PDA

View Full Version : GOOD BOOKS



TexWiller
05-06-2005, 05:06 PM
what is your favorite (fictional and non-fictional) book on ww2?

Gen. Sandworm
05-06-2005, 05:19 PM
New book forum. Yea :D The admin asked me to move books topics in here. If you remember any books that you have meantioned in the past please post them in here. Thanks.

Gen. Sandworm
05-06-2005, 11:44 PM
A favorite book of mine. William Shrier's Rise and Fall of the 3rd Reich. Great book that give alot of insight into the background and inner working of Hitler's empire. I suggest everyone interested in WW2 read it. :)

South African Military
05-07-2005, 08:06 AM
I reccomend a fictional book called Garden Of Beasts By Jeffery Deaver its a new book about a guy who tries to assasinate an important official in the German governmant. Most of its fictional, however allot info is actually facts and makes you feel what it was like to live in Germany around 1936 when Hitler was preparing for war. A good page turner, I finished it in under a week.

Bluffcove
05-07-2005, 08:30 AM
The Secret Diary of Anne Frank. Anne Frank
The Gurkha's "Better to die than be a Coward" John Parker 1988

Preatorian
05-07-2005, 11:53 AM
Fictional one.
Neal Town Stephenson
"Cryptonomicon"
Great book. Strongly recommended.
http://www.cryptonomicon.com/main.html

Cactus
05-24-2005, 10:40 PM
Winter Fire was good 8)
German Boy was good as well
Rise and Fall of the 3rd Reich as stated above was also an excellent read.

pdf27
05-25-2005, 01:52 AM
Defeat into Victory by Field Marshal Slim. Probably the only book written by a WW2 general who could actually write, and Slim was quite possibly the best general on any side in WW2.

lieutlienant Vorontsov
06-02-2005, 06:14 AM
My favorite book is: Konvoy PQ-17

Sturmtruppen
06-05-2005, 06:14 PM
I flew for the fuhrer

Crab_to_be
06-05-2005, 06:50 PM
I read 'The Second World War' by Winston Churchill last year. It's an excellent account, although it is very long and I suspect that the author is not entirely without bias. Even so, I can highly recommend it.

'Fighter Boys' was an enjoyable read. It's the story of the RAF told through its pilots. As is expected, the Battle of Britain dominates. The full reference is:
Bishop, P., 'Fighter Boys', HarperCollins, London, 2003.

The autobiographies of Marshal Zhukov and General Heinz Guderian are both worth reading. I don't think that needs any explanation.

'Panzer Commander' by Hans von Luck. The autobiography of a man who served under Guderian and reached Colonel by the end of the war, when he was captured by the Russians and spent ten years in a Gulag.

There are more - I made good use of my University's library last year. A shame I've been too busy this year.

A copy of 'Defeat into Victory' is currently winging its way to my house along with a biography of Field Marshal Slim, thanks to ebay.

2nd of foot
06-07-2005, 04:16 PM
Crab also look for the Unofficial History. This is Slim’s WW1 and early WW2 encounters and “Defeat into Victory” follows on from it.

You will also note that he was about to give up the uniform and return to Great Britain to write or start a new career just as the war started.

Sturmtruppen
06-07-2005, 06:30 PM
oh!,i forgot to recommend you the book atchung panzer! by Heinz Guderian.

Voluntary Escaper
06-08-2005, 03:01 PM
Quartered Safe Out Here - George MacDonald Fraser (Burma)
With the Jocks - Peter White (British Army Europe 1945)
The Forgotten Soldier - Guy Hajer (German Eastern Front)

Not combat related:
The Truce - Primo Levi (Odyssey-like return from Auschwitz via western Russia)

Commando Jordovski
07-13-2005, 08:41 AM
My favourite book which im still reading!! has to be " D-Day" by Stephen E. Ambrose.
Any one else read this book ?

PzKpfw VI Tiger
07-16-2005, 06:19 PM
Best WWII Books:

Atchung Panzer! : Heinz Guderian
Turning the Tides; Decicesive Battles of the Second World War: Nigel Cawthorne
The Diary of Anne Frank
Duel of Eagles: Peter Townsend

american sniper
07-24-2005, 11:02 PM
my fav WWII book is soldier boys

well thats the only WWII book i have read

Hanz Lutz
07-25-2005, 04:15 AM
I read a Battle for Moscow .Very good book.

South African Military
07-26-2005, 06:17 AM
I would like to ask you what you think are really good books on the aircraft of the Second world war. It can be about the pilots who flew, the history of, or even the very technical stuff.

Dani
07-26-2005, 06:21 AM
Generally, Osprey Aircraft Series could be a good choice.

http://xml.amazon.com/onca/xml2?dev-t=DQAP9JFAMYL69&t=usaceofworwartwo&KeywordSearch=world%20war%202%20osprey%20aircraft&mode=books&type=heavy&page=1&f=http://www.acepilots.com/wse25.xsl

Dani
07-26-2005, 06:27 AM
For WW2 Romania:

http://img350.imageshack.us/img350/6811/baero5tf.jpg
Edited in English and Romanian

Available at www.modelism.ro

South African Military
07-27-2005, 12:18 AM
nobody else!?

South African Military
07-27-2005, 07:02 AM
...right so I am thinking of the following, please feel free to post what you think.


-Aircraft of WWII by Stewart Wilson
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1875671358/qid=1122464502/sr=8-6/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i6_xgl14/002-4939052-1343213?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

-Griffon-Powered Spitfires by Kev Darling

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/1580070450/qid=1122464652/sr=8-1/ref=sr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14/002-4939052-1343213?v=glance&s=books&n=507846

South African Military
07-28-2005, 05:02 AM
Best WWII Books:
Turning the Tides; Decicesive Battles of the Second World War: Nigel Cawthorne


I got that book. It was alright. Good for an overview and the basics.[/quote]

Dani
07-28-2005, 05:28 AM
SAM, I hardly recommend you:
http://www.saairforce.co.za/reviews/review85saaf.htm
Check it out mate!

Quoted:
85 Years of the SAAF
By Winston Brent
To be released July/August 2005!

This book records the individual aircraft histories of the thousands of aircraft that have worn the SAAF roundal or insignia over the past 85 years.
This book is for the casual or serious researcher of the SAAF as the stories of action by the pilots and aircrews have been recorded on other publications. Previous publications have recorded the names of those pilots and aircrew who have made the ultimate sacrifice in the service of South Africa. This book goes a step further and the aircraft type, squadron and serial is identified by cross-reference to the individual aircraft, the incident or action can be identified.
There are three Rolls of Honour covering the three eras of the SAAF: 1921 - 1939, WWII 1949 - 1947, and post war 1947 - 2005. The Rolls are in chronological order and include the aircraft type, serial and squadron.

South African Military
07-28-2005, 06:39 AM
Looks good! I think I wait till the price drops :wink:

Hosenfield
08-15-2005, 09:55 PM
Well, heres a partial list of good ww2 books that i've read/am reading last year:

The battle of kursk, glantz

Colossus reborn the red army 1941-1943 (Its a giant book, with everything you need to know about how the red army, actually too giant, haven't finished it yet)

When titans clashed (good book summing up the ostfront)

Siege of Leningrad,glantz (prob, the best book about leningrad)

Overlord, hastings( objective view on fighting in the normandy from both sides, as well as strengths/weaknesses of allied/axis forces)

armageddon, hastings (objective view on fighting in the west from both sides, futher accessment of strengths/weaknesses of allied/axis forces)

the forgotten soldier(panzergrenadier corporal's memoir)

in deadly combat (recon major memoir)

panzer commander( colonel hans von luck, commander of 21st panzer armored regiment)

armored battles of the waffen-ss (1943-45) ( a bit biased, but exciting book with descriptive fighting in all waffen-ss fronts/campaigns)

Grenadiers (again, a bit biased, a lot of action, written by Kurt meyer)

the 12th ss 1,2 (not done reading yet, but very good books about the creation, training, and deployment of the 12ss in the west)

The SS:Hitler's Instrument of Terror(sums up the normal and bad of the SS organizaiton)


Who has read any of these books? Opinions?

Commando Jordovski
08-16-2005, 05:35 AM
I have got panzer commander but havent read it yet and have read part of
Colossus reborn the red army 1941-1943.

I am currently reading "Soviet Military power" and "D-day"

Hanz Lutz
08-16-2005, 08:45 AM
I read battles in Africa ,Tobruk is very good ,Australian defend Town ,with only one division ,against germans and italians,very goos stuff.

PzKpfw VI Tiger
08-18-2005, 05:25 PM
Sorry for such a late reply, a pretty good book on the battle of britan: Duel of Eagles, written by Peter Townsend

Commando Jordovski
08-21-2005, 01:55 AM
Australians went crazy in WW1 and WW2 when i watched this black and white video clip!!!

Like in WW1 when the aussies on horses just with bush knives and rifles charged towards the turkish machine guns screaming at the top of their lungs, they hadn't had water for weeks.

WW2, the aussies in african desert ran towards a German Camp with huge mechates and austrailan machine guns and scared the germans away.

:lol:

PzKpfw VI Tiger
08-21-2005, 08:16 AM
Australians went crazy in WW1 and WW2 when i watched this black and white video clip!!!

Like in WW1 when the aussies on horses just with bush knives and rifles charged towards the turkish machine guns screaming at the top of their lungs, they hadn't had water for weeks.

