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Panzerknacker
06-08-2006, 07:25 PM
Spitfire Mk-IX with Mark Hanna at the controls..

Spitfire Mark IX. (http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-5032538990033127959&q=ww2+gov&pl=true[/url)

Man of Stoat
06-09-2006, 05:29 AM
Is that poll a WAH?

Cuts
06-10-2006, 02:13 AM
Try this (http://www.bofunk.com/video/818/low_flying_plane.html) one flown by Ray Hannah.
The cameraman knew, the bloke on screen didn't !
Look slightly to the left of the two tall trees just under the horizon on the right side of the commentator.


The language is a little, er, fresh - you have been warned !

Panzerknacker
06-11-2006, 02:49 PM
Nice haircut from that Spit, good video Cuts. :D


Is that poll a WAH?

It was.

Panzerknacker
09-15-2006, 07:43 PM
Amazing video, Spitfire shaving some guys head. :shock:

http://www.j-talk.com/files/library/gary/spitfire.wmv


http://j-foto.com/images/29092_0cddhf_s.jpg

George Eller
12-28-2006, 05:06 PM
-

Airshow Action: Spitfire at Duxford
Airshow Action: Spitfires at Duxford - a huge line up, said it is the largest since WW2,
some twenty machines. Local TV piece with all the usual homilies.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8YOr9ZWArRE&mode=related&search=

Spitfire line-up
IWM Duxford sequence, a short clip of the Spitfires etc which were visiting for the airshow plus resident P51 etc.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0QsW_MPuM0&mode=related&search=

Warbirds: Spitfire Doc Pt3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n_u5r9Oc7hg&mode=related&search=

-

VonWeyer
12-29-2006, 04:36 AM
That's a pretty cool clip Panzerknacker.

redcoat
12-29-2006, 03:33 PM
With Spitfires I would have to split my vote into 2, for medium to low altitude I would go with the IX, for high altitude it would have to be the XIV.
If I really had to choose it would be the XIV.

Panzerknacker
01-08-2007, 07:58 PM
Nice picture Redcoat, here some basic info about the Spit:

http://i10.tinypic.com/2nu4v8h.jpg

VonWeyer
01-09-2007, 03:51 AM
A classic picture Redcoat. Very eerie.

Panzerknacker
01-27-2007, 02:27 PM
Argentine Flight Lieutenant Algeron Middleton flying an Spitfire PR XIV meet unexpectedly a Me-262 prototypes flying over Peenemunde in 1944.


http://www.aviationart.com.ar/galerias/militar/Spitfire%20PR%20%20Algie.jpg

GermanSoldier
02-01-2007, 07:41 PM
Some pictures that I looked up on the internet. Very well taken pictures. Enjoy!
http://i9.tinypic.com/499u2xk.jpg
http://i9.tinypic.com/4c8d579.jpg
http://i7.tinypic.com/2le0zzk.jpg
This is probably the oldest picture of the Spitfire I found above.

Panzerknacker
03-09-2007, 10:09 AM
Armament of the MK-I and MK-II variants:



http://img249.imageshack.us/img249/2644/76940902pn2.jpg


http://img156.imageshack.us/img156/5323/25164235sf8.jpg


http://img115.imageshack.us/img115/3059/78306683tc9.jpg



to be continued....

Panzerknacker
04-25-2007, 06:30 PM
Spifire Mk II Long range:

This weird variant of 1941 had a fixed underwing tank of 184 liters. Used mostly for escorting duties of the bombers in the early "Circus" operations.

http://img174.imageshack.us/img174/8522/002le6.jpg


The tank was not droppable and reduced the maximum speed to mere 528 km/h.

3 view:

http://img134.imageshack.us/img134/3221/55802845vs2.jpg

shoogs
04-26-2007, 05:14 PM
nace pic redcoat. this wing tipping stunt had to be changed, after a while the germens started to put a wire from the tip of the wing to the fuselage so if another plain tryed to tip the wing the it would trigger off the bomb so then the pilots had to bring there wing just under or over the wing of the v1 to send it off corse.

