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Lancer44
05-09-2006, 10:42 PM
"Because of the strain involved, scouts were rotated at short intervals. I do not remember the name of the scout who led the second platoon, but it was he who relieved me. Within three minutes after taking the lead, he was hit by a burst from a machine gun. The Japanese had dug in on a coral hill and were waiting for us. We took whatever cover we could find, moved into firing positions, and battled throughout the day and into the night. Daylight came and we put feelers out to see if the Japanese were still there. They had moved out and the scouts body was gone.
We moved up the hill into the evacuated Japanese positions. There, we found him. His body had been carved as though he were a mere piece of beef. All the flesh was gone from his legs, arms, buttocks and chest and his heart and kidneys were missing. We had no doubt that they were eating our dead.
No prisoners, we vowed to ourselves"

This was written by Chester Nycum, paratrooper from 503 PIR on Noemfor.
Full account here: http://corregidor.org/Heritage_Battalion/nycum/ch5.html

Reports about Japanese cannibalism are quite common.
Look at page of War Diary of Australian 2/3 Machine Gun Battalion:

http://www.awm.gov.au/database/awm52/display_image_frame.asp?page=0009&item_number=8%2F5%2F3&diary_name=2%2F3+Machine+Gun+Battalion&folder_number=032&folder_date=March+1945&lastpage=165&submit.x=13&submit.y=5

Yuki Tanaka, Japanese researcher in his book "Hidden Horrors" mentioned report from Archemi village. He omitted names having in mind family of KIA soldier.
Report of Lt. McFie written 20 May 1945:

"In the morning 9-th of March 1945 about 0900, together with late sgt Sewell we found body of private Josh KIA 8-th of March.
The body was in following state:
(a) all cloth was removed
(b) both hands cut off close to armpits
(c) stomach was removed together with heart, liver and entrails
(d) all muscles cut off from the bones
(e) we could not find hands, heart and entrails
(f) the only untouched body parts were head and feet.
Japanese mess tin full of apparently human meat was about five feet from body of Pvt Josh, right between two dead japanese soldiers."

Private Thomas William Josh, 27 years old from Marrickville, (Sydney suburb), textile worker, married... was eaten by Japanese.

http://img235.imageshack.us/img235/7691/hiddenhorrors1az.th.jpg (http://img235.imageshack.us/my.php?image=hiddenhorrors1az.jpg)

Quite often Australians and Americans were finding corpses of Japanese soldiers which had muscles cut off by their collegues - obviuos signs of widespread cannibalism.

Here two photos of dead Japanese soldiers with muscles cut off for consumption:

http://img222.imageshack.us/img222/6666/japkannibalism3cx.th.jpg (http://img222.imageshack.us/my.php?image=japkannibalism3cx.jpg)

http://img231.imageshack.us/img231/8760/japkannibalism22os.th.jpg (http://img231.imageshack.us/my.php?image=japkannibalism22os.jpg)

Photographs courtesy of Mrs. Aiko Herzig.

So guys, next time you'll order your Friday arvo sushi, think for a split second about some bad lucky fellows in Pacific...

Cheers,

Lancer44

1000ydstare
05-10-2006, 03:20 AM
Japanese canabilism was wide spread towards the end of the war. The supply chain broke down to almost neglibable activity as crucial stores were lost, Japanese industry took a pounding and, of course, many of the Logistics soldiers were forced in to combat to protect the home islands.

As has been shown time and again, Japanese soldiers would rarely give up. The eating of human flesh was just one way to keep yourself alive to fight for the Emporer. Such activities are not the sole domain of Japanese snipers either, there have been many documented cases of the consumption of human flesh (the ultimate taboo) to stay alive. The plane crash from "Alive" for example. For centuries ship wrecked sailors have drawn lots, to decide who was for dinner.

It all comes down to... How much do you want to live? If they are dead already, I like to think I could carry out this practice with little after effect.

