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DerMann
02-21-2006, 06:14 PM
Was the US Army ever involved in the Pacific? I know that Patton wanted to fight in the Pacific


"We want to get the hell over there. The quicker we clean up this Goddamned mess, the quicker we can take a little jaunt against the purple pissing Japs and clean out their nest, too. Before the Goddamned Marines get all of the credit."

But did were any army units actaully stationed in the Pacific (not the Army Aircorps, mind you). I know that for Operation Olympia and Operation Downfall the Army would have been used (my grandfather was to go to Japan if they had not dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki).

Ace
02-21-2006, 07:30 PM
Yes, US Army infantry involved in the Pacific. Some famous battles they fought in was the Battle of the Philippines and Guadalcanal. The most famous unit is probably the 1st U.S. Army Ranger Battalion would were involved in Burma, India, New Guinea, and the Philippines.

George Eller
02-22-2006, 01:43 PM
Was the US Army ever involved in the Pacific? I know that Patton wanted to fight in the Pacific


"We want to get the hell over there. The quicker we clean up this Goddamned mess, the quicker we can take a little jaunt against the purple pissing Japs and clean out their nest, too. Before the Goddamned Marines get all of the credit."

But did were any army units actaully stationed in the Pacific (not the Army Aircorps, mind you). I know that for Operation Olympia and Operation Downfall the Army would have been used (my grandfather was to go to Japan if they had not dropped the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki).
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More US Army personnel operated in the Pacific than Marines. Over 400,000 if I remember correctly.
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vcs-ww2
03-06-2006, 02:44 PM
Re: U.S. Army involvement in the Pacific

All operations in the Philippine Islands were U.S. Army under the overall command of Gen. Douglas McArthur -- while the island-hopping (up until Iwo Jima) operations (under Admiral Nimitz) were Marine operations.

Operation Iceburg -- The invasion of Okinawa
This was a joint Army-Marine operation under the overall ground command of Army Lt. General Simon Buckner. Gen. Roy Geiger (USMC) took over command following Gen. Buckner's being killed. The large majority of troops were U.S. Army.

For the planned invasion of Japan commands were broken into two divisions:

(1) Admiral Nimitz (USN-USMC) would be in overall command of all troops (Including Army) during the actual invasions. Nimitz would remain in command until troops were ashore and Army headquarters were set up.

(2) General McArthur would then take over overall command of troops -- both Army AND Marines. McArthur's Sixth Army Commander General Walter Kreuger would be in direct command on the ground of the joint Army/Marine troops

The code name for the invasion(s) of Japanj was Operation Downfall.
This plan consisted of two phases-- Preliminary and follow-up:
(1) Operation Olympic -- The invasion of Kyushu, Japan. (2) Operation Coronet -- The Invasion of the Japanese Kanto Plain

Operation Olympic would be made up of four corps -- three Army and one Marine. Army troops would greatly outnumber Marines. Strength of the Sixth Army -- about 600,000 Army & Marines. ( Roughly half combat troops -- half support)

Operation Coronet would have also been a joint Army/Marine venture -- same as Olympic. Here again, the Army would have greatly outnumbered Marines. No proposed strength figures available.

Nickdfresh
03-06-2006, 10:57 PM
The US Army was also responsible for continental defense. US Soldiers mounted assaults on the Japanese garrisons on Alaska's islands such as Kiska.

I also learned today the USAAF B-17s were the first US aircraft to drop bombs in WWII, attacking a Japanese task force shortly after Pearl Harbor...

In fact, the USAAF shot down more aircraft than did the USN/USMC...

deserter
05-11-2006, 04:12 PM
The 7th division drove the Japanese out of the Allutiens. They were trained in amphibious operations by the marines. The 7th went on to fight at Kwajalein, Leyte and Okinawa.

Nickdfresh
06-15-2006, 06:58 PM
The 7th division drove the Japanese out of the Allutiens. They were trained in amphibious operations by the marines. The 7th went on to fight at Kwajalein, Leyte and Okinawa.

True. Unfortunately, they were also trained for warm weather operations geared to deployment in the North African theater...

Then, they went to Alaska. They had a very difficult time initially...

BTW (off-the top of my head), the US Army also did the significant fighting in the Philippines (from the Japanese conquest of 1941-42 to the 'liberation' in 1945), Burma (with the Army's famed "Merrill's Marauders (http://www.ranger.org/rangerHistoryWorldWarIIMerrillsMarauders.html)" assisting the British & Aussie Armies there), New Guinea, and even Okinawa...

Here's some more info on the Philippines traumatic WWII history: http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/books/wwii/70-42/70-424.html

Doug 1956
08-26-2006, 06:58 AM
In a classic example of early US Army involvement in the Pacific theatre (they got better, so I don't use this as an example to denigrate US forces in general) in the 'Battle' of the Kokoda Track (a series of battles and engagements) in New Guinea, two battalions of troops from the US 32 Inf Division were sent from Kapa Kapa to Jaure, a distance of approximately 50k. It was considered, from looking at maps, that it was going to be a hard route march, instead it took 14 days to do that 50k, and the troops when they arrived were completely unfit for action.

Lessons were learnt.

Another main involvement of the US Army in the Pacific, as mentioned, was the garrisoning of the Phillipines at the time of the Japanese attack.

George Eller
12-16-2006, 01:48 PM
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Hi Francesca,

Based on information you provided, I would say that your uncle probably served in the US Army's 25th Infantry Division ("Tropical Lightning"). This division saw action at Guadalcanal, New Georgia and the Philippines. The shoulder patch has a yellow lightning bolt on a red taro leaf with a yellow edge.

The only other army division at Guadalcanal was the 23rd Inf Div - but that unit was not at New Georgia.

