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nstoolman1
11-13-2006, 12:16 AM
Hope to get info. My father has a Arisika Japanese Pressure Testing Rifle. It has the chrysanthemum (spelling ?) and other symbols still on it. It is complete as far as I can tell and still functions mechanically. Have never fired it thou. Does any one have any printed info or know where I can get it?



Thanks for your time.

Gutkowski
11-20-2006, 06:12 PM
Is the rifle a type 99 or a type 38 do you have photos of it ?
Thanks,
Gut-

Gutkowski
11-20-2006, 06:14 PM
Here is a link for the markings
http://www.radix.net/~bbrown/japanese_markings.html

Gen. Sandworm
11-21-2006, 06:42 AM
Thats a good one Gutkowski.

Here is another link from our archive. I have an Arisaka rifle as well.

http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1938

nstoolman1
11-22-2006, 01:03 AM
Thank you gentlemen for responding. No I don't have any pictures. My father told me awhile back he believes it is a 38. He told me my moms brother was with some of the first troops to land in Japan. He supposedly was in a position to get 2 of these rifles out but I know of only ones location.
Currently my father has it but he lives up in N. Calif. I'm in S. Calif.

I have the web site you posted. Thank you. I guess I'm going to have to make a trip up there and see if I can talk him out of it.

Gen. Sandworm
11-22-2006, 05:15 AM
Thank you gentlemen for responding. No I don't have any pictures. My father told me awhile back he believes it is a 38. He told me my moms brother was with some of the first troops to land in Japan. He supposedly was in a position to get 2 of these rifles out but I know of only ones location.
Currently my father has it but he lives up in N. Calif. I'm in S. Calif.

I have the web site you posted. Thank you. I guess I'm going to have to make a trip up there and see if I can talk him out of it.

Alot of US serviceman came home with the type 38's very common model. So more than likely thats what he has. Would be nice if he had a good condition type 99 which is a bit harder to come by.

Gen. Sandworm
11-22-2006, 05:16 AM
Not that I would want to but curious does anyone know if ammo is still available for these rifles? Im assuming that you would have to special order them.

nstoolman1
11-24-2006, 11:33 AM
The part that makes this rifle unique is the fact that it was not a service rifle. It's sole purpose was to test the ammunition that was used. It has a special pressure testing pot just foward of the receiver. A metalic blank or wafer was inserted into the pot and when fired it measured the pressure the cartridge developed. My uncle "found" these two rifles in a factory type warehouse when they went ashore and brought them out. I'm waiting for vacation time to go visit my dad to get more info. I don't know about ammo for it but from what i can remmember the looks of the rifle is in good shape. By removing the wafer the rifle will function and fire a bullet. Thanks for the response.

Gen. Sandworm
11-24-2006, 12:54 PM
The part that makes this rifle unique is the fact that it was not a service rifle. It's sole purpose was to test the ammunition that was used. It has a special pressure testing pot just foward of the receiver. A metalic blank or wafer was inserted into the pot and when fired it measured the pressure the cartridge developed. My uncle "found" these two rifles in a factory type warehouse when they went ashore and brought them out. I'm waiting for vacation time to go visit my dad to get more info. I don't know about ammo for it but from what i can remmember the looks of the rifle is in good shape. By removing the wafer the rifle will function and fire a bullet. Thanks for the response.

Could be something special. Post some pics if you can.

Gutkowski
11-24-2006, 06:59 PM
Does you rifle look like this ?? if so its a Rare WWII Japanese Type 99 pressure test rifle.It is estimated that less than 20 of these rare rifles have survived
$3000-$5000
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/160-77.jpg

Here is a story from not too long ago
Gun Buy Back: $75 for $5000 Rifle

See update at end...

From the "Why did I do that?" department comes this Daily Sentinel story:


WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. He bought it for two packs of Chesterfield cigarettes. He sold it for a $75 Target gift card.

But World War II Navy veteran Bruno Filippelli never knew the Japanese rifle that collected dust in his closet for 60 years was a bona fide wartime treasure.