There has long been a "custom of the sea"

From wikipedia

The case of R v. Dudley and Stephens (1884) 14 QBD 273 (QB) is an English case which is said to be one of the origins of the defense of necessity in modern common law. The case dealt with four crewmembers of an English yacht which were cast away in a storm some 1600 miles from the Cape of Good Hope. After several days one of the crew fell unconscious due to a combination of the famine and drinking sea-water. The others (one objecting) decided then to kill him and eat him. They were picked up four days later. The fact that not everyone had agreed to draw lots contravened The Custom of the Sea and was held to be murder. At the trial was the first recorded use of the defence of necessity.


In Japan, there was a strange perspective on the value of human life, taking in to account things like the Kamikaze, and even today they have a different outlook compared to most Europeans. When a Japanese student killed and ate a Dutch woman a few years back, he was treated with revulsion in Europe, yet on realease to Japan he has been freed and has even written a cookery book and hosted a cookery programme as a celebrity!!!

From wikipedia

Another well-known case involved a Japanese student of English literature, Issei Sagawa, who grew fond of Renée Hartevelt, a 25-year-old Dutch woman he met while studying at the Sorbonne Academy in Paris in 1981. He eventually murdered and ate her, writing a graphic yet poignant description of the act. Declared unfit to stand trial in France, his wealthy father had him extradited back to Japan where he eventually regained his freedom. The way he reveled in what he did made him a national celebrity, and he has written several bestselling novels and continues to write a nationally syndicated column. The story is the subject of a verse in the 1986 Rolling Stones song "Too Much Blood" and the 1981 Stranglers song "La Folie".

For the wiki page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannibalism

Lancer44
05-10-2006, 07:40 PM
Hi 1000ydstare,

First part of your post is a plausible explanation, well known for years, starvation, breakdown of japanese supply chain etc.
At the end when you mentioned celebrity status of student which ate his Dutch girlfried you are perhaps closer to truth. :D

Yuki Tanaka in his book Hidden Horrors clearly proved that cannibalism was common in late 1942, during New Guinea campaign when Japanese Imperial Army had much better supply than Americans and Australians.
So, if you want to justify cannibalism in Bouganville in 1945 simply by starvation, how you can explain that on Kokoda Trail Australians had been finding their strangled troopers with buttocks cut off?

Yuki Tanaka searching in archioves of Australian War Crimes Section discovered that informations about widespread cannibalism among Japanese forces filtered to high command circles of Australian Army almost immediately in 1942, but were never declassified.
Resposible for this decision was Judge William F. Webb, later President of Tokyo Tribunal. Webb did not allowed info about cannibalism to be used as propaganda tool. He wanted to protect KIA soldiers families and rightly expected that they can be subject of immense psychological stress.
Another official reason for suppression of information was possibility of lynching Japanese POWs in Australia. Such event could endanger lives of Allied POWs not only in Japanese but also German hands.

Late December 1944 Australian Imperial Forces captured top secret Japanese order signed by General Major Aozu, which clearly stated that Japanese soldier which willingly consume human flesh are criminals and will be penalised by death. However order mentioned that consumption of enemy dead is excluded and all right.
After the war Australian War Crimes Section collected many testimonies proving that cannibalism was common and took form of organised activity approved by Japanese officers.
Unfortunately cannibalism become unpunished crime. War Law and International Law is based on precedents. Canibalism according to Law was not a crime per se...
General Lieutenant Joshio Tachibana and eleven other Japanes officers were charged by Tokyo Tribunal for beheading two American pilots in August 1944 on Chichi Jima island in Bonin Archipelago. Tachibana ordered execution. One of the pilots, US Navy radio operator was slaughtered and eaten by defendants.
US Tribunal sentenced to death Vice Admiral Mori and major Motoba for execution of five American pilots. Major Motoba pleaded guilty and admitted that he ate Americans because he hate them. Mori and Motoba were sentenced for "manslaughter and preventing of honourable burial", but not for cannibalism...

Tanaka explained cannibalism of dead Japanese soldiers by their collegues as form of bonding and mystical ritual preserving the dead.
Consumption of Allied soldiers was explained as form of gaining power and combatting battle stress.