WW2, the aussies in african desert ran towards a German Camp with huge mechates and austrailan machine guns and scared the germans away.

:lol:

:lol: :lol: anyway, I've read Panzer Commander, getting Panzer General (Heinz Guderian) and currently reading Rommel as Military Commander.

Commando Jordovski
08-24-2005, 01:05 AM
Australians went crazy in WW1 and WW2 when i watched this black and white video clip!!!

Like in WW1 when the aussies on horses just with bush knives and rifles charged towards the turkish machine guns screaming at the top of their lungs, they hadn't had water for weeks.

WW2, the aussies in african desert ran towards a German Camp with huge mechates and austrailan machine guns and scared the germans away.

:lol:

:lol: :lol: anyway, I've read Panzer Commander, getting Panzer General (Heinz Guderian) and currently reading Rommel as Military Commander.

I think my father might be reading that same book you are. :D

Crab_to_be
08-24-2005, 03:19 AM
Is that 'Infantry Attacks!' by Rommel?

I read it as part of the recommended books list when I was learning the delicate art of Platoon Command (better known as MTQ2 which sounds, and is, far less impressive ;)). I can imagine it being rather dry as it is concerned very much with the nuts and bolts of infantry warfare. Certainly, without the background of having been taught the formal estimate and orders I would have struggled to finish it.

I only had one proper complaint about the translation (which is an American one from the 1930s, if my memory serves me correctly) and that is the use of the phrase 'hit the dirt'. It jars horribly with the tone of the book and to my mind sounds like Cleetus (Simpsons, slack-jawed yokel) interrupting the flow of the text.

Hosenfield
08-25-2005, 09:19 PM
i've never read infantry attacks? are any of the concepts outdated?

ww2fanatic1944
08-25-2005, 09:32 PM
band of brothers is a great book. i forget the author, and its an easy read but it tells a great story. it even had an 8 or 9 part series directed by steven spielberg about it, show on HBO. the series is very good, and movie quality.

Commando Jordovski
08-26-2005, 12:12 AM
band of brothers is a great book. i forget the author, and its an easy read but it tells a great story. it even had an 8 or 9 part series directed by steven spielberg about it, show on HBO. the series is very good, and movie quality.

Band of Brothers has several Series right?, I read the first two series of the books a long time ago and I found it very dull and boring so i didn't bother reading the rest of the series.

ww2fanatic1944
08-26-2005, 02:09 AM
as far as i no there is only one book, about easy company, by stephen ambrose. i might be wrong...but the ending of band of brothers doesnt really leave any plot left for a 2nd book to be written, because at the end of the book the war ends.

Crab_to_be
08-26-2005, 02:16 AM
i've never read infantry attacks? are any of the concepts outdated?

Yes and no. I can imagine the use of artillery fire to cut the wires of field telephones is rather less useful than it was in 1914-18. However, it is still recommended reading for Student Officers and I presume is on the reading list for Sandhurst.

Hosenfield
08-26-2005, 02:39 AM
a common trick practised by the germans on both the west/eastern fronts was to cut telephone wires, then prepare an amush position.

when the repair party showed up, the germans would make them surrender, and take them as prisoners!

Commando Jordovski
08-26-2005, 10:32 AM
The Stephen E. Ambrose book im currently reading is "D-Day" it's one of the best detailed versions i have read of the Normandy invasion.
I highly recommend it.

Firefly
08-26-2005, 10:36 AM
The Stephen E. Ambrose book im currently reading is "D-Day" it's one of the best detailed versions i have read of the Normandy invasion.
I highly recommend it.

Yes I have that too. Although Ive said before Im not a great Ambrose fan and he does get some facts wrong. Try the Longest day, thats another good D-Day book.

Hosenfield
08-27-2005, 12:03 PM
actually, I'm not really an Ambrose fan either. No offense to anybody, but certain parts of his books come across to me as "WW2 for flag-waving dummies". His writing, however, is very simple and readable.
but some of his arguments are poorly reseached.

Hes not a real researcher like David M. Glantz and he throws out statistics, loss figures, units strengths left and right with many of them wrong. all his information are readibly available info from the net and old, sometimes inaccurate books written in the 70s-80s.

IE, He gave the strength of KG peiper in the ardennes 22,000! When everyone knows that KG peiper was 4,800 men strong!

He used the old "patton estimate" for german causalties in normandy, with is 250,000. But the actual number, compiled by historians with german records, is 89,000.

he constantly uses the slang jabos, which started to annoy me.

he calls every german tank gun "an 88". he claimed that the panther had an "88"!

etc, etc

Commando Jordovski
08-27-2005, 12:19 PM
Yeah alot of Ambroses writing is quite comprehendable and explained military vehicle and army names.

Firefly
08-27-2005, 12:26 PM
actually, I'm not really an Ambrose fan either. No offense to anybody, but certain parts of his books come across to me as "WW2 for flag-waving dummies". His writing, however, is very simple and readable.
but some of his arguments are poorly reseached.

Hes not a real researcher like David M. Glantz and he throws out statistics, loss figures, units strengths left and right with many of them wrong. all his information are readibly available info from the net and old, sometimes inaccurate books written in the 70s-80s.

IE, He gave the strength of KG peiper in the ardennes 22,000! When everyone knows that KG peiper was 4,800 men strong!

He used the old "patton estimate" for german causalties in normandy, with is 250,000. But the actual number, compiled by historians with german records, is 89,000.

he constantly uses the slang jabos, which started to annoy me.

he calls every german tank gun "an 88". he claimed that the panther had an "88"!

etc, etc

And as stated before, for example in band of Brothers, he always has them fighting elite units, Im sure they did on occassions, but not all occassions.

Still his books are readable and not heavy going as some are. I would say they would be a good starting point for anyone getting into the subject.

Also, he does seem to treat Eisenhower as a God.

Hosenfield
08-27-2005, 12:38 PM
there is the 82nd airbornes' complete combat history out in bookstores now. ITs 800 pages, and documents Every combat action of the 82nd. I skimmed through it, and its "action-packed". Mr.Nordyke knows his military equipment, as well as making the book very readable.

The only flaw is that the book isn't objective, its heavily tuned to a pro-american slant. In fact, i've rarely read a book so americanized. With chapters like "My God,Matt, can't anything stop these men"

still recommend it, though

interesting in that the 82nd, besides engagements with/ low quality troops or regular troops, paid a disportionate toll in blood against the hermann goering panzer division, and 1st SSLAH, 2nd SS das reich.


All American, All The Way: The Combat History Of The 82nd Airborne Division In World War II by Phil Nordyke

Domobranec
12-07-2005, 06:30 PM
John Corsellis, Marcus Ferrar: Slovenia 1945- Memories of death and survival after world war II; I.B. Taurius, Great Britain

http://213.253.134.29/jackets/l/185/1850438404.jpg

PLT.SGT.BAKER
12-07-2005, 07:05 PM
D-DAY the invasion of europe by the editors of american heritage

temujin77
12-07-2005, 09:03 PM
My fav is American Caesar by William Manchester. Absolutely beautiful writing style plus a very comprehensive look on Douglas MacArthur's life. No wonder Manchester was noted as one of the greatest history writers of our time.
http://ww2db.com/read.php?read_id=23

I'm currently reading Shattered Sword by Jonathan Parshall and Anthony Tully. I'm about half way through the 600-page book. It is simply *the* best book on the Battle of Midway I've ever come across, and I don't even need to mention the fact that Jon and Tony's dedicated research uncovered a lot of facts that the western world had taken for granted about the battle were WRONG. Excellent read.
http://ww2db.com/read.php?read_id=34

Landstorm
12-11-2005, 02:58 PM
My favourite is "Winter" forget who is the auther though. Also novels by Sven Hassell are very good too

juliburke
02-17-2006, 07:03 AM
I am in search of a WWII book that was written while the war was in progress. I know that this book is real and that I did not dream about it. While visiting at a party with members from the 101st Airborne division (Band of Brothers) one of the re-enactors was there getting autographs and had the book with him. I forget what the name is. I was also told that with the help of **** Winters and others during the filming of Band of Brothers that this book was also used so that the movie would be accurate. Any ideas out there? :?:

Johnny Busted
02-25-2006, 11:21 AM
My favourite book which im still reading!! has to be " D-Day" by Stephen E. Ambrose.
Any one else read this book ?

Read that.....Excellent book. Now reading the "sequal" Citizen Soldiers. Highly recommended.

deserter
05-12-2006, 11:57 AM
I'm currently reading "Path to Victory: The mediterranean Theater in WWII" by Douglas Porch. Haven't gotten far enough in it yet to form an opinion, but has, thus far, kept my interest.

Outerheaven
05-22-2006, 06:11 PM
I would recommend Luftwaffe Aces.
Luftwaffe Aces (http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0811731774.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg&imgrefurl=http://amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/0811731774&h=475&w=316&sz=47&hl=en&start=20&tbnid=XTNqYCeLjpOdSM:&tbnh=126&tbnw=83&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dluftwaffe%2Baces%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3D en%26hs%3DJ2I%26lr%3D%26client%3Dfirefox-a%26rls%3Dorg.mozilla:en-US:official_s%26sa%3DN)
The auther also does Infantry Aces, and Panzer Aces.
I recommend them all. There filled with exciting stories and first hand accounts on
the battle field by the real men that he interviews.