He turned it over to West Palm Beach police Saturday during the city's gun buy-back program, and the rare and valuable firearm better suited in a polished museum or with a wealthy weapons collector now lies alongside 450 other submitted shotguns, handguns and assault rifles in the department's evidence storage room.

"I feel like an idiot," said Filippelli, 79, four days after selling the rifle and just a few hours after discovering its worth.

And police say they're not giving it back. In fact, the gun could soon be melted down and destroyed with the others.

The controversy over the rare gun erupted when a picture of Filippelli turning over the rifle appeared in the Sunday edition of The Palm Beach Post. A Palm Beach police officer recognized the rare rifle, researched the gun and then delivered the bad news to Filippelli Wednesday.

"He told me, 'If I was you, I never would have turned it in,' " Filippelli said.

The gun, an Arisaka Type 99 pressure test rifle, is one of less than 100 ever produced. There are as few as 50 left, including about 20 in the United States, according to gun experts and dealers. The type of rifle was never used in the field. It was designed to test the chamber pressure and bullet velocity for the Type 99 rifle, which Imperial Japanese forces widely used throughout World War II.

Although the gun is not listed in most price guides, a piece in good shape could be valued by as much as $5,000, said Bob Adams, a rare-gun collector and firearms dealer in Albuquerque, N.M.


Oops! But hey, it's another gun off the street, or rather out of the closet: The cops are refusing to return it because of that... And West Palm Beach is so much safer now.

Update 7/16: The police decided to return the gun to Filippelli. From AP/Yahoo:


A gun collector saw a photo of the Arisaka Type 99 pressure test rifle in The Palm Beach Post and told Filippelli the gun is a rarity worth thousands. He asked for it back, but the police originally said no. They planned to melt it down with the other 450 firearms collected or give it to a museum.

But after the Post ran a story Friday about the Delray Beach resident's mistake, the police returned the gun.

"I think the publicity got too much for them," said Filippelli, 79. "Or maybe because I'm a vet or maybe they felt sorry for me."

He even got to keep the gift card, which he'll use to buy a present for his daughter.


So the story has a happy ending. Filippelli says he'll donate the gun to a museum.

George Eller
11-25-2006, 12:08 AM
-

From: Guns & Ammo: Surplus Firearms, 2005, pp 120-123.

http://img168.imageshack.us/img168/8885/arisaka01hf7.jpg

http://img151.imageshack.us/img151/2516/arisaka02og1.jpg

http://img168.imageshack.us/img168/6936/arisaka03wf2.jpg

http://img168.imageshack.us/img168/5151/arisaka04cl5.jpg

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George Eller
11-25-2006, 01:26 AM
-

02
From: Bolt Action Rifles, by Frank de Haas, DBI Books, Inc., 1971, pp 87-90

http://img172.imageshack.us/img172/7176/arisaka05ai8.jpg

http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/1016/arisaka06za5.jpg

http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/1230/arisaka07gw1.jpg

http://img241.imageshack.us/img241/2553/arisaka08jk5.jpg

(CONTINUED BELOW)

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George Eller
11-25-2006, 01:27 AM
-

(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)
03
From: Bolt Action Rifles, by Frank de Haas, DBI Books, Inc., 1971, pp 91-94

http://img172.imageshack.us/img172/9043/arisaka09ua0.jpg

http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/2102/arisaka10ay7.jpg

http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/6505/arisaka11la1.jpg

http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/4715/arisaka12kp3.jpg

(CONTINUED BELOW)

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George Eller
11-25-2006, 01:27 AM
-

(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)
04
From: Bolt Action Rifles, by Frank de Haas, DBI Books, Inc., 1971, pp 95-98

http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/633/arisaka13ct5.jpg

http://img172.imageshack.us/img172/4412/arisaka14np3.jpg

http://img241.imageshack.us/img241/966/arisaka15wd2.jpg

http://img241.imageshack.us/img241/8157/arisaka16gn7.jpg

(CONTINUED BELOW)

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George Eller
11-25-2006, 01:28 AM
-

(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)
05
From: Bolt Action Rifles, by Frank de Haas, DBI Books, Inc., 1971, pp 99-100

http://img241.imageshack.us/img241/9408/arisaka17ia1.jpg

http://img241.imageshack.us/img241/4720/arisaka18eb4.jpg

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tom!
11-25-2006, 06:50 AM
Hi.

