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Gutkowski
11-21-2005, 08:00 PM
Just checking to see if anyone as started a link for weapons we own ?
My K98
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/DSCF0504.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/DSCF0503.jpg

My No4 Mk1 ROF (F) 5/43
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/DSCF0222.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/DSCF0221.jpg

My No1 MK3 1942 lithgow
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/en1.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/end.jpg

My No1 Mk3 Ishey (just Got It and its in the cleaning process)
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/DSCF0511.jpg

My CZ52 1953
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/DSCF0117.jpg

My Mi Garand 6/44 S/A
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/m1.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/m12.jpg

My M28 Finn Civil Guards Rifle all matching #s
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/DSCF1200.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/DSCF1197.jpg

My 1941 Kovrov non import stamped SVT 40 (I traded this for my Garand ) :(
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/SVT011.jpg
http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y67/gutkowski/svt2arsenelmarks.jpg


and a bunch of new ones
What do you fellas have ?

bas
11-21-2005, 10:44 PM
Nice pics mate, thats a fine looking Kar98k.

Here's my assortment of arms:
http://www.ww2incolor.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=1074

Man of Stoat's a enthusiast as well with a fair bit of experience with WWII firearms:

http://www.ww2incolor.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=239

THE SARGE
11-22-2005, 01:33 AM
I used to own a WWII vintage M1 Carbine with full CES (it also saw action in Korea, too) but due to our (Australia's) new gun laws, I had to hand it in to the Federal Police. 1 - it was semi-auto, 2 - it was military style, 3 - it had become illegal to own, unless the barrel was welded up and the firing pin destroyed. Being in the military at the time of the gun buy-back scheme, I had the M1 Carbine converted by our own armourer into a fully auto capable weapon, hence, illegal. I also owned a SMLE Mk IV Jungle Rifle with open iron sights and full CES, but I sold it to a collector for quite a tidy sum. These were allocated at random for $50 AuD in 1990 when Australian Army war stocks were being sold off, to be replaced by the ubiquitous SLR.

DerMann
11-22-2005, 04:52 PM
I have a Czech Vz.24 Mauser from the year 1938. The barrel and receiver match. I also have a twenty round trench magazine and a 15" long bayonet on it (also Czech).

http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b67/DerMann3/Copyofmymauser2.jpg
That picture is a bit out of date. I just recently got a straight bolt for it.

I aso have a Webley and Scott Mk. VI revolver from 1916, still in .455. None of it matches, it's mainly for shooting (even though I don't shoot it that often for good reasons)
http://i17.photobucket.com/albums/b67/DerMann3/100_3825.jpg

Gutkowski
11-22-2005, 06:27 PM
Bas . I have seen you collection over at surplus rifle Impressive to say the least :P

Very nice Trench Mag on the 98 and the webley is awsome :lol:

Iron Yeoman
11-22-2005, 07:34 PM
the webley is awsome :lol:

Of course his webley is awesome, It's British! :lol: :lol: :lol:

DerMann
11-22-2005, 07:52 PM
the webley is awsome :lol:

Of course his webley is awesome, It's British! :lol: :lol: :lol:
That's basically why I bought the Webley over a 1911 (that and the 1911 would've cost me about $200 more and it fires bullets that are 30 grains heavier than the 1911 :D ).

Cuts
11-23-2005, 06:15 AM
...

...it fires bullets that are 30 grains heavier than the 1911 :D ).

Do you find this to be an advantage DM ?

DerMann
11-23-2005, 02:23 PM
...

...it fires bullets that are 30 grains heavier than the 1911 :D ).

Do you find this to be an advantage DM ?
Yes and no.

Pros:
More inertia

Cons:
More recoil
More expensive
Slower than a .45

Cuts
11-23-2005, 08:12 PM
...

...it fires bullets that are 30 grains heavier than the 1911 :D ).

Do you find this to be an advantage DM ?
Yes and no.

Pros:
More inertia

Cons:
More recoil
More expensive
Slower than a .45

Not sure I understand your answer, how does the inertia affect you personally ?
When you say more recoil, do you mean in relation to the 1911's rd ?
Do your heads really cost more to buy, if so where do you get them from ?

DerMann
11-24-2005, 12:13 AM
...

...it fires bullets that are 30 grains heavier than the 1911 :D ).

Do you find this to be an advantage DM ?
Yes and no.

Pros:
More inertia

Cons:
More recoil
More expensive
Slower than a .45

Not sure I understand your answer, how does the inertia affect you personally ?
When you say more recoil, do you mean in relation to the 1911's rd ?
Do your heads really cost more to buy, if so where do you get them from ?

