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Panzerknacker
12-17-2006, 03:40 PM
I will try in here to make a compilation of the the naval cannons, field howitzers and others used in the conflict.


Off course if somebody can help.....;)

BDL
12-18-2006, 06:43 AM
L118 Light Gun

Weight: 1858 kg
Length: 8.8 m
Width: 1.78 m
Height: 2.13 m
Ammunition (105 mm): HE, HESH (Now obsolete in British service), WP, Smoke, Illuminating, Target Marking
Elevation: Between -100 to 1250 mils (Using the elevation hand wheel)
Traverse: 6400 mils on its platform (By rotating the tracks) and 100 mils left or right (Using the traversing hand wheel)
Maximum Range (HE): 17.2 km
Anti Tank Range: 800 m
Muzzle Velocity (max): 709 m/s
Shell Weight (HE): 15.1 kg
Rate of Fire: 6 rounds per minute

Prior to the mid-1970's, the British Army used the 105 mm OTO Melara Mod 56 as its light artillery weapon. This was originally designed for Italian Alpini, and was light enough to be lifted by Wessex helicopters or towed by Land Rovers. However, it lacked range (making it vulnerable to counter-battery fire) and was not entirely popular.

Its replacement was designed during the early 1970's, based on the ordnance of the Abbot self-propelled gun. It was heavier than its predecessor, but new, more capable helicopters such as the Puma, were entering service, and these could carry the new weapon. However, a new vehicle, the Land Rover 101 Forward Control (Land Rover, One Ton) was designed as its prime mover in the field. Since the end of the 1990's, the British Army have been using Pinzgauer ATVs as their gun tractors.

It first entered service with the British Army in 1975. In 1982, it saw intense use in the Falklands War. Five batteries (30 guns) were deployed to the Falkland Islands. During the final phases of the battles around Port Stanley, these guns were firing up to 400 rounds per gun per day, mostly at "Charge Super" i.e. the most powerful propellant charge for which they were designed. They were a major factor in the British victory.

At present, the British Army deploys the Light Gun with 29 Commando Regiment RA, 7 (Para) Regt. RHA and 40 (Field) Regt. RA. These support Marine Commando, Air Assault or Light formations.

Three regiments of the Territorial Army (100 Regt. RA(V), 103 (Lancastrian Artillery Volunteers) Regt. RA(V) and 105 Regt. RA(V)) are also equipped with the Light Gun. 104 Regt. RA(V) and other units use the Light Gun for ceremonial purposes.

Those Officer Training Corps with "Gun Troops" train with the L118.

http://www.armedforces.co.uk/army/listings/army105mmguna.jpg

(Information taken from the Light Gun Wiki page and confirmed on the MOD official Army site.}

BDL
12-18-2006, 07:04 AM
All British ships at the time (destroyers and frigates anyway - our carriers don't have heavy guns) carried the Vickers 4.5'' (114mm) Mk 8 Mod 0 gun in their turrets. I'm struggling to find any decent technical data for this weapon but it can apparently fire up to 25 rounds a minute to a range of over 12 miles.

Panzerknacker
12-18-2006, 02:45 PM
Thanks BDL I will provide some pics of the 4,5 " and his ammo later.

2nd of foot
12-18-2006, 06:57 PM
http://youtube.com/watch?v=zGZFUg2B5FI&mode=related&search=

4.5 firing 5 rounds in 10 seconds :)

Panzerknacker
12-18-2006, 09:33 PM
Nice piece.

Here some shots of the Vickers Mk-8 in the argentine destroyer "Hercules".

Note the case eyection chute in the right low corner.


http://i17.tinypic.com/47ap99z.jpg

http://i12.tinypic.com/34hdj07.jpg


More info:

http://www.navweaps.com/Weapons/WNBR_45-55_mk8.htm

1000ydstare
12-23-2006, 10:33 AM
Of course the old 4.5in on HMS Arrow jammed when it was supposed to be supporting 2PARA and their assault on Goose Green!!! Not quite the 25 rds per minute.

Panzerknacker
12-23-2006, 06:07 PM
Very true, no chance to bring down a Exocet with this gun despite some sources. :roll:

2nd of foot
12-24-2006, 09:16 AM
Why not, they used AAA in WW2 to shoot down V1s with radar. The gun is radar contoled with a computer aiming off with a proximity fuze. You only need to wing it ro knock it off course not blow it to bits.