Serial numbers:

The serial numbers are taken from production documents, the total production numbers may be lower. Additionally there were also local non-Arsenal productions under supervision which may not be included.

a) type Meiji 38 6,5 mm rifle:

Koishikawa Arsenal/ Tokyo Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 0 - 2.029.000
Production periode: 1906-ca.1935

Kokura Arsenal:

Series No.: 20
Serial numbers: 29.000 - 49.000

Series No.: 22
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series No.: 23
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series No.: 24
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series No.: 25
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series No.: 26
Serial numbers: 0 - 71.000

Production periode:1933-1940

Nagoya Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 2.021.000 - 2.031.000
Production periode: 1923-ca.1933

Series No.: 26
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series No.: 27
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series No.: 28
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series No.: 29
Serial numbers: 0 - 8.000

Production periode: ca.1933-ca.1940

Jinsen Arsenal (Korea):

Serial numbers: 0 - 1.400

Series No.: 30
Serial numbers: 1.000 - 13.000

Production periode: ca.1939-ca.1940

Mukden Arsenal (Manchuria):

Serial numbers: 0 - 30.000

Serial numbers: 65.000 - 79.000

Serial numbers: 5.000.000 - 5.065.000

Production periode: ca.1934-ca.1940


Special production for military police units:

Nagoya Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 0 - 2.600


Kokura Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 0 - 1.500


b) type Meiji 38 6,5 mm carabine:


Koishikawa Arsenal/ Tokyo Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 0 - 212.000
Production periode: 1906-ca.1935

Kokura Arsenal:

Series No.: 2
Serial numbers: 12.000 - 92.000

Production periode: 1933-1940

Nagoya Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 0 - 2.000
Production periode: 1923-ca.1933

Series No.: 4
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series No.: 5
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series No.: 6
Serial numbers: 0 - 4.000

Production periode: 1933-1940

Mukden Arsenal (Manchuria):

Serial numbers: 0 - 7.000

Serial numbers: 29.000 - 44.000

Serial numbers: 600.000 - 628.000

Production periode: ca.1934-ca.1940


c) type Meiji 44 6,5 mm carabine:

Koishikawa Arsenal/ Tokyo Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 0 - 56.000

Production periode: 1911-ca.1933

Kokura Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 56.000 - 70.000

Series No.: 1
Serial numbers: 0 - 9.000

Production periode: 1933-1940

Nagoya Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 0 - 2.000
Production periode: ca.1930-ca.1933

Series No.: 2
Serial numbers: 0 - 12.000
Production periode: ca.1933-ca.1940


d) type 97 6,5 mm sniper rifle:

Kokura Arsenal:
Serial numbers: 0 - 8.000
Production periode: 1937 - 1939

Nagoya Arsenal:
Serial numbers: 0 - 15.000
Production periode: 1937 - 1939


e) type 99 7,7 mm long rifle:

Toyo Kokyo, Hiroshima prefecture, under supervision of Kokura Arsenal:

Series: 37
Serial numbers: 0 - 31.000

Production periode: 1939 - 1940

Nagoya Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 0 - 8.000

Production periode: 1939


f) type 99 7,7 mm rifle:

Nagoya Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 1
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 2
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 3
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 4
Serial numbers: 10.000 - 99.999

Series: 5
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 6
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 7
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 8
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 9
Serial numbers: 10.000 - 99.999

Series: 10
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 11
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 12
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Production periode: 1940 - 1945

Private companies under supervision from Nagoya Asenal:

Series: 4
Serial numbers: 0 - 9.999

Series: 9
Serial numbers: 0 - 9.999

Series: 13
Serial numbers: 0 - 19.999

Kokura Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 0 - 1.999

Series: 20
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 21
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 22
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 23
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 24
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 25
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Production periode: 1940 - 1945

Tokyo Juki Kokyo under supervision from Tokyo Arsenal:

Series: 27
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 37
Serial numbers: 0 - 59.999


Toyo Kokyo under supervision from Kokura Arsenal:

Series: 30
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 31
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 32
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 33
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 34
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999