Panzerknacker
05-03-2007, 12:30 PM
2 images of the two inch thick (50.8mm) armored windshield glas used in the Spit Mk II variant.

http://img355.imageshack.us/img355/5927/parabrisas1fu6.jpg


An one with combat damage after some encounter with BF-109, the glass withstand 7,92mm rounds at point blank range and 13 mm round at more than 300 meters.

http://img249.imageshack.us/img249/7381/parabrisas2yn6.jpg

Panzerknacker
05-04-2007, 09:16 AM
Amament of Spit Mk I & II (part II)

http://img81.imageshack.us/img81/3675/10570151vd8.jpg



http://img105.imageshack.us/img105/2765/sssgr6.jpg


Armament of British Aircraft 1909-1939 H. King /Putnam books.

Matzos
06-19-2007, 02:01 AM
Argentine Flight Lieutenant Algeron Middleton flying an Spitfire PR XIV meet unexpectedly a Me-262 prototypes flying over Peenemunde in 1944.


http://www.aviationart.com.ar/galerias/militar/Spitfire%20PR%20%20Algie.jpg


There was a FR XIV (Fighter Reconnaissance) but not a PR XIV, it does look to me as a PRXI

Panzerknacker
06-19-2007, 07:00 PM
Well ,wathever be the variant the paint is obviously inspired in that picture ;)

Matzos
06-20-2007, 12:48 PM
Well ,wathever be the variant the paint is obviously inspired in that picture ;)

Very true

redcoat
06-22-2007, 07:31 AM
Well ,wathever be the variant the paint is obviously inspired in that picture ;)Spitfires employed in the reconaissance role employed special camouflage. High altitude aircraft were painted a dark shade of blue overall (known as PRU Blue). Low level aircraft were often painted pink (known as PRU Pink), this unusual colour proved very good at hiding the aircraft against a background of low cloud.

Panzerknacker
06-23-2007, 06:18 PM
Yes I remember saw the pink Spitfires in a old Aerospace publishing magazine, I will search some pictures.

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Runway/9601/pruspit.jpg

1000ydstare
06-24-2007, 01:52 AM
A model of one

http://www.aircraftresourcecenter.com/Gal3/2701-2800/Gal2741_Spitfire_Manzoli/01.jpg

The darker patches on each wing (8 in total) would be the tape that was put over the machine guns muzzles, of armed Spits, to prevent mud entering on take off. That is why the wings of Spits returning to base always seem to have torn parts on them.

The later varients of combat Spits, armed with cannon, had condoms over their muzzles for the same purpose.

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Runway/9601/pruspit.jpg
Here is a PRU blue owned by the USAF museum.

The recce flights had no armour or armanments for their planes, all were removed to increase endurance. Likewise, the high altitude flights tended to be very cold as the heat from the engines were rerouted away from the pilot to the cameras to keep them warm.

No one plane was assigned to one pilot, pilots would often fly a different Recce Spit each time they took off.

It was about now that "Gremlins" became quite common. From a book on Spitfires.


WW II aircrew were telling stories about them as early as the 1940's, and Ronald Dahl, an ex-RAF-pilot, wrote "The Gremlins," a fairy tale about the hazards of combat flying, in 1942. The book was published by Walt Disney and serialized in Cosmopolitan. Disney wanted to do a movie on the book that even Eleanor Roosevelt read to her grandchildren, but could not figure out how to make creatures who destroyed Allied aircraft lovable.


A Poem from WWII known to some English PRU pilots who first encountered the Gremlins that caused many problems for flight crews in the war. Gremlins were alleged to be mischievous, elf-like beings that were the "real" cause of engine trouble and other mechanical difficulties.

[quote]This is the tale of the Gremlins
As told by the PRU
At Benson and Wick and St Eval-
And believe me, you slobs, it's true.

When you're seven miles up in the heavens,
(That's a hell of a lonely spot)
And it's fifty degrees below zero,
Which isn't exactly hot.

When you're frozen blue like your Spitfire,
And your scared a Mosquito pink.
When you're thousands of miles from nowhere,
And there's nothing below but the drink.

It's then that you'll see the Gremlins,
Green and gamboge and gold,
Male and female and neuter,
Gremlins both young and old.

It's no good trying to dodge them,
The lessons you learnt on the Link
Won't help you evade a Gremlin,
Though you boost and you dive and you jink.

White ones will wiggle your wing tips,
Male ones will muddle your maps,
Green ones will guzzle your glycol,
Females will flutter your flaps.

Pink ones will perch on your perspex,
And dance pirouettes on your prop,
There's a spherical middle-aged Gremlin,
Who'll spin on your stick like a top.