"25th Infantry Division. Activated in Hawaii in July 1940, from elements of the old Regular Army Hawaiian Division (the balance becoming the 24th Infantry Division), to which a National Guard regiment from the state of Washington was added. Headquatered at Schofield Barracks, the division incurred some casualties during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. It served as part of the garrison of Hawaii until December 1942, when it went to Guadalcanal, subsequently seeing action in the Northern Solomons and the Philippines, suffering 5,432 casualties, 1,497 (27.6%) of them battle deaths. The division remained in Japan on occupation duty after the war. Six men won the Medal of Honor."
from: The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan and Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 626

"25th Infantry Division ("Tropical Lightning"), Guadalcanal, New Georgia, Philippines. Yellow lightning bolt on red taro leaf edged yellow." [Campaign service and shoulder patch]
from: The US Army in World War II, Mark R. Henry, Osprey Publishing, 2001, p 45

25th Infantry Division
ORDER OF BATTLE of the UNITED STATES ARMY GROUND FORCES in WORLD WAR II
Pacific Theater of Operations
http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/matrix/25ID/25ID-WW2-OB.htm

A Brief History of the 25th Infantry Division (WWII)
http://www.25thida.org/division.html#WWII

25th Infantry Division Association
http://www.25thida.com/

Related HomePages for 25th Infantry Division
http://www.military.com/HomePage/UnitPageListHomePages/1,13491,100015,00.html

I hope this helps.

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Francesca1973
12-17-2006, 02:49 AM
Thanks Mr. George Eller! As it turns out you are absolutely right. I didn't hear back from anyone on this site for a couple of days and I was actually able to track down Angelo's son Bob in Idaho and he told me that Angelo had been a part of the 25th.

George Eller
12-17-2006, 11:55 PM
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Thanks Mr. George Eller! As it turns out you are absolutely right. I didn't hear back from anyone on this site for a couple of days and I was actually able to track down Angelo's son Bob in Idaho and he told me that Angelo had been a part of the 25th...

...And Thanks again Mr. Eller for taking the time to answer my post with such a well thought out reply. Much appreciated.

You are most welcome Francesca. :)

It looks like you have done your homework. Congratulations.


BTW, There were a total of 18 men whose dog tags were found by kids on Munda and I've been able to track down two of them so far. I'm still working on the rest. If you have any ideas about ways to track down the ones who didn't have next of kin listed on their dog tags, could you let me know? francesca@willitsonline.com.

That's great. I assume that you have been inquiring at the various 25th Inf Div associations. I wish you continued success.
If I can think of any helpful ideas I will email you.


I think Angelo was a part of the 3d Battalion, 35th Infantry "Cacti" based on this description on: http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/matrix/25ID/25ID-cc_htm.htm

"On 28 March General Mullins, the division commander, ordered the redeployment of the 35th Infantry, which had been engaged in the drive on Balete Ridge in the Putlan River Valley. The 35th was to join the 161st in the push along Highway 5. Mullin's plan was for the 35th Infantry to lead the assault on Kapintalan. The first leg of this drive stopped at the ridge on the south of the town, called the 'Fishhook.' On 2 April the regiment began its assault against the ridge. The Japanese, in strong positions consisting of pillboxes and caves that ran along the 'Fishhook,' beat off the "Cacti" soldiers. The battle for the ridge continued for the next week, until men from the 3d Battalion, 35th Infantry, occupied the ridge."

Note that the day the 35th began the assault on the ridge was on April 2. This was the day that Angelo earned his medal. Does this look right to you?

That makes sense to me. You might consider contacting veterans of the 35th Inf Regt through their associations.
They may be able to verify your theory.

The 35th Infantry Regiment Association
http://www.cacti35th.org/

35th INFANTRY REGIMENT (CACTI) ASSOCIATION
REUNION 2007—PHILADELPHIA, PA
JULY 26TH – JULY 29th, 2007
CROWNE PLAZA CENTER CITY PHILADELPHIA, PA
http://www.cacti35th.org/35th_inf_***/reunions/ReunionForm2007.html

25th Infantry Division Association
http://www.25thida.com/

Also, Francesca, you may want to work with your cousin Bob to obtain your uncle's military records.
Although, as well as you have done your research, you may have already started the process.
Below is some information that may be helpful to you.

I wish you all the best in your research. Happy hunting and good luck. :)

George.

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National Personnel Records Center
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Personnel_Records_Center

Military Personnel Records Center
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_Personnel_Records_Center

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NARA's National Personnel Records Center (NPRC)
http://www.archives.gov/st-louis/

NPRC is one of the National Archives and Records Administration's largest operations. We are a central repository of personnel-related records, both military and civil service. Our mission is to provide world class service to Government agencies, military veterans, former civilian Federal employees, family members, as well as researchers and historians.

Military Personnel Records
http://www.archives.gov/st-louis/military-personnel/index.html

National Personnel Records Center
Military Personnel Records
9700 Page Avenue
St. Louis, MO 63132-5100

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Military Record Requests (SF-180)
How to Obtain Standard Form 180 (SF-180), Request Pertaining to Military Records
http://www.archives.gov/st-louis/military-personnel/standard-form-180.html

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The 1973 Fire at the National Personnel Records Center (St. Louis, MO)
http://www.archives.gov/st-louis/military-personnel/fire-1973.html

On July 12, 1973, a disastrous fire at NPRC (MPR) destroyed approximately 16-18 million Official Military Personnel Files. The affected record collections are described below.

Branch Personnel and Period Affected Estimated Loss:

Army Personnel discharged November 1, 1912, to January 1, 1960 80%

Air Force Personnel discharged, September 25, 1947, to January 1, 1964
(with names alphabetically after Hubbard, James E.) 75%

No duplicate copies of the records that were destroyed in the fire were maintained, nor was a microfilm copy ever produced. There were no indexes created prior to the fire. In addition, millions of documents had been lent to the Department of Veterans Affairs before the fire occurred. Therefore, a complete listing of the records that were lost is not available. Nevertheless, NPRC (MPR) uses many alternate sources in its efforts to reconstruct basic service information to respond to requests.

