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eolithic
12-21-2006, 04:57 AM
any one read the book stalingrad !! its awesome a real detail insight on the complete campaign

Firefly
12-21-2006, 10:17 AM
I really liked it.

alephh
12-21-2006, 12:49 PM
Very good :-)

... assuming we are talking about the one by Anthony Beevor ;-D

_

eolithic
12-21-2006, 07:58 PM
yes yes correct ! v r takin abt the 1 by anthony beevor

RifleMan20
01-27-2007, 09:39 PM
Sounds like a good book,do you know the average price of the book.

GermanSoldier
01-31-2007, 02:38 PM
I have read it, but let me make sure is it a informational book or a story book. Because I have only read the informational book.

kuuk
03-26-2009, 09:37 PM
Many years ago I read a book named "Stalingrad" whihch was written by a German participant in the battles. His name was Theordore Plevier. He wrote at least two more books about the Russian front: One was called "Moskau", the other "Berlin". My copies were translated from German into Dutch. These books described how brutal and senseless war can be.

Saxon
03-27-2009, 01:46 PM
I read 'Enemy at the Gates: The battle for Stalingrad' by William Craig.

Please don't think about the movie. This book merely inspired the movie.
The book covers the snipers involved, but this is only one facet of a much deeper work.

The book covers the whole battle in depth, with a historical and documentary approach. Including what led up to the battle, the many failures of German High Command, and the aftermath, POWs and survivors.

A harrowing account of a horrific battle.

flamethrowerguy
03-27-2009, 04:02 PM
Many years ago I read a book named "Stalingrad" whihch was written by a German participant in the battles. His name was Theordore Plevier. He wrote at least two more books about the Russian front: One was called "Moskau", the other "Berlin". My copies were translated from German into Dutch. These books described how brutal and senseless war can be.

Plievier's trilogy was a good read. In his book "Stalingrad" however it was obvious that Plievier wrote it during his time in the USSR (he emigrated in 1933), one can sense a little bit of censorship.

Schuultz
03-29-2009, 10:28 AM
Plievier's trilogy was a good read. In his book "Stalingrad" however it was obvious that Plievier wrote it during his time in the USSR (he emigrated in 1933), one can sense a little bit of censorship.

So if he emigrated to the USSR, did he fight with the Red Army?

flamethrowerguy
03-29-2009, 12:09 PM
So if he emigrated to the USSR, did he fight with the Red Army?

No, like most German emigrants he was "evacuated" to the east (Tashkent/Uzbekistan in his case) in late 1941.
After the Battle of Stalingrad in early 1943 he became a member of the "Nationalkomitee Freies Deutschland" (National Committee for a Free Germany).

RicemanCDN
03-30-2009, 01:01 PM
i enjoyed it . though it took me a while to read i have to read it over cause i had to do a bunch of book studys for school so i had to put it down so many times

Frogman
02-27-2011, 05:35 PM
I just got my copy of Stalingrad by anthony beever! so far so good! Now if I can only find a good book about the battle of Kursk

skorzeny57
02-28-2011, 01:41 PM
I agree with you, Frogman, about "Stalingrad" of Anthony Beevor. I've also read "Berlin", written by the same author, that is considered the ideal continuation of "Stalingrad".

Frogman
02-28-2011, 06:02 PM
I agree with you, Frogman, about "Stalingrad" of Anthony Beevor. I've also read "Berlin", written by the same author, that is considered the ideal continuation of "Stalingrad".
So the Book Fall of Berlin is pretty much all the battles after stalingrad all the way to the battle in berlin? Does it talk about the battle of Kursk?

skorzeny57
03-01-2011, 11:00 AM
The book "Berlin" (in Italy was edited with the title "Berlino 1945 - La caduta" - the fall -), is mainly based on the surrounding and the final assault to Berlin, from the Red Army. It starts about from January 1945 to the last months of the war.The battle of Kursk started five months after the fall of Stalingrad, on July 4th, 1943. It is considered the Stalingrad ideal conyinuation, not in chronological sense, but just because it was written by the same author, with the same method and principles. If you are expecially interested about Kursk, there are many other books. Here's i give you some titles:

KURSK : THE GREATEST TANK BATTLE EVER FOUGHT, 1943 - M. K. Barbier (2002)

KURSK : THE GERMAN VIEW - Steven H. Newton (2003)

THE BATTLE OF KURSK (Modern War Studies) - David M. Glantz & Jonathan M. House (2004)

KURSK : HITLER'S GAMBLE, 1943 - Walter S. Jr, Dunn (2008)

ZITADELLE : THE GERMAN OFFENSIVE AGAINST THE KURSK SALIENT, 4 - 7 JULY 1943
Mark Healy (2010)

Nickdfresh
03-01-2011, 07:03 PM
German Bundeswehr military historian, Karl-heinz Frieser, and author of The Blitzkrieg Legend: The 1940 Campaign in the West is supposedly writing a book on the Eastern Front as an official German military history that will focus on the offensives up to Kursk....

Schuultz
03-05-2011, 10:53 PM
In view of what Frieser's basic thesis was in The Blitzkrieg Legend, he'll probably end up arguing that the inter-connection and improved communication of the Soviet tank and regular forces by 1943 brought the end to German Panzer hegemony. It is clear that Frieser is a strong believer in the supreme importance of fast and comprehensive communication and he'll probably draw a direct line between the early German successes and the Chaos in the Soviet Headquarters (which basically caused a communications breakdown) and contrast it with the German defeat at Kursk and the empowered Zhukov's personal attention and constant communications with the local ground commanders.