05-22-2006, 07:25 PM
Right, nice book. I read it last year.

By the way, that is a neat signature/avatar!

SS Tiger
05-23-2006, 02:01 AM
That sig is very cool, did you make it yourself? If so what effects did you add to it, it certainly rocks!

Outerheaven
05-28-2006, 05:15 PM
Thanks for the complements on the signature. But no I didn't make it. I had it made at another forum. The address is on the bottom right hand corner.

WaistGunner
07-19-2006, 11:04 AM
Flyboys--James Bradley

Band of Brother-Stephen Ambrose

Origins of the Second World War--A.J.P. Taylor

I am looking for a good first person aaccount from a Luftwaffe pilot if anyone has any recommendations.

Outerheaven
07-19-2006, 06:04 PM
I am looking for a good first person aaccount from a Luftwaffe pilot if anyone has any recommendations.
Here you go:
http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/Outerheaven151/th_mov31775.jpg (http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b380/Outerheaven151/mov31775.jpg)

http://d89156.i50.quadrahosting.com.au/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=6762&cPath=23_25

WaistGunner
07-20-2006, 12:30 PM
Thank you for the reccomendation. I'll go to Amzon today to see if they have it.

AntoniC
07-22-2006, 01:58 PM
is Clay Blairs 2 volume set on Hitlers U-Boat War !

They are an excellent read, with a load of details, and very informative !.

Well worth buying , if you like naval history

Firefly
07-22-2006, 02:01 PM
Welcome aboard Toni. Toni is an old friend of mine who I have finally persuaded to join the forum.

I'll let him tell you about himself, but he is another welcome Polish addition.

Enjoy the forum matey.

AntoniC
07-22-2006, 02:02 PM
New book forum. Yea :D The admin asked me to move books topics in here. If you remember any books that you have meantioned in the past please post them in here. Thanks.

I thought it was an excellent book also - and the brst bit being that it was a neutral view until Dec 7 1941 also !.

deserter
09-20-2006, 12:31 PM
I'm currently reading "Path to Victory: The mediterranean Theater in WWII" by Douglas Porch. Haven't gotten far enough in it yet to form an opinion, but has, thus far, kept my interest.

Finished the book. Interesting role of the French Expeditionary Force in breaking the Gustav Line.

D502
10-02-2006, 05:37 AM
My favorites:

Der Nürnberger Prozeß (The Nuremberg Trial) by Joe J. Heydecker + Johannes Leeb

Die Frauen der Nazis I+II (The women of the Nazis I+II) by Anna Maria Siegmund

Denn Du trägst meinen Namen. Das schwere Erbe der prominenten Nazi-Kinder. (My Father's Keeper: Children of Nazi Leaders-An Intimate History of Damage and Denial) by Norbert Lebert + Stephan Lebert

Bis zur letzten Stunde (Until the Final Hour: Hitler's Last Secretary) by Traudl Junge + Melissa Müller

Digger
11-12-2006, 06:23 AM
G'day,

I've already mentioned JV44 Galland's Circus on it's own thread. I guess my all time favourite is The Blond Knight Of Germany by Raymond F Toliver and Trevor J Constable. A fascinating story about Eric Hartmann.

The First And The Last by Adolf Galland.

Dresden by Frederick Taylor, a very well written book which dispells many of the myths about the Dresden raid.

Business In Great Waters-The U-Boat Wars 1916-1945.

Regards to all,
Digger.

GermanSoldier
01-23-2007, 05:15 PM
There is Soldier Boys
It is about a 18 year old American who joins the Airborne. Then their is a 15 year old teenager from the Hitler Youth. Then they fight each other on different fronts.

Wolfgang Von Gottberg
01-23-2007, 06:06 PM
I'd have to say Man is Wolf to Man. It's a hefty biography.

A Pole is recruited into the Soviet Tank Core as a T34 driver. During some battle against the Germans, the T34 breaks down and he is told to wait in it while the rest of the crew finds help. They never came back. Then the NKVD found him "Abandoning the Front" and he is sent to a Goulag in Siberria. Very graphic but VERY gripping

RifleMan20
01-29-2007, 06:19 PM
Is there any good books that are like a journal.

RifleMan20
01-29-2007, 06:47 PM
thanks for your help though.

Wolfgang Von Gottberg
01-31-2007, 06:01 PM
I know of some, but are you looking for fiction or non-fiction?

FICTION:
Soldier Boys
Soldier X
In the Eyes of the Emperor

NON FICTION:
The Forgotten Soldier
Man is Wolf to Man
German Boy

That's all I know of for now, but I'll probably think of some more as time goes by. I'll PM you ;)

RifleMan20
02-01-2007, 05:42 PM
Thank you kindly sir,I will look for those books;)

RifleMan20
02-01-2007, 05:43 PM
Thank you kindly sir,I will look for those books;)

RifleMan20
02-01-2007, 05:44 PM
uh oh something went wrong with that post

Panzerknacker
02-19-2007, 06:06 PM
I like the format of the MEN-at-arms series by Osprey.

My favorite is Auxiliary forces to the Wermacht, the Nº 254 of that serie.

http://www.ospreypublishing.com/osp_img/titlecovers/P2579AS.JPG

GermanSoldier
03-25-2007, 09:30 PM
soldier X


I am going to see if I can rent that book at the nearest library. Hopefully they have it there.

Vassili Chukolov
04-30-2007, 03:25 PM
Having a large collection of military memoirs, I have a couple good WW2 memoirs as well.

Blood Red Snow~It's from a german machine gunner's perpective of fighting Russia in Stalingrad. Plenty of action, and a good read for a WW2 buff.

Currahee! ~ A great memoir about a 101st Airborne Trooper's experiance dropping in Normandy.

Any else have any other suggestions?

Ivan
05-01-2007, 07:41 AM
Currahee! ~ A great memoir about a 101st Airborne Trooper's experiance dropping in Normandy.Burgett's other books are great as well.

Vassili Chukolov
05-02-2007, 06:17 PM
The Road To Arnhem is another good one. Probably one of my favorites from his.

BlackUhlan
06-22-2007, 05:42 PM
The forgotten soldier by Guy Sajer

bwing55543
07-02-2007, 02:53 PM
I liked The Longest Day: June 6, 1944 by Cornelius Ryan.

jacobtowne
07-04-2007, 11:23 AM
No Bended Knee by Gen. Merrill Twining, USMC. It's a memoir of the Guadalcanal Campaign. I'm reading it now and it is quite well done. Guadalcanal was one of the two great allied victories of 1942, and the turning point of the Pacific war on land.

JT

SS-Master
07-28-2007, 10:09 AM
My favourites:
Aline Sax - No step behind (geen stap terug)
John McAleer & Billy ****son - Unit Pride
Evan Hunter - Sons
Frederick Forsyth - The Odessa File
Michael Romse - Camp Massacre
Leon Uris - Battle Cry
John Harris - The fox from his lair
John Brason - Secret Army
Robert Birton - Moment of glory
Ray Rigby - The hill
And everything from Kirst.

bwing55543
08-08-2007, 08:20 PM
I just picked up another good one: Parachute Infantry by David Kenyon Webster. Yes, the same Webster who was part of the Band of Brothers. This book is pretty much the miniseries from his point of view.

Speaking of which, did anyone read Ambrose's Band of Brothers? If anyone did, can he tell me if it's any good?

kev0253
02-03-2008, 03:39 PM
the forgotten soldier by guy sayer is worth a read if i recall it is about the brandenburg division but i might be wrong.

kev0253
02-03-2008, 03:41 PM
the book by ambrose band of brothers is well worth reading !

Nickdfresh
02-04-2008, 06:30 AM
So is "Pegasus Bridge."

Chevan
02-04-2008, 06:35 AM
Alan Clark "Barbarossa"
Eric von Mainstain "Lost victories"

temujin77
02-04-2008, 06:24 PM
Here's a great book I read recently:

The Greatest US Marine Corps Stories Ever Told
http://ww2db.com/read.php?read_id=76

It's not all WW2, but a good chunk of it is. Through stories of individual Marines, this book nicely introduces the Marine spirit. Very readable and very enjoyable. I really highly recommend it.

MayberrySaint
02-08-2008, 06:04 PM
"Enemy at the Gates" by William Craig was my first and still favorite WWII book.

Erik
02-11-2008, 10:52 PM
http://dynamic.images.indigo.ca/ProductImage.aspx?lang=en&width=72&isbn=0773759522&cat=books&quality=85
Maple Leaf Against the Axis by David J. Bercuson is a good read on Canadas overall involvement in the war... "overall" because it doesn't get very specific on individual battles - it covers the basics of Canadas war on land, in the air and at sea.

I've got Parachute Infantry and it's next on my read list.

B-17engineer
02-16-2008, 12:41 PM
I like Half a Wing, three engines, and a prayer.
The 8th army from North Africa to the ALps
and finally
Jump dammit about a B-17 airmen evading capture

the_librarian
02-16-2008, 07:20 PM
Hi all!

These are some great reading! I'll be busy for months! I've got a list or two, but do online books count? The CMH has some great stuff! Here's a link to one of them:

http://www.history.army.mil/books/agf/agf23.htm

the_librarian
05-27-2008, 02:58 AM
I stumbled across some older paperbacks at a booksale. I can't say I've read all of them yet, but what I've read is super!