Panzerknacker
12-25-2006, 07:05 PM
But a 0,25 square meters frontal section missile coming to you at mach 1 and 4 meters above the sea...?

I should not say impossible but very unlikely. That why the CIWS cannons were created.

----------------------------------


Oto Melara M-56 105 mm Howitzer.

The OTO Melara 105 mm Mod 56 began life in the 1950s to meet the requirement for a modern light weight howitzer that could be used by Italy's world famous Alpini (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpini) Brigades.

M-56 of the Argentine Army.

http://i12.tinypic.com/2na33a9.jpg





And the fact that it still remains in service with those same units a full half century after the howitzer's introduction is testament to the gun's quality.


Lowered gear forn AT use.

http://www.panzerbaer.de/guns/pix/105mm_bw-01.jpg



The Mod 56 has a number of unique characteristics for a weapon of its caliber, including the ability for its crew to manhandle the gun (due to its light weight, and the capability of being able to be used in the direct fire role. Being a pack howitzer it is designed to be broken down into 12 parts, each of which can be easily transported.[1] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OTO_Melara_Mod_56#_note-0) The capability of this weapon to be "knocked-down" allows the sections to be easily transported a number of ways, including by mule. This has made the gun rather popular with Mountain (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountain_warfare) and Airborne (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Airborne_forces) troops in a number of countries. Over all, the Mod 56 has served in approximately 30 countries worldwide, of which a partial listing of the major operators is listed. In the Mlavinas this piece was used by the Argentine Army and the Marines Artilleire section, even reliable was periodically outranged by the L-30 105 mm british gun.

Weight:1 273 kg (2 806 lb)

Length14 calibre: 1.47 m (57.9 in)

Caliber (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caliber)105 mm

Elevation (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elevation_%28ballistics%29)-7° to +65°

Traverse:56°

Muzzle velocity (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muzzle_velocity): 472 m/s .
Maximum range: 11 100 m (12 140 yd)

1000ydstare
12-26-2006, 05:40 AM
The CIWS and the 4 1/2 inch have two very different ways of killing missiles because they have two differing roles.

CIWS is a radar controlled stream of bullets that destroys missiles close in (a very much last ditch effort after other countermeasures have failed).

The 4 1/2 inch gun on the front is uses traditional "predictor" software in concert with a radar. Whilst a CIWS uses the radar return from the stream of bullets to guide in to the missile. The gun mount moves the barrel to a point where it thinks the missile will be hit.

The shell itself doesn't have to hit the target, but explodes in a shot gun effect. Only one piece of shrapnel maybe needed to bring the missile down. This system engages the missiles slightly further out than the CIWS.

The shotgun effect is the same as most SAMs today.

Edit to add.

A few websites for your perusal.

http://www.quarry.nildram.co.uk/MCG.html

http://www.middle-watch.co.uk/gun.htm

2nd of foot
12-26-2006, 11:17 AM
The 105 pack is very good and used by the Kiwis in Vietnam. It was well regarded by the US as it could be broken down to small portable loads and moved by a small helli lift. Unfortunately due to its lightweight it could not produce the extended rates of fire that the Anzacs needed and were shot out very quickly. They refitted with US 105s, do not know the name.

1000ydstare
12-26-2006, 12:32 PM
Pack Howitzers were used prior to WW1 aswell. Which is where the term "pack" comes from. THey were broken down and attached to mules. Think of the Gun Run of the RN, for the way they come apart.

After the L5 Pack Howitzer, I think it was the M101A1 105mm Light Howitzer, a towed general purpose, light field gun. It often served in the direct support role, due to its light weight, dependability and its high rate of fire capability made it the ideal weapon for moving with the light infantry forces and responding quickly to fire missions with high volumes of close-in fire. (think of what the current fighting in Afghan requires). The M101A1 was almost virtually the same weapon used by US from World War II.

In 1966 the M102 was issued to units in Vietnam. The heli capabilities of the L5 allowed it to be slung under the UH-1 Iroqois or Huey.