It doesn't affect me personally, it gives me a feeling of superiority over smaller and faster bullets

Yes.

I was refering to the overall cost of the bullet, a box of 50 is $28 without shipping. I need to buy a mould to start reloading though. No one sells just plain .455 bullets, you have to make 'em (unless you get lucky on eBay).

Cuts
11-29-2005, 08:22 AM
Der Mann, I hope I'm not reading this all wrong, but I'm unsure as to what you mean about your "feeling of superiority over smaller and faster bullets" - how do you find this to be of assistance ?

I still don't understand your theory of the recoil either, the Mk 6 and the Colt are just about the same weight, (though the revolver is slightly heavier,) the mv and me of the latter considerably higher. Has Newton been disproved ?

I've always considered the 45 ACP to be a comfortable rd to fire, especially in JMB's invention, and the Mk 6 to be an absolute pussycat.
Have you fired these two handguns ?

Man of Stoat
11-29-2005, 08:50 AM
The laws of physics are such that for a revolver and recoil operated pistol of the same weight firing the same cartridge with the same muzzle velocity, the free energy of recoil will be greatest for the recoil operated pistol. To all intents and purposes, this is because momentum is conserved between the bullet and the moving parts of an automatic pistol, and not the whole weight of the pistol. In the case of a revolver, momentum is conserved between the bullet and the full weight.

Hatcher devotes a whole chapter to this in his famous Notebook.

Incidentally, someone has made a gas operated slide for the colt M 1911, which reportedly tames the recoil immensely.

DerMann
11-29-2005, 07:18 PM
Der Mann, I hope I'm not reading this all wrong, but I'm unsure as to what you mean about your "feeling of superiority over smaller and faster bullets" - how do you find this to be of assistance ?

I still don't understand your theory of the recoil either, the Mk 6 and the Colt are just about the same weight, (though the revolver is slightly heavier,) the mv and me of the latter considerably higher. Has Newton been disproved ?

I've always considered the 45 ACP to be a comfortable rd to fire, especially in JMB's invention, and the Mk 6 to be an absolute pussycat.
Have you fired these two handguns ?

I have shot both a Webley and a 1911. In fact the first time I had fired the 1911 I hit the ground because I over compensated for the recoil (I did what I would normally do for the Webley). I love how the 1911 handles, I have absolutely no problems with recoil. I used dual 1911's and hit the target at 20 yards about 10/16 times.

Mechanized Warfare
11-29-2005, 07:54 PM
Where exactly can you get these surplus weapons? I been wanting for a very long time to own myself a K98 and an M1 Garand. If anyone can provide me info on where to get them, I would greatly appreciate it.

DerMann
11-29-2005, 09:33 PM
Check www.auctionarms.com and www.gunbroker.com . Also try to go to gun shows and pawn shops.

Man of Stoat
11-30-2005, 08:52 AM
I have shot both a Webley and a 1911. In fact the first time I had fired the 1911 I hit the ground because I over compensated for the recoil (I did what I would normally do for the Webley). I love how the 1911 handles, I have absolutely no problems with recoil. I used dual 1911's and hit the target at 20 yards about 10/16 times.

Wow! Not only have you single-handedly disproved Newton's laws of motion, you have also single-handedly destroyed the four elementary marksmanship principles. Frankly, if you are consciously "compensating for recoil", I'm surprised you manage to hit any target at all.

I'm intrigued now. By "compensating", do you mean "aimed low" or " flinched like a rent boy on his first job"?

Cuts
11-30-2005, 12:09 PM
Der Mann, I hope I'm not reading this all wrong, but I'm unsure as to what you mean about your "feeling of superiority over smaller and faster bullets" - how do you find this to be of assistance ?

I still don't understand your theory of the recoil either, the Mk 6 and the Colt are just about the same weight, (though the revolver is slightly heavier,) the mv and me of the latter considerably higher. Has Newton been disproved ?

I've always considered the 45 ACP to be a comfortable rd to fire, especially in JMB's invention, and the Mk 6 to be an absolute pussycat.
Have you fired these two handguns ?

I have shot both a Webley and a 1911. In fact the first time I had fired the 1911 I hit the ground because I over compensated for the recoil (I did what I would normally do for the Webley). I love how the 1911 handles

... My bold.

The bullet will leave the bbl of the wpn before the recoil comes into play so will have no effect on where the muzzle is pointed, this is why manufacturers put those knobbly bits on top of them.
If you must aim off very low with the Webley then your wpn has been altered or damaged at some stage.
Either the fore-knobbly bit is too low or the rearknobbly bit too high. Ask your gunsmith to check your knobbly bits.