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Getting a Copy of Your Military Records
http://usmilitary.about.com/cs/generalinfo/a/milrecords.htm

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U.S. 25th Infantry Division
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._25th_Infantry_Division

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Francesca1973
12-18-2006, 06:55 PM
Hi Mr. Eller,
I took a guess, and I was wrong. I called Angelo's son today to see if he'd gotten the papers out and he had. My Uncle *was* in the 25th I.D. "Tropical Lighting", but he was in the 161st Infantry, Company L. I don't know what platoon or rifle squad. Do you know anything about the 161st, Company L? He earned his DSC near Kapintalan, Luzon, Philippines on April 2, 1945. Maybe I could find some old friends of his or maybe family members who remember their relatives talking about my Uncle Angelo. It would help if I had Platoon and rifle squad names. Maybe I'll be able to find them out later. I did actually write to the National Archives requesting records as a third party relative last week. And ironically enough, I had already ordered the book "Across the Dark Islands: The War in the Pacific" by the late Floyd Radike of the 161st Infantry before I knew my uncle was in the 161st, also. The book description confirmed a story my uncle told my dad about incompetent "90 Day Wonder Lieutenants" during WWII, so I ordered it to learn more. It hasn't arrived yet, though. My question is this: Did Lieutenants command entire Companies, or just platoons as a rule? I still haven't figured out the command structure, etc. I know my Uncle was at least a Staff Sergeant by the time he left the army, possibly a Sergeant First Class. And I don't understand how his serial number indicates that he was drafted from his home in Martinez, CA, but the facts say that he was in a Washington National Guard Unit. How is this possible? It's confusing! I wish I had been less into Barbies and more into asking questions and learning about my Uncle while he was still alive.

George Eller
12-18-2006, 09:53 PM
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Hi Francesca,

Congratulations again. Looks like the pieces of the puzzle are starting to come together. Floyd Radike's book on the 161st Infantry sounds interesting. Lieutenants commanded platoons, Companies were commanded by Captains with a Lieutenant and several Sergeants in the Company HQ staff.

I will look for more information on Company L, 161st Infantry from my set of U.S. Army in World War II - one of the volumes - Triumph in the Philippines covers that campaign pretty thoroughly (it is almost 2 inches thick). I'll post what I find there later.

An interesting bit of trivia that I came across from the volume mentioned above :
2d Lt. Robert M. Viale, a platoon leader of Company K, 148th Infantry, was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for heroic action during the regiment's advance southward through Manila. Viale was the first of four men of the 37th Division, all from the 148th, to win Medals of Honor in Manila. from U.S. Army in World War II: Triumph in the Philippines, The War in the Pacific, Stetson Conn, General Editor, National Historical Society, 1994, p 255 note 14.

I have topographic maps showing troop movements of the 161st, 27th and 35th Regiments in the area mentioned below. I will scan and post within the next few days.

Some information on 25th Inf Div at the Kapintalan area on Luzon at the weblink below.

LUZON

KAPINTALAN

http://www.cacti35th.org/regiment/history/history/luzon9kapitanlan.htm

On 28 March, the regiment received a change of orders. We were to maintain contact with the enemy in our present zone of advance until 31 March, and thereafter block the east approaches of the Putlan River Valley with one battalion less one company. Starting on 29 March, we were to relieve the 27th Infantry’s 1st Battalion in its zone one company at a time, then to attack north astride Highway #5 in zone and by a series of close-in envelopment’s, clear the highway. On battalion plus one company went into Division reserve. In case time hung heavy on our hands, we were to be prepared to assist the 27th and 161st Infantry Regiments in their zones immediately on call.

On the 29th and 30th, the 2d Battalion moved to the Putlan River Valley and went into Division reserve. The 1st Battalion, less B and C Companies, moved to the 64th Field Artillery area to provide local security. B Company went into Division CP as Guard, and C Company remained on the trail at the head of the Roller Coaster Road to block any Jap advance down the road. By the 30th, the 3d Battalion had completed relief of the 1st Battalion, 27th infantry in our new Regimental zone on Highway #5 near Kapintalan.

Shortly after dusk on the 30th, a large Japanese force attacked C Company from all sides. The attack continued fiercely throughout the night. At dawn the company began to withdraw to the bulldozer road, and immediately came under attack by about one hundred fifty Japs in three groups. A Company moved out from the Battalion perimeter around the 64th Field Artillery Battalion’s position to go to their aid. But the Japs had thrown three separate road blocks across the approaches to the Roller Coaster Road and no connection could be made. Battalion Headquarters Company, "Smoot’s Galoot’s" (The Company of Guerillas attached to the regiment, and commanded by Captain Robert Smoot), and finally F Company of the 2d battalion were brought into the struggle to break the road block. At 1900, the last of the blocks was reduced, and C and A Companies made contact. About fifty five Japs were killed during the fight, at a cost of one officer and six of our men killed, four wounded, and one officer missing in action.

The enemy had strong prepared positions in the Kapintalan area, astride all approaches to Balete Pass. We did not know too much about enemy strength in this sector, but their extremely aggressive attitude, suggested that their positions were strongly garrisoned. Approaches to the enemy positions were generally along narrow ridges, usually less then fifty yards wide, and all movement was canalized along the crests. Thus, a few well placed pillboxes defended by auto weapons could hold up the advance of a much larger force. The enemy strongpoints were placed in depth along these narrow ridges. Attempts to go around the flanks were futile simply because the flanks could not be found. Every enemy strongpoint was protected by another just behind it. The only method was to select a line of advance. And push straight ahead, reducing one position after another.

The plan for securing the Kapintalan area appeared intricate but it was actually extremely simple and flexible. Nine prominences in the pillbox-and –cave-infested area east of Highway #5 were marked as the objective. As nearly as possible they were selected to form a square, with rows of three, running east-west and columns of three running north-south. On the overlays, they looked rather like the marks the players make in a tic-tac-toe game. That advantage of the plan was that, after the southernmost row of the objectives were gained, a variety of choices lay before us: if it were feasible we could move up the outer columns of the square to surround the area, or we could occupy all three objectives in each row before moving further north.

Objective number 1, on the southeast corner of the square, was a bare topped ridge known as the "Fishhook" because of its appearance on our photo-maps.

L Company, attacking north-northeast toward this terrain feature on the morning of 2 April, overran a large Jap outpost and advance four hundred yards, receiving only small arms and mortar fire. K Company moved up behind them and occupied the old L Company positions. The next day, both companies sent out patrols to determine the extent of the enemy lines. K Company ran into an east-west line of resistance two hundred yards to their front and suffered two wounded. We were running into thickly wooded terrain which drastically limited visibility. And heavy rains were bogging down the already slow advance.

