 'RAF Banter' sketch where enemy planes are given various icknames, notably 'Cabbage Crate.')


Fritz
From the common German male proper noun.
Also WWI in orgin, British Tommy slang.

1000ydstare
10-11-2007, 11:06 AM
Jerry came from the chamber pot and how the helment looked like one as far as I am aware.

Tom and Jerry was actually named AFTER the "Tommy" and the "Jerry". Tom being a common name for a cat, Jerry came after.

I have been told that the Germans find "Bosch" insulting, although in literal translation it means Bush (i think).

For the French - Frogs = Frogs legs (the national "dish")

For Brits - Roast Beef is a common name for our national dish.

Americans - Yanks, Septics, SPAMs, Yankee,

Canadians - Canucks.

Can't think of many more to be honest.

tankgeezer
10-11-2007, 12:07 PM
Once when I was in Germany, there was nearly a fight in the Gasthaus, when a German used the local word for Americans. I dont remember the word exactly, but it was sounded as "zoopfin"(if I heard it right) The fight would have been over the German's confusion of the words,definition. Yank,(ee) and Jerk. Very similar if used as a verb, but not well taken if used as a noun. once the confusion of words cleared, All were happy, and the beer flowed. :EDIT Okay I just looked it up, its spelled zupfen, and has a variety of meanings, mostly centered around the act of plucking, pulling, strumming, yanking,, etc. must be a local slang word for Yankee. Erlangen, Bavaria, W.Germany.(there were 2 in those days, for the younger among us.)

pdf27
10-11-2007, 12:40 PM
Once when I was in Germany, there was nearly a fight in the Gasthaus, when a German used the local word for Americans. I dont remember the word exactly, but it was sounded as "zoopfin"(if I heard it right) The fight would have been over the German's confusion of the words,definition. Yank,(ee) and Jerk. Very similar if used as a verb, but not well taken if used as a noun. once the confusion of words cleared, All were happy, and the beer flowed.
In the circumstances I's better not clarify the meaning of "septic" and "Spam" ;)

Splinter54
10-11-2007, 02:41 PM
but it was sounded as "zoopfin"(if I heard it right)

I don't know, where you had been, but this somehow sounds like a Bavarian dialect ^^ but it doesn't have any sense concerning the Americans.

A very common word for the Americans here is 'Amis'
In the seventys, there had been a film (can't recall the name - american film) but there was a spy called 'Ami Polizei Funk' which means American Police Radio :mrgreen:

British are (had been one have to say!) the Thommies and Russians the Ivans.

@ Cuts: Yes, i knew that had to come from Sauerkraut and in my opinion (even my origins are in the world capital of beer ^^) it doesn't tastes that good - only with a Schweinshaxn' :D

PS: I wonder if anybody knows 'Steckerlfisch' :p

1000ydstare
10-11-2007, 03:03 PM
haxn mmmmmm.

Dribbles down chin.

Lovely. The Ratkeller near me does a cracking haxn. The meat falls off the bone.

Mmmmmmm.

Cracking Dunkle Bier too.

Nickdfresh
10-11-2007, 03:46 PM
Ooof!

I should add that the primary derogatory reference to the German enemy by Americans in WWII was the aforementioned "Krauts." I believe Hun (the reference being Germanic barbarians I believe) was also a British derived slang reference, as well as Bosche. A more predominately American slur might be "Herm/Hermann/Hermann the German...


I think it should be mentioned that Americans are often at a disadvantage when using nationalistic ethnic slurs pertaining to Europeans, since the society is largely one of a "melting-pot." Many American soldiers, as well as my grandmother and mother, were of recent German, English, Scottish, or French-Canadian lineage for instance, so in a sense, they may have loved eating sour Kraut and indeed in my home town, which is named after a famous German city, there was up until about a decade ago still German grocery shops selling imported sauerkraut, cheeses and meats. *sigh*


There are some more subtle, lesser known American derision's of the British: "Brits," even though it is merely the shortened term for the British, can be seen a a bit rude.