From wiki

The 25 pounder Short Mark I, or Baby 25 pr, was an Australian pack gun version of the 25 pounder, first produced in 1943. This was a shortened version of the standard 25 pounder, mounted on the Carriage 25 pr Light, Mark 1. The Baby was intended for jungle combat and was used in Southeast Asia and the Pacific, during World War II. The gun could be towed by a light vehicle or broken down into 13 sections.


Mark I
Known officially as the Ordnance, Quick Firing 25 pounder Mark I, or QF 25 pdr Mk.I in short, these conversions of the 18 pdr first entered British service in the early 1930s. Often referred to as the 18/25 pdr, the majority of these were lost in the early Norwegian Campaign. Many of these were captured by the Germans, who liked them so much they built up entire artillery units based on them. These units were deployed in Normandy prior to D-Day, leading to somewhat ironic duels between 25 pdr units on either side.

2nd of foot
12-26-2006, 05:01 PM
1000 you do realise that Anthony Williams (ref yuor link) is Tony?

Panzerknacker
12-26-2006, 06:48 PM
The shell itself doesn't have to hit the target, but explodes in a shot gun effect. Only one piece of shrapnel maybe needed to bring the missile down. This system engages the missiles slightly further out than the CIWS.



I know, I know that is a 1944 technology I am familiar with that.

The CIWS was badly neede despite the 114mm gun, the losses of the Royal Navy should be much less whit that.

1000ydstare
12-27-2006, 03:45 AM
2nd of Foot, Sorry you'll hav eto explaint hat one to me, I am a bit dim this morning.

2nd of foot
12-27-2006, 06:56 AM
The CIWS and the 4 1/2 inch have two very different ways of killing missiles because they have two differing roles.

CIWS is a radar controlled stream of bullets that destroys missiles close in (a very much last ditch effort after other countermeasures have failed).

The 4 1/2 inch gun on the front is uses traditional "predictor" software in concert with a radar. Whilst a CIWS uses the radar return from the stream of bullets to guide in to the missile. The gun mount moves the barrel to a point where it thinks the missile will be hit.

The shell itself doesn't have to hit the target, but explodes in a shot gun effect. Only one piece of shrapnel maybe needed to bring the missile down. This system engages the missiles slightly further out than the CIWS.

The shotgun effect is the same as most SAMs today.

Edit to add.

A few websites for your perusal.

http://www.quarry.nildram.co.uk/MCG.html

http://www.middle-watch.co.uk/gun.htm



NAVAL ARMAMENT: THE MCG PROBLEM
Anthony G Williams
Revised 27 August 2005
The person who wrote the article you linked to (above) is Tony Williams.

http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/member.php?u=2444

1000ydstare
12-27-2006, 07:25 AM
Ah, got you. Didn't know he was a member. I kept coming up with Tony Robinson of Baldrick fame.

Panzerknacker
01-02-2007, 08:32 PM
Argentine Oto-Melara M-56 in action:

http://i10.tinypic.com/2i7prpi.jpg


The rifling of this gun.

http://i17.tinypic.com/333cyft.jpg

1000ydstare
01-03-2007, 03:43 AM
I see what he's doing wrong there. He needs to use the laying equipment, not just look down the barral. :D

Panzerknacker
01-03-2007, 06:19 PM
Believe or not, in the last combats of June some argentine gunners took aim trough the barrel due the close range of the British troops.

1000ydstare
01-04-2007, 06:35 AM
Cool.

I did here the L118s were fitted with bayonets at one point :D

Panzerknacker
01-09-2007, 08:37 PM
FM CITER L33 155 mm howitzer.

http://www.saorbats.com.ar/GaleriaSaorbats/EA04/images/BArt16_JPG.jpg


Without a doubt the best artillery piece of the entire war. The Citer L33 had an range of 24 km (27 km with rocket assisted proyectile) and throws a 45,3 kg explosive shell. The gun consistently outranged the L118, but only two batteries of 3 guns each were actually deployed in the Falklands /Malvinas.

VonWeyer
01-10-2007, 08:31 AM
Beautiful pic Panzerknacker.

Panzerknacker
01-11-2007, 06:56 PM
Thanks , here is another.

http://www.latinamericanstudies.org/falklands/argentine-artillery-1.jpg


The argentine gunners claimed 3 hits on brittish frigates with this kind of weapon.

VonWeyer
01-11-2007, 07:00 PM
It almost looks like a scene from WW I.