The Big Show (http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1162000)

Thunderbolt (http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/2369851)

the_librarian
06-16-2008, 05:57 AM
Found this one on Google books. Weighty, but important for the backstory:

American Logistics in World War II (http://www.google.com/books?id=FSeJJDfj140C)

imi
06-23-2008, 08:49 AM
http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0300104685/ref=sib_dp_pt#reader-link

Moreheaddriller
06-27-2008, 06:43 PM
Mine is fatherland by Robert Harris

kamehouse
08-23-2008, 07:32 AM
Here are a few books I had great pleasure to read:
European volunteers,the 5.SS-Panzer-Division "Wiking" by Peter Staßner
Death of the Wehrmacht,the German Campaign of 1942 by Robert M Citino
It never snows in September,the German view of Market-Garden and the battle of Arnhem,September 1944 by Robert J.Kershaw
Black Edelweiss, A memoir of combat and conscience by a soldier of the waffen-SS by Johann Voss
In the firestorm of the last years of the war,II.SS-Panzerkorps with the 9 and 10.SS-Divisions "Hohenstaufen" and "Frundsberg" by Wilhelm Tieke
Bridgehead Kurland,the six epic battles of Heeresgruppe Kurland by Franz Kurowski
Grenadiers,the story of waffen-SS general Kurt"Panzer" Meyer by Kurt Meyer
Like a cliff in the ocean,the history of 3.SS-Panzer-Division "Totenkopf" by Karl Ullrich
Das Reich volume 1,2 and 3 by Otto Weidinger
The History of Panzerkorps GroßDeutschland volume 1,2 and 3 by Helmut Spaeter
For research purposes anything in the "then and now" collection.

Jazzman
09-11-2008, 05:59 PM
Just finished "Killing Rommel" by Steven Pressfield. About the war in North Africa, excellent! Also try "War of the Rats" by David L. Robbins which is about the sniper war waged in Stalingrad. Both are fact based fiction works and great reads. "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich" should be required reading for this site!

kuuk
09-22-2008, 10:08 PM
One of my favorite books is: "Soldier of Orange" by Erik Hazelhoff Roelfzema, in English or in the original Dutch language. (I had the honor to meet Mr. R. once on an airplane traveling to Amsterdam).

Another favorite book is the earlier mentioned "The Big Show" by Pierre Clostermann. It was the first pocket book (used) I bought in the US back in 1960 for the grand sum of 10 cents! I still have it, but it is now barely legible. During WWII from, Sep 19 1944 until Feb 25 1945, we were evacuated to a little town called Beers (rhymes with bails) which is approxiamately 10 miles from the German built airbase Volkel in the southern part of the Netherlands. P.C. was based there for some time, and I am sure that he was one of the pilots of the many "Tempests" that came screaming over! One of the pictures in the book was taken at Volkel and that was the reason I originally bought it.

D502
10-01-2008, 03:49 AM
Something else entirely:

Little Girl lost (An der Hand meiner Schwester. Zwei Mädchen im Kriegszerstörten Deutschland) by Barbie (Bärbel) Probert-Wright

In 1945, seven-year-old Barbie and her sister Eva were trapped, terrified, in war-torn Germany. With their father missing, and hundreds of miles from their mother, news of the approaching army left them confronted with an impossible choice: to face invasion, or to flee on foot. Eva, aged 19, was determined to find her mother. For Barbie, 12 years younger, the journey was to be more perilous but, spurred on by her sister’s courage and her desperate desire to be reunited with her mother, she joined Eva on a journey no child should ever have to endure. Over three hundred miles across a country ravaged by a terrible war, they encountered unimaginable hardship, extraordinary courage and overwhelming generosity. Against all the odds, they survived. But neither sister came out of the journey unscathed.
This book doesn't provide you with politics or a story of the war with details of events, it shows another point of view.

herman2
10-01-2008, 09:13 AM
I Was There................is the name of a book involving the day to day tribulations involving the Hitler Youth during WW-2. It is enjoyable and easy reading about the kids drama that unfolds as they go from school friends to Hitler Youth comrads, and the over use of their power to degrade one another....it is a sad story but brings together the view of how it was being brought up in Germany during WW-2....The book relates to stories my parents use to tell me, when my dad was in the Hitler Youth....basically you had to join...there was no such thing as saying No...and unfortunately, at the time, it made your parents proud to be in the Hitler Youth...

kamehouse
10-01-2008, 02:14 PM
War without Garland,operation Barbarossa 1941/42 by Robert Kershaw.
Barbarossa viewed by soldiers on both sides(more German though) with lots of letters/diaries of the time and several interviews.Nearly finished it and really impressed by the style and way the author tries to put you in the shoes of the poor infantry guy or the tank gunner.

gunner-B
10-04-2008, 12:51 AM
Tank ’40 Hours of battle by Ken Tout: tells the story of his exploits as a Sherman tank crewman during the first 40 hours of Operation Totalize during the Normandy campaign. This is probably the best tank warfare book you are ever likely to read.
Ken Tout was in C troop 1st Northamptonshire Yeomanry, the same unit that (May have)Destroyed Wittmanns Tiger. (Joe Ekins may well have done the job)
Also by Ken Tout is Tanks Advance, which goes into his exploits from England, landing in Normandy, and on to his getting injured in Holland.

The forgotten soldier by Guy Sajer: A 'MUST READ' book about life & death on the Eastern front.

Paul

Manheim Schrute
10-23-2008, 09:35 PM
I really enjoyed "The Forgotten Soldier" A really good look at how awful it must have been to fight in Russia. I understand there is some controversey regarding this book,but I was totally into reading it.

gunner-B
10-24-2008, 04:32 AM
Here are a few more books that may be of interest:

HITLER: Joachim c. Fest. A rather academic and detailed book of Hitler’s life, that runs for about 800 pages. It’s hard going but if you have to read a biography about the man then you should get this one. The author by the way served in the German army during the war, and no, the book doesn’t glorify Hitler.

HITLER: Norman Stone A good short, critical over-view of Hitler, of about 230 pages. An easier substitute to the one above.

THE RISE AND FALL OF THE THIRD REICH: William L. Shirer. A terrific account of the Third Reich that (Even after 48 years,) still “stacks up” well .

Wings of War: History of Airborne Warfare 1918-1945: Peter Harclerode. Covers Airborne operations of all the major forces on the Western and Eastern fronts and the Pacific and Asian fronts.

BATTLE OF BRITAIN then and now: If you want a book that shows you the “Boys” that sacrificed ALL for the freedom of this world, then get this book, their photo’s look back at you, many from different nations. A very moving book.
The book also shows the pieces of wreckage that have been recovered since the battle and are either in museums or private collections. There is also sections on the losses of pilots, aircraft, the order of battle of both sides . The list goes on and on. As for photos, they are countless, in this large book of over 800 pages.

THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF TANKS OF WORLD WAR TWO: Peter Chamberlain, Hilary Doyle & Thomas L. Jentz.
BRITISH AND AMERICAN TANKS OF WORLD WAR II: Peter Chamberlain, Chris Ellis.
Both of the above books give a good, informative overview of the types of tanks and A.F.Vs in service, and are well illustrated.

TAIL-END CHARLIES: John Nichol, Tony Rennell. A book about a most hazardous of wartime occupations; being a bomber crewman in both the R.A.F and U.S.AF over Europe. (John Nichol was one of the two man Tornado crew tortured and put on Iraqi T.V and made to confess all to the world during the first gulf war)

TapOut64
12-09-2008, 08:26 PM
"The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors" by James D. Hornfischer is a must read. He had me feeling like I was on board while all the action was happening. Having served in the Coast Guard aboard two different Cutters (Duane-327' and Rush 378') I could really relate to the destroyers and the stories he told of life on board. This book is simply great.

RicemanCDN
01-17-2009, 03:58 PM
My favorite is non Fiction
it is Tigers In The Mud By Otto Carius
Great read You should check it out
i also enjoyed Micheal Whittmann Volume 1 by Patrick Agte

paspartoo
02-08-2009, 10:16 AM
Having read about 50 books on ww2 i can recommend the following:
Thunder in the East by Evan Mawdsley
Wages of Destruction by Adam Tooze
Brute Force by John Ellis
Rising Sun by John Toland

Eismann
03-02-2009, 04:55 PM
I found Adolf Hitler by John Toland to be a really good read. I thoroughly recommend it.

herman2
03-05-2009, 12:45 PM
I found Adolf Hitler by John Toland to be a really good read. I thoroughly recommend it.

I find any books by John Toland to be great. I read the Adolf Hitler book and the Rising Sun book by John Toland and must say that I found his books to be unbias and easy reading. I read them many years ago, but after hearing his name again, I think I'll re-read his books and maybe check out other books by him. I first became influenced about ww-2 stuff after reading his books. Without him, I probably wouldn't have such a keen interest in ww-2 events and who knows; maybe then I never would have hooked up with this great forum!

kamehouse
03-05-2009, 01:21 PM
I would recommend:
"Victory was beyond their grasp with the 272nd volks-grenadier division from the Hürtgen forest to the heart of the Reich" by Doug Nash.
"When titans clashed,how the red army stopped Hitler" by House and Glantz

the_librarian
03-06-2009, 05:00 AM
Hope a general post on good books is allowed? I've been grabbing some excellent reading (and adding them to my online bookshelf) by going to google.com/books. If you select full text and then type in your topic---you will pull some GREAT out of print stuff. Just doing a general search on world war II brought me some titles like these:

Eagles of the RAF: The World War II Eagle Squadrons‎

Letters from the Pacific: A Combat Chaplain in World War II‎

The Secret War: The Office of Strategic Services in World War II‎

Baseball Digest 1946: Player talks about Hurtgen Forest

I could go on forever....check it out!