"Limey" was popular slang for the British in the US until recently, being taken from the lime juice British sailors drank to ward off scurvy, and was/is considered a mildly rude put-down. I imagine the US senior officer class in the Army and Navy of the time, often fiercely Anglophobic, may have had some more obscure slurs such as "FEB," or "Fog-breather/Foggy."

Some today may be insulted as Euro___ (-sexual, -***, -trash, -wanker, -weenie, etc.) or "Gay-or-Just-English?".

As for Aussies, there is no real 'put-down' for them in the current American lexicon since they're generally well thought of, or little thought of, though there may have been some terms more prevalent during WWII, such as "convict" or "penal colonist."

American soldiers often referred to Italians as Guineas, Dagos or Wops, but some Italian-American soldiers would have again taken offense to this obviously...

Canadians used to be referred to, in addition to Canuck, as "51st-Staters" and the more derisive "Canuckleheads" by Americans..

Oh, I don't wanna go on with this...

tankgeezer
10-11-2007, 03:57 PM
I don't know, where you had been, but this somehow sounds like a Bavarian dialect ^^ but it doesn't have any sense concerning the Americans.

A very common word for the Americans here is 'Amis'
In the seventys, there had been a film (can't recall the name - american film) but there was a spy called 'Ami Polizei Funk' which means American Police Radio :mrgreen:

British are (had been one have to say!) the Thommies and Russians the Ivans.

@ Cuts: Yes, i knew that had to come from Sauerkraut and in my opinion (even my origins are in the world capital of beer ^^) it doesn't tastes that good - only with a Schweinshaxn' :D

PS: I wonder if anybody knows 'Steckerlfisch' :p
I was stationed in Bavaria, and in truth, seldom ever heard "zoopfin" used except between germans, (also known as "Rads" ) Ami was/is used as well, more commonly. Many young Germans would address us with "hey man" they must watch too much bad american tv.

Splinter54
10-11-2007, 04:07 PM
[...] and indeed in my home town, which is named after a famous German city[...]

Yes, Washington DC is quite a wide spread town name here :D *provocates reply to find out the name*

Bosch - what should be bad about it? Bosch was/is a big electricity company here. I think you mean the french word 'boche' for Germans which means something like pig.

Only name which could be insulting against by Germans against Germans is the name 'Osram' - it's a bit a old expression.
Osram is the name of a company which produces electric lamps and their slogan is (you can read it also at the buildings at the Karlsplatz/Stachus at Munich) : 'Hell wie der lichte Tag', what means 'Bright like the day'.
If someone is a choleric person or if he get's ashamed very quickly and get's a red head - you call him Osram - quite old, but still spread :D

Firefly
10-11-2007, 04:08 PM
I was stationed at Ramstein and many a German automatically assumed I was an American. I used to love their surprise when I replied 'are you talking to me old chap'. Generally though I was dismayed by my American cousins who would sidle up to me and Mrs FF when we were having a conversation and say 'Gee, I love those Irish accents', grrrrrrrrrrr.

Still I loved Germany, but those days are gone for us RAF types.....

tankgeezer
10-11-2007, 06:52 PM
I was stationed at Ramstein and many a German automatically assumed I was an American. I used to love their surprise when I replied 'are you talking to me old chap'. Generally though I was dismayed by my American cousins who would sidle up to me and Mrs FF when we were having a conversation and say 'Gee, I love those Irish accents', grrrrrrrrrrr.

Still I loved Germany, but those days are gone for us RAF types.....

I am not surprised at that,, Most Germans figured if you are speaking English, you must be American, My inept countrymen must have been hiding in a cave someplace. There is no way to confuse the Scot, and Irish accents. Even Glaswegians arent close.(and I still cant understand them.) Big difference in Gaelic, and Gallic.

tankgeezer
10-11-2007, 07:00 PM
In the circumstances I's better not clarify the meaning of "septic" and "Spam" ;) well, most Americans have a thick skin, and can take a joke, even if its on them. so let er rip,, I wanna know. (dont worry, I wont drag out my anti tank gun,,,,)

Panzerknacker
10-12-2007, 07:45 AM
Couldn't tell you when it started, highly likely went wide spread in '82, although Britain and Argentina were rivals in football prior to that


Hmmm, that was the one I felt. :roll:

Nickdfresh
10-12-2007, 09:55 AM
Yes, Washington DC is quite a wide spread town name here :D *provocates reply to find out the name*


Oh, I'm not actually from Washington, like seemingly everyone else here; I'm just a transient refugee.:)


Bosch - what should be bad about it? Bosch was/is a big electricity company here. I think you mean the french word 'boche' for Germans which means something like pig.

