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Hosenfield
08-02-2005, 11:43 PM
The Forgotten Soldier (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1574882864/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=lazerguy-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=1574882864) remains one of the best written war memoirs ever with deep personal analysis. Sajer was a french-german grunt in the elite Greater Germany Armored division. Book ends with him being in american custody.
however, there have been claims to the book's authenticity in that the GD rolls indicate that no Guy Sajer existed and certain events/things he said happened in fact didn't. also, there are no photos of guy sajer or his comarades.http://www.assoc-amazon.com/e/ir?t=lazerguy-20&l=as2&o=1&a=1574882864

Cactus
08-03-2005, 01:13 AM
I have it and started it but had to stop because I have other books that need to be read. However I will finish this when I can. 8)

Firefly
08-03-2005, 02:06 AM
Although I have read and enjoyed this book, I agree that it does come with some controversy. There is a discussion of the pros and cons here:

http://members.shaw.ca/grossdeutschland/sajer.htm

ddodson
09-18-2005, 11:13 PM
Excellent book! Some folks seem to think there are discrepencies as noted above, but the author does seem to do well communicating his feelings and what it was like for him during this time. A good read!

PzKpfw VI Tiger
09-20-2005, 07:52 PM
I've heard of it but I've never read it. I cant seem to find it in stores - any help besides ordering it online?

ddodson
09-20-2005, 08:39 PM
Sorry, Ordered mine online through amazon.com There is a newer edition that is illustrated, but it just has some photos and nothing of anyone specific to the book.

FluffyBunnyGB
11-17-2005, 04:46 PM
It's a while since I read it, but I thought there was a bit of cross-over somewhere with Sven Hassel's "Legion of the Damned".

Might be a coincidence or one may have read the others work.

temujin77
11-17-2005, 10:12 PM
My colleague Bryan Hiatt did a review of this book and posted it on my WW2DB site:

http://ww2db.com/read.php?read_id=27

He seemed to have liked the book as well.

Trooper
01-30-2006, 02:46 PM
I am reading it for the second time now. It is the most moving, powerful book I have ever read.

These idiots who sit on their butts and pick holes in it's authenticity make me laugh.

Firefly
01-31-2006, 02:47 AM
I am reading it for the second time now. It is the most moving, powerful book I have ever read.

These idiots who sit on their butts and pick holes in it's authenticity make me laugh.

Can you expand on this. I'm interested as to why you think its the genuine article.

Trooper
01-31-2006, 12:54 PM
Of course any opinion is subjective, but my instinct tell me that it is authentic. Only a soldier would be able to describe the horror, hardships and comradeship with such intensity. I personally do not believe that it is the work of a novelist.

I have read the criticism ( and counter-criticism) and nothing strikes me as being conclusive. Even if there are a few factual errors in there, what does it prove? I have trouble remembering what I did last week sometimes.

I could be wrong of course ( it wouldn't be the first time), but we have to trust our own judgement in these things.

Firefly
01-31-2006, 01:12 PM
I agree, I believe too that it is based on facts, but I think the unit may be diffrent. Damned good read though.

Rockatansky
03-02-2006, 01:07 PM
I think it's great too, I do believe he added to his own personnel experience in the war to create the book though. However, if he had just come out and said thats what he did, like Remarque in "All Quiet On The Western Front", he wouldn't have got in all this controversy. Remarque really only fought for about 4 months in the trenches before he was severely wounded, where as his character Paul fights for years.

arhob1
03-19-2006, 06:05 PM
I've read the book and thought it was a fantastic and moving account.

Following Firefly's link, as the author said:


"Apart from the emotions I brought out I confess my numerous mistakes.That is why I would like that this book may not be used under no circumstances as a strategic or chronological reference. Except for some clear landmarks we didn't know exactly where we were (I am speaking about Russia). We had only code numbers for mail which meant nothing to us .... In the black Russia of winter I would not have been surprised if someone had told me that we were in China."

