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Panzerknacker
09-13-2007, 02:42 PM
Very interesting video of this variant used for maritime attack.

http://es.youtube.com/watch?v=IZ-a8U1QWUw

Firefly
09-13-2007, 03:58 PM
That aircraft surely must have been the best all round plane in ww2. It could carry the same weight of bombs as a B-17.

redcoat
09-13-2007, 05:23 PM
That aircraft surely must have been the best all round plane in ww2. It could carry the same weight of bombs as a B-17.Yes and no.
While the Mossie could carry around the same amount of bombs to long distance targets like Berlin as the B-17 (approx 4,000Ib), on shorter range missions the B-17 could carry far more (up to 17,500Ib, from memory)

Panzerknacker
09-13-2007, 07:20 PM
By the way, this was the FB Mark XVIII variant.

http://www.afwing.com/images/heavygun/mosquito_fb-5.jpg


. Also known as the "Tse Tse Fly," this particular model was armed with four 0.303-inch caliber machine guns and a single 57-mm cannon in the nose. The 57-mm cannon was based on a standard Army light artillery piece called the 6-pounder but modified with a Molins automatic loader. The entire system weighed about 1,800 lb (815 kg). The aircraft carried 25 rounds of ammunition, weighing 7 lb (3.2 kg) each, and the automatic loader could fire the entire magazine in just 20 seconds.


http://www.aerospaceweb.org/question/weapons/guns/mosquito.jpg
Mosquito FB.XVIII armed with its 57-mm cannon

The aircraft was originally designed as an anti-tank weapon, but was instead used for anti-shipping and anti-submarine duties as well as to attack shore installations. However, rockets were found to be better suited to the task, so the cannon was later supplemented by an armament of two 500-lb bombs or eight 60-lb rockets. Only 27 examples were built, the first seeing action in October of 1943.

Firefly
09-14-2007, 02:47 AM
Yes and no.
While the Mossie could carry around the same amount of bombs to long distance targets like Berlin as the B-17 (approx 4,000Ib), on shorter range missions the B-17 could carry far more (up to 17,500Ib, from memory)

Yes you are right, but still, what an aircraft eh. I bet when you got posted to the Mossie in Bomber Command in 1943 you heaved a sight of relief. Their casualty rates were very low compared to the heavies.

kallinikosdrama1992
11-25-2007, 08:11 AM
could carry the same wheight with a b-17 ? Jesus Christ !!!!!!!!! yeah but the same wheight does not mean that it carried the same number of bombs . right ?
i mean was it able to achieve the same damage in the enemies ?

Mosquito
11-26-2007, 05:59 AM
could carry the same wheight with a b-17 ? Jesus Christ !!!!!!!!! yeah but the same wheight does not mean that it carried the same number of bombs . right ?
i mean was it able to achieve the same damage in the enemies ?

It has nothing to do with quantity.
Read the previous post...


while the Mossie could carry around the same amount of bombs to long distance targets like Berlin as the B-17 (approx 4,000Ib), on shorter range missions the B-17 could carry far more (up to 17,500Ib, from memory)

Tony Williams
12-02-2007, 08:13 AM
This article on my website will give you some background to the Tsetse's gun and ammunition: http://www.quarry.nildram.co.uk/Molins.htm

17poundr
12-25-2007, 09:56 AM
It has nothing to do with quantity.
Read the previous post...

The point is, that the Mossie's, could go low level, so that right at the first glimmer of dawn, they would crush a Gestapo castle somewhere in occupied Europe, no other bombers could do this, although the A-20s could have trained with the mossies, and become a similar force...

But the mossie's real 'magic' was it's versatility, I mean, a night figher par exellence, a night bomber, a day fighter bomber, a sea attack plane (mainly against coastal shipping off the Norwegian coastline), a recce plane including long distance weather recon, a post ferry plane over occupied Europe to Sweden and never catched by the alerted FW-190s from Denmark!

Also some anti sub patrolling... I mean this thing did it all! And what was the amazing thing was that when it was designed, Britain was very much in it's toughest moments during 'the bliz', sometime in late 1940, and they realized that aluminium would be hard to come by, so they designed the whole planes frame from wood, and covered it with canvas treated with emulsion for a tough end result, and only the weapons, some of the internal rigging, cockpit were metal... This also meant, that the early radars in use back then had a harder time fixing it, as there was so little metal!