On 5 April L Company patrols ran into resistance only ten yards from their own lines. Severe casualties were inflicted on the enemy, and the company advanced about one hundred seventy five yards during the day. K Company swung to the northwest with the purpose of coming into line on L Company’s right flank. With the aid of Cannon Company, several pillboxes and caves were knocked out. By dark, the company was about two hundred yards southwest of L Company, and still in contact with the enemy. I Company followed behind K Company as it swung to the right, then cut north so as to come up on the line in the center.

On the 6th and 7th all three companies continues maneuvering into line. They were running into pillbox after pillbox, cleverly camouflaged in the dense undergrowth. When one was located, and our men began to move in on it, two or three others would open up. M-4 tanks, T-32 37mm guns, bazookas, flame-throwers, and white phosphorous grenades were employed against them, and on the 5th, 6th, and 7th, a total of thirty three pillboxes and caves were knocked out.

Heavy rains enhanced the difficulty of the task, but on 8 April the battalion was at last lined up from left to right; K, I, and L. There was a small ditch running toward a piece of high ground on the Fishhook called "Pillbox Hill", from which machine gun fire had been encountered previously. Company K was given the task of occupying it. The company pushed up the ditch, using tanks and T-32’s to knock out pillboxes, and flame throwers on individual holes. The objective was reached with only seven Japs accounted for; they had apparently evacuated the night before.

(and it continues)

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Francesca1973
12-19-2006, 02:10 AM
What's funny is that even if I was wrong about my uncle being in the 35th, I was actually right about the mountain being "Fishhook". I am continually amazed at how much information was preserved in such detail. Thanks again for all of the research. The details about mortar and small arms fire also fits with family accounts, as well. So far I've found 4 of the veterans/families on the list of lost dog tags found. I read that about Robert Viale earlier in my search. He was originally from Bayside, near Eureka, CA. I looked in the local phone book for Viales and found one. I called and asked him if he was related to Robert Viale and sure enough,Robert was his Great Uncle. Small world, isn't it? We're working together to see if we might be related from waaayyyy back in Italy.

George Eller
12-19-2006, 01:26 PM
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Wow, you've been doing your homework! I deleted my first posts because the information was just wrong and superflous. I found out that the information my mom had given me about Angelo not getting his medals until 15 years after the war might have been mistaken. Bob read the letter to me and it was awarded to him, in person, in July of 1946. He has a picture of Angelo receiving it. So I don't know what my mom was remembering, maybe something else entirely. It was about 40 years ago, so who can blame her for making a mistake? What's funny is that even if I was wrong about my uncle being in the 35th, I was actually right about the mountain being "Fishhook"! I am continually amazed at how much information was preserved in such detail. It's really wonderful. And thanks again for all of the research. The details about mortar and small arms fire also fits with family accounts, as well. So far I've found 4 of the veterans/families on the list of lost dog tags found. And I think I'm close to finding the 5th. Just waiting for a return phone call. Oh, I read that about Robert Viale earlier in my search. I thought the similarity of names was really interesting. Ironically enough, he was originally from Bayside, near Eureka, CA. I'm only an hour away from there. So I looked in the local phone book for Viales and found one. I called and asked them if they were related to Robert Viale and sure enough it was the man's Great Uncle. Small world, isn't it? We are most likely related, but he wasn't sure where his family was from in Italy. He said he'd call his mother and ask if she knew. But I haven't heard back from him yet, so I was going to call him back tomorrow and check in. He said that he travels a lot and used to check for Viale's in the phone books of the towns he was in. But they always hung up on him and weren't interested in seeing if they might be related. He said I was the first possible relative who'd actually called him! Pretty funny. One interesting note on the Robert Viale front. His wife is still alive and living in Eureka. His son is now a General at Fort ?? (it's in my notes somewhere) in California. So the tradition lived on in that family. I hope he's able to find out some more information from his mom because it would be nice to find another cousin who lives nearby.

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That's amazing. New information keeps coming in on a steady basis. That's great that your cousin Bob has documentation and photographs about your uncle Angelo's military service and awards. Maybe he can supply copies to you.

That is also an interesting story about Robert Viale and his wife and grand nephew. It is a small world. I had a feeling when I read about him that he might be related to you. It is interesting too, that Robert and Angelo Viale were both fighting on Luzon (although in different units) during the same time period and that both were decorated for distinguishing themselves in combat, although Robert received his medal posthumously. And both were residents of California.

I will be out this evening, but I do plan to scan those maps that I mentioned previously. I will probably post them tomorrow night. Also, I will post more on the 161st Regiment as promised.

Also, on the dog tags - there were a couple other army divisions on New Georgia if I remember correctly. I will check to let you know their designations.

I hope that you have continued success in your research.

George

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Francesca1973
12-20-2006, 12:36 AM
Thanks again for your reply. You've been very kind to continue replying. I made no progress on my dog tag search today. I was taking a little break. However, I am really wondering about something. Say that the family of a veteran sells his dog tags and war memorabilia when he dies. They don't care about the dog tags and letters for some reason and they just sell the entire estate. Do the dog tags revert back to the Federal Government since they are the ones who originally issued them? The reason I ask is because I just saw the saddest thing on ebay. A pilot was killed in action during WWII. His dog tags were sold for $137.50 on ebay. There was also a letter that his platoon had sent to his mother. I was so upset when I read this, I wrote to the seller. His two sentence response was. "The family didn't want them. I bought them at the estate sale." It just seems wrong to me that any dog tag should be sold-ever. It seems as if there should be a Museum or something. What do you think? Has this ever been discussed on this forum before?

George Eller
12-21-2006, 01:27 AM
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Hi,

Well, here are the maps I promised. I was short on time today, so I will continue on this topic probably Friday evening.
It is really getting late here on the East Coast.

Enjoy.