I have heard of many young soldiers in the British Army whom don't know what Division they are in so as the author was only 16-20 years old at the time it wouldn't be too surprising if he got a few things wrong.

A great read.

shylethalsoldier
10-02-2006, 05:40 AM
Excellent book! Some folks seem to think there are discrepencies as noted above, but the author does seem to do well communicating his feelings and what it was like for him during this time. A good read!

I am up to pg 939 and this book would have to be the most emotional true stories that I have read. Well one part where his friend died an awful death, and a few other situations that Guy was in but other than that I really enjoy it so far and tells of what else really did go on, not the usual sorta-stereotype of the war but kind of reveals alot more of what happened through the eyes of this soldier, I wonder if he is still alive for real type thing. I doubt it though, but to the point this book is incredible and I recommend anyone into true stories (obviously).

Wolfgang Von Gottberg
01-17-2007, 04:41 PM
I know not much of the Wehrmacht, but as a German soldier's autobiography during WWII; I believe it was wonderfull and deeply accurate.

Sturmfuhrer
01-18-2007, 05:28 AM
I`ve read Guy Sayer book in Russian but it was called "The last soldier of the Third Reich". I wonder isit the same book, just renamed by interpreter?

http://www.centrmag.ru/k4451.html

Chevan
01-18-2007, 11:57 PM
I`ve read Guy Sayer book in Russian but it was called "The last soldier of the Third Reich". I wonder isit the same book, just renamed by interpreter?

http://www.centrmag.ru/k4451.html
Thanks for the link Sturmfuhrer. I'll try to search it in net for the reading.

Cheers.

Sturmfuhrer
01-19-2007, 06:41 AM
Thanks for the link Sturmfuhrer. I'll try to search it in net for the reading.

Cheers.


Chevan,

Don`t bother, here you can read this book in Russian language.

http://militera.lib.ru/memo/german/sajer/

And as I found out it`s the same book, just renamed.

GermanSoldier
01-29-2007, 06:21 PM
I looked it up on the internet good summary.

dirigo207
06-20-2007, 06:46 PM
Regardless of the controversy it is a great book. Considering his age at the time it is no wonder he has no solid facts. It was not written to be a definitve guide, it was a young man's journy through hell. The German Army was realing from Stalingrad, and were fighting hard all over the Eastern Front, it could not have been the super efficiant model we all envison.

BlackUhlan
06-22-2007, 08:35 AM
I first read it in high school then once again a few months back. I do believe he did make certain parts up such has speeches that seem to drag on for a half a page which I doubt anyone could remember unless they wrote it word for word at the time of hearing it but I do believe his story is solid because he does not betray him self to be a hero or someone that should of been given and knights cross in fact he spends allot of time betraying others to be hero’s like Linsen and The Veteran. I did grow tired of reading about his food complaints when in other books unless a unit had been surrounded I rarely read about a shortage of food this was one of the strong points of the German army along with a regular mail exchange.

The only other book I can promote that comes close to this one is "Twilight of the Gods" by Thorolf Hillblad. Action wise its a better book and you wont want to put it down. He does not spend the whole book bashing the Nazi party and Hitler like alot of books but lets you live out he last days of world war two through the eyes of a Swedish volunteer in the Waffen SS leading all the way up to the battle of Berlin.

ww2artist
09-04-2007, 04:05 PM
I thoroughly enjoyed the book and hope that it is authentic.

diverdoc
11-17-2007, 02:07 PM
i also read it in high school, and just re-read it recently. excellent book. i doubt its made up. as mentioned, he sure didnt glorify his actions, in fact at times he made himself sound as if he weer too scared to act. not something somebody would usually make up and "brag" about.

CA15
05-28-2008, 04:39 PM
I read a battered old copy of this book some years ago. If authenticity is questioned, then I'd say this is the finest, most convincing work of fiction I have read.
Go on a two week peace time exercise and you'll have no idea what your mates in the second troop are up to - other than via a fertile rumour mill; so confusing the details is to be expected when you're on the biggest two-way range ever witnessed.
My wife is from South Russia, so the trek to see the outlaws is via Rostov-na-Donu - it's easy to appriciate Monsoir Sager's awe of the sheer scale of the place. For sure the endless swathes of sunflowers are far less intimidating than endless swathes of T-34s and conscripts in itchy woolen uniforms...
Anyone wanting to split hairs over the details of The Forgotten Soldier ought to jam it and just read the book.