Rising Sun*
03-06-2009, 05:38 AM
I find any books by John Toland to be great. I read the Adolf Hitler book and the Rising Sun book by John Toland and must say that I found his books to be unbias and easy reading. My bold

I wasn't aware Toland had written about me, but if it's true to life I'm sure it will be a hugely interesting book. :D

Seriously, my recollection is that some of Toland's opinions are debatable, although more from his later work on Pearl Harbor, but he certainly gives a lot of accurate detail in Rising Sun, particularly from the Japanese side.

I'd recommend reading Toland's Rising Sun first and then John Costello's The Pacific War next. The latter is probably the best book dealing with the Pacific War as a whole. It has the advantage of being written about a decade later than Toland's book, which gave Costello access to some papers not available to Toland. There are some deficiencies in minor detail in Costello's book on a few points I know something about, and therefore probably on many more, and probably the same in Toland's but it's too long since I read it to recall. A balanced reading of these two books gives anyone all they need to know about the Pacific War, unless they want to get into close detail about various events.

As a side note, Costello's untimely death is seen by some as done to stop him revealing something significant about things which get the conspiracy theorists going. http://www.illuminati-news.com/091006b.htm

five4
03-25-2009, 04:53 PM
I doubt very much that anyone outside of Military forums even knows about the rape of Nanking let alone have read the book,a must read by all but not for the faint of heart.2 books that I have recently read and reccomend are"The unknown Battle of Midway"by Alvin Kernan and"Lightnig Strike"by Donald Davis.

RicemanCDN
03-26-2009, 04:09 PM
i am reading the forgotten soilder and it is amazing so far every war buff should read it

Yosh1aki
04-14-2009, 05:16 AM
My short list of favourite books probably reveals me as an intellectual lightweight, but here goes:

Fiction:

‘Easter Day 1941’ by GF Borden

‘Tramp in Armour’ by Colin Forbes

‘Empire of the Sun’by J G Ballard

Pretty much anything by John Harris

Pretty much anything by Douglas Reeman


Non-fiction:

'D-Day: Spearhead of invasion’ by RW Thompson (Pan/Ballantine Illustrated history of WW2)

‘The Great World War 1914-1945’ by Bourne, Liddle, & Whitehead (I only have volume 2, still looking for vol 1)

‘The Other Hundred Years War’ by Russell Braddon

‘Japan’s Imperial Conspiracy’ by David Bergamini*

‘Kokoda: The Bloody Track’ by Patrick Lindsay**


Not strictly WW2, but good non-fiction books that deal in passing with WW2:

‘Modern Times –The World from the twenties to the nineties’ by Paul Johnson

‘Why the West has Won’ (American title: ‘Carnage and Culture’) by Victor Davis Hanson

‘The Guinness Book of Military Blunders’ by Geoffrey Regan

‘A History of Warfare’ by John Keegan


*I know that Bergamini's book was roundly panned by critics and academics, but I liked it and think he was probably correct.

**I have a (rather tenuous) link with this book - I did the interpreting when the author visited Japan to interview Japanese veterans of Kokoda for a TV documentary of the same name (Kokoda: The Bloody Track). The book was based on the documentary.

Yosh1aki
04-14-2009, 05:28 AM
My absolute favourite WW2 novel is ‘Easter Day 1941’ by G F Borden (which is why it sits at the top of my list above).

I cannot reccomend this book enough. I have read and re-read it until my copy (a Penguin paperback published in 1987) is beginning to fall apart.

It is the story of a lone tank behind enemy lines in the Western desert. In this case, the enemy are the Italians and Germans, and the tank crew are British tankers, plus a couple of wandering infantrymen from the Indian Army who are picked up by the tank, and an American veteran of the Spanish Civil War (he is the tank commander and also the narrator of the tale).

The tank is a captured Italian M13/40. Borden must have done some intense research in order to write this brilliant story. He presents the M13/40 warts and all, comparing it unfavourably with the British and German tanks in the desert, but shows that it was still capable of dishing out some serious damage. I suppose there could have been M13/40 variants with different armament configurations, but the one in the story has a 47mm main gun in the turret, able to fire HE or AP, with a coaxial 8mm Breda machine gun. There are also two more 8mm Breda MGs in a ball mounting below the turret next to the driver.

Just to give you a taste of the book, I have typed out the beginning of the story and a couple of other passages. Please forgive any weird spelling mistakes; I am not a great typist.

This is how the book begins:

“Up on the hull of the M13/40, his back to the barrel of the 47mm gun, Mackeson sees the rising trail of dust first. He pounds his fist against the slabbed armor of the turret, points southwest across the desert and shouts “Something’s coming.”
We stop considering morning tea and start thinking of danger; for in the desert any unidentified movement is potent, and during this retreat, movement to the west is hostile. We are in our second confused week of the great withdrawal to the east. The 2nd Armoured Division is dead, shot down in the afternoon at El Agheila and at dawn nine days later at Agedabia. We are a cast off remnant, a single armored fighting vehicle far out in the sand, equally distant from the Gulf of Sirte to the west, the Mediterranean to the north, and the Egyptian border to the east.”

A little further on, Smythe the machine gunner points out to Mackeson the driver that they are not in a Panzer III:

“Don’t I bloody well know it,” Smythe says. He is aggrieved and deflated by the mention of the Panzer III, a German armored fighting vehicle of efficient design employed with dash and cunning by the Germans. But then the Panzer III aggrieves and deflates us all, for we ride and fight in an M13/40. The M13/40 is an Italian armored fighting vehicle dragooned into the 2nd Armoured Division after the great desert victories against the Italians. So many M13/40s were captured, the powers that be thought they might as well be put to use. It wouldn’t have been such a bad thought except that the M13/40 isn’t worth much. For although it has lines reminiscent of the Russian T34/76, that faint similarity, and the diesel engines, are all the two AFVs have in common. The M13/40 has a poor power to weight ratio and is slow off the road. It is also poorly gunned and mechanically unsound. It has a high silhouette, which in armored warfare means death. Its plates are held together with rivets. Rivets are unnerving: any solid shot striking the M13/40, even if it does not penetrate, may pound a rivet into the fighting compartment; and any such rivet will be moving almost as fast as the shot that struck the tank’s carapace. We are told we are to get tanks with welded plates, but that possibility is meaningless now. We are in the desert, alone, in an M13/40 and we must rely on Italian design and Italian workmanship to see us through. We aren’t required to be happy about it, but the M13/40 is all we have.”

Having given the M13/40 a thorough shellacking (above), Borden describes some very good action scenes where the M13/40 and its unhappy crew destroy pretty much all before them.

Later they are spotted by Italian aircraft:

“As Chowduri straightens, his back stiffens and he says ”Aircraft”. At first I do not understand: he speaks with the same tone he might use had he said “Sand” or “Water”.
Mackeson slams the faceplate shut and I hear his hoarse voice call out, “Oh, Christ now.”
I vault onto the hull of the M13/40, scramble up onto the turret. I take the field glasses from Chowduri and say, “Where?” He points his arm northwest and I see three shapes moving against the sky. They are close to the earth and they are angling toward us. As I raise the glasses I tell Chowduri to get inside. He slips down through the hatch and flattens himself against the wall of the fighting compartment in front of Mohammed’s knees. He says something to Mohammed I do not understand.
Through the glasses I see the aircraft are Savoia SM-79s: more Italian equipment. But Italian aircraft are better than Italian armor, and Italian pilots are good. I have seen the Savoia before: it was the standard bomber aircraft used by the Fascists in Spain. It is a trimotor and it carries more than two thousand pounds of bombs. It also carries five machine guns, but these do not worry me. Machine gun fire is not a problem unless the gunner is very lucky and is able to shy rounds through an open port. But here we have warning and can button up like a tortoise. Unfortunately, no one can button up against bombs. A good pilot in an SM-79 can end our journey to the east right here.”

Again, I suppose there were variants of the SM-79, with different armament configurations, but while Borden says the SM-79 had five machine guns, one of my most treasured reference books says they only had 4 machine guns. On the other hand, it gives the SM-79 a really good rating as one of the best bombers of the war:

Info from page 19 of Bombers 1939 ~ 1945 (Purnell’s History of the World Wars Special):

Savoia-Marchetti SM79
Armament: 3x 7.7mm; 1x 12.7mm machine guns
Bomb load: 2,750 lb
Not only the best Italian but one of the best of any land-based bombers used during the Second World War. Developed in 1936 from a commercial airliner design and later active on virtually every battlefront involving the Regia Aeronautica.

Sorry if this post was too long winded.
Cheers,
Pete

Rainman
04-21-2009, 06:39 PM
FLY BOYS its about Chichi Jima in the Pacific and all the flier who were shot down including George Bush Sr. and how the Japs canibalized some of our men...Read it you won t believe it till you sit there and read it in firsthand reports

Quentin Rees
05-07-2009, 02:49 PM
Try this..