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Map showing advance of 32nd and 25th Divisions of I Corps on Luzon in the Philippines - 21 Feb to 10 March 1945.
For reference the town of San Jose is circled in yellow and the town of Kapinatalan is underlined in yellow. Both are located along Highway 5.
http://img112.imageshack.us/img112/9233/25thdivphilippinesmap01ag1.jpg
from U.S. Army in World War II: Atlas, The War in the Pacific, Stetson Conn, General Editor, National Historical Society, 1994, p 79

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Map showing advance of 161st, 27th and 35th Regiments of 25th Division on Luzon in the Philippines - 12 March to 31 May 1945.
For reference the the town of Kapinatalan is underlined in yellow and located along Highway 5.
Black dashed arrows indicate the advances - 29 March to 21 April 1945.
http://img153.imageshack.us/img153/3466/25thdivphilippinesmap02bo4.jpg
from U.S. Army in World War II: Triumph in the Philippines, The War in the Pacific, Stetson Conn, General Editor, National Historical Society, 1994, p 521

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Map showing advance of US forces on Luzon in the Philippines - January to August 1945.
For reference the area around the town of San Jose is circled in yellow.
Also circled in yellow is the US I Corps - part of General Krueger's 6th Army. The 25th Inf Div was part of I Corps.
http://img139.imageshack.us/img139/7065/25thdivphilippinesmap03vf7.jpg
from Atlas of World War II, David Jordan and Andrew Wiest, Barnes & Noble Books, 2004, p 229

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Partial modern day map of Luzon, Philippines from www.Multimap.com
For reference the area around the town of San Jose is circled in yellow.
http://img153.imageshack.us/img153/9602/25thdivphilippinesmap04mz7.jpg

http://www.multimap.com/map/browse.cgi?client=public&X=13450000&Y=1750000&width=700&height=400&gride=&gridn=&srec=0&coordsys=mercator&db=w3&addr1=&addr2=&addr3=&pc=&advanced=&local=&localinfosel=&kw=&inmap=&table=&ovtype=&keepicon=&zm=0&scale=2000000&up.x=289&up.y=4

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Francesca1973
01-30-2007, 04:27 PM
U.S. Army in World War II: Triumph in the Philippines, The War in the Pacific, Stetson Conn, General Editor, National Historical Society, 1994, p 521

This is next on my list of books to purchase. I love these maps, George. Thanks again for posting them.

Gen. Sandworm
01-30-2007, 04:31 PM
from Atlas of World War II, David Jordan and Andrew Wiest, Barnes & Noble Books, 2004, p 229

Awesome book recommend it to everyone. Barnes & Noble are great for coming up with book that the average person wouldnt want but total gold for others ........ at very good prices. I know I sound like an advert but this one is a really great book.

Francesca1973
01-31-2007, 06:14 PM
I'm going to a town an hour away that actually has a big bookstore tomorrow. Can you believe the town I live in has one used book store and that's it? I can't wait to raid the WWII section. I'm going to make a note of all the books recommended on this forum before I go tomorrow. Then I'll update everyone on my shopping spree. Damn, I'm off topic again. Since I'm off topic anyway, has anyone gone over to check out the thread I started a few days ago about Italian Americans in WWII. I'm beginning to think I'm invisible since I haven't gotten a single reply. Either that or people find that thread extremely boring. Not sure which.

Back on topic a bit: Does anyone feel that the Army's involvement is often overlooked in the Pacific by historians because the actions of the Marines were so much more dramatic?

32Bravo
02-01-2007, 12:00 PM
When reading the through the thread on the 101st, I was reminded of a book I read some time ago on Pacific operations, a chapter of which covered the U.S. invasion of Coregador in the Phillipine Islands. As I recall, this was carried out by the 501 Para Infantry. One of the most dramatic airborne operations I have ever read. Does anyone know of this, and if so, were the 501(?) Para Infantry an element of the 101 or 82, or were they a part of an entirely different formation?

32Bravo
02-01-2007, 04:42 PM
The jump on 'Corregidor' February 1945.

The troops detailed for the operation, known colletcively as Rock Force, included the 503rd Parachute Infantry Regiment, the 3rd Battalion 34th Infantry Regiment, the 46th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion, one company of the 161st Parachute Engineer Battalion and supporting units. In overall command was the 503rd's commanding officer, 33 year old Colonel George M Jones.

Francesca1973
02-01-2007, 07:19 PM
32 Bravo, thanks for introducing the information about the 503rd parachute infantry. I had no idea they used airborne troops in the South Pacific. I think it deserves it's own thread in this section (American Military-Pacific Theater) so that the information won't get lost at the bottom of this thread and it will be more likely to be viewed by anyone interested in the Airborne. Just a suggestion. I'm going to go look up some more information about the 503rd and thanks again.:)

32Bravo
02-02-2007, 05:29 AM
Good thinking! In the meantime, if you check the above maps, you will symbols of other airborne ops.

George Eller
02-10-2007, 07:07 PM
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Photos of my sets of:
History of United States Naval Operations in World War II 15 Volume Set (Hardcover),
by Samuel Eliot Morison, Castle Books, 2001. The series was originally published volume by volume 1947 until completed in the early 1960s. I bought my set through the Military Book Club for sale price of $150 (about $10 per volume)
And
U.S. Army In World War II, 50th Anniversary Commemorative Edition, Kent Roberts Greenfield - General Editor (1953) thru Maurice Matloff - General Editor (1972), The National Historical Society, 1994. Originally published by volume 1953 - 1973. I purchased my set volume by volume through the National Historical Society in the mid 1990's.

http://img101.imageshack.us/img101/6762/usnavyarmywwii01oi2.jpg

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/5381/usnavyarmywwii02iu1.jpg

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/9899/usnavyarmywwii03sm6.jpg

http://img266.imageshack.us/img266/9448/usnavyarmywwii04qr1.jpg

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History of United States Naval Operations in World War II 15 Volume Set (Hardcover)
by Samuel Eliot Morison
http://www.amazon.com/History-United-States-Naval-Operations/dp/0762854316/sr=1-1/qid=1171147199/ref=pd_bbs_1/105-6883372-2892422?ie=UTF8&s=books
"A Classic., July 11, 2002
Reviewer: Cap'n Co (Fall River, Massachusetts United States)
This is the definitive history of US Naval ops in the second world war. It is very well written. Morison was a Harvard history professor interested in maritime matters who FDR appointed in April 1942 as official naval historian and comissioned in the USNR. During the rest of the war Morison worked on the history full time, spending about half the time at sea with various elements of the fleet. The series was published volume by volume until completed in the early 1960s.
When these books were written, the allied successes in breaking axis codes were still secret, so the full reasons behind many command decisions could not be discussed. On occasion this forced Morison into a little obsfucation. So long as the reader is aware that some crucial signals intelligence could not be mentioned, it makes little difference to the work as a whole."