Antony Beevor's book 'Berlin; The Downfall 1945' is well worth a read too - more of a bigger picture, there are still enough snapshots to appriciate the individual's perspective.

Nickdfresh
08-17-2008, 06:26 PM
I have read this book (german version) and its fantastic. It takes you to the front as if you were really there, 1942 onthe eastern front fighting the commies pushing them back into the devils den. I will admit sometimes i wish i was really there as a waffen ss officer fighting for the freedom of europe lol. But anyway id recommend this book to anyone interested inthe war from the german point of veiw

Well, I guess the book is a work of fiction since they didn't "push the commies back" but were pushed back into defeat themselves...

Nickdfresh
08-17-2008, 08:34 PM
yes unfortunatly, the commies won but they were nearly destroyed shame we didnt finish them what a world we could of made lol. Also this book is fact not fiction, a real story of a real hero.


Oh yes! A wonderful world of mass murder and scoff-law scum in power...

Chevan
08-18-2008, 07:37 AM
As i have said im no nazi, but i think the world would of been much better than it is today no war, murders, pedos, rapists etc total peace on earth
I think the world would have been much better if today is no racist extremists like you.

Firefly
08-18-2008, 08:55 AM
As i have said im no nazi, but i think the world would of been much better than it is today no war, murders, pedos, rapists etc total peace on earth

Please tell me your not serious about that statement. Please also tell me why YOU think YOU arent a Troll?

I am genuinely interested in your style of posting and your repeated stating of this phrase - 'I'm NO Nazi'......

I am now going to read every one of your posts since you joined as you have definitaly caught my interest here.

Rising Sun*
08-18-2008, 09:13 AM
i think the world would of been much better than it is today no war, murders, pedos, rapists etc total peace on earth

Which, my dear young boy of profoundly insensitive generative organs (crudely referred to by our American friends as 'numb nuts' ), presumably was going to be achieved by Nazi wars of aggression on other nations; murdering people in them when the Nazis could spare time from wiping out the Jews and others at home; a party run by paedophiles like Julius Streicher who liked a bit of boy bum; etc, etc, etc, which somehow was all going to produce peace on earth?

The biggest flaw in your quoted statement is 'I think'.

You don't.

Nor do people like you.

That is the whole problem with morons who are impressed by Nazi regalia and pomp and ceremony, and who are too stupid and too ignorant to understand why the Nazis didn't last.

There is, however, a regrettable problem unique to you. What little subtlety was shown by your earlier trolls has disappeared.

You are making yourself too easy a target. If this continues, everyone will ignore you, as no doubt they do in real life, and then where will you be?

Rising Sun*
08-18-2008, 09:43 AM
I think the world would have been much better if today is no racist extremists like you.

It is, mate, it is.

The Waffen SS that tighten stevey's undies were wiped out by your lot, with a tiny bit of help from the other Allies during their brief and largely unimportant advance from Normandy to Berlin and a few brief bombing forays into occupied territory and Germany, along with trivial events like the Battle of Britain and something or other that happened in North Africa. ;) :D

Tools like stevey are just living in a dream world of being Waffen SS officers and strutting around the planet being bullies, just like the real ones who probably ordered stevey's grandpa (if he really had a German soldier grandpa) around on the Ostfront and got their asses kicked by 'slav scum' while trying to wipe them out.

Notice how stevey's posts always deal with what could have been if his lot hadn't lost, not with what really happened?

It's the same as the photos of the sheilas he had in his profile.

They're all fantasies.