Anyway the whole story is weird and strange.

Cheers,
Lancer 44

1000ydstare
05-11-2006, 02:29 AM
The bonding side of it is the one of the reasons I have read about. It was seen as a way of the whole Army sharing the burden as it were "The boys at XXX are doing it, and so are we."

Some have suggested the pyschological impact on allied soldiers, but by the time this sort of thing got widespread, the Japanese cruelty to soldiers would have already been known.

Timbo in Oz
08-06-2006, 07:50 AM
the Japanese during their advance after Isurava, on the Kokoda track, ate their own dead and killed and ate Australian POW's. NB this became SOP as they began retreating from this 2nd* defeat.

So much for the Japanese Army's 'staff work'.

*Milne Bay was their first defeat in jungle warfare in WWII - (leaving aside Kalkin Gol which wasn't in 'jungle') - a few weeks earlier and also in New Guinea. But there they could got back in the ships left, and bugger off.

In Assam and Burma from late 1944 on - SOP again.

I would not be at all surprised if they did this in China - from the 30's on.

Sushi! You betchah!

And > than 90% of their people STILL know nothing of the story of WWII!

A democracy?

hmmmmmm!?

WaistGunner
08-08-2006, 03:23 PM
In what little I have read of the Pacific war I have encountered several times authors explaining that the Japanese did not have plans in place for decent logistics. The soldiers were often given instruction called "local provisions". In many area they went especially in China, the locals didn't even have enough food for themselves let alone an invading army. This was one cause of cannibalism early in the war. Does this seem correct to those of you with more knowledge of the Pacific theater?

Twitch1
08-15-2006, 04:39 PM
There was a Japanese-made movie made long ago whose title I can't remember that depicted the situation from the Japanese point of view. Rough stuff.

Panzerknacker
08-16-2006, 08:38 PM
Is hard not to be sicked by some of this japanese activities,

Lancer44
08-17-2006, 05:44 AM
There was a Japanese-made movie made long ago whose title I can't remember that depicted the situation from the Japanese point of view. Rough stuff.

Title was "Yuki, Yuki, te shingun". (I don't know what it mean.)
Nothing to do with Yuki Tanaka, Japanese researcher which wrote a book.
In this documentary some Japanese veterans confessed to cannibalism and admitted that not neccessarily hunger was behind it.

If you look at it from the most primitive, physiological point of view, eating ones enemy is an ultimate victory - eating first, total destruction and finally turning into a fecal matter.

It is hard to understand after that many centuries of western civilisation...


Lancer44

temujin77
08-17-2006, 06:47 PM
By stating this, I'm not trying to say whether cannalism is moral or not, or pass any kind of judgment in one favor or another.... however, if you are stranded in some crazy jungle with no food, wouldn't some westerners also consider to eat the dead to stay alive? I don't know if I would do that personally, but I think I would certainly consider, I think. Your body and your mind will tell you to do whatever you need to do to survive. It's human nature.

Lancer44
08-17-2006, 10:24 PM
By stating this, I'm not trying to say whether cannalism is moral or not, or pass any kind of judgment in one favor or another.... however, if you are stranded in some crazy jungle with no food, wouldn't some westerners also consider to eat the dead to stay alive? I don't know if I would do that personally, but I think I would certainly consider, I think. Your body and your mind will tell you to do whatever you need to do to survive. It's human nature.

I agree with you. But as I said there was cannibalism even when Japanese had adequate supplies.

During first fights on New Guinea alongside Kokoda trail Australians and Americans had worse supplies than Japanese, but reports exist about finding Australians strangled, with their buttocks cut off for consumption by Japanese.
I will dig up something I had seen in AWM in Canberra and present here.

Lancer44

temujin77
08-18-2006, 09:44 AM
I agree with you. But as I said there was cannibalism even when Japanese had adequate supplies.

Yeah, no excuse there... that's definitely atrocity in its very meaning.