Panzerknacker
01-11-2007, 07:30 PM
Yeap, there was some bayoneting charges like in that bloody war.

VonWeyer
01-12-2007, 02:54 AM
Incredible.

1000ydstare
01-13-2007, 11:05 AM
Which Frigates did they think they hit? I have never seen a record of any such successes, except by the Royal Marines at Georgia who damaged a corvette with a MG and Carl Gustav Anti-Tank weapon during the invasion of Georgia.

http://www.saorbats.com.ar/GaleriaSaorbats/EA04/images/BArt16_JPG.jpg
Is it a white flag or warning pennent on the gun? Or a unit flag? Does it mean anything?

Panzerknacker
01-13-2007, 06:35 PM
Which Frigates did they think they hit?

Not sure there were hit by nocturnal shots, no more info were provided.


Is it a white flag or warning pennent on the gun? Or a unit flag? Does it mean anything?


Too many question for a single post.

Panzerknacker
01-19-2007, 06:43 PM
Both type of guns in action.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-z9hdbSXVhw

Panzerknacker
04-09-2007, 10:21 PM
Oerlikon twin 35 MM.


http://www.britains-smallwars.com/Falklands/Oerlikon.gif

The Oerlikon 35 mm twin cannon is a towed anti-aircraft gun (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anti-aircraft_gun) made by Oerlikon-Contraves (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oerlikon-Contraves). The system was originally designated as 2 ZLA/353 ML but this was later changed to GDF-001. It was developed in the late 1950s and is used by around 30 countries.


http://img159.imageshack.us/img159/6610/gada601145ew.jpg

The system could be paired with the off-gun Super Fledermaus fire control radar, which in the late 1970s was upgraded to the Skyguard system.

In 1980 an upgraded model, the GDF-002 was produced, which featured an improved sight, and the ability to be directed by an off-gun digital control system. A few years later a third version of the system was being produced, the GDF-003, which was broadly similar to the GDF-002, but included some enhancements like self lubricating weapons and integrated protective covers.


http://img152.imageshack.us/img152/5034/gada601153bg.jpg


35x228mm round.

http://www.pof.gov.pk/products/images/LARGE/35mm.jpg

Super Fledermaus

The Super Fledermaus' fire control system was designed and built by the then separate Contraves company. It consists of a towed trailer with an E/F band pulse doppler search radar with a range of around 15 km and a pulse doppler tracking radar operating in the J band (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J_band), also with a range of 15 km. It was also used as the fire control system on the Gepard SPAAG.
[/URL]
The [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skyguard_radar"]Skyguard (http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/) system is contained within a towed trailer, mounted on the roof of which is a pulse doppler search radar, a pulse doppler tracking radar and co-axial television. The trailer also houses the crew of two and the small petrol generator.

A typical battery using the Skyguard consists of two twin 35 mm gun platforms with a single Skyguard fire control radar.



The captured 35mm were refurbished and issued to a reserve RAF regiment to back up the Rapiers.
Later the guns were put in museums and the Skyguard radars incorporated into a weapons range for air to air combat over the North Sea. This was based on the Nellis principle but has to be over water as we simply don't have the airspace over land. So its not perfect by any means, but its a lot better than nothing.

1000ydstare
04-10-2007, 04:15 AM
Weren't these weapons used in the defence of Goose Green also? As in against the Paras as an im promptu artillery support?

Panzerknacker
04-10-2007, 10:10 AM
Yes, they were used agaisnt ground target. The second picture shows one of this action I believe.

1100 per minute rounds of half kilograms shells coming to you.....nasty.

The guns were manned by Air Force personel, in this link you find some pics.


http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Fort/2839/Barrie/Goose-Green.html

1000ydstare
04-10-2007, 03:27 PM
http://www.geocities.com/Pentagon/Fort/2839/Barrie/gg_5.gif


More ammunition – the black and yellow stuff close to the camera is 20mm AAA ammunition. In the background is a variety of artillery ammunition (including white phosphorous shells). A lot of the ammunition was unstable – a few days after I took the photographs several Argentine soldiers and a couple of Gurhkas were killed or injured when some of it exploded as they were clearing it up.

Possibly the source of the rumour regards the Medic who shot an Argentine, during a ammo based explosion. But like I say it is only a rumour and one that I couldn't even tell you the title of the book that I read it in.