Series: 35
Serial numbers: 0 - 49.999

Production periode: 1940 - 1945

Jinsen Arsenal, Korea:

Series: 40
Serial numbers: 0 - 99.999


g) type 99 7,7 mm sniper rifle:

Kokura Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 0 - 1.999

Nagoya Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 0 - 9.999´


h) type 100 7.7 mm paratroop rifle (TERA rifle):

Nagoya Arsenal:

Series: 1
Serial numbers: 0 - 59.999

Series: 21
Serial numbers: not clear

Series: 22
Serial numbers: not clear


i) type 1 (type 38) 6,5 mm paratroop rifle (TERA rifle):

Nagoya Arsenal:

Series: 4
Serial numbers: not clear

Series: 5
Serial numbers: 0 - 5.999


j) type 2 7,7 mm paratroop rifle (TERA rifle):

Nagoya Arsenal:

Serial numbers: 0 - 29.999


k) type I 6,5 mm rifle:

Regia Sezione Fabbrica D´Armi Escertcito Gardone V.T.; Fabbrica D´Armi Beretta S.P.A. Gardone V.T.; Fabbrica National D´Armi Brescia:

Series: A- L
Serial numbers: 0 - up to 99.999 each

Total production: 60.000 rifles

Production periode: 1938 - 1939


l) type 5 7,7 mm semi-automatic rifle:

Yokosuka Naval Arsenal:

serial numbers: none

Production periode: 1945

Total production: 200, 125 assembled until surrender


Yours

tom! ;)

nstoolman1
11-25-2006, 07:11 PM
If memory serves me correctly I believe the rifle my dad has has a forestock just past the pressure chamber. Yes, I also saw that article in my web surfing. I want to thank you gentlemen for your time and information.

George Eller
11-25-2006, 10:07 PM
-

Thanks Tom for the serial numbers and production information. Great work.

Here is some more information on Japanese rifles of WWII

01
From: Small Arms of the World, Eleventh Edition, Edward Clinton Ezell, Stackpole Books, 1977, pp 405-410

http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/5764/japaneserifles01rx1.jpg

http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/8400/japaneserifles02wu8.jpg

http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/8915/japaneserifles03tp6.jpg

http://img179.imageshack.us/img179/6441/japaneserifles04sm8.jpg

(CONTINUED BELOW)

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George Eller
11-25-2006, 10:08 PM
-

(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)
02
From: World War II Small Arms, John Weeks, Galahad Books, 1979, pp 61-64

http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/1395/japaneserifles05vb3.jpg

http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/762/japaneserifles06pe9.jpg

http://img179.imageshack.us/img179/1255/japaneserifles07bf0.jpg

-

From: The Encyclopedia of Infantry Weapons of World War II, Ian V. Hogg, Thomas Y. Crowell Company, Inc., 1977, p 47

http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/4485/japaneserifles08fn1.jpg

(CONTINUED BELOW)

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George Eller
11-25-2006, 10:09 PM
-

(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)
03
From: The Encyclopedia of Infantry Weapons of World War II, Ian V. Hogg, Thomas Y. Crowell Company, Inc., 1977, p 49

http://img179.imageshack.us/img179/1485/japaneserifles09zj2.jpg

-

From: Fighting Techniques of a Japanese Infantryman 1941-1945, Leo J. Daugherty III, MBI Publishing Company, 2002, p 83

http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/9776/japaneserifles10gx3.jpg

-

From: Japanese Army Handbook 1939-1945, George Forty, Sutton Publishing Limited, 1999, pp 115-118

http://img179.imageshack.us/img179/3541/japaneserifles11cv0.jpg

-

From: The Military Sniper since 1914, Martin Pegler, Osprey Publishing, 2001, pp 27-29, 35

http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/6098/japaneserifles12uk8.jpg

(CONTINUED BELOW)

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George Eller
11-25-2006, 10:10 PM
-

(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)
04
From: Out of Nowhere: A history of the Military Sniper, Martin Pegler, Osprey Publishing, 2004, pp 218-221

http://img179.imageshack.us/img179/8529/japaneserifles13le9.jpg

http://img179.imageshack.us/img179/1368/japaneserifles14fn2.jpg

http://img179.imageshack.us/img179/8592/japaneserifles15hw4.jpg

-

From: Guns & Ammo: Surplus Firearms, 2005, pp 14-15.
For surplus military small arms and ammo:

http://img179.imageshack.us/img179/9126/japaneseammo01ep6.jpg

-

Gen. Sandworm
11-26-2006, 06:59 AM
Does anyone have a problem with mearging this thread with?:

http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?p=90328#post90328

The content is very relavent to this thread.