Hiddenrug
08-19-2006, 07:32 AM
I have read that the Australian Infantry came across many dead Japanese soldier with eaten off limbs. Very demeaning if you ask me!

Lancer44
08-19-2006, 08:11 AM
I have read that the Australian Infantry came across many dead Japanese soldier with eaten off limbs. Very demeaning if you ask me!

Hi Hiddenrug,

I noticed reading Australian Daily Intelligence Reports at Battalion levels, that Australian Infantry also came across many unburied Japanese soldiers in close proximity to inhabited Japanese huts. Everywhere, near Gona, Buna, on Bougainville...
Conclusion was, that when Japanese wounded died, his "mates" just carried him a few metres away and tossed into jungle.

For people from European civilisation it is unbelievable... Proper honourable burial of fallen fellow soldiers is something absolutely fundamental.
My father was in North Africa where troops in action moved very quickly.
He told me that leaving unburied collegues was extremely rare. Even if such thing happened, they always tried to come back and find the place. Most often fallen Allies were properly buried by Germans or Italians with marked graves, crosses and secured dog tags.
It may seem unbelievable, but in Polish Carpathian Brigade were Jewish soldiers which did not deserted and opted to stay in the Polish Army.
One of them was killed together with a crew of Bren Gun Carrier near Gazala. Their mates could not bury them - they had to run away from ambush.
When they came back after Germans retreated, they found graves with crosses. One grave had just stick and David's star drawn on the piece of scrap steel attached to it.
So, Germans, nazis - (anyone can say) - went into trouble to dig a grave for a Jew in 40 degrees C heat.

Japanese soldiers did not bother to bury their own killed mates. They preferred to cut a fresh meat from them to prepare their evening bake.

Lancer44

Hiddenrug
08-19-2006, 08:22 AM
Very Valid points. My great uncle was a sniper on kokoda and he would tell my old man about taking " Pot-shots" at the Japanese toscare them off. Could tactics like these change the way the enemy thought about disposing of bodies?

Lancer44
08-19-2006, 08:38 AM
Very Valid points. My great uncle was a sniper on kokoda and he would tell my old man about taking " Pot-shots" at the Japanese toscare them off. Could tactics like these change the way the enemy thought about disposing of bodies?

No I don't think. Perhaps in combat conditions...yes. I have some proof which I will post next week. Reports of Australian Machine Gun Battalion soldiers.
They were finding Japanese soldiers skeletons 10 metres from huts in which they spotted perfectly fit Japanese.

When Americans paras landed on Corregidor in 1945, they found skeleton of one of island defenders from 1942. He was lying on the ground and in circle around him were skeletons of Japanese invaders he killed.
The place was in very easily accessible area near the long barracks.
During nearly 3 years of occupation, more than 6000 Japanese troops could not find time to bury skeletons of their mates?

Hiddenrug
08-19-2006, 08:41 AM
Yeah. Awful things happen in war. Lets hope it will never happen again.

war heroes
08-20-2006, 05:15 AM
yea many horrififc things happen in wars but with out them and the men who fight in them we wouldnt be hear today and that is why im joining the australian army to help those people and things that happen behond camera and stories.

Lancer44
08-20-2006, 06:12 AM
yea many horrififc things happen in wars but with out them and the men who fight in them we wouldnt be hear today and that is why im joining the australian army to help those people and things that happen behond camera and stories.

Goodonya war heroes!

Goood luck in the Army!

OFF TOPIC:
Writing on forums like this one, please try to pay a bit more attention to your posts.

I know that ignoring capital letters, "improvements" to written English, as it is generally accepted and something which is manifestly justified as "dyslexia" are common this days.
Believe me, ability to write in cultural, respectable manner helps in life!
I wish you all the best! Try to work harder on your communication skills and who knows? Sky is the limit. Remember that in the Army communication is everything.