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U.S. Army In World War II, 50th Anniversary Commemorative Edition, Kent Roberts Greenfield - General Editor (1953) thru Maurice Matloff - General Editor (1972), The National Historical Society, 1994
(I think it is out of print)
http://www.army.mil/cmh-pg/collections/USAWW2/USAWW2.htm
http://www.ibiblio.org/hyperwar/USA/index.html

A complete set was auctioned at ebay with starting bid at $375
http://cgi.ebay.com/U-S-ARMY-IN-WORLD-WAR-II-50th-Anniversary-Greenfield_W0QQitemZ250044286559QQihZ015QQcategory Z378QQcmdZViewItem

http://www.google.com/search?as_q=50th+Anniversary+Commemorative+Edition&hl=en&num=10&btnG=Google+Search&as_epq=US+Army+In+World+War+II&as_oq=&as_eq=&lr=&as_ft=i&as_filetype=&as_qdr=all&as_nlo=&as_nhi=&as_occt=any&as_dt=i&as_sitesearch=&as_rights=&safe=images

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25th INFANTRY 'TROPIC LIGHTNING' DIVISION in World War II. The unit fought in some of the fiercest fighting in the Pacific at Guadalcanal, followed by New Georgia Island and finally the bloody battles in Luzon.
http://www.military.cibmedia.com/main-search-detail.asp?idsearch=25th+inf&productcode=BP-25d2

The Official U.S. Army history of the 25th "Tropic Lightning" Infantry Division in WWII. The 25th first saw combat during the Dec. 7th 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. The unit fought in some of the fiercest fighting in the Pacific at Guadalcanal, followed by New Georgia Island and finally the bloody battles in Luzon.

Originally published in 1946 by Army and Navy Publishing Company. Details on the unit are as follows. Activated: 10 October 1941 in Hawaii. Campaigns: Guadalcanal, Luzon. After the Japanese machine-gunned Schofield Barracks, 7 December 1941, the 25th Infantry Division moved to beach positions for the defense of Honolulu and Ewa Plains. Following intensive training, the 25th began moving to Guadalcanal, 25 November 1942, to relieve Marines near Henderson Field. First elements landed near the Tenaru River, 17 December 1942, and entered combat, 10 January 1943, participating in the seizure of Kokumbona and the reduction of the Mount Austen Pocket in some of the bitterest fighting of the Pacific campaign.

The threat of large enemy attacks caused a temporary withdrawal, but Division elements under XIV Corps control relieved the 147th Infantry and took over the advance on Cape Esperance. The junction of these elements with Americal Division forces near the cape, 5 February 1943, ended organized enemy resistance. A period of garrison duty followed, ending 21 July: On that date, advance elements debarked on Munda, New Georgia.

The 35th Infantry Regiment, under the Northern Landing Force, took part in the capture of Vella Lavella, 15 August to 15 September 1943. Meanwhile, other elements landed on New Georgia, took Zieta, marched through jungle mud for 19 days, and captured Bairoko Harbor, winning the island. Elements cleared Arundel Island, 24 September 1943, and Kolombangara Island with its important Vila Airport, 6 October. Organized resistance on New Georgia ended, 25 August, and the Division moved to New Zealand for rest and training, last elements arriving on 5 December.

The 25th was transferred to New Caledonia, 3 February-14 March 1944, for continued training. The Division landed in the San Fabian area of Luzon, 11 January 1945, to enter the struggle for the liberation of the Philippines. It drove across the Luzon Central Plain, meeting the enemy at Binalonan, 17 January. Moving through the rice paddies, the 25th occupied Umingan, Lupao, and San Jose and destroyed a great part of the Japanese armor on Luzon.

On 21 February, the Division began operations in the Caraballo Mountains. It fought its way along Highway No. 5, taking Digdig, Putlan, and Kapintalan against fierce enemy counterattacks and took Balete Pass, 13 May, and opened the gateway to the Cagayan Valley, 27 May, with the capture of Santa Fe. Until 30 June, when the Division was relieved, it carried out mopping-up activities. On 1 July, the Division moved to Tarlac for training, leaving for Japan, 20 September. Nicknames: Tropic Lightning; sometimes called the Pineapple Division. Shoulder patch: In form of taro leaf in red, on which is superimposed a flash of lightning in gold. 1,235 KIA, 4,190 WIA, 262 Died of Wounds.

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FROM DOWN UNDER TO NIPPON: The SIXTH U.S. ARMY in World War II. by Sixth Army Commander General Walter Krueger. Covers all 6th Army campaigns, divisions and major combat teams across the SW Pacific. -OUT OF PRINT-
http://www.military.cibmedia.com/main-search-detail.asp?idsearch=5th+inf&offset=25&productcode=BP-125
The SIXTH U.S. ARMY in World War II: FROM DOWN UNDER TO NIPPON. by Sixth Army Commander General Walter Krueger.The 6th Army, under the command of General Krueger, swept across the SW Pacific. Details its 2,700 mile advance, marked by numerous amphibious assaults, including the capture of the Admiralty Islands, Biak and Noemfoor Islands, the final New Guinea landings in ?44, and the bloody liberation of the Philippines. PRIMARY UNITS COVERED: 6th Infantry Division, 25th Infantry Division, 32nd Infantry Division, 33rd Infantry Division, 37th Infantry Division, 38th Infantry Division, 40th Infantry Division, 43rd Infantry Division, 1st Cavalry Division, 11th Airborne Division, 112th Cavalry Regiment Combat Team, 34rd Infantry Regiment Combat Team, 158th Infantry Regiment Combat Team, 503rd Parachute Regiment Combat Team From Down Under to Nippon describes the achievements and the hardships of the 6th Army and its individual units. It is an unadorned narrative of bitter fighting, hardships and outstanding performance, luck and victory. Exceptional coverage of Luzon and the recapture of the Philippines. 392 pages. Photographs. Maps.

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ww2admin
02-11-2007, 12:20 AM
Oh...my....you have more WWII books than my small town library. Congrats. I think?