Gutkowski
11-26-2006, 09:56 AM
No problem ,keep us informed when you get some photos .I know I would like to see it

Panzerknacker
11-26-2006, 12:40 PM
With the Dresde church topic ?? :shock:

Hmmm...not sure :D


I think you mean the Arisaka topic yes I am on favor.

BTW Nice scans George.

Gen. Sandworm
11-26-2006, 12:52 PM
Does anyone have a problem with mearging this thread with?:

http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?p=90328#post90328

The content is very relavent to this thread.

Yea dont know what happened there :confused: any they are merged.

Gutkowski
11-26-2006, 01:21 PM
Ok all you pros Id my Type 38
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/Gramps%20WWII%20Marine%20Items/gramps2.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/Gramps%20WWII%20Marine%20Items/gramps5.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/Gramps%20WWII%20Marine%20Items/gramps4.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/Gramps%20WWII%20Marine%20Items/gramps3.jpg

Panzerknacker
11-26-2006, 01:29 PM
Very good condition for that kind of rifle , :!: congrats.

tom!
11-26-2006, 01:58 PM
Hi.


Ok all you pros Id my Type 38


Pic 1: nihachi shiki = type 38, the chrysanthemum indicates that this rifle wasn´t captured after surrender as all chrysanthemum were erased before the weapon was given away after surrender (chrysanthemum as heraldic symbol for the emperor)

pic 2: no series number, serial number 826158, symbol of Koishikawa Arsenal. This indicates that this rifle was made by the Koishikawa Arsenal before 1935

pic 3: symbol of Koishikawa Arsenal, indicating that the rifle´s firing mechanism was fabricated at Koishikawa Arsenal. The "O" is the firing mechanism proof mark.

pic 4: symbol of Koishikawa Arsenal on the barrel, indicating that the barrel was also fabricated by Koishikawa Arsenal. The "S" is the barrel proof mark.

Yours

tom! ;)

Gen. Sandworm
11-26-2006, 02:56 PM
Ok all you pros Id my Type 38


Good looking rifle! I would love to post some pics of mine but thats not possible at the moment but I will do when I get the chance.

George Eller
11-26-2006, 03:05 PM
-

Hi Tom,

Nice work. I must compliment you also on your excellent website (although in German). Some links to your website that pertain to this topic are posted below.

Japanese Military Power 1930-1945
http://www.ww2technik.de/artikelmainj.htm

Japanese Armed Forces 1930-1945
http://www.ww2technik.de/jwaffenmain.htm

Japanese Infantry Weapons
http://www.ww2technik.de/jinfwaffenmain.htm

Japanese Rifles
http://www.ww2technik.de/jap%20gewehre.htm

Manufacturer symbols
http://www.ww2technik.de/sites/inf/Herstellersymbole.htm

Serial Numbers
http://www.ww2technik.de/sites/inf/seriennummern.htm

-

World Lingo
Free Online Language Translator
http://www.worldlingo.com/en/products_services/worldlingo_translator.html

-

Beautiful rifle Gutkowski.

(your markings link provided earlier)
http://www.radix.net/~bbrown/japanese_markings.html

-

Thanks Panzerknacker.

-

I think it was a great idea to merge these threads General.