The difference is that stevey has more chance of shagging one of the models who used to be in his stick book profile than he does of ever becoming an SS officer. Not least because the SS has been gone for over sixty years, although stevey might have to wait about the same time before one of his stick models would begin to consider him, by which time she'll be nudging ninety and the only use stevey will have for Viagra will be the huge quantity the nurses in the ancient's home feed him every night to stop him rolling out of bed. :D

Chevan
08-18-2008, 01:26 PM
It is, mate, it is.

The Waffen SS that tighten stevey's undies were wiped out by your lot, with a tiny bit of help from the other Allies during their brief and largely unimportant advance from Normandy to Berlin and a few brief bombing forays into occupied territory and Germany, along with trivial events like the Battle of Britain and something or other that happened in North Africa. ;) :D

All this is true:)
But..
You are forgetting about Australia mate.
That feeded the whole giant American Army in Pacific.The hungry Yankees can't fight- we know it for sure:):D
If not Heroical Australian home front - Americans would never kick out the Japs from Asia.




It's the same as the photos of the sheilas he had in his profile.

They're all fantasies.

The difference is that stevey has more chance of shagging one of the models who used to be in his stick book profile than he does of ever becoming an SS officer. Not least because the SS has been gone for over sixty years, although stevey might have to wait about the same time before one of his stick models would begin to consider him, by which time she'll be nudging ninety and the only use stevey will have for Viagra will be the huge quantity the nurses in the ancient's home feed him every night to stop him rolling out of bed. :D
:mrgreen:
Of course.
Well i think he posts here between masturbations on his "models girlfriend". You know how it is going when you are 16:)( although he is hardly more then 13, if keep in mind the sense of his posts)
He just can't find the other board for to place here his "models"
Poor child, he can't to OWN a real girl.Just dreams to be a "Cool waffen SS":)

Nickdfresh
08-18-2008, 08:44 PM
Is this his "model girlfriend?"

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y240/Nickdfresh/cutenazi.jpg

Manheim Schrute
08-19-2008, 10:06 PM
Is this his "model girlfriend?"

http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y240/Nickdfresh/cutenazi.jpg

"She" is a very Handsome "woman":rolleyes:

kamehouse
08-23-2008, 07:03 AM
Back to topic i think,
a movie of the forgotten soldier has been confirmed:
Verhoeven attached to direct The Forgotten Soldier
Mike Goodridge in Los Angeles
21 Jul 2008 06:00



Paul Verhoeven, whose last film Black Book was one of his most acclaimed in years, has become attached to another World War II story The Forgotten Soldier based on the memoir by Guy Sajer.

The story follows Sajer’s harrowing experiences as a teenager as a French recruit in the German army on the eastern front during the war.

Michael Frost Beckner, whose writing credits include Spy Game, has written the screenplay for the project and will produce alongside his brother John Beckner and Verhoeven. The producers plan to shoot in 2009 on location in eastern Europe.

Financing and worldwide distribution is being arranged by LA-based executive producer Thomas Augsberger of Eden Rock Media.

The novel is a French classic and was recently cited as one of prime minister Nicholas Sarkozy’s favourite books. Sajer, who is still alive, has never optioned the rights to the book despite strong interest, but is said to have been won over by Verhoeven.

Verhoeven has been attached to several other projects since Black Book including The Thomas Crown Affair 2 for MGM, a film of Pete Dexter’s novel The Paperboy which Jan De Bont is to produce, Tsarist crime romp The Winter Queen aka Azazel which has Milla Jovovich attached to star and a Dutch-language adaptation of Jan Siebelink’s biography Kneeling On A Bed Of Violets.

Michael Frost Beckner is represented by Endeavor.

Link:http://www.screendaily.com/ScreenDailyArticle.aspx?intStoryID=39936&strSearch=the%20forgotten%20soldier&strCallingPage=ScreenDailySearchSite.aspx

Manheim Schrute
09-04-2008, 09:40 PM
OH man,I loved this book,fact or fiction,I have no idea,but it was a great read. I especially found the story of the young soldiet Forsch,who after escaping bombings and other attacks on his retreat,he get's hung for stealing a couple of bottles.:shock:
There where many other parts which I found fascinating. Captain Weisridau came across as a very strong and excellent leader,as well as the veteran. Even Hal's was able to incorporate a few laughs here and there.

swedish ranger90
01-03-2009, 01:39 PM
here stands some text about the book

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Forgotten_Soldier

Byron
01-19-2009, 05:26 PM
I've read this book twice and it is exceptionally good.