Of course, that's where is was derived (French). Most Americans recognize 'Bosch' today as a maker of quality spark plugs, oil filters, automotive electronics, and power tools....

Rising Sun*
10-12-2007, 10:44 AM
As for Aussies, there is no real 'put-down' for them in the current American lexicon since they're generally well thought of, or little thought of, though there may have been some terms more prevalent during WWII, such as "convict" or "penal colonist."


Probably little thought of, but don't tell our Prime Minister that 'cos he thinks Dubya thinks he's the Man of Steel, 'cos Dubya said so. Dubya, and our Prime Minister, also assured us that there were weapons of mass deception in Iraq, so it's best not to place too much credence in his opinions.

To expand your lexicon, Skip is, like most things here, a word of endearment or an insult depending upon inflection and the relationship of the speaker and the auditor.

Wogs (i.e. not proper Aussies, just second or third generation Mediterraneans who've been here for at best a quarter of the time since European settlement - or invasion if you prefer that more active historical view) coined it as a respose to terms like wog, dago, spick, balt, reffo, Lebo, spag, etc in the 1960's / 70's from a kid's television show (about the equivalent of Rin Tin Tin or Lassie, with production values about thirty years behind) about a kangaroo with a lot more intelligence than most kangaroos, which put it roughly half way between a cat and beach sand.

Intro here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DCHY6n907OE
and you have no idea how potent was the symbolism of playing a gum leaf in the first scene. Could probably still do it myself, or with tissue paper over a comb which was another source of discordant bush music.

Many of the scenes in Skippy the Idiot Kangaroo actually involved bits of dead roos, usually paws, doing things. Nothing remarkable about that. I worked in a souvenir shop in Melbourne in the mid sixties that flogged crap like kangaroo paw bottle openers i.e. dead roo's paw with chrome bottle opener screwed into the end of it, and kangaroo skin moccasins. Such a popular item that my very hands fitted Marlene Dietrich with a pair of them in 1965. She had a shocking cough and wasn't anything to get excited about, but I was only fifteen. I'm closer to sixty now and if I'd been that age then I still wouldn't have been any more excited.

And my point was? :confused:

Rising Sun*
10-12-2007, 10:57 AM
well, most Americans have a thick skin, and can take a joke, even if its on them. so let er rip,, I wanna know. (dont worry, I wont drag out my anti tank gun,,,,)

Rhyming slang.

Septic = Septic tank = Yank.

A septic tank is, and was in WWII when the term was coined here as a measure of our fraternal fondness for our American allies ;) (who were better dressed, better paid and often better behaved than the local soldiery, thus getting the local girls and causing a lot of resentment and only a few riots that ended in deaths), an underground receptacle for sewage in unswered areas, which either is a simple tank which is pumped out by men with no teeth and no brains into foul smelling tankers with smelly brown tracks down them - which tankers still exist and cost a fortune to use- or which, like the one at my beach shack, have a sand filter system which disperses the contents into the soil, and makes the grass grow like buggery at this spring time of year so that I've just been reminded that I have to make a four hour round trip just to mow it. Thanks for reminding me. Not! :D

tankgeezer
10-12-2007, 01:07 PM
Rhyming slang.

Septic = Septic tank = Yank.
Oh, like Cockney. not bad.. Here in the Grand Republic, the septic tank is still used in more suburban & rural areas, as is the mound system. Mostly though, we use the modern soilent Green facilities as we are along the edge of Lake Michigan.

