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View Full Version : Infantry Machine-Guns of WWII



Hiddenrug
08-04-2006, 06:53 AM
Commonwealth Weapons:

The Bren Gun - the base of fire for the British Infantry throughout World War Two

Length 116 cm
Weight 9 kg (empty) 10.2 kg (loaded)
Calibre 0.303 in (7.7 mm)
Magazine 30 round box
Muzzle Velocity 745 metres per second
Rate of Fire 500 rpm

http://img222.imageshack.us/img222/6995/brenkw8.th.jpg (http://img222.imageshack.us/my.php?image=brenkw8.jpg)

Hiddenrug
08-04-2006, 06:55 AM
Feel free to request Information on any Light/Medium/Heavy Machine-Guns.

Panzerknacker
08-04-2006, 07:21 PM
Do you have any info about the BESA s MGs ?

Hiddenrug
08-04-2006, 10:14 PM
This was a heavy machine gun of Czech origin that was also produced by the British as the BESA. When Czechoslovakia fell into German hands in 1939 the Germans took over the factories of their famous armaments industry and continued producing many of the weapons from small arms to tanks and artillery.

Production of this weapon continued on a limited basis until 1942. It saw service during the early part of the war particularly with rear echelon units (ie Police) and the SS.

Calibre: 7.92x57mm
Length: 109cm
Weight: 36.5kg (with tripod)
Rate of fire: 500-700 rpm

http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/4076/zb37eo7.th.jpg (http://img88.imageshack.us/my.php?image=zb37eo7.jpg)

Panzerknacker
08-04-2006, 10:32 PM
Oh thanks, I was thinking that this is a completely new weapon. it was used mostly in tanks right?

Hiddenrug
08-04-2006, 10:48 PM
Yes it was mainly mounted on vehicles.

Hiddenrug
08-04-2006, 11:13 PM
The M1919A4 (Browning Light Machine Gun)

Length 104 cm
Weight 14 kg (gun), 6.4 kg (tripod)
Calibre 0.30 in (7.62 mm)
Feed 250 round belt
Muzzle Velocity 855 metres per second
Rate of Fire 400 to 500 rpm

The M1919A4 fulfilled the light machine gun role for US forces in the absence of a more appropriate weapon. It is difficult to describe it as a light machine gun, as it was noticeably heavier than other examples and also needed a weighty tripod mount to fire from

http://img147.imageshack.us/img147/632/m1919a4iv1.th.jpg (http://img147.imageshack.us/my.php?image=m1919a4iv1.jpg)

There are many varients of this weapon. If you would like me to post more images of these weapons please say so.

oddball
08-05-2006, 04:09 AM
Just as a side note the Bren was named after it's Czech place of origin, Brno,
and it's place of manufacture, Enfield.

Cuts
08-05-2006, 04:12 PM
Hiddenrug, I wouldn't take everything on that site as gospel as it doesn't cover the wpns in detail.

For example, there were a number of marks of BREN that had different characteristics and these are not reflected in the gen on the Bayonet Strength site.

The same goes for other the weapons, although as it does give a general idea of those covered.

Hiddenrug
08-06-2006, 01:32 AM
This thread is for a general overview of the weapon and SOME stats. I do not see the need to include every little detail for each weapon.

2nd of foot
08-07-2006, 06:25 AM
This was a heavy machine gun of Czech origin that was also produced by the British as the BESA. When Czechoslovakia fell into German hands in 1939 the Germans took over the factories of their famous armaments industry and continued producing many of the weapons from small arms to tanks and artillery.

Production of this weapon continued on a limited basis until 1942. It saw service during the early part of the war particularly with rear echelon units (ie Police) and the SS.

Calibre: 7.92x57mm
Length: 109cm
Weight: 36.5kg (with tripod)
Rate of fire: 500-700 rpm

http://img88.imageshack.us/img88/4076/zb37eo7.th.jpg (http://img88.imageshack.us/my.php?image=zb37eo7.jpg)

I seem to remember that the BESA was more the original BREN in 7.92. and was used in most british tank well into the 60s and very well respected.

Man of Stoat
08-07-2006, 02:19 PM
No, the BESA is a very different beast. although it is gas operated, it has a recoiling barrel.

Incidentally, one of the reasons why it was brought into British service in the German 7.92 mm calibre was that Britain was actually considering adopting that cartridge after the war, until it carried out the ideal calibre trials which resulted in the .280 cartridge of EM2 fame. logistically this was not a huge issue -- since it was only used as a tank gun the ammunition could be delivered with all the other specialist tank ammunition and equipment . I think Kynoch produced the ammunition for it. Another very good reason was that the design could essentially be copied straight off without a potentially problematic calibre change.

2nd of foot
08-08-2006, 02:33 PM
Was it the same camber as the Germans 7.92 and could they interchange? Besides the Vickers I cannot think of another gun they could have used as a coax. Were the Shermans shipped with browning?

Cuts
08-08-2006, 07:25 PM
Was it the same camber as the Germans 7.92 and could they interchange? Besides the Vickers I cannot think of another gun they could have used as a coax. Were the Shermans shipped with browning?

Yep, M1919A4 Brownings.

Man of Stoat
08-09-2006, 03:17 AM
Yes, the German 7.92 mm calibre which the BESA was produced in was the same German 7.92 mm as the Germans used, therefore German German 7.92 mm could be fired in the BESA in German 7.92 mm calibre, and the BESA German 7.92 mm calibre could indeed be fired in German guns chambered for the German 7.92 mm calibre.

;)

Hiddenrug
08-09-2006, 03:29 AM
Which American Tank had the 50.cal. HMG?

Cuts
08-09-2006, 01:37 PM
Many Shermans used the M2 as secondary/AA armament in a turret ring.