PDA

View Full Version : The turning point



Kovalski
04-03-2007, 04:13 AM
What was (in your opinion) the most important moment in WW2 which determined the future result of war?

I think that the November 1942 was such a moment.
The Soviets began a counter-offensive at Stalingrad, Americans landed in North Africa, British defeated Afrika Korps at El-Alamein, the 2nd battle at Guadalcanal took place and Los Alamos was selected as the site for an Atomic Bomb Laboratory.

Do you have other suggestions?

Pozdrawiam,
Kovalski

Rising Sun*
04-03-2007, 06:24 AM
Two moments. Each equally important. The second could not have occurred without the first. Without the first, all prospects of the world as we know it now would have been lost.

1. The moment of Churchill's decision to fight the Germans to the end, which kept the flame of defiance and potential victory alive while others blundered about in the shadows looking for easier ways out.

2. The moment when Japan ordered its forces to implement the plans to attack Malaya, the Philippines, Pearl Harbor etc.

This brought America into the war with Japan's defeat assured and the American contribution to Europe decisive.

alephh
04-04-2007, 03:49 AM
Stalin had 2.9 million soldiers in the West. He lost over 4 million (casualties, captured) soldiers during the first handful of months after Operation Barbarossa began. Could any western democracy take that sort of a annihilation and continue fighting the war?


_

redalb2253
04-04-2007, 06:55 AM
The battle of Midway along with Guadalcanal were the turning points in the Pacific the Imperial navy was never the same after Midway, still a large and powerful fleet the loss of front line pilots was impossible to recover from.

Rising Sun*
04-04-2007, 07:27 AM
Stalin had 2.9 million soldiers in the West. He lost over 4 million (casualties, captured) soldiers during the first handful of months after Operation Barbarossa began. Could any western democracy take that sort of a annihilation and continue fighting the war?
_

But, given the first post, what was the most important moment in that process?

Rising Sun*
04-04-2007, 07:39 AM
The battle of Midway along with Guadalcanal were the turning points in the Pacific the Imperial navy was never the same after Midway, still a large and powerful fleet the loss of front line pilots was impossible to recover from.

Again, given the first post, what was the most important moment in that process?

The Midway water signal that allowed the code breakers to identify where the IJN was going?

Mc Cluskey's lucky finding of the IJN capital ships?

Or something else?

redalb2253
04-04-2007, 08:26 AM
First had to be the the breaking of the code without that there would have been no Midway sea battle and the Japanese would have taken the island.

Kovalski
04-04-2007, 09:22 AM
It seems I didn't make myself clear enough. I thought about a moment, or short period of time, when some events of great importance took place. It might be a minute, a day, week, or a month.

pozdrawiam,
Kovalski