(your Arisaka link provided earlier)
http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1938

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Gutkowski
11-26-2006, 03:27 PM
Thank you Tom
This rifle as most have seen before is my grandfathers bring back from WWII he was a with the 1st Marine div. and the rifle was captured on his birthday Jan 2 1944.I will get some photos of his sword that he brought back too ,Do we have any sword experts here ???
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/Gramps%20WWII%20Marine%20Items/gramps10.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/Gramps%20WWII%20Marine%20Items/gramps8.jpg

Gutkowski
11-26-2006, 03:39 PM
Here are some
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/British%20Solders%20WWII/IMG_0584.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/British%20Solders%20WWII/IMG_0583.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/British%20Solders%20WWII/IMG_0582.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/British%20Solders%20WWII/IMG_0585.jpg

Gutkowski
11-26-2006, 03:40 PM
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/Gramps%20WWII%20Marine%20Items/IMG_0580.jpg
I was told that this may be where a bullet hit the sword before killing the officer ??
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/Gramps%20WWII%20Marine%20Items/IMG_0581.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/Gramps%20WWII%20Marine%20Items/IMG_0586.jpg

VonWeyer
11-27-2006, 04:10 AM
You must be very proud to have these weapons as family heirlooms!
Don't know much about swords, but very interesting photos none the less.

Regards
VonWeyer

Tim
02-05-2007, 09:32 PM
Alot of US serviceman came home with the type 38's very common model. So more than likely thats what he has. Would be nice if he had a good condition type 99 which is a bit harder to come by.

I have a model 99 in great condition, My dad was a marine in WW2 and in korean war. During WW2 as Master Sergeant of a USMC Recon Unit and one of 4 to live of 3000 marines taking a beach head to secure the next wave of marines. Just a little back ground of 1% of what he went through. I will try and get some pics of this weopon my Dad brought back with him. He took it from an arsenal they captured. I also have pics of him from the world news wondering who this 17 year old marine was digging a fox hole and of course turned out to be my Dad lol. Just to name a few WW2 memoriabilia. I have stuff that would probably blow your mind as to still having lol.

Tim
02-06-2007, 01:03 AM
I have a model 99 in great condition, My dad was a marine in WW2 and in korean war. During WW2 as Master Sergeant of a USMC Recon Unit and one of 4 to live of 3000 marines taking a beach head to secure the next wave of marines. Just a little back ground of 1% of what he went through. I will try and get some pics of this weopon my Dad brought back with him. He took it from an arsenal they captured. I also have pics of him from the world news wondering who this 17 year old marine was digging a fox hole and of course turned out to be my Dad lol. Just to name a few WW2 memoriabilia. I have stuff that would probably blow your mind as to still having lol.

I should add its from the Nagoya Arsenal (Serial # 57303) (Series # 5) (Type 99 short rifle) .

jacobtowne
02-06-2007, 09:29 AM
Here's a Type 14 Nambu from my collection. It's Showa 6.1 (January, 1931). The holster is an early type made ca. 1930, without firing pin pouch. The sword is a Tanaka, a war trophy one of my uncles brought back.

JT

Panzerknacker
02-28-2007, 07:29 PM
That is one of the called "pre-manchuria"..right ?


The tankers pistol.

http://img87.imageshack.us/img87/8265/shikiup5.jpg

The cartrigde, 8x21mm Nambu, muzzle velocity about 300 m/s.

http://www.municion.org/8x21/8x21.jpg

http://www.municion.org/8x21/8x21.htm

Rising Sun
03-01-2007, 04:22 AM
During WW2 as Master Sergeant of a USMC Recon Unit and one of 4 to live of 3000 marines taking a beach head to secure the next wave of marines.

Where was that?

Rising Sun
03-03-2007, 09:15 AM
During WW2 as Master Sergeant of a USMC Recon Unit and one of 4 to live of 3000 marines taking a beach head to secure the next wave of marines.

I'd still like to know where this was.

As your father's unit was 3,000 men it was a USMC regiment or, in UK / Australian terms, a brigade.


The Marine division that figured in Admiral Nimitz' plans for the Gilberts was organized according to the E series tables of organization adopted in April 1943. With an authorized strength of 19,965 officers and men, the division was constructed in a triangular fashion--three infantry regiments, each of which had three infantry battalions. This arrangement enabled the division commanding general to hold in reserve an entire regiment without impairing the ability of his command to attack or to remain on the defensive. A regimental commander could exercise this same option with his battalions, and the battalion commander with his rifle companies, as well as with a headquarters company and a weapons company. An infantry regiment was authorized a basic strength of 3,242, a battalion 953, and a rifle company 196.
http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USMC/III/USMC-III-I-3.html

You're talking about a rounded 100% death rate for that beach landing, wiping out a regiment. There isn't even one Pacific beach landing with a rounded 100% casualty rate that I know of, at regimental level or even battalion or company level. I can't even think of an island campaign that had an effective 100% casualty rate, let alone an effective 100% death rate, at those unit levels.