Should this not be the case then have the bbl checked out by a competent gunsmith, although at handgun ranges the damage will be eminently visible to an untrained eye.


...

I used dual 1911's and hit the target at 20 yards about 10/16 times.
What is/are dual 1911's ?


I still don't understand your "feeling of superiority over smaller and faster bullets" - how do you find this to be of assistance ?




...

I have absolutely no problems with recoil.

...
Yet you say you were compensating for it. Are you getting confused ?
Compensating for recoil is normally a trait of those who do have a problem with it - do you have a flinch when you shoot ?
Take a course at a recognised trg establishment, it'll work wonders on your techniques.
I don't know which part of Texas you're resident in, but a friend recommended the centre below.

Tim Oxley (Instr.), Texas Small Arms Academy, Houston.
Telephone 713-561-5335

I would say try the Thunder Ranch, but the cses are not cheap and I'm not sure if it's the best place for you to start. (For either side.)

Mechanized Warfare
11-30-2005, 01:22 PM
Check www.auctionarms.com and www.gunbroker.com . Also try to go to gun shows and pawn shops.

Thanks.....ill try those links right now. :wink:

George Eller
12-01-2005, 10:17 PM
Of World War II small arms I have two Lee-Enfield rifles:
No 4 Mk I* made at the Long Branch Arsenal near Toronto, Canada in 1942 and SMLE Mk III made at a BSA (Birmingham Small Arms, Co.) controlled company near Birmingham in Shirley, England in 1940.
Both have issue slings and bayonets.

I used to own a Springfield Model 1903A3, but sold it about 20 years ago.

Also had a Colt 1911A1, but sold it and bought a S&W Model 1955 revolver in .45 ACP instead. The Model 1955 is similar to the Smith & Wesson Model 1917 revolver used during WWI and WWII, although it has a longer barrel and better sights. They both use half-moon clips to load and eject the rimless cases from the cylinder.

I have fired the M-1 Garand and M-1 Carbine (owned by my brother).

I own or have owned more modern weapons through the years.

I plan to buy a Russian Mosin-Nagant M1891 (either a M91/30 or M44) in the near future. Would eventually like to buy a Mauser 98k.

DerMann
12-03-2005, 06:23 PM
I have shot both a Webley and a 1911. In fact the first time I had fired the 1911 I hit the ground because I over compensated for the recoil (I did what I would normally do for the Webley). I love how the 1911 handles, I have absolutely no problems with recoil. I used dual 1911's and hit the target at 20 yards about 10/16 times.

Wow! Not only have you single-handedly disproved Newton's laws of motion, you have also single-handedly destroyed the four elementary marksmanship principles. Frankly, if you are consciously "compensating for recoil", I'm surprised you manage to hit any target at all.

I'm intrigued now. By "compensating", do you mean "aimed low" or " flinched like a rent boy on his first job"?

Aimed low.




Der Mann, I hope I'm not reading this all wrong, but I'm unsure as to what you mean about your "feeling of superiority over smaller and faster bullets" - how do you find this to be of assistance ?

I still don't understand your theory of the recoil either, the Mk 6 and the Colt are just about the same weight, (though the revolver is slightly heavier,) the mv and me of the latter considerably higher. Has Newton been disproved ?

I've always considered the 45 ACP to be a comfortable rd to fire, especially in JMB's invention, and the Mk 6 to be an absolute pussycat.
Have you fired these two handguns ?

I have shot both a Webley and a 1911. In fact the first time I had fired the 1911 I hit the ground because I over compensated for the recoil (I did what I would normally do for the Webley). I love how the 1911 handles

... My bold.

The bullet will leave the bbl of the wpn before the recoil comes into play so will have no effect on where the muzzle is pointed, this is why manufacturers put those knobbly bits on top of them.
If you must aim off very low with the Webley then your wpn has been altered or damaged at some stage.
Either the fore-knobbly bit is too low or the rearknobbly bit too high. Ask your gunsmith to check your knobbly bits.

Should this not be the case then have the bbl checked out by a competent gunsmith, although at handgun ranges the damage will be eminently visible to an untrained eye.


...

I used dual 1911's and hit the target at 20 yards about 10/16 times.
What is/are dual 1911's ?


I still don't understand your "feeling of superiority over smaller and faster bullets" - how do you find this to be of assistance ?




...

I have absolutely no problems with recoil.