Cheers,

Lancer44

Dani
08-20-2006, 06:32 AM
Not to mention that any army means to obey to a set of rules;)

Nickdfresh
08-20-2006, 09:15 AM
The book "Flyboys" details the Japanese Imperial Army's fixation on (pseudo)Bushido and the 'cult of death,' as opposed to earlier times, when the first incarnations of the modernized Japanese Imperial Army had a code similar to most Western armies.

In any case, and this is all from memory, the book details an episode where a U.S. Naval Aviator (in George Bush I's sqaudran) was shot down over Chichi Jima, Iwo Jima's sister island that was not invaded, but instead was to be isolated and neutralized via a series of airstikes on it's radar, listening posts, and communication stations. One or two of the pilots survived and were captured by I believe a contingent of mixed Imperial Navy and Army units. At least one of the men was forced to serve as an additional translator with the Japanese Naval Intelligence section, and was actually befriended by an American born (Nisei) Japanese sailor that had been drafted as his family returned to Japan prior to hostilities. After a time, the drunken, tyrannical IA commander said the man was to be executed and consumed, purely for ceremonial purposes as they indeed had enough food. Something about showing solidarity with the starving troops languishing on bypassed Pacific atolls. Most of the Japanese enlisted and junior officers were horrified, and refused to partake in the eating of human flesh, but his friend saved part of his liver and made it into a sort of shrine I believe.

Maybe I'll page through the book and typed some extracts, unfortunately, I don't have a scanner...

Hiddenrug
08-21-2006, 04:56 AM
Goodonya war heroes!

Goood luck in the Army!

OFF TOPIC:
Writing on forums like this one, please try to pay a bit more attention to your posts.

I know that ignoring capital letters, "improvements" to written English, as it is generally accepted and something which is manifestly justified as "dyslexia" are common this days.
Believe me, ability to write in cultural, respectable manner helps in life!
I wish you all the best! Try to work harder on your communication skills and who knows? Sky is the limit. Remember that in the Army communication is everything.

Cheers,

Lancer44
Same here war heroes! I'm joining the 1st Armoured Division RAAC. Good luck mate.

A little punctuating effort goes along way!

Lancer44
08-23-2006, 11:07 PM
A bit more documented facts:


http://www.awm.gov.au/cms_images/web/awm52/8/AWM52-8-5-3-032.pdf

War Diary of 2/3 Australian Machine Gun Battalion from March 8, 1945
At 07.45 there is mentioned death of Private Josh.
Look at next page March 9, 1945.
At 10.12 "Private Josh body recovered. JAPS had removed all flesh from body."

Report written by Lieutenant McFie May 20, 1945 and mentioned by Yuki Tanaka in his book:

"In the morning 9-th of March 1945 about 9.00 am together with late Seargant Sewell, we found body of Private Josh KIA
9-th of March.
Body was in following state:
a) all clothing was removed
b) both hands were cut close to arms
c) stomach was cut off together with heart, liver and entrails
d) all muscles were cut off to the bones
e) we could not find hands, heart and entrails
f) the only untouched body parts were feet and head

Japanes mess tin filled with human meat was lying four to five feet from Private Josh body between two killed Japanese soldiers"

Private Thomas William Josh, 27 yo, textile worker from Marrickville, was eaten by Japanese...

http://www.awm.gov.au/cms_images/awm108/010/010220.pdf


http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.cgi?path=17281875138481#search=%22Yuki%20T anaka%20japanese%20cannibalism%22

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0813327180/102-1478225-3896158?v=glance&n=283155

Lancer44

nopuko
11-12-2006, 12:20 AM
Japanese cannibalism extended to innocent civilians as well. In Truk, the Japanese killed, butchered, cooked and passed the resulting dish around to various IJA and IJN units in Truk Lagoon to see if it was palatible. And they weren't near starving - planning for the future, probably, after their resupply was cut off after Operation Hailstone in Feb. 1944. We have an account of this on our website - http://nopukob.com/starvation/ - taken from Stewart's book. His account pretty much agrees with all the stories I heard from locals who were alive at the time.

redcoat
01-24-2007, 04:47 PM
The book "Flyboys" details the Japanese Imperial Army's fixation on (pseudo)Bushido and the 'cult of death,' as opposed to earlier times, when the first incarnations of the modernized Japanese Imperial Army had a code similar to most Western armies.