1000ydstare
10-13-2007, 04:16 AM
I would point out here, for those new to this, however that the flip side of the Septic = Septic Tank = Yank is slightly more insulting.

It could be used to implie that Americans are full of sh1t. Just like a Septic Tank.

I have often wondered if there was more to the Limey bit. It is a little unknown but the Royal Navy used to issue Lemons to its crews (German U-boats did similar during the war also), the Lemons were replaced by Limes because Limes were cheaper.

Terms like "to Lime over" meaning to worry over pennies were used around this time (18C), as the Admiralty only saved a small amount by the swap. This was mainly so that the British Lime growers (who lobbied the Navy and governers) could sell their fruit, rather than the Royal Navy buying Lemons and Oranges of Johney Foreigner.

For some reason or another Americans also used the term "lime about" to describe the British Sailers interest in looking around red light areas for entertainment. I don't know if, perhaps, British sailers looked after their pennies in this pursuit also, whilst their American counterparts spent a small fortune as per their own stereotype of seemingly having little regard for their financial expediture.

Whilst almost cerainly this term began to describe British Sailors, it appears to have grown out to describe all British.

1000ydstare
10-13-2007, 08:41 AM
Other nicknames for the Brits, include "teabags" mainly from the German speaking Swiss, who believe we drink Tea all day.

The Poles use "5 oclocks" on the grounds that we have tea at five oclock.

Portagues use Bife (literal steak) but sounds similar to beef, for females tourists especialy they us bifa.

Tommy from Tommy atkins is an old one (from the 18C) but received wide spread use from the Germans in WW1.

Red Coat, often believed to come from America but used all over Europe prior to that.

The French also called us the "Les goddams" and of course we have been called "the contemptables" from "the contemptably small army" rather than we were contemptable.

It is also worth noting that the Norther Irish regard "Brit" to be a insulting term used by the Catholic/Republicans.

In a similar way that, for some reason, the term Fenian is a derogatory term for Catholics/Repuclicans used mainly by the Protestant/Unionists.

Nickdfresh
10-13-2007, 10:48 AM
Rhyming slang.

Septic = Septic tank = Yank.

A septic tank is, and was in WWII when the term was coined here as a measure of our fraternal fondness for our American allies ;) (who were better dressed, better paid and often better behaved than the local soldiery, thus getting the local girls and causing a lot of resentment and only a few riots that ended in deaths), an underground receptacle for sewage in unswered areas, which either is a simple tank which is pumped out by men with no teeth and no brains into foul smelling tankers with smelly brown tracks down them - which tankers still exist and cost a fortune to use- or which, like the one at my beach shack, have a sand filter system which disperses the contents into the soil, and makes the grass grow like buggery at this spring time of year so that I've just been reminded that I have to make a four hour round trip just to mow it. Thanks for reminding me. Not! :D



LOL We still have a lot septic tanks owned by Yanks? :D Especially in the New England portion of the country where the actual "Yankees" are. I just assisted my brother in putting in an "environmentally (more) friendly" variant of the septic set-up (the old ones will not meet code), and now the sand must contain "envirotubing" as the leech field...

pdf27
10-13-2007, 04:09 PM
In a similar way that, for some reason, the term Fenian is a derogatory term for Catholics/Repuclicans used mainly by the Protestant/Unionists.
The Fenian Brotherhood was one of the early Irish Republican organisations (200 years or so ago).

Splinter54
10-13-2007, 04:15 PM
England stomped France to the ground today at football - i was talking to a french and his first comment concerning this match was: Saleté de Rosbif :D

1000ydstare
10-14-2007, 03:02 AM
Rugby dear chap, not football.

Ref Fenian Brotherhood, yep knew about them but why doth that become an insult?

Splinter54
10-14-2007, 04:00 AM
Rugby dear chap, not football.