Tarawa probably had the worst USMC casualty rate in the initial beach assault, but I cannot find any reference to about 3000 dead on a beach in the first wave. Or, for that matter, in several waves. Tarawa casualties were in the thousands only if measured in days, not the first beach wave. And we're still not talking about deaths.

If there was a USMC action with only 4 men left alive out of 3,000 in the beach assault it would probably be the USMC's biggest event, and it would be remembered and comemmorated by the USMC. It isn't.

I can't find any reference to it, nor have I ever heard of it. So, where did this happen?

Boff
03-03-2007, 05:46 PM
maybe he meant 300?

tankgeezer
05-28-2007, 11:49 PM
I have been told that 100 prototype receivers for the type 99 Arisaka rifle were made in the U.S. forged at the Ladish Co. in Cudahy, Wisconsin. I cannot verify this claim, but thought it interesting anyway. - Raspenau -

Jenkin
06-19-2007, 12:40 AM
Not that I would want to but curious does anyone know if ammo is still available for these rifles? Im assuming that you would have to special order them.

replying to his initial question, that there is ammo that is still available, and unfired brass, 139 Grain bullets and powder is still available for the rifles, but military ammo, as almost impossiable to come across, like military ammo for any caliber

tankgeezer
06-21-2007, 12:55 AM
Not that I would want to but curious does anyone know if ammo is still available for these rifles? Im assuming that you would have to special order them.Ammunition should still be available commercially,there were some makers that specialized in obsolete or difficult to obtain calibers.(Norma, Lapua, and some others) though it will be costly. also, there are alot of firearms dealers that offer reloading services, and they might make you some ammo if you are willing to pay for the die set needed to size, and complete the cartriges. you could also do it yourself with reloading equipment being not too expensive. As long as you reside in a place where there are no laws prohibiting the practice. Military ammo will be nearly impossible to find in any quantity, mostly just a few single rounds from collectors.

Gutkowski
07-08-2007, 11:27 AM
Here is a link for the ammo Hornady 7.7X58 JAP 150GR SP 20rd box $20.30
http://www.rrarms.com/catalog.php?action=1001&brand=7.7JAP

Hornady 6.5X50 JAP 140GR SP 20RD $20.30 per 20rd box
http://www.rrarms.com/catalog.php?prod=AHRN80485

diverdoc
11-18-2007, 03:11 PM
Norma Industries makes 7.7 ammo, but it is freeking expensive, about $1 a round, and it is hard to find on top of that.

Ezrick
06-14-2008, 11:01 PM
I recently found a Type 38 in (I kid you not) my grandfather's attic. It seems to be no better than an average example of the type though it was most probably brought back as a battlefield momento from the pacific.

It has been a lot of fun looking up the various markings and their meanings. It does have the emporer's chrysanthemum marking above the 'Type 38' marking. It has serial number 33411 of series 26 and was built at the Nogoyo armoury sometime between 1923 and 1930.

All fun stuff and like I said a good time looking it all up and finding the information.

Then I noticed something that made a chill run up my spine.

On the right side of the receiver in the wood near the bolt there are 7 notches carved. They are poorly spaced and obviously carved by an unskilled hand.

Does anyone know if Japanese soldiers commonly 'put a notch in their gun' when they killed (or believe they killed) and enemy soldier?

Panzerknacker
12-26-2008, 04:50 PM
A rare picture of a kamikaze with a spanish Beistegui Royal 7.65mm gun.

http://img376.imageshack.us/img376/8959/dsc01283ev8xr6.jpg


http://i41.tinypic.com/25rfdxz.jpg

tom!
12-26-2008, 07:57 PM
Hi.