Indeed.
In fact, during the Japanese-Russian war of 1905, neutral western observers were highly impressed with the humane way the Japanese army treated its Russian POWs

Nickdfresh
01-25-2007, 10:33 PM
Indeed.
In fact, during the Japanese-Russian war of 1905, neutral western observers were highly impressed with the humane way the Japanese army treated its Russian POWs

I also find it interesting that the Russians released a large number of Japanese POWs that returned to Japan without suffering any "shame" that the WWII Japanese soldier was told he would suffer if he surrendered.

Indeed, the Japanese that were taken prisoner by US forces in the Pacific would often cooperate readily, since they considered themselves now stateless and would often ask if they could become Americans...

ww2artist
09-06-2007, 06:46 AM
I'd heard of this, but thought it was only isolated cases. It's sickening alright.....there really is nothing separating man from wild animals when he acts this way.

Rising Sun*
09-07-2007, 07:14 AM
I'd heard of this, but thought it was only isolated cases. It's sickening alright.....there really is nothing separating man from wild animals when he acts this way.

Man is an animal. He just likes to think he isn't, until the chips are down and then he is either an animal or he dies.

Cannibalism was accepted in Western culture for a long time, at least among shipwrecked mariners, and well into the 19th century.

The Japanese might have eaten a lot more of their own than of their enemy, at least in Papua New Guinea. There are many references to it in the diaries of the Japanese there. The poor bastards were starving, as early as late 1942, partly because of Allied action, largely because Japanese ration systems worked on the basis that troops would live off the land to a fair extent after landing.

This worked in quick campaigns like Malaya and in productive Asian countries where there were similar diets and agriculture, but it didn't work too well in Papua New Guinea where the natives worked on subsistence gardening - not farming - and limited raising of livestock. The Japanese plundered these resources fairly quickly and, like the locusts they were because they had no supply train to feed them, quickly ran out of adequate food supplies.

By 1944 a lot of Japanese in the SWPA were contained in areas where they were occupied mainly in growing their own food, at subsistence or worse levels.

There were also other factors at work, such as Japanese distaste for the barley issued to combat beri beri in preference to rice, so that their health suffered.

overlord644
09-08-2007, 02:18 AM
Goodonya war heroes!

Goood luck in the Army!

OFF TOPIC:
Writing on forums like this one, please try to pay a bit more attention to your posts.

I know that ignoring capital letters, "improvements" to written English, as it is generally accepted and something which is manifestly justified as "dyslexia" are common this days.
Believe me, ability to write in cultural, respectable manner helps in life!
I wish you all the best! Try to work harder on your communication skills and who knows? Sky is the limit. Remember that in the Army communication is everything.

Cheers,

Lancer44

I agree and usually try to at least make my posts presentable but heres an email i received that is pretty surprising

Don't delete this just because it looks weird. Believe it or not, you
can read it.
I cdnuolt blveiee that I cluod aulaclty
uesdnatnrd what I was rdanieg. The
phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid Aoccdrnig to rscheearch at Cmabrigde
Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in what oredr the
ltteers in a word are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is that the first and
last ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and
you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn
mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.
Amzanig huh?

Raven
09-25-2007, 02:07 AM
That's fantastic overlord. Finish a great thread with your spam. Nicely done! :evil:

I just wish to thank everyone who contributed. I never knew about this until now.

alfiechan
09-27-2008, 05:09 AM
There is an interesting Japanese documentary called "The Emperor's naked Army marches on" about a japanese soldier who served in New Guinea and whose buddies were eaten by officers. In the 80s he went to his old commanding officers' homes with a truck with loudspeakers to confront them and he also used a slingshot to shoot a pin ball at the Emperor for which he was arrested. later he went to an officers' home again and as he was not there killed his son with a sword!