Emchista
06-13-2009, 06:44 AM
I too have this book in my Library and consider it a "keeper" despite the controversy....it really is a powerful piece of writing!

But lately I've harboured a lingering suspicion that while Mr. Sajer "may" have in fact spent time on the Eastern Front he did it, not as a member of the Grossdeutschland Division but with Das Reich, an SS Division (2nd Panzer) that did its heaviest fighting in Russia, and was known to contain a large number of young Alsatian "volunteers".

Yes, Waffen-SS cufftitles were always worn on the LEFT sleeve, as opposed to the cufftitles of "Regular Army" Elite Units, which were always worn on the RIGHT. (American troops, reputedly showing no mercy to any German soldier wearing one of these embroidered "cuff bands", were either unaware of the significance of the placement, or simply didn't care.) But this not my only reason for suspecting that Mr. Sajer was indeed a member of a Waffen SS Division.

There is the matter of that brutal "training regimen". The Waffen SS always placed an extremely high value on physical fitness and endurance: Mr. Sajer himself alludes to this. Contrast his description of the ordeals he was forced to undergo before being awarded that covetted (and highly problematic) cufftitle with the training given to Siegfried Knapp in "Soldat".

In addition, the speeches given by "von Wesreidau" seem very to contain very strange utterances (like the folly of believing "all men are equal", or the urgency of Germany's mission "to change the face of the world") for an Officer representating what is supposed to be a completely "apolitical" organization --ie, the Regular German Army. As SS Doctrine, though, it's right on the mark.

So,--if Mr Sager really WAS a member of a Waffen SS Unit, why all the obfuscation, and the reluctance to be interviewed? Could it have been because Das Reich, regardless of its composition, was responsible for the massacre of an an entire Alsatian village? And had Mr. Sajer identified himself as being any part of it (even a lowly "panzergrenadier") any sympathy he might have hoped to garner for himself and his colleagues would have evaporated faster than snow on an izba's clay stove.

flamethrowerguy
06-13-2009, 07:59 AM
I too have this book in my Library and consider it a "keeper" despite the controversy....it really is a powerful piece of writing!

I still haven't read it yet but I was able to snatch a copy by paying a shitload of money - for a German paperback version.


Could it have been because Das Reich, regardless of its composition, was responsible for the massacre of an an entire Alsatian village? And had Mr. Sajer identified himself as being any part of it (even a lowly "panzergrenadier") any sympathy he might have hoped to garner for himself and his colleagues would have evaporated faster than snow on an isba's clay stove.

Err, I guess you're referring to Oradour-sur-Glane which is located in the Limousin region, not in the Alsace.
But right, two-thirds of the men trialed for Oradour were Alsatians.

kuuk
06-14-2009, 02:35 PM
Years ago I read a book in a way similar to the "Forgotten Soldier"
The Name of the book was: "The Black March" by Peter Neumann. Based on facts, he joined the SS, performed at a Lebensborn place, and various other war times activities.

Anybody else read that book?

flamethrowerguy
06-15-2009, 01:30 PM
Years ago I read a book in a way similar to the "Forgotten Soldier"
The Name of the book was: "The Black March" by Peter Neumann. Based on facts, he joined the SS, performed at a Lebensborn place, and various other war times activities.

Anybody else read that book?

Hmmm, never heard of that book, couldn't find the German version either.

"Performing at a Lebensborn place" does sound like a pleasant job to me though.;)

kuuk
06-16-2009, 02:42 PM
Herr Flamethrowerguy,

I checked Amazon.com and they show a number of copies of the Black March.
Mostly used but also new ones. Prices vary widely from US$2 to $ 85+. Good Luck!

flamethrowerguy
08-27-2009, 02:56 PM
I finally got to read "The Forgotten Soldier", it was an o.k. read but does definitely not justify the hype. I've read dozens of personal accounts of WW2 vets with similar or more intensity.