After the Spitfire, Britains most emblematic plane imho...

17poundr
12-30-2007, 10:19 AM
Great links! :)

I love the Mosquito! Just it's look, and ofcourse the stories of all the amazing things that this one plane could do! And to think that it almost never made it through the armaments board!

My favourite if really pressed for an answer is the Intruder night fighter model, they used to go some miles aside the bomber stream on a 'big night', raf raid... As the Lufwaffe had developed a system where each nighfighter (usually based onto a Me 110 or JU-88, with those ugly antenna's in the front of it), the German plane would circle in it's box, waiting for orders from a strong ground radar, then it would be vectored into it's own radars range, and fix the plane, fly under it, and use the upward tilted 20 or 30mm MG's, with a mixture of armour pearcing and explosive shells, and let rip! about 80% of the Wellingtons, Halifaxes, Stirlings and mostly Lancasters never saw the enemy plane that shot them down!

But the Brit's wouldnt just bend over and take it! The formed special intruder squadrons from Mosquito's and Beaufighters with a good radar in the nose (unexposed on the Brit models), and with a fiew 20mm cannons, they would use the german ground to air-air to ground traffic to fix the enemy plane, or just go free hunting, anyway the end product was that the German plane all consentrating on getting the next Brit bomber, usually never realized that behind and slightly below was a Mosquito intruder! They just shot them down as daytime planes, they didnt have a slanted mg, but they did fire from very close...

The Germans didnt seem to be very alerted to the intruders , they probably thought that most of the shot down night fighters were shot down by RAF bombers, as the USAAF daytime bombers did account for an ever increasing ammount of daytime Me-109s and FW-190s!

I do not know how many german night fighters the Intruders did get all in all, but it's for shure that it must of been in the hundreds, and in a totally different kind of air war, where most of the pilots who scored, went on to score tens of RAF bombers, the intruders must have saved hundreds of bomber command planes from a hellish spin in flames, where you were very, very lucky if you bailed out alive!

Again, one part of ww2 that isnt that known...

Any info on the intruders would be welcome!

I put pics of Mossies, and a couple of other planes... Hope U like 'em!

Jagdpanther
05-12-2008, 01:04 AM
the cannon probably slowed down the plane when it was fired

KOYLI
06-13-2008, 06:05 AM
My next door neighbour works for a company that is making a replica of a Mossie for an Australian. They have had great difficulty in finding suitable original plans for the project. I'll try and get some photos to put on site.
Jim

CliSwe
11-27-2008, 07:12 PM
the cannon probably slowed down the plane when it was fired

And? ... Let's not forget the combat parameters here. Airspeed when aiming a heavy weapon against a ground target, should be a lot lower than when facing an airborne opponent. I don't think the Mosquito was very often drawn into a dogfight - pilots generally used its high speed to evade pursuit.

Cheers,
Cliff

redcoat
11-28-2008, 07:19 AM
. I don't think the Mosquito was very often drawn into a dogfight
The Mosquito was the highest scoring Allied night fighter of WW2 with over 600 kills credited to it.

32Bravo
11-28-2008, 10:56 AM
Chocks away, chaps!

http://tw.youtube.com/watch?v=d8ARxDGtoPU

Operation Oyster: Mosquitos and Bostons on live ops. Some terrific footage.

http://tw.youtube.com/watch?v=AZzgDkFvHbI

The Mosquito:

http://tw.youtube.com/watch?v=-cb6SmK_c2g&feature=channel

32Bravo
11-28-2008, 02:30 PM
...and just for a few laughs:

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=4OZq-tlJTrU&feature=related

Churchill
11-28-2008, 04:13 PM
That's cool. What was the original movie of that called? The Mosquito Squadrons?

32Bravo
11-30-2008, 12:15 PM
That's cool. What was the original movie of that called? The Mosquito Squadrons?

No. Mosquito Squadron was a different film but based on an actual operation to free resistance fighters in Holland.

The above is from the film 633 Squadron.

A fictional story, but it does portray the part played by Colonial personnel (the last time I saw one of those actors was in Crocodile Dundee) in the RAF and particularly the Mosquito Squadrons. I just happen to like the music. :)

Terry_214
12-27-2008, 11:34 AM
Koyli,

you have a pm.

Terry_214
12-27-2008, 11:36 AM
I live very near Hatfiled and often visit the DeHaviland mesuem and Society.