They'll freeze up your camera shutters,
They'll bite through your aileron wires,
They'll bend and they'll break and they'll batter,
They'll insert toasting forks into your tyres.

And that is the tale of the Gremlins,
As told by the PRU,
(P)retty (R)uddy (U)nlikely to many,
But a fact, none the less, to the few.

Certainly a British manifestation, the first gremlins were allegedly encountered by photoreconnaisance units (PRUs), whilst flying at very high altitudes, the above RAF ditty says it all.

A 1943 Looney Tunes Cartoon introduced Americans to the Gremlin. Bugs Bunny's "Falling Hare" cartoon stars Bugs and a Gremlin in an epic struggle to prevent the sabotaging of Bug's aircraft. For some reason or another the aircraft is coloured pink, like the low level PRU aircraft.

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Runway/9601/gremlins.jpg

More here

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gremlin

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Falling_Hare

Source for above matierial

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Runway/9601

Panzerknacker
07-03-2007, 07:08 PM
Close up to the gun feeder of a Mark IX from the polish Sqn 303, The hispano Mk-II cannon used a 20x110mm cartrigdes. 120 rounds per gun wree carried in the Spifire.

http://img224.imageshack.us/img224/4999/20mm1fi2.jpg



Setting the gun convergence in a mark IX of the Czech 310 sqn, the usual collimation range was 275 yads, but it migh vary according to the pilot tastes.

http://img224.imageshack.us/img224/7658/ajustandoarmasgs8.jpg

CAFM
03-19-2009, 07:09 PM
From what I have heard or read, it would depend on which phase of the war one is asking about. My current area of interest, for a museum newletter that I am publishing, is differences between the Mark V and the Mark IX, when faced with the appearance of the Focke-Wulf 190. With that and the beneficial effect the difference the Mark IX had on ensuing dogfights, I could only say that the Mark IX is the best.

Uyraell
03-20-2009, 04:29 AM
Favourite variant is any of the contraprop variants, though I really really like the looks of JK535, a Spitfire VIII contraprop.

For the poll, MK IX, in 1942/43, Mk XIV in 1944.

(Incidently, despite the very different engine sound, if ever anyone has heard the Spitfire
or Mustang in a very low pass, the instant reaction, even IF you're mentally prepared for it, is :"Holy F**K!!!!!!!" -- I know, because I have been standing right next to the public barrier when each has passed at very low alititude -- Spitfire, Hurricane, Mustang, at a couple of airshows I attended.)

Regards, Uyraell.

jopped
03-20-2009, 11:41 AM
I'll have to go with the Spitfire Mk IX, as it could tackle the FW-190 when it first came out, and it was able to carry bombs. However, I find the Spitfire Mk Vb the most beautifull version of the Spitfire. The Mk XIV was also very nise,...

Cheers,
Joppe

Uyraell
03-20-2009, 01:38 PM
I'll have to go with the Spitfire Mk IX, as it could tackle the FW-190 when it first came out, and it was able to carry bombs. However, I find the Spitfire Mk Vb the most beautifull version of the Spitfire. The Mk XIV was also very nise,...

Cheers,
Joppe
You're right, `tis simply the looks of the contraprops that intrigue my eyes.
To me, they have a panache above the other Spitfire variants.

Regards, Uyraell.

Matzos
03-21-2009, 03:16 AM
A model of one

http://www.aircraftresourcecenter.com/Gal3/2701-2800/Gal2741_Spitfire_Manzoli/01.jpg

The darker patches on each wing (8 in total) would be the tape that was put over the machine guns muzzles, of armed Spits, to prevent mud entering on take off. That is why the wings of Spits returning to base always seem to have torn parts on them.

The later varients of combat Spits, armed with cannon, had condoms over their muzzles for the same purpose.

http://www.geocities.com/CapeCanaveral/Runway/9601/pruspit.jpg
Here is a PRU blue owned by the USAF museum.

The recce flights had no armour or armanments for their planes, all were removed to increase endurance. Likewise, the high altitude flights tended to be very cold as the heat from the engines were rerouted away from the pilot to the cameras to keep them warm.

No one plane was assigned to one pilot, pilots would often fly a different Recce Spit each time they took off.