Laconia
11-01-2009, 04:09 PM
This is a very good book. I could hardly put it down once I started reading it. As an American, I was interested in reading about the war from those who were on the other side.

The Commander
08-26-2010, 12:44 AM
The first time I read this book I was 13. I was just starting to gain interest in military history as well. I was just awestruck with the way Guy described his experiences in the German army. In a way his writing almost made you feel as though you were right there with him. I have a couple of copies of this book, and am currently reading it, for..oh...I don't know..about the....50th time.. Excellent read, and I give it a 5 star rating! And if you have not read it, you really should.

kowalskil
11-28-2010, 03:29 PM
Forgotten soldier remains one of the best written war memoirs ever with deep personal analysis. Sajer was a french-german grunt in the elite Greater Germany Armored division. Book ends with him being in american custody.
however, there have been claims to the book's authenticity in that the GD rolls indicate that no Guy Sajer existed and certain events/things he said happened in fact didn't. also, there are no photos of guy sajer or his comarades.

I read it last summer. And I agree; the book is definitely worth reading.

Ludwik Kowalski (see Wikipedia)

witman111
05-02-2011, 08:42 AM
Hi everyone,

just to point out this great book. I read quite a few of them but this one is by far the best because it packs first hands emotional punch. The book really builds up like a epic movie... say Gone with the wind... or ... Titanic... and ends with sorrow of Prussia.

Anyway, at one point after barely surviving Cossack onslaught and after having survived full year of relentless everyday massacres in the east, Guy writes about speech by new unit commander hauptman Weiserdau (who afterwards unfortunately got killed by partisan mine):
"We are trying, taking due account of the attitudes of society, to change the face of the world, hoping to revive the ancient virtues buried under the layers of filth bequeathed to us by our forebears. We can expect no reward for this effort. We are loathed everywhere: if we should lose tomorrow those of us still alive after so much suffering will be judged without justice. We shall be accused of an infinity of murder, as if everywhere, and at all times, men at war did not behave in the same way. Those who have an interest in putting an end to our ideals will ridicule everything we believe in. We shall be spared nothing. Even the tombs of our heroes will be destroyed, only preserving-as a gesture of respect toward the dead-a few which contain figures of doubtful heroism, who were never fully committed to our cause. With our deaths, all the prodigies of heroism which our daily circumstances bring and the memory of our comrades, dead and alive, and our communion of spirits, our fears and our hopes, will vanish, and our history will never be told. Future generations will speak only of an idiotic, unqualified sacrifice. Whether you wanted it or not, you are now part of this undertaking, and nothing which follows can equal the efforts you have made, if you must sleep tomorrow under the quieter skies of the opposite camp. In that case, you will never be forgiven for having survived. You will either be rejected or preserved like a rare animal which has escaped a cataclysm. With other men, you will be as cats are to dogs and you will never have any real friends.
Do you wish such an end for yourselves? "

Needles to say after this I already got chills at this point....

flamethrowerguy
05-02-2011, 03:43 PM
Threads merged...

John Hoehn
06-25-2011, 04:59 AM
A good read as such, but the question of authentication haunts me. More research should be done by people who had been closer to this division. Maybe the book is 'faction'.

royal744
07-28-2011, 11:41 PM
Fabulous book. Read it a long time ago. It was the best personal war experience narrative by a soldier on either side of the line I ever read. I've read both sides of the Guy Sajer controversy. I believe Sajer.

muscogeemike
08-02-2011, 05:15 PM
Hi everyone,

just to point out this great book. I read quite a few of them but this one is by far the best because it packs first hands emotional punch. The book really builds up like a epic movie... say Gone with the wind... or ... Titanic... and ends with sorrow of Prussia.