I think it is more likely a late-war simplified Sugiura type 8mm pistol (basicly a Colt model 1903 rechambered for the Nambu 8 mm pistol ammunition). The form of the gun fits almost perfect but the safey trigger, which is placed on the left side, is missing.

To my opinion the picture is mirrored as the pilot is shown left-handed which is somewhat rare among military personel of that time. This would also explain the missing safety trigger.

click me (http://www.heartsofiron.eu/forum/gallery/image.php?album_id=60&image_id=455)
Early war (1942) Sugiura type pistol

tankgeezer
12-27-2008, 12:55 AM
Norma Industries makes 7.7 ammo, but it is freeking expensive, about $1 a round, and it is hard to find on top of that.

If you are up to loading your own ammo, you can try R.C.B.S co. they make die sets for lots of difficult to obtain ammunition, and other die sets for making cases from other compatible(and easier to get) cases. They even make dies for my lahti.

Panzerknacker
12-27-2008, 03:47 PM
I think it is more likely a late-war simplified Sugiura type 8mm pistol (basicly a Colt model 1903 rechambered for the Nambu 8 mm pistol ammunition). The form of the gun fits almost perfect but the safey trigger, which is placed on the left side, is missing.



Oh thanks, I tought it was a foreign pistol. I aiming identifing small arms is pretty bad lately.

Now other question emerges ...why a kamikaze would need a pistol ? :lol:

Major Walter Schmidt
03-03-2009, 08:36 PM
If some Kamikaze gets captured, they would need to kill himself.

gojulas
03-03-2009, 11:49 PM
http://ww2incolor.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=3231&d=1236142080

Here is a picture of the pressure testing version

Deaf Smith
03-13-2009, 09:51 PM
Now other question emerges ...why a kamikaze would need a pistol ? :lol:

The pilot may very well not have been a kamikaze pilot all his (short) life. Some of the pilots were quite experienced and had fought for years in the war. So that may have been his personal pistol he flew with for many a sortie.

Sad really. Blinded by his faith in the 'emperor/god'.

Deaf

Major Walter Schmidt
03-13-2009, 10:18 PM
I wouldnt say "blinded"..... More misused, by the Military...

zombieoutlaw
03-27-2009, 12:43 PM
You can get ammo for the arisaka type 99 and arisaka type 38 at cabelas.com. 7.7x58 is 23.99 a box, 6.5x50 is also 23.99 a box. It's made by hornady.

SS Ouche-Vittes
04-05-2009, 09:51 PM
hi guise!

Deaf Smith
04-16-2009, 09:32 PM
You guys hear they found a bunch of automataic weapons, INCLUDING a Nambu Light and 50 mm knee mortar in Alabama?

Someone threw them in a ditch.

http://sipseystreetirregulars.blogspot.com/2009/04/its-raining-automatic-weapons-in.html

Sure would like to play with them! Oh, well the ATF will torch them now.

zombieoutlaw
04-20-2009, 08:03 PM
When did they find those weapons??

tankgeezer
04-20-2009, 11:38 PM
Very interesting pile of hardware, great value if papered, only good for parts otherwise. If you have, or buy an unpapered class III, or NFA weapon, the only thing you can do is strip the usable parts to sell, and cut the receivers up. Then you are safe from prosecution. If a large bore, permanently convert it to U.S. .50 cal, then it needs no papers, and is born again legal.They will search the history of these guns, see if they are stolen from a legit owner, and return them if so. otherwise, they will end up in the Gov't inventory for whatever training, or use they will provide.

Panzerknacker
08-28-2009, 06:50 PM
Video of the Type 11 and 96 6,5 mm machineguns.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOeHH54v4AA

VonWeyer
08-31-2009, 08:06 AM
Great footage and some interesting facts...specifically the counter on the magazine.

Panzerknacker
08-31-2009, 06:44 PM
More videos about japanese guns ( actually think this was the only tV program ever dealing with this subject)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MhpCemV0-jo

RTY1941
09-16-2010, 06:15 AM
Good information

olespeiceah
09-20-2010, 08:35 PM
That's a good video. I think i also saw a series on WWII weaponry in either Discovery or Nat Geo