Where's the difference between football (the American) and Rugby? - Rugby is harder? :neutral:

Rising Sun*
10-14-2007, 06:48 AM
Where's the difference between football (the American) and Rugby? - Rugby is harder? :neutral:

We in the English speaking world, which by definition excludes America :D, do not regard that padded up, helmeted, run three feet and stop for half an hour, run another three feet and substitute another helmeted padded ape because the last one was exhausted or was a specialist in the first twelve feet of the ground and might get confused if he goes any further, don't kick on the run but stop the game to have a kick because a kick is such a big event and just another reason to stop an already slow game, gridiron game played in America as football.

We prefer our apes to clash like free apes, with fewer breaks in play and no padding and, especially, no helmets so that we can see the claret flow.

Of course, where I am, we play an even better, faster and more athletic game which distinguishes itself from rugby, and gridiron, by, among other things, most of the players having necks and, usually, most of their own teeth. :D And no padding at all, unlike rugby and gridiron.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d-PFRrJQtew

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_hqosNvv5E


http://www.droppunt.com/images/sampi3.jpg



http://www.droppunt.com/images/lukemcpharlin.jpg



http://geelong.keldar.net/Images/BOttensR052006_1.jpg



http://en.epochtimes.com/news_images/2006-6-27-kangaroos_v_carleton_71279986.jpg

Rising Sun*
10-14-2007, 07:11 AM
LOL We still have a lot septic tanks owned by Yanks? :D

This would make them Septic's septics, and doubly [insert preferred pejorative term for Americans here]. :D

Or is it like a double negative, so that a Septic's septic is actually pure? I guess you could check out your brother's septic in a few months to see if it's pure? :confused:

Sometimes I think too much. It makes my brain hurt. :D

1000ydstare
10-14-2007, 07:29 AM
I still reckon the Irish game of hurling has GOT to be the most nuts game out there.

Think rounders crossed with rugby/ausie rules football.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurling

http://www.mkschubert.de/eire/hurling1.jpg

Rising Sun*
10-14-2007, 08:25 AM
I still reckon the Irish game of hurling has GOT to be the most nuts game out there.

Think rounders crossed with rugby/ausie rules football.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurling

http://www.mkschubert.de/eire/hurling1.jpg

Any game where the players are armed, like hurling, lacrosse, and hockey have an extra dimension for spectacular injury.

Ice hockey is my favourite, although it'd be better if (a) they didn't wear padding and (b) worked out that hitting a bloke in the head who's wearing a helmet isn't likely to do much.

Now, I'm a Paddy meself, some generations removed, but the fact is, you can't civilise the Irish.

There we were, an Aussie rules team bringing civilisation to the land of pototoes, and they cop a few whacks and get all upset and ban us.

Not the boyos of my ancestors, who'd just put the boot in harder if they copped a whack.

Don't even try to understand the rules of this game, which combines two unrelated codes and makes about as much sense as a rugby team playing a soccer team with rules from both sides.

2006 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OIGREZw4Sr4&mode=related&search=


2004 Pre game warm up

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eEWVajd7hUI&mode=related&search=

No worse than we do at home http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AbugTv3FzY&mode=related&search=

None of this is like the old days. The last video is about what you'd expect in AFL before the game started, before the bloody money men and marketers got into it and wanted to make it appeal to women and small furry animals with spending power to support the rich drones who profit from the game.


[December 10, 2006]

The AFL will try to broker a peace deal with Irish officials to salvage the future of International Rules football after Ireland scrapped next year's series.

Ireland's Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) on Sunday voted to cancel its planned 2007 trip to Australia, angered by what it labelled Australian "thuggery" in last month's second Test in Dublin.

The GAA will also prepare a list of proposed changes to rules and penalties which it has demanded the AFL must accede to if the annual series is ever to be revived.

AFL chief executive Andrew Demetriou said both his league and the GAA would have further internal discussions before trying to find some common ground.

"The International Rules Series will be suspended for 12 months at both junior and senior level for 2007," Demetriou said.

"We will meet with the GAA in the new year to talk through future plans between our two organisations.

"The GAA intends to have further internal discussions about the structure and the rules of the series.

"We look forward to talking to them once they have completed that process on how we may proceed in the future."

Among mooted rule changes, tackling could be outlawed from the hybrid game in the future.