REVIEWS on 'The Cockleshell Canoes'

This from Prof. Eric Grove - Review in Navy News May 2009.

' this volume really is one of the most original, interesting and informative to have appeared recently'

'an excellent and ground breaking work',

'described in great detail'.

From 'The Croaker' April 2009 issue by M.J.A.

'Clarity of delivery'.

'Rees writes well and his narrative flows'

'a stimulating and revealing tract'

'fascinating and detailed accounts'

Globe and Laurel - March - April 2009 issue by G.A.D

'remarkable book',

' this great and important military and maritime story - which he tells very well',

'good looking and man sized book' with 'stunning photographs'


'Navy News' is a Uk based magazine highly rated. highly subscribed.
'The Croaker' is a Subscription only magazine especially for Special Forces past and present ONLY.
'The Globe and Laurel' is a magazine of the Royal Marines.

The Navy News does a free on line edition - review is on page 44.

stano666
11-26-2010, 09:42 AM
Anyone with suggestions for books about luftwaffe planes (every thing that did flew for RLM -even if it was only once- paper only projects are less interesting for me) Non fiction ofcourse, and lots of picks, data, etc. It'l be appreciated.

stano666
11-30-2010, 06:59 AM
I ordered " wings of the luftwaffe " by ... Winkle. for 50€, it should arrive next week. stano666: cheers: Yee!!!
P.S. suggestions are still welcome (VERY)

Greycap Leader
12-18-2010, 04:04 PM
what is your favorite (fictional and non-fictional) book on ww2?
Hi, I have to say that the book which had the greatest impact for me was the Big Show, Pierre Clostermanns famed personal account. His detailed account of combat in all it's ferocity lives long in the memory. Another personal favourite is V.E.Tarrant's historical account of our legendary battleship HMS Warspite, written with drive and a real passion for a national icon, hugely recommended.

kuuk
12-19-2010, 03:34 PM
Greycap Leader.
I feel the same about Pierre Clostermann's BIG SHOW. I always remember his description of his first flight in a Hawker "Typhoon"!
I have previously commented about reading that book.. See my earlier message #101.
Regards and keep on reading.
Ed.

Greycap Leader
12-19-2010, 05:24 PM
As a keen enthusiast of Luftwaffe history, I can wholly recommend William Green's Warplanes of the Third Reich, which was originally published by Macdonald in 1970 (ISBN 0 02382 6). This book has since been re-published in more than one volume I believe. Another excellent suggestion would be Luftwaffe Flying Colours 1935-1945, by Michael Ullmann (ISBN 9 781902 109077). Both volumes are excellent sources of accurate information. If you need any further info, please let me know.

Best Regards,

Uyraell
12-22-2010, 12:41 AM
In 1999, Warplanes of the Third Reich was selling at NZ$ 970.95 for a new copy.
That was the 1970 Edition.
The book-seller shopowner reckoned then it would take 48 days to take delivery of the book.

I have a copy, gifted years ago to me. I've relied on it many times over the decades, and read it cover to cover more than twice.

Regards, Uyraell.

Greycap Leader
12-23-2010, 04:53 PM
Salutations Uyraell,
Another book which left a deep impression on me was "The Secret War" by Brian Johnston. This is book accompanied the 1976 BBC series of the same name. I still have my original 1977 copy, which has seen better times unfortunately. I have read it many times and still leaves you astounded at it's detail. I also have the series (on VHS unfortunately) and is, I believe one of the best series compiled on WW2, bettered only by the World at War. If you have not seen an edition of this fascinating book, I wholeheartedly recommend it.
My world is surrounded by books, I count upon my library as my most valuable possession, not in monetary value of course, but as a long standing friend for which the pursuit of knowledge is the real goal in life.

I extend to you, my very best wishes for Christmas and the New Year my friend.

Kind Regards,
Greycap Leader

Uyraell
12-23-2010, 07:58 PM
Salutations Uyraell,
Another book which left a deep impression on me was "The Secret War" by Brian Johnston. This is book accompanied the 1976 BBC series of the same name. I still have my original 1977 copy, which has seen better times unfortunately. I have read it many times and still leaves you astounded at it's detail. I also have the series (on VHS unfortunately) and is, I believe one of the best series compiled on WW2, bettered only by the World at War. If you have not seen an edition of this fascinating book, I wholeheartedly recommend it.
My world is surrounded by books, I count upon my library as my most valuable possession, not in monetary value of course, but as a long standing friend for which the pursuit of knowledge is the real goal in life.

I extend to you, my very best wishes for Christmas and the New Year my friend.

Kind Regards,
Greycap Leader

Warm and Respectful Salutations, Greycap Leader. :)

"The Secret War" is one of those few titles I was able to re-obtain after my then fiancee destroyed my entire book collection, both Sci-Fi and Military History. Books I had been collecting very slowly since my early teen years.

I watched the TV series of the book, and was duly impressed with Professor R.V. Jones sagacity and modesty which contrasted very strongly with the arrogance and myopia of Lindemann/Lord Cherwell.
In the event, Jones's views and predictions were entirely vindicated, whilst Cherwell's proved to be as ossified as the generation he came from.
I am certain you and I are likely to enjoy many long and fruitful discussions here on this forum.

I Thank you most cordially for your Kind wishes,
and in my turn take this opportunity to wish you all the very best for Christmas and the New Year Greycap Leader my friend. :)

Kind and Respectful Regards Greycap Leader, Uyraell.

muscogeemike
01-01-2011, 12:56 PM
THE THREADBARE BUZZARD, by Thomas M. Tomlinson offers a slightly different perspective to the US efforts early in the War, especially Naval/Marine Air activities and capabilities.

TigerBites
05-12-2011, 03:45 PM
The Battle of Britain & Lancaster & need to read Spitfire by Leo McInstry and Operation Werwolf by Tom Kane

EagleMMDCXVI
02-12-2012, 10:32 PM
I'm currently reading "If I Survive" By George Wilson and find it to be a good read.

At the top of my head, I remember these books being good reads. There non-fiction by the way.

Jeff Shaara-The Rising Tide
Jeff Shaara-The Steel Wave
Jeff Shaara-No Less Than Victory

muscogeemike
02-13-2012, 09:08 AM
I'm currently reading "If I Survive" By George Wilson and find it to be a good read.

At the top of my head, I remember these books being good reads. There non-fiction by the way.

Jeff Shaara-The Rising Tide
Jeff Shaara-The Steel Wave
Jeff Shaara-No Less Than Victory

I have read Shaara's books, in this genre here are some other authors (you may already know them):
Harold Coyle
Larry Bond
Robert Conroy
Douglas Niles and Michael Dobson

Truce
02-13-2012, 11:00 AM
If I survive is one of my favorites!;)
I also really liked Coyle’s Civil war series. Has he done any ww2 hist fiction?

I would recommend;
-Unless Victory comes. (Combat with a machine gunner in Patton’s third army) By Gene Garrison
-The 18 year old replacement. Richard Kingsbury
-For those I loved by Martin Gray (Warsaw 1939)
David stone’s Fighting for the Fatherland: A history of the German soldier from 1648 to the present day. :army:

EagleMMDCXVI
02-13-2012, 01:41 PM
In reply to my earlier post where I said the books were non-fiction I should have said they were historical fiction. My bad. :oops:

imi
04-30-2012, 05:23 AM
looks like a good book
Uniforms and bayonets from 1841 until 1945
https://filepost.com/files/b14f3eb4/Deutsche_Uniformen_und_Seitengewehre_1841-1945.pdf

panz
05-11-2012, 05:07 PM
One of my favourites is the book, Sniper on the Eastern Front - The Memoirs of Sepp Allerberger Knights Cross.
A sniper in the German army, he was credited with 257 kills and it is a no nonsense book,
I mean, snipers see where they shoot at, from very close, and he tells you about it.

srbphoto
06-19-2012, 03:08 PM
WWII Memorial: Jewel of the Mall is a 90 page full-color photographic book on the WWII Memorial with an introduction by Senator Robert Dole and photographs by renowned photographer Stephen R. Brown. The photographs are exclusive never-to-be duplicated images as Stephen R. Brown had access to the site and cranes as the Memorial was built. Panoramic scenes of the new face of the Mall comprise seventy-five pages of the book while the other fifteen are a documentary of the creation and installation of the sculpture and Marble ornamentation that is part of this new memorial. The book is sold on the Mall at various outlets and at discount prices to veteran's groups. There is a new edition out this Spring containing 28 more pages.

srbphoto
06-20-2012, 03:01 PM
what is your favorite (fictional and non-fictional) book on ww2?