...
Yet you say you were compensating for it. Are you getting confused ?
Compensating for recoil is normally a trait of those who do have a problem with it - do you have a flinch when you shoot ?
Take a course at a recognised trg establishment, it'll work wonders on your techniques.
I don't know which part of Texas you're resident in, but a friend recommended the centre below.

Tim Oxley (Instr.), Texas Small Arms Academy, Houston.
Telephone 713-561-5335

I would say try the Thunder Ranch, but the cses are not cheap and I'm not sure if it's the best place for you to start. (For either side.)

I was told by someone (can't remeber who, but it wasn't on the internet) that the Webley is sighted for 100 yards, I don't know if this is true or not, but I do have to aim below the target at 20 yards just the hit it.

Dual 1911's means I have one in each hand.

I don't flinch, I just aim a bit lower. I don't even do that with any other guns I shoot, it's just that I find it most effective to do this when I shoot with the Webley.

Man of Stoat
12-04-2005, 03:50 AM
Sounds to me like your front knobbly bit is too short, or the load you're firing is wrong. I would be very suprised if it was sighted for 100yds, since British pistol ranges are not that long.

DerMann
12-04-2005, 02:53 PM
Sounds to me like your front knobbly bit is too short, or the load you're firing is wrong. I would be very suprised if it was sighted for 100yds, since British pistol ranges are not that long.

I'll look into that, I know it sounded weird to me too when I heard it.

George Eller
12-10-2005, 03:00 AM
http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/3461/1misccollection15es.jpg
Two views of my gun collection during the mid-1980's. From left to right: Colt AR-15, Ruger Mini-14 (customized), Ruger 10/22 Deluxe Sporter (.22 LR), Remington No. 4 single shot rifle (.22 LR), Ithaca Model 37 slide action 12 gauge riot gun, Springfield M1903A3 (Remington mfr.), Lee-Enfield No. 4 Mk. I*, Lee-Enfield No. 5 Mk. I jungle carbine (sporterized), Ruger Model 77 (.308 Win., standard barrel) and Ruger Model 77V (.308 Win., heavy barrel).

Some have since been sold, but I still have the Ruger Mini-14, Ruger 10/22 Deluxe Sporter (.22 LR), Ithaca Model 37 slide action 12 gauge riot gun and Lee-Enfield No. 4 Mk. I* from that time. I have also added additional weapons to my collection since then. Some are shown below.

http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/8743/2coltar151ur.jpg
Colt AR-15 which I sold about 1986.

http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/9012/3rugerm7724hk.jpg
Ruger Model 77V bolt-action rifle (.308 Win., heavy barrel) with Redfield 3x - 9x widefield scope and leather cheek piece. Also Gurkha Kukri and KA-BAR knife. Sold the rifle in the late-1980's.

http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/8237/4rugerm7717cj.jpg
Same rifle as above (other side view) with my Smith & Wesson Model 1955 revolver (.45 ACP). I still have the revolver, but have since changed the grips.

http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/8600/5enfield15jo.jpg
My Lee-Enfield rifles (photo taken today). Top is a SMLE No. 1 Mk. III* made at a BSA (Birmingham Small Arms, Co.) controlled company near Birmingham in Shirley, England in 1940, with 1907 bayonet (17 in blade). Bottom is No 4 Mk I* made at the Long Branch Arsenal near Toronto, Canada in 1942, with spike bayonet.

http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/2161/6enfield86uo.jpg
My Lee-Enfield rifles again (photo taken today). Same as above with slightly different lighting.

http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/4216/8sksm132rh.jpg
Top is my Yugoslavian made SKS Model 59/66 rifle with Russian steel cased 7.62 x 39 mm ammo. Bottom is my brother's M-1 Garand rifle with eight round clip of .30-06 ammo. (Photo taken today).

http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/6086/9mini1419eu.jpg
Top is my Ruger Mini-14 (customized with folding buttstock, bipod, etc.) with extra 30-round clips. Bottom is my Ithaca Model 37 slide action 12 gauge riot gun. At right is my Smith & Wesson Model 1955 revolver (.45 ACP) with Model 1917 walnut grips and two half-moon clips of .45 ACP rounds. (Photo taken today).

http://img215.imageshack.us/img215/2233/ammocomparison0bx.jpg
Close up of half-moon clips loaded with .45 ACP rounds, 5.56 x 45mm cartridge, Russian 7.62 x 39mm cartridge, British .303 cartridge, and British Martini-Henry .577-.450 caliber cartridge (of Zulu War fame).
-

BDL
12-10-2005, 05:36 AM
George, do you own a Martini Henry or just some of the ammo?