There were two variants of recce Spitfires that were armed, the PR Type1G and the PR.XIII

Saxon
05-05-2009, 01:01 PM
I would have to go with the Mark IXe with 2x 20mm cannon and 2 x .50 cal MG

But I almost went for the Mk VIII, which really belongs on the poll, as the third most produced Spitfire after the Mk V and Mk IX.

The Mk VIII was supposed to be the best Spitfire to fly, according to most pilots. It probably doesn't get the recognition it deserves because almost all Mk VIIIs were used in the Pacific/Asian theaters.

leccy
05-05-2009, 02:41 PM
I was up in RAF Coningsby working in the BBMF Hanger when they had one of these in for a re-build (they were going to sell one of the other aircraft to pay for it at the time)

Spitfire Ltd Supermarine Spitfire LF.XVIe G-OXVI - Duxford

http://www.airplane-pictures.net/images/uploaded-images/2009-2/36148.jpg

Clave
05-05-2009, 06:34 PM
Mk 22!

http://www.clavework-graphics.co.uk/aircraft/supermarine_spitfire/Mk_22_GB_73Sqn.png

Uyraell
05-06-2009, 02:08 AM
Absolutely Beautiful, Clave ! :D

Have you ever done the contraprop Spitfires?
I'm thinking of JK535 and others of a year or so later.
Gorgeous-looking Spitfires.

The other "oddity" is EN530, a Mk VB Captured and re-engined with a DB605 for test purposes.

Those would make for highly unsual and extremely interesting pictures.
Cheers, and Thanks for a beautiful piece of art. :D

Kind Regards, Uyraell.

Panzerknacker
05-06-2009, 08:36 PM
Hmmm, powerful variant, but the Griffon potrudes too much, its lacks the elegance of Merlin spitfires.

Uyraell
05-07-2009, 09:36 AM
I agree the Griffon_Spitfires are less elegant, though to my eyes, they show a design maturity the Merlin_Spitfires do not.
However, Panzerknacker, you do raise an interesting point, with mentioning elegance.
One reason I like the contraprop Spitfires is that (to my eyes, at least) the 5-bladed prop variants always looked significantly less elegant than the three, four, or 6-bladed (ie. contraprop). Five blades seemed to make the aircraft "chunky" and "boilerplate" -looking. :mrgreen:

Warm Regards, Uyraell.

Librarian
10-29-2009, 11:26 AM
Photography is a mirror of its time and the genuine historical document that must influence future impressions of a period that can never be repeated. Periods tend to be remembered by the people who were active in them, and we are fortunate in having a number of pictorial relics connected with personalities and material artifacts some famous, some simply notorious, but all dearly remembered who gave the significant impact upon one epoch as well as an distinctive flavor of great times of yore.

Instead of just another incomplete treatise about a true masterpiece of the art of mechanical design and creator of history that even today captures our fascination, instead of making an additional and unavoidably repetitious discourse about the object that symbolizes something greater than its mere form or function, let us commence with an highly individual snapshot coupled with the object of our devotion:

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a137/Langnasen/SpitfireConnieEdwards.jpg

Connie Edwards with MK IXs and Mk XIVs at Debden in 1969. Photo taken by Mr. David James.

As you know, the making of the "The Battle of Britain" probably was the greatest single factor in turning the tide on the almost total extinction of airworthy Spitfires. By the beginning of 1968, 27 (about two squadrons) of Spitfires were brought together for active filming, 12 of which were in flyable condition.

Wilson Connell "Connie" Edwards was one of four pilots of the Confederate Air Force (a living museum in Texas dedicated to preserving WW II aircrafts) to fly some of the Bouchons used in "The Battle of Britain" film. However, he was pictured against the Spitfires, with a snapshot that does raise some pleasant memories about an airplane which represents not only the final stage of a marvelous technical development that had started in thirties, but also the apotheosis of the spirit and everlasting human values deeply embedded into early 1940s.

And for the poll - Mk XIV, an astonishing and truly inspiring combination of power, mobility, agility and sturdiness. :)

plheure2
01-02-2010, 07:46 PM
If a gang of thugs were to press me against the wall and demand of me my favorite Mark of Spitfire, I would have to say..... all of them!! I absolutely drool over Spitfires.... they are one of my top fighter planes, ever!! Long live Reggie Mitchell's creation!!

paladin
01-08-2010, 04:01 AM
rare pixs spitfire mk1 (http://www.v-like-vintage.net/en/photo_details/91986_photo_noName/)

:D