Anyway, at one point after barely surviving Cossack onslaught and after having survived full year of relentless everyday massacres in the east, Guy writes about speech by new unit commander hauptman Weiserdau (who afterwards unfortunately got killed by partisan mine):
"We are trying, taking due account of the attitudes of society, to change the face of the world, hoping to revive the ancient virtues buried under the layers of filth bequeathed to us by our forebears. We can expect no reward for this effort. We are loathed everywhere: if we should lose tomorrow those of us still alive after so much suffering will be judged without justice. We shall be accused of an infinity of murder, as if everywhere, and at all times, men at war did not behave in the same way. Those who have an interest in putting an end to our ideals will ridicule everything we believe in. We shall be spared nothing. Even the tombs of our heroes will be destroyed, only preserving-as a gesture of respect toward the dead-a few which contain figures of doubtful heroism, who were never fully committed to our cause. With our deaths, all the prodigies of heroism which our daily circumstances bring and the memory of our comrades, dead and alive, and our communion of spirits, our fears and our hopes, will vanish, and our history will never be told. Future generations will speak only of an idiotic, unqualified sacrifice. Whether you wanted it or not, you are now part of this undertaking, and nothing which follows can equal the efforts you have made, if you must sleep tomorrow under the quieter skies of the opposite camp. In that case, you will never be forgiven for having survived. You will either be rejected or preserved like a rare animal which has escaped a cataclysm. With other men, you will be as cats are to dogs and you will never have any real friends.
Do you wish such an end for yourselves? "

Needles to say after this I already got chills at this point....

As a US Viet Nam veteran these sentiments strike home. But this is not a new thing. A Roman Centurion, Marcus Flavinues, wrote the following around 2,000 years ago:“Make haste to reassure me, I beg you, and tell me that our fellow citizens understand us, support us and protect us as we ourselves are protecting the glory of the Empire. If it should be otherwise, if we should have to leave our bleached bones on these desert sands in vain, then beware of the anger of the Legions!

Nickdfresh
02-06-2012, 02:30 PM
An interesting website regarding this book, it seems the consensus is building that Sajer did serve in the East in some capacity; the comments in this thread regarding the potential that he actually changed what unit he served in, from Das Reich to Grossdeutschland, is pretty interesting...

http://members.shaw.ca/grossdeutschland/sajer.htm

kowalskil
02-06-2012, 02:36 PM
The first time I read this book I was 13. I was just starting to gain interest in military history as well. I was just awestruck with the way Guy described his experiences in the German army. In a way his writing almost made you feel as though you were right there with him. I have a couple of copies of this book, and am currently reading it, for..oh...I don't know..about the....50th time.. Excellent read, and I give it a 5 star rating! And if you have not read it, you really should.

I was also very much impressed by his memoir, reading it a year ago, at the age of 80.

======================================
Ludwik Kowalski, author of a free on-line “Diary of a Former Communist: Thoughts, Feelings, Reality.”

http://csam.montclair.edu/~kowalski/life/intro.html 1946-2004.

forager
02-06-2012, 05:39 PM
I can hardly support lauding the ideals and practices of the German aggressions in WW2.
The world would have gotten on quite well without all that misery.

JR*
03-06-2012, 09:43 AM
Notwithstanding the mistakes, and the clearly "factional" padding-out in places, I tend to believe that "The Forgotten Soldier" is a reasonably authentic memoir - but one informed by a more artistic temprament than that behind many veteran memoirs written by old soldiers of more prosaic frame of mind. As to the suggestion that Sajer may have been a member of a different unit on the Eastern Front - perhaps "Das Reich", or another Waffen-SS outfit - it is certainly an interesting suggestion. It would certainly help to explain the armband business. I don't know, however. I know that it is difficult to work out the timelines, given the rather limited, claustrophobic point of view of the protagonist (one of the convincing aspects of the book, actually), but a "Das Reich" timeline does not work as well for me as a "Grossdeutschland" timeline; a lot more fictionalising would seem required to make this work. Still, it is a little while since I read the book; I should look at it again with "Das Reich" timelines in mind. Best regards, JR.