Lemuel
12-10-2005, 07:17 AM
I don't own any firearms but I do have a WW1 German Hand Grenade, the smaller Egg style, not the Stick Grenade

George Eller
12-10-2005, 04:14 PM
George, do you own a Martini Henry or just some of the ammo?

BDL, Actually the Martini-Henry round is a relic from my father's old gun collection of the 1960' - 70's. He sold his Martini-Henry about 1978. Below is a picture of him posing in front of his collection about 1967. Top to bottom: M-1 Carbine, Model 1891 Argentine Mauser, Springfield 1903A3 (Smith & Corona mfr.-1943) and at the bottom is the Martini-Henry. Dad had sporterized both the Mauser and Springfield.

http://img467.imageshack.us/img467/8881/dadwithrifles1960s8nt.jpg

So, growing up I did handle the Martini-Henry, but never actually fired it myself. I imagine it had quite a kick. :D

Here is a link to Atlanta Cutlery which has some Martini-Henry rifles in their stock.
http://www.atlantacutlery.com/WebStore/BrowseProducts.aspx?GroupID=&CategoryID=&SubCategoryID=&Position=0&SearchCriteria=martini&ActionSource=

http://www.atlantacutlery.com/imagelib/0600406_l_000000.jpg

-

Man of Stoat
12-10-2005, 04:28 PM
Gah! Sporterising! :evil:

George Eller
12-10-2005, 05:21 PM
Gah! Sporterising!

I know, sporterizing is frowned upon nowadays. But back then and even earlier, it was a fairly common practice. :)

-

Cuts
12-10-2005, 05:57 PM
Gah! Sporterising!

I know, sporterizing is frowned upon nowadays. But back then and even earlier, it was a fairly common practice. :)

-

Aye, the war was still a recent memory and rifles were more plentiful.
I recently received a MkIII* in a similar condition. :cry:

A quick question if I may George, on your Ruger 77 you've got what looks like a M1-C/D cheekpad.
Do you find it pushes your head a bit too far to the left when using centrally mounted glass ?

George Eller
12-11-2005, 02:43 PM
Aye, the war was still a recent memory and rifles were more plentiful.
I recently received a MkIII* in a similar condition.

A quick question if I may George, on your Ruger 77 you've got what looks like a M1-C/D cheekpad.
Do you find it pushes your head a bit too far to the left when using centrally mounted glass ?

Cuts, It was indeed an M1-C/D cheekpad. The M1C/D rifles did use offset mounts because of the loading system of the M1. The Ruger company did not offer a Monte Carlo style stock with cheek piece as was available on other makes such as Remington or Winchester. So, I opted for the adjustable leather cheek piece instead. I never really noticed a problem with it. However, I haven't fired the rifle since I sold it in the late 80's. :)
-

cpl condor
12-19-2005, 11:48 PM
I own a Ballester Molina .45 ACP, FM High Power Detective Model,
and wait for a FN FAL.
The Ballester Molina look like these
http://geviar.com/acces/stock/balles-pav-alzag-ejer1.jpg

Wheezer1
12-20-2005, 08:27 AM
I just have one, a 44' Springfield M1 with a UC uncut bayonet that hangs on the wall over the computer. Took it out and fired it once.....our ears rang for days. (have earplugs for next time...lol) I don't know how our guys kept from going deaf. I posed that question to a friend of mine who saw lots of action in Europe (carried an M1) and he just shrugged his shoulders and said "we never thought about it"....lol!

Someone posted earlier about where to acquire vintage weapons and wanted to mention that the Civilian Marksmanship Program (USA) is great if you're looking for an M1 or 03'. All their rifles are combat veterans (WW2, Korea), have been completely checked out and safe to fire. Requirements are minimal and prices are the best.

Gutkowski
12-20-2005, 08:20 PM
I just have one, a 44' Springfield M1 with a UC uncut bayonet that hangs on the wall over the computer. Took it out and fired it once.....our ears rang for days. (have earplugs for next time...lol) I don't know how our guys kept from going deaf. I posed that question to a friend of mine who saw lots of action in Europe (carried an M1) and he just shrugged his shoulders and said "we never thought about it"....lol!

Someone posted earlier about where to acquire vintage weapons and wanted to mention that the Civilian Marksmanship Program (USA) is great if you're looking for an M1 or 03'. All their rifles are combat veterans (WW2, Korea), have been completely checked out and safe to fire. Requirements are minimal and prices are the best.

You have to wear ear plugs LOL CMP's supplys are very low and I think all the 03,s have been sold