I love the Mosquito, more each time I go there.

bootneck
01-09-2009, 03:42 PM
I thought that they were made from ply and balsa wood as per a recent sky programme "warplanes" and built by furniture makers to free up metal workers for other planes.

Tony Williams
01-09-2009, 08:56 PM
I thought that they were made from ply and balsa wood as per a recent sky programme "warplanes" and built by furniture makers to free up metal workers for other planes.

De Havilland favoured advanced wooden construction methods even before the war, because of their favourable strength/weight ratio. Look at the DH Albatross airliner. So although it is true that the Mosquito could be made by people with non-strategic skills using non-strategic materials, that wasn't the reason why it was designed that way (but it might have helped in getting approval for it to be built).

Uyraell
02-11-2009, 06:49 AM
The 57mm video, opens showing a TypeXXVIII coastal sub, then a Type VIId, then a Type IXc: not that the poms knew people would be identifying the subs 65 years on, but I thought it interesting to note.
Nor was that as big as guns got in a Mosquito.

The 17 pounder 76.2 mm was ignored.

The 32 pounder was flown successfully and fired, from memory the thing had 21 shots, and employed a Galliot muzzle brake as part of the recoil absorption system. This was achieved by spiral ducting of air and gasses from the barrel, within the muzzlebrake itself. 6 Mossies were built and flown with the 32lb'er.

All in all, very interesting to see.

Regards, Uyraell.

Tony Williams
02-11-2009, 07:01 AM
The 32 pounder was flown successfully and fired, from memory the thing had 21 shots, and employed a Galliot muzzle brake as part of the recoil absorption system. This was achieved by spiral ducting of air and gasses from the barrel, within the muzzlebrake itself. 6 Mossies were built and flown with the 32lb'er.

I was aware of the plans to equip the Mosquito with the 3.7 inch AA gun (known as the 32 pdr in its abortive anti-tank version), but understood that this had never actually happened. I also doubt that it would have carried 21 rounds, as the Tsetse could only carry 23 rounds of the much smaller 6 pdr ammo. Can you give a source for your information?

Uyraell
02-12-2009, 03:57 AM
I was aware of the plans to equip the Mosquito with the 3.7 inch AA gun (known as the 32 pdr in its abortive anti-tank version), but understood that this had never actually happened. I also doubt that it would have carried 21 rounds, as the Tsetse could only carry 23 rounds of the much smaller 6 pdr ammo. Can you give a source for your information?


My Source is Purnell's, and before you laugh, despite some inaccuracies they were in general terms reliable publications.

I admit to possible inaccuracy of memory: number of shots may have been 12 or 15, and when I dig the book out again I'll post a correction here.

I am reasonably certain a mere 6 of the 32 pdr beasts were built and flown, that from the Mosquito book published (with a black cover outlining a photo of an FBVI in flight) in the late 1970's early 1980's.
Exact details of said book, author and publication references elude me now, as I never owned a copy of same. I do recall it as a couple of hundred pages, close enough to a squared off A4 page, with many pictures either drawn or photographs. 32pdr references were in an appendix under production figures in the back of the book.

Hope this info helps, scant though it is.

Regards, Uyraell.

Tony Williams
02-17-2009, 02:12 AM
I am reasonably certain a mere 6 of the 32 pdr beasts were built and flown, that from the Mosquito book published (with a black cover outlining a photo of an FBVI in flight) in the late 1970's early 1980's.
I have checked my references and asked Mosquito enthusiasts, but I cannot find any reference to even a single Mossie with the 3.7 inch/32 pdr gun having been built. Wallace Clarke's stanadrd book on British Aircraft Armament doesn't even mention the proposal, and he does include some experimental weapons. I think that had one been built and test-flown, we would certainly have heard about it.

Uyraell
02-17-2009, 06:00 AM
Purnell's History of the Second World War. Special, Allied Secret Weapons. Page 15, right hand column. op-cit.
According to that article, one 32pdr aircraft was built (most likely a conversion, Imo) flown, and the weapon fired. Thereafter, the point having been proved, the aircraft was scrapped.
The other book I mentioned is the one which mentions 6 32pdr Mossie aircraft as having been built.

Regards, Uyraell.

peopleselbow
03-08-2009, 03:05 PM
i have a model mosquito with the 57 mm autocannon as an option