WORLD WAR II MEMORIAL: Jewel of the Mall. World War II Memorial: Jewel of the
Mall is a 120 page full-color photographic book on the WWII Memorial with an introduction
by Senator Robert Dole and photographs by renowned photographer Stephen R.
Brown. The photographs are exclusive never-to-be duplicated images as Stephen R. Brown
had access to the site and cranes as the Memorial was built. He also photographed the creation
of the 18-foot high 80,000-pound bronze sculptural eagles and related pieces, which
adorn the Memorial. The documentation of the “lost wax” process in itself is a unique peak
into sculptural history. The book features panoramic scenes of the new face of the Mall;
documentary of the creation and installation of the sculpture and marble ornamentation
that is part of this new memorial; and a section entitled “A Living Memorial” which focuses
on the day-to-day activities, to include Honor Flights, that make this memorial so vibrant.
Brown has sold over 100,000 WWII Memorial books through the Smithsonian and National
Parks Service bookstores and to a number of Veteran and Civic Associations. The book
is without doubt the most accomplished photographic survey of a Memorial, which stands
between the Washington Monument and Lincoln Memorial and is just three blocks away
from the White House. 15 to 20 Million visitors go through the WWII Memorial every year
so it has become the most beloved of memorials.
The book has its own website and an accompanying blog on activities that revolve around
the WWII Memorial. This blog has produced a number of articles about the book. Honor
Flight has bought forty thousand books for their veterans so proud veterans of the Honor
Flight experience are distributing it all over the country. Brown regularly appears on
WTTG Washington to speak about photography and the Mall.
A sample review:
“This is a powerful book. It will please your eye and bring your patriotic
juices to boil. One caveat: If you have fancied yourself a fair photographer,
paging through this book may make you want to take your camera out of
the case and throw it away....I’m not sure how many photo books of the
World War II Memorial you think you need, but if you can only get one,
this should be it”
- Bob Janiskee, National Parks Traveler
Stephen R. Brown has been a professional photographer and writer for thirty-five years.
His images and articles on photography have appeared in Smithsonian, Life, Newsweek,
Time, Fortune, the New York Times, National Geographic Books, Broadcasting & Cable,
American Photo, Photo Techniques, etc. His work been exhibited in solo shows here and
abroad and in “Indelible Images: 100 Years of War Photography” and “Odyssey: 100 Years of
NGS Photography,” both of which were initiated at the Corcoran Gallery of Art and traveled
around the world. His work is available at stephenbrownphoto.com

Wittmann
10-20-2013, 12:59 AM
I'm not sure if these books have been mentioned,

Hitler's Plot to Kill the Big Three, by Laslo Havas .

Disaster at Bari, Glenn B Infield.

I have several others, but these come to mind at the moment.

I have read many mentioned, but it looks as I have more reading to do.

JR*
01-07-2014, 10:20 AM
Some good suggestions for reads in this thread. Agree re. "Tigers in the Mud", by Otto Carius. Carius has a somewhat stiff writing style but (at least in the Stackpole English translation) very readable. Essential reading for the tank-inclined. I might also mention "T-34 in Action - Soviet Tank Troops in WWII", by Artem Drabkin and Oleg Shermet (team translators), another Stackpole publication.

Regarding "The Forgotten Soldier", this memoir has been the subject of some controversy, owing to certain alleged "improbabilities" surrounding the circumstances of the author, and particular errors in the text (for example, over the sleeve on which "Grossdeutschland" soldiers wore their honor cuffbands, left or right). However, overall, making allowances for possible lapses of memory, "The Forgotten Soldier" seems to me both plausible and credible. It is certainly a very good read. Best regards, JR.

pdf27
01-08-2014, 03:11 AM
Another recommendation that I'm halfway through at the moment - Britain's War Machine by David Edgerton. So far it's very good - I don't agree with all of it, but it does for the UK economy what Wages of Destruction does for the German one. Reading the two together (and you can tell that Edgerton was heavily influenced by Tooze) and a lot of things suddenly make a lot more sense.

Kilroy
03-10-2014, 09:20 PM
I heard that author is pretty good right?

Kilroy
03-10-2014, 09:29 PM
You'll be sor-ree! By Sid Phillips
Parachute Infantry by David Kenyon Webster
Voices of the Pacific by Adam Mako
Unless victory comes by Gene Garrison
If you Survive by George Wilson
Strong Men Armed by Robert Leckie
The last stand of fox company by Bob Drury and Tom calvin ( its the Korea war but its real good)
Band of Brother by (of course) Stephen E. Ambrose
D-day (and) Wild Blue also by Stephen E. Ambrose
Citizen soldier by Stephen Ambrose

caroline89
12-02-2014, 03:29 AM
Good.Fictional one.Like it!

JR*
12-02-2014, 07:07 AM
Wow ! How easy is it to get banned around here - is this a record ? Or is there Something I Don't Know ... ? JR.

tankgeezer
12-02-2014, 08:08 AM
[QUOTE=JR*;193573]Wow ! How easy is it to get banned around here - is this a record ? Or is there Something I Don't Know ... ? JR.[/QUOTE
'Tis the Spamming Season. Besides, a couple of mortal sins aside, it's really not at that easy to be banned here.

Rising Sun*
12-02-2014, 08:50 AM
As mods, we are careful to distinguish between


7256



and



7257

Kilroy
12-02-2014, 09:49 AM
Wow that one new guy got banned pretty quickly, though I feel like it was a member from the site just making a new account to just spam till they got banned...

tankgeezer
12-02-2014, 01:24 PM
To answer concerns, the banned party had placed Spam in their profile having to do with women's clothing, it was not due to the post they made in this thread. Profile Spam shows up fairly often, and especially during the Holiday Season. The Site has had a rash of Profile Spammers of late. The Staff has the job of keeping it from polluting the Boards, and offending the delicate sensibilities of our members.
Since other Spammers will look up the exploits of their fellows, if they find other offenders have been banned, they may just pass us by.

tankgeezer
12-02-2014, 06:31 PM
As mods, we are careful to distinguish between


7256



and



7257
Neither one tastes very good, but the Ultra Dry does give one fresh breath. :mrgreen:

JR*
12-03-2014, 06:00 AM
Yes, I get it. Thanks. Regarding Spam (a sort of ham with beef compressed "luncheon meat" developed in the US shortly before WW2), opinions may be divided as to its taste, but it still sells. During the war, huge quantities of Spam were supplied for inclusion in soldiers' rations, in the US and beyond. Some Soviet Red Army soldiers referred to cans of Spam (in the absence of more tangible manifestations up to 1944) as "Second Fronts". Best regards, JR.

tankgeezer
12-03-2014, 08:04 AM
The 50's Dinner stand-by, (we had it often when I was very young) was really not bad tasting, but it did take a little getting used to. And was preferred by all of us over the other stand by, hot Tuna Casserole. In it's current iteration, Spam contains Ham, Pork shoulder, salt, and some vaguely menacing preservative. I remember there were a few dozen cans of it, and lots of other things kept in the cellar during the Cuban missile crisis.

JR*
12-03-2014, 09:07 AM
I may have been wrong about the beef element; pork seems more ... harmonious. Regarding canned tuna - you can do quite an acceptable pasta sauce with canned tuna, canned tomatoes, onions and a little garlic. I like a few sliced mushrooms in it, myself. It is one of our standbys ... although perhaps not everybody would like the look of it. My wife describes it as "tuna mush" ... Yours from the Depths of the Larder, JR.

tankgeezer
12-03-2014, 05:04 PM
Spam has been around since 1937, and given the times it faced, the recipe may have been changed from time to time. So it may well have had some beef in it depending on the times, or the market it was intended for. (kind of guessing at that, the official Hormel Spam site doesn't address that.)
I'm a big fan of cold tuna salad, in sandwiches, and also the pasta version with sliced cucumber, and tomato. The Tuna pasta sauce might work though, I'll have to try that on some Spaghetti squash.

Rising Sun*
12-04-2014, 07:32 AM
I may have been wrong about the beef element; pork seems more ... harmonious.

Maybe.

Australian version was 'Camp Pie'. Read the ingredients and you'd find it was mainly cereal fillers.

Spent a very hot Scout camp in the early 1960s where we had camp pie for every lunch and evening meal (along with bread and jam for dessert and general filler) for a fortnight. Ugly, sweating, jelly like blobs of otherwise unsaleable offal and grease rapidly covered in the flies which weren't busy shitting in the open jam tins, after a busy day of blowing the sheep. (No, not making the sheep smile, just laying maggots in the shit stuck in the wool on the back of the sheep's legs, which was why sheep were sometimes mulesed which is now something well intentioned but ignorant people who don't understand farming and have never had to put down a fly blown sheep think was a form of voluntary sadism practised on defenceless animals by evil farmers: http://www.petaasiapacific.com/featureMulesingAustralianWool.asp )

When my children were in primary school I had the brilliant idea of introducing them to fried camp pie, which I had vague recollections from post-Scout camp encounters as being edible, largely because of the crunchy outside. My children rejected it as soon as they put in their mouths. So, immediately afterwards, did I as soon as I put it in my mouth with a view to challenging their rejection.

I was probably of the last Australian generation which in our childhood ate foods which were common to earlier generations but which now would offend more delicate tastes, such as aged mutton, liver, kidney and other offal. I ate mutton routinely when I worked in the bush in the 1960s. I'd probably retch or even vomit if I had try to to eat it now. When I was a kid, mutton was common and lamb was a spring delicacy, while chicken was something eaten only a couple of times a year on special occasions such as Xmas. Now, chicken is spewed out of every fast food outlet on every corner while lamb is eaten occasionally, and nobody would eat mutton even if anyone was silly enough to try to sell it.

I need to check the shelves in the supermarket next time I'm there to see if camp pie is still stocked.