George Eller
02-11-2007, 12:34 AM
Oh...my....you have more WWII books than my small town library. Congrats. I think?
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LOL, Thanks ww2admin,

Well, that's part of my collection. I don't claim to have the world's largest, but there's more not pictured. I know what you mean though about small town libraries. :)

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32Bravo
02-14-2007, 11:05 AM
Have you memorised them all, George?

George Eller
02-14-2007, 11:25 AM
Have you memorised them all, George?
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Geez, I wish ;)

I do plan on posting a complete listing of all US Army ground and air units that served in the Pacific / CBI during WWII. I should have some spare time this evening to get started. :)

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Francesca1973
02-14-2007, 11:38 AM
Hi Everyone,

Good postings, George. I haven't been on forum much. The first dog tag of my project is winging its way across the Pacific to Kansas as we speak. It's heading to the home of F.A. Bell's sister, who is thrilled to have it back after over 60 years. I don't think she'll believe it until it arrives in the mail. The dog tag belonged to Frank Alonzo Bell of Tonganoxie, Kansas. :cool:

George Eller
02-14-2007, 01:00 PM
Hi Everyone,

Good postings, George. I haven't been on forum much. The first dog tag of my project is winging its way across the Pacific to Kansas as we speak. It's heading to the home of F.A. Bell's sister, who is thrilled to have it back after over 60 years. I don't think she'll believe it until it arrives in the mail. The dog tag belonged to Frank Alonzo Bell of Tonganoxie, Kansas. :cool:
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Thanks Francesca, and congratulations :)

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:09 PM
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US Army, USAAF and US Marine Corps Units in the Pacific - WWII

01
http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/5900/usarmypacific01ym3.jpg
War in the Pacific: Pearl Harbor to Tokyo Bay, Bernard C. Nalty, Salamander Books, Ltd., 1991, pp 288-289

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/8484/usarmypacific02fc5.jpg
The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 624

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 625

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 626

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:10 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)

02
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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 627

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 628

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 629

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 630

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:11 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)

03
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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 631

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 632

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 633

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, pp 634, 399

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:12 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)

04
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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 400

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 401

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 402

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 403

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:13 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)

05
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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 404

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 405

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 406

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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 407

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:14 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)

06
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The Pacific War Encyclopedia, James F. Dunnigan & Albert A. Nofi, Checkmark Books, 1998, p 408

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The US Army in World War II, Mark R. Henry, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2001, p 42

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The US Army in World War II, Mark R. Henry, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2001, p 43

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The US Army in World War II, Mark R. Henry, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2001, p 44

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:15 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)

07
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The US Army in World War II, Mark R. Henry, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2001, p 45

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The US Army in World War II, Mark R. Henry, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2001, p 46

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The US Infantryman in World War II: Pacific Area of Operations 1941-45, Robert S. Rush, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2002, p 4

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/2289/usarmypacific26pz6.jpg
The US Infantryman in World War II: Pacific Area of Operations 1941-45, Robert S. Rush, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2002, p 5

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:16 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)

08
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The US Infantryman in World War II: Pacific Area of Operations 1941-45, Robert S. Rush, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2002, p 6

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The US Infantryman in World War II: Pacific Area of Operations 1941-45, Robert S. Rush, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2002, p 7

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/7729/usarmypacific29nj8.jpg
The US Infantryman in World War II: Pacific Area of Operations 1941-45, Robert S. Rush, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2002, p 8

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The US Infantryman in World War II: Pacific Area of Operations 1941-45, Robert S. Rush, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2002, p 9

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:17 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)

09

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The US Infantryman in World War II: Pacific Area of Operations 1941-45, Robert S. Rush, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2002, p 10

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The US Infantryman in World War II: Pacific Area of Operations 1941-45, Robert S. Rush, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2002, p 11

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/2047/usarmypacific33sa8.jpg
The US Infantryman in World War II: Pacific Area of Operations 1941-45, Robert S. Rush, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2002, p 12

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/6828/usarmypacific34uc1.jpg
The US Infantryman in World War II: Pacific Area of Operations 1941-45, Robert S. Rush, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2002, p 13

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:18 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)

10
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The US Infantryman in World War II: Pacific Area of Operations 1941-45, Robert S. Rush, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2002, p 14

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The US Infantryman in World War II: Pacific Area of Operations 1941-45, Robert S. Rush, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2002, p 34

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/5646/usarmypacific37xw8.jpg
The US Infantryman in World War II: Pacific Area of Operations 1941-45, Robert S. Rush, Osprey Publishing, Ltd., 2002, p 60

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/6633/usarmypacific38yn7.jpg
The World War II Databook, John Ellis, Aurum Press, Ltd., 1993, p 115

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:19 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)

11

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The World War II Databook, John Ellis, Aurum Press, Ltd., 1993, p 116

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The World War II Databook, John Ellis, Aurum Press, Ltd., 1993, p 189

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The World War II Databook, John Ellis, Aurum Press, Ltd., 1993, p 191

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The World War II Databook, John Ellis, Aurum Press, Ltd., 1993, p 192

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:21 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)

12
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The World War II Databook, John Ellis, Aurum Press, Ltd., 1993, p 193

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The World War II Databook, John Ellis, Aurum Press, Ltd., 1993, p 194

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The World War II Databook, John Ellis, Aurum Press, Ltd., 1993, p 195

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The World War II Databook, John Ellis, Aurum Press, Ltd., 1993, p 196

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:22 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)

13
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Illustrated World War II Encyclopedia, Lt Col Eddy Bauer and Brigadier Peter Young, H.S. Stuttman Inc., 1978, p 2681

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/585/usarmypacific48zx9.jpg
Illustrated World War II Encyclopedia, Lt Col Eddy Bauer and Brigadier Peter Young, H.S. Stuttman Inc., 1978, p 2682

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/4681/usarmypacific49qt3.jpg
Illustrated World War II Encyclopedia, Lt Col Eddy Bauer and Brigadier Peter Young, H.S. Stuttman Inc., 1978, p 2683

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/6386/usarmypacific50wd0.jpg
Illustrated World War II Encyclopedia, Lt Col Eddy Bauer and Brigadier Peter Young, H.S. Stuttman Inc., 1978, p 2684