The Irish, whose Gaelic Football does not involve tackling, were infuriated by a tackle laid by Australia's Danyle Pearce that knocked out Irish player Graham Geraghty in last month's Test.

Also, suspensions stemming from International Rules matches could have to be served in regular season AFL or GAA matches.

The GAA said no future series would be possible unless the AFL agreed to the list of changes it was preparing.

"It will be forwarded to the AFL for their consideration," the GAA said in a statement.

"If the GAA's terms, as outlined in this document, are acceptable to the AFL, then discussions on the future of the series could take place."

The Irish cancellation of next year's tour adds to the AFL's headaches stemming from last month's trip.

It also had to send Carlton star Brendan Fevola home early after he grabbed an Irish barman in a headlock, prompting an investigation by Irish police.

Australia's planned under-17 tour of Ireland next year will be replaced by a tour of South Africa. http://www.smh.com.au/news/Sport/Irish-scrap-International-Rules-tour/2006/12/10/1165685543827.html

Rising Sun*
10-14-2007, 09:17 AM
P.S. Count the bodies on the ground in 2006.

All Irish.

I wonder why they don't want to play any more. :D

Panzerknacker
10-14-2007, 11:25 AM
--Where's the difference between football (the American) and Rugby? - Rugby is harder?---Seems hat there is no much rugby played in Germany. hehe. So going back to the topic, Could we say that the equivalent of argie is Brit ?

1000ydstare
10-14-2007, 01:23 PM
So going back to the topic, Could we say that the equivalent of argie is Brit ?

Yes, we could. Argie is purely a shortened version of Argentina, as is Brit for British.

And as far as I can remember on this site that has always been the case.

Out of curiosity, why did you bring it up?

Cuts
10-14-2007, 03:39 PM
Bad luck in the semi-final there PzKnacker.
The Pumas played well.

It'll be an interesting final...

Panzerknacker
10-14-2007, 05:03 PM
I bring it up to be sure that I am not being calling for a derogatory name in my nose, even I am still feel that someone here has used that word as it...in more than one ocassion.Cuts, I didnt agree, the Pumas played an awful game today, and thats why they lose, seems that they had butter in their hands.

tankgeezer
10-14-2007, 07:09 PM
I bring it up to be sure that I am not being calling for a derogatory name in my nose, even I am still feel that someone here has used that word as it...in more than one ocassion.Cuts, I didnt agree, the Pumas played an awful game today, and thats why they lose, seems that they had butter in their hands.
We call that "butterfingers"

Cuts
10-14-2007, 07:41 PM
I bring it up to be sure that I am not being calling for a derogatory name in my nose, even I am still feel that someone here has used that word as it...in more than one ocassion.Cuts, I didnt agree, the Pumas played an awful game today, and thats why they lose, seems that they had butter in their hands.


I'm not so sure, they made them work hard.

See here:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/rugby_union/7043379.stm
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/rugby_union/7044196.stm

The stats for the Pumas looked good despite never having beaten the Boks, and they kept the ball in play longer than ZA. Unfortunately, for the Argies, the Saffers excel at taking advantage of sudden opportunities, something they were given too many times.
I for one will be supporting the big cats against the chooks on the 19th.




Edited for fat-fingered typing.

Panzerknacker
10-15-2007, 06:59 PM
In order to win over South Africa the pumas needed to be 100 % in the game..I dont know what happen the sunday but they simply didnt.The best game of Argentina was this.http://stage6.divx.com/user/databaze/video/1709352/RWC-Argentina-vs-Ireland

1000ydstare
10-15-2007, 11:28 PM
And this has what to do with the topic?

You have accused me of meandering in the past, but at least it always has a connection to the topic. This is.....

Rising Sun*
10-16-2007, 01:16 AM
And this has what to do with the topic?



Funny, I was thinking along the same lines.

Check post #34 and subsequent.

The rule to be deduced is: If it's something that interests PK it's alright to wander, otherwise it's off topic.

Panzerknacker
10-16-2007, 09:35 AM
And this has what to do with the topic?