JR*
12-04-2014, 08:15 AM
I seem to recall that frying was a favored method of preparation for Spam - may even have done it myself, long time ago. Regarding mutton - it has been coming back into vogue with some chefs Over Here, who like its stronger flavor in stews, pies, slow-roasts etc, when compared to lamb. Mutton is actually quite hard to get here on the retail market. Lamb is regarded as a premium product both here and in our external markets (notably France), so few farmers have much interest in keeping a wooly long enough to be mutton. Interestingly, my father - who grew up in early 20th century rural West of Ireland - will not eat sheepmeat of any description. Not that he has no experience of the stuff - quite the opposite. His reason appears to be that, at the time and place of his upbringing, sheepmeat was regarded as "poor man's fare", which meant he got plenty of it. However, he no longer wishes to remind himself of the association ... Yours from The Bog, watching the sheepishes ... JR.

tankgeezer
12-04-2014, 10:00 AM
I once had Lamb, (at least I was told it was Lamb) at a dinner given by my In-Laws many years ago. I was told that it was oh so good, and tasty, and that I would enjoy it. I was out of sorts for several days, and have not yet ventured to try it again. (In truth, I believe it was a fiendish plot by my In-Laws to get me out of the Family) :mrgreen:
Next time I visit the WalMart, I'll look for some Spam, and fry it up, and give a comprehensive report of the experience. At least its not Bully Beef.

JR*
12-04-2014, 10:10 AM
I must confess that I am not very partial to lamb myself. But my wife is. So I end up eating (and cooking) more than enough of it. Mind you, while she grew up in a vastly less-than-wealthy household herself, it was in Newbridge, Co. Kildare (only 50 minutes drive from Dublin on a good day). I expect that the well-fed woolies of the Lilywhite County were too valuable to have been "poor man's fare". I must ask her what the Kildare equivalent was - cast-off racehorse, perhaps ? Yours from the Curragh, JR.

tankgeezer
12-04-2014, 11:00 AM
We also have another version of "Mystery Meat" called either Mock Chicken, or City Chicken. Had lots of it while growing up, not the worst tasting thing, but nothing to write home about. This is the ingredients list.
"minced veal, pork, or other meat, molded onto a stick or skewer so that it somewhat resembles a chicken leg, then breaded and braised. " Somewhat resembles a Chicken leg is more than a little literary license, it was just a rectangular block of stuff on a round stick. (Still better than Lamb....)

JR*
12-04-2014, 11:19 AM
Interesting, tankgeezer. Quite recently, a survey was done (I think by Britain's Trading Standards Authority) of pizza restaurants and takeaways in the region of a North of England town/city. I cannot quite remember which - it may have been Scarborough. Since this is not a very prosperous place, pizza restaurants and takeaways are almost as common as bookies' shops in the area. They discovered, among other things, that almost all of the restaurants and takeaways were using a "chicken" pizza topping of "mechanically-recovered meat" with quite a similar composition to that of your "Mock Chicken". The one thing it did not contain was actual chicken. We do not have a Trading Standards Authority here in the Emerald Isle, more's the pity. Since I read an article on this, I have not gone near a chicken pizza. Or, indeed, any pizza ... Yours from Napoli, in mourning, JR.

Nickdfresh
12-04-2014, 12:05 PM
Yes, I get it. Thanks. Regarding Spam (a sort of ham with beef compressed "luncheon meat" developed in the US shortly before WW2), opinions may be divided as to its taste, but it still sells. During the war, huge quantities of Spam were supplied for inclusion in soldiers' rations, in the US and beyond. Some Soviet Red Army soldiers referred to cans of Spam (in the absence of more tangible manifestations up to 1944) as "Second Fronts". Best regards, JR.

I thought it was "Roosevelt Sausage"... :mrgreen:

tankgeezer
12-04-2014, 03:17 PM
Soylent Red.... Hormel is probably close to selling their 8 billionth can of the stuff.

Rising Sun*
12-05-2014, 05:33 AM
His reason appears to be that, at the time and place of his upbringing, sheepmeat was regarded as "poor man's fare"

It was rabbit here, during the 1930s Depression. Sold in pairs, presumably because you can't get a feed off one of the stringy little semi-rodents. Still sold a bit in butchers in my childhood in the 1950s, but my parents' and grandparents' generations generally wouldn't buy them because of the 'poor man' stigma, although none of them were so poor during the Depression that they had to survive on rabbits.

Which, despite grand stories by various people of living on rabbit alone during the many years of the Depression, just ain't possible. http://www.raising-rabbits.com/rabbit-starvation.html

Shot and occasionally trapped or snared my share of rabbits as a kid to young adult. Now, as testament to how ageing transforms one to a gentler person, I like looking at them as they bounce around my beach shack, with no desire to hurt the cute little bunnies. Although from time to time I do visualise a head shot on one of the really fat ones, then I think of the blood and flies while gutting and skinning them which confirms my aged preference for meat served up on polystyrene trays in supermarkets rather than killing my own.

Rising Sun*
12-05-2014, 05:50 AM
I once had Lamb, (at least I was told it was Lamb) at a dinner given by my In-Laws many years ago. I was told that it was oh so good, and tasty, and that I would enjoy it. I was out of sorts for several days, and have not yet ventured to try it again.

Quite possibly the fat, which is very rich. And yummy, yummy, yummy when concentrated in crispy meat.

I love lamb, especially the crispy fat on roasts and chops, but it doesn't love me. Poor consequences are proportional to fat ingested. Oddly enough, pork crackling is similar. Which is a pity as I've found a place on the way to the beach shack that does pork roast dinners for $14, with a miserly bit of pork crackling on it, but also sells crackling slabs about 4 inches square for $2. Gee, which one is better value to sustain me until I hit the bakery 40 minutes down the road which does the world's best lamingtons with strawberry jam and fresh cream?

The best lamb is Greek spit roast over charcoal, on its own or in a souvlaki on pita bread warmed on a grill with olive oil then filled with tzatziki or garlic sauce, tomato, lettuce, lemon juice and herbs.

Rising Sun*
12-05-2014, 05:56 AM
Interesting, tankgeezer. Quite recently, a survey was done (I think by Britain's Trading Standards Authority) of pizza restaurants and takeaways in the region of a North of England town/city. I cannot quite remember which - it may have been Scarborough. Since this is not a very prosperous place, pizza restaurants and takeaways are almost as common as bookies' shops in the area. They discovered, among other things, that almost all of the restaurants and takeaways were using a "chicken" pizza topping of "mechanically-recovered meat" with quite a similar composition to that of your "Mock Chicken". The one thing it did not contain was actual chicken. We do not have a Trading Standards Authority here in the Emerald Isle, more's the pity. Since I read an article on this, I have not gone near a chicken pizza. Or, indeed, any pizza ... Yours from Napoli, in mourning, JR.

Bunch of numbnuts animal rights protesters here some years ago tried to stop a ship sailing with live sheep for Arab countries.

Genius protesters bought large quantities of pizza ham; invaded the ship; and sprinkled the pizza ham liberally over the sheep, believing that the sheep contaminated by pork would be rejected by the Muslim countries for which they were destined.

Slight problem for numbnuts. "Pizza ham" was in fact a beef product treated with various non-pork products to make it ersatz pork, much cheaper than anything containing even a trace of the real piggy stuff.

This is what happens when you don't eat enough meat, especially pork in my preferred forms of bacon and crackling, to maintain sound brain function. ;) :D

tankgeezer
12-05-2014, 09:13 AM
Fats are an essential part of a well functioning brain. Aside from those owned by the majority of Politicians.(this according to my doctor) which is why I enjoy two strips of Bacon daily. Besides, any good purveyor of BBQ will tell you, the flavor is in the fat. :)

Nickdfresh
12-06-2014, 02:38 PM
I'm a relative newcomer to Spam. I never had it growing up, but was curious about it from seeing it referred to in all things WWII related and of course the Monty Python skit. :mrgreen:

But it was maybe 10 years ago I picked up a few cans on sale to use as a winter iron ration should I have been snowed in, which I never was leaving me with lots of surplus spam to eat the following spring and summer. Unless of course I just left it for next winter. But in any case I tried it several different ways, including Hunter Thompson's infamous fried spam sandwiches he would make after finishing a new book. I finally found that I actually sort of like Spam with eggs when fried in thin slices. That salted, fatty meat-thing seems to accompany eggs pretty well for some reason so I guess that's the main way I can tolerate it...

tankgeezer
12-08-2014, 06:45 PM
I bought some original recipe Spam, they call it Classic Spam, have tried it sauteed in olive oil, garlic, and a bit of ginger. If not cooked too long, it's a bit bland, but has a good texture, reasonably juicy. Too much cook time renders it a tough, unpleasant piece of shoe leather . Diced with scrambled eggs its fine, but had a slight bitter edge in the taste. I made an effort to discover the faint nuclear glow many might expect from highly processed food like substances, but could find no trace of this mythic property. (Although my camera did act up a bit when used in proximity to the Spam without the shielding of its metal can ) :mrgreen:

JR*
03-30-2016, 09:43 AM
Getting back to books, might I suggest "Eva Braun - Life with Hitler" by Heike B. Gortemaker ? This is a remarkably well-researched, revealing biography, going well beyond a limited account of Eva's life. There is an increasing amount of "background"/homefront scholarship breaking into the popular history literature that is well worth reading to obtain a broader view of the context of WW2. Best regards, JR.

Half-Track
08-07-2017, 04:59 AM
As far as non fiction, The Longest Day by Cornelius Ryan followed by Band of Brothers by Stephen Ambrose. I honestly can't think of a book of fiction that I have read on the War.