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 10:23 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE)

14
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Illustrated World War II Encyclopedia, Lt Col Eddy Bauer and Brigadier Peter Young, H.S. Stuttman Inc., 1978, p 2685

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/1769/usarmypacific52pg7.jpg
Illustrated World War II Encyclopedia, Lt Col Eddy Bauer and Brigadier Peter Young, H.S. Stuttman Inc., 1978, p 2688

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/2039/usarmypacific53ib1.jpg
Illustrated World War II Encyclopedia, Lt Col Eddy Bauer and Brigadier Peter Young, H.S. Stuttman Inc., 1978, p 2689

http://img522.imageshack.us/img522/6803/usarmypacific54ub8.jpg
Illustrated World War II Encyclopedia, Lt Col Eddy Bauer and Brigadier Peter Young, H.S. Stuttman Inc., 1978, p 2690

(CONTINUED BELOW / NEXT PAGE)

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George Eller
02-25-2007, 11:45 PM
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(CONTINUED FROM ABOVE / PREVIOUS PAGE)

15
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The World War II Databook, John Ellis, Aurum Press, Ltd., 1993, p 243

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The World War II Databook, John Ellis, Aurum Press, Ltd., 1993, pp 244, 235

(END)

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R.Garvin
11-26-2007, 07:03 PM
Mr. Eller,
I was doing a search online for a map on the action at Lupao in the Philippines when I ran across your exchange with Francesca about her uncle. Dad was with HQ, 2nd Bn. , 35th Inf. during the Liberation of the Philippines. He passed away in 1995, and I recently have been doing some research on him with an idea in mind of publishing his photographs and some of his artifacts from the War.
I have the Lupao battle map which was drawn by T/4 Don Santee on 20 Feb. 1945, shortly after the action and was part of the book 165 Days which was about the 25th's involvement in the Philippine Campaign. I also have a lot of previously unpublished photos that he handed down to me.
To make a long story short, your posts helped me understand where the 35th fought and how my Dad was involved in the battles through your excellent research. I have been on both the 25th's and the 35th's website and your information just enhanced what is currently on those outstanding sites. Thanks for helping even when you didn't relaize you were.

Randall K. Garvin

George Eller
11-26-2007, 08:52 PM
Mr. Eller,
I was doing a search online for a map on the action at Lupao in the Philippines when I ran across your exchange with Francesca about her uncle. Dad was with HQ, 2nd Bn. , 35th Inf. during the Liberation of the Philippines. He passed away in 1995, and I recently have been doing some research on him with an idea in mind of publishing his photographs and some of his artifacts from the War.
I have the Lupao battle map which was drawn by T/4 Don Santee on 20 Feb. 1945, shortly after the action and was part of the book 165 Days which was about the 25th's involvement in the Philippine Campaign. I also have a lot of previously unpublished photos that he handed down to me.
To make a long story short, your posts helped me understand where the 35th fought and how my Dad was involved in the battles through your excellent research. I have been on both the 25th's and the 35th's website and your information just enhanced what is currently on those outstanding sites. Thanks for helping even when you didn't relaize you were.

Randall K. Garvin
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Hi Randall,

You're very welcome. I'm glad that my posts on the 25th Inf Div were helpful to your research about your father's service in the 2nd Bn, 35th Inf Rgt. I am sorry to hear that your Dad has since passed away. With the information that you have, you could almost retrace your father's steps in the Philippines campaign should you ever decide to visit there.

If you should need any help on further research just let me know - PM (private message) would be fine.

I have the History of United States Naval Operations in World War II 15 Volume Set (Hardcover),by Samuel Eliot Morison, Castle Books, 2001. The series was originally published volume by volume 1947 until completed in the early 1960s. I bought my set through the Military Book Club for sale price of $150 (about $10 per volume)

And

U.S. Army In World War II, 50th Anniversary Commemorative Edition, Kent Roberts Greenfield - General Editor (1953) thru Maurice Matloff - General Editor (1972), The National Historical Society, 1994. Originally published by volume 1953 - 1973. I purchased my set volume by volume through the National Historical Society in the mid 1990's.
(Atlas set included)

http://www.ww2incolor.com/forum/showpost.php?p=94391&postcount=25

And thank you very much for the compliments. I really appreciate that :D


All the Best,

George

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PA.Dutchman
01-17-2008, 10:46 PM
My father was in the 11 Bombardment Group 42 Squadron. They went into the Pacific with Admiral Nimitz in 1942 who wanted AAF Bombers NOW!

They were awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for their action over superior numbers during the period of July to November 1942 in the Pacific Theater.

The photo was taken during this time in 1942 It is on Page 9 of the book "Grey Geese Calling" I have my fathers copy of the photo with the names on the back. He is in the front row center with the helmet at his feet.

PA.Dutchman
01-18-2008, 12:15 AM
This is the photo of the 11 Bombardment Group before the attack on 12/7/1941. My father is in this one as well, and the brother of a friend who was shot down a week before he was to return to Hawaii.

They are standing in front of a B-17. Several of the individuals in the photo were friends of my father and shot down moments after the attack began.

Robert Kelley is one, my father has this photo from January of 1941 then under that date he has died 12/7/1941

PA.Dutchman
01-18-2008, 12:51 AM
This is the complete 11 Bombardment Group 7 TH AAC before 12/7/1941.

This is the 11 TH Bombardment Group 1940 at Hickam.

One needs to get paid as well and I recently found my father's old pay book.

PA.Dutchman
01-18-2008, 01:13 AM
I agree that is so sad. In 1972 we had a huge flood here in Pennsylvania. Our church volunteered to help families clean up and remove the mud from their homes.

Four of us helped an elderly lady who had a son that was an American POW in Germany. All she had were his letters, some had been damaged, but she searched hit and low until she found them.

Here are my fathers Dog Tags. I am saving everything for our sons. My mother moved into a Senior Center and she gave me everything Pop had. It isn't much, but it belonged to Pop. To me that says it all!

Here are Pops Dog Tags,

PA.Dutchman
02-10-2008, 04:37 AM
The 11 Bombardment, the 42 Sq. was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation for their actions during July to November of 1942.