The same as Hurling ;)

You want a rugby topic ?


The rule to be deduced is: If it's something that interests PK it's alright to wander, otherwise it's off topic.

That would made a better forum. :cool:

Flammpanzer
10-16-2007, 10:47 AM
I have been told that the Germans find "Bosch" insulting, although in literal translation it means Bush (i think).

No. “Busch” is Bush :D

“Bosch” has no meaning, but there is a famous company here called BOSCH that produces a lot of electric stuff. It comes from the French boches, which means something like “bulls” but more idiots/stupids.

“Huns” were not Germans at all, huns were an Asian-Slavic tribe. So the word was not chosen very clever somehow.

Regarding Sauerkraut: The Russians and the Czech eat much more Sauerkraut than the Germans – today.

If you ask older people (WW2-vets, one lives here in the house) here, the US were simply "Amis", the British "Tommies" and the Russians were "Ivans". All the other names I have never heard of, they seem to be very specific and had no widespread those days, I guess.

Here some German stuff from WW1:

Jeder Schuss ein Russ`

Jeder Stoß ein Franzos`

Jeder Tritt ein Brit`

Jens

Cuts
10-16-2007, 06:40 PM
Ok to keep this on off thread again, here's a twice swiped article in which most if not all the countries are treated with equal irreverence:


International Rugby Board (IRB) Rugby World Cup 2007

Following complaints to the IRB about the All Blacks being allowed to motivate themselves by performing the 'Hakka' before their games, other nations were asked to suggest pre-match rituals of their own.
The IRB Rugby World Cup 2007 organizing committee has now agreed to the following pre-match displays.

1. The England team will chat about the weather, wave hankies in the air and attach bells to their ankles, before moaning about how they invented the game and gave it to the world, but no-one appreciates them.

2. The Scotland team will chant "You looking' at me, Jimmy?" before each of them smash a bottle of beer over their opponents' heads.

3. The Ireland team will split into two, with the Southern half perfoming a Riverdance, while the Northerners march the traditional route from their dressing room to the pitch via their opponents' dressing room.

4. Unfortunately the committee was unable to sanction the Welsh proposal to form a choir and sing Tom Jones' "The Green Green Grass of Home".

5. Argentina will unexpectedly invade a small part of opposition territory, claim it as their own "Las In-Goal-Areas", and have to be forcibly removed by the match stewards.

6. Two members of the South African team will claim to be more important than the other 13, whom they will imprison between the posts. These two will then go about selecting the best parts of the pitch to settle on and claim they have been there for centuries.

7. The Americans will not attend until almost full time. In future years they will amend the records to show that they were, in fact, the most important team in the tournament, and Hollywood will produce a blockbuster film called "Saving Flanker Ryan".

8. Five of the Canadian team will sing "Le Marseillaise" and hold the rest of the team to ransom.

9. The Italian team will arrive in Armani gear, sexually harass the female officials, and then prepare pasta dishes, which they will then flog to the crowd for a fortune.

10. The Japanese will shock fans by demonstrating how to capture a whale for scientific research by harpooning an opposition prop.

11. The French won't have a pre-match display and will simply hide in fear in the dressing room for the whole match, form a new government and claim resistance.

12. The Australians will have a barbecue on their side of the field and invite the opposition over before the game. The food and alcohol will be in abundance and, by the start of the game, no-one will remember what they came to the stadium for. After some streaking, the singing of dirty songs and the occasional chunder, everyone will go home thoroughly convinced it was a bloody good night.

13. The Moroccan team will quietly pray during the first half and then launch suicide attacks against the opposition after the break. Unfortunately, this strategy works well for the first game only, after which Morocco is forced to withdraw from the tournament due to lack of players.

14. Samoa will prepare a huge feast in the middle of the pitch by digging a large hole and filling it with burning embers. They will invite the opposition over by saying "We'd like to have you for dinner." Only when the opposition arrive at the pit will they realise that there is no meat and that they are in fact the main course.

Hopefully, with these policies now in place, further problems in this area should cease to exist.