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reiver
06-05-2005, 07:37 AM
I'm sorry, but this thread was just too much fun to let die out.
Let's leave aside the fact that many of the Roman's inventions were developments rather than innovations. This is true of so many inventions it would be foolish to only consider it true of the Romans.
Let's leave aside the fact that many Roman inventions and developments were lost after the collapse of their Empire.
Let us instead look at a few of the meagre offerings the British made to the world, none of which, according to Ironman, were world changing.

Surgical anaesthesia, surgical antisepsis, penicillin, vaccination, cloning, Portland cement, iron as a building material, tubular steel, the Bessemer converter for steel production, the reflector telescope, food canning, refrigeration, the thermos flask, the electric motor, the electromagnet, the pocket calculator, the breech-loading rifle, fulminate ignition/the percussion cap, shrapnel, the first Regular Army unit issued with a rifled weapon, the tank, radar, the theory of gravity, the theory of evolution, logarithms, nature of the orbits of comets, Keynesian economics, Parliamentary Democracy, abolition of slavery, systemised trial by jury, legal system utilised by all English-speaking nations, steam locomotive, the railway, the pneumatic tyre, the marine screw propeller, the (patented) turbo-jet engine, the hovercraft, television, the telephone, the MP3 player, the World Wide Web.
Oh, and the world's most influential language.

(Ironman; nice to see from your new signature that you acknowledge that America is an Imperial power :))

Discuss.

pdf27
06-05-2005, 08:21 AM
Let us instead look at a few of the meagre offerings the British made to the world, none of which, according to Ironman, were world changing.
Not forgetting Differential Calculus and both the programmable and non-programmable computer. Both of these (calculus particularly) have far more earth shattering consequences than most of the items on your list.

reiver
06-05-2005, 08:58 AM
Let us instead look at a few of the meagre offerings the British made to the world, none of which, according to Ironman, were world changing.
Not forgetting Differential Calculus and both the programmable and non-programmable computer. Both of these (calculus particularly) have far more earth shattering consequences than most of the items on your list.

I would in no way suggest the list I posted is complete, or even that it contains the most influential British ideas, inventions or discoveries.
That would depend on subjective opinion.
Merely that it shows that Britain and her Empire made some contributions, beyond that of the English language, which could well be described as world changing.
I even left out Scotch whisky and Viagra :)

Bluffcove
06-05-2005, 01:37 PM
Not only the first marine screw propellor but the first IRONCLAD ship.
Worlds first efficient metropolitan sewerage system.
The first "MODERN" suspension bridge (not burma bridge)
The Wheel has just been invented by my friend in Yeovil
Cider - more exactly "scrumpy"
First military use of the longbow.
First use of Khaki. (possibly - depends on your dulux colour chart)
Etiquette, class and manners.
Northerners
Hovis
Cricket (not man-rounders) baseball
Rugby (contact sport with skill)
Association football (played with the foot)
Shakespearian Sonnets.
The naval chronometer!
GMT.
Consitutional Monarchs.
Diplomacy as an Alternative to war!
Land Rovers.
Television.
Light bulbs
The Infantry Square.
Victory
Brown Bess
Long Tom
Military Cannonade.
the Assult spade!
Winston Churchill, Oscar Wilde -and with them acidic whit and verbosity.

some of these might be repeats some of them might be invented elsewhere.
but
if in my opinion i use the word .......(British)........ to mean these things tehn surely that is what it is, if it is fitting for the word to be used in that place and the name fits then why should it not be called an .....(british).....
and after all of that, The British invented the British Empire, that spawned... IRONMAN...... How can I not be proud :lol:

pdf27
06-05-2005, 02:08 PM
Diplomacy as an Alternative to war!
I've got a feeling the Spartans may have beaten you to that (they're actually a bunch I have rather a lot of sympathy for... at least in their earlier incarnation)...

Sturmtruppen
06-05-2005, 05:49 PM
romans rule!

Bluffcove
06-05-2005, 06:16 PM
How durst though besmirchify me?

I also claimed we invented "victory" but no-one has argued that yet!

Sturmtruppen
06-05-2005, 06:18 PM
british made the mp3 ? ,that`s important,i can`t live without it.

Iron Yeoman
06-06-2005, 07:37 AM
I also claimed we invented "victory" but no-one has argued that yet!

To quote Al murray 'and which defeated nation do you hail from sir?'

And of course Blackadder
'When i joined the army the prerequiste of a British campaign were that on no account were the enemy to have guns, even spears made us think twice. No, the sort of people we liked to fight were three foot tall and armed with sharp pieces of fruit.'

FW-190 Pilot
06-06-2005, 01:04 PM
british made the mp3 ? ,that`s important,i can`t live without it.
i dont know whether the british did made the mp3 or not, but some company did convert some AK-47 to mp3 player to promte peace

FW-190 Pilot
06-06-2005, 01:06 PM
talking about invention, a 2000 years old sword in china has found to have the same anti-rust technology to 1937 german and the 1955 american, those sword are reported as still useable.

Sturmtruppen
06-06-2005, 01:27 PM
Let us instead look at a few of the meagre offerings the British made to the world, none of which, according to Ironman, were world changing.
the MP3 player
Discuss.

the mp3 player

pdf27
06-06-2005, 02:26 PM
I also claimed we invented "victory" but no-one has argued that yet!
I would have thought that one was clearly unarguable - it's been parked in dry dock in Portsmouth for the last 80 years or so, and is the oldest commissioned warship on earth...

Sturmtruppen
06-06-2005, 04:18 PM
americans invented the CD (from philips) :P

Bladensburg
06-06-2005, 04:23 PM
I thought Phillips were a Dutch company :?:

Bluffcove
06-06-2005, 06:17 PM
I also claimed we invented "victory" but no-one has argued that yet!
I would have thought that one was clearly unarguable - it's been parked in dry dock in Portsmouth for the last 80 years or so, and is the oldest commissioned warship on earth...

I was aware of that., However we "built" THE VICTORY and did not "invent" it. My rather jingoistic attitude was suggesting, there was not such thing as "victory" Prior to the Brits, only winning, which personally I htink sounds a bit NAFF.

Victory is derived from the English word Victoria, the name of the Queen that ruled over the entire world and is rumoured to have beaten Joan of Arc in an arm wrestling match in 1902 at the Gillbert and Sullivan summer soiree

pdf27
06-06-2005, 06:46 PM
I was aware of that., However we "built" THE VICTORY and did not "invent" it. My rather jingoistic attitude was suggesting, there was not such thing as "victory" Prior to the Brits, only winning, which personally I htink sounds a bit NAFF.

Victory is derived from the English word Victoria, the name of the Queen that ruled over the entire world and is rumoured to have beaten Joan of Arc in an arm wrestling match in 1902 at the Gillbert and Sullivan summer soiree
If I was being a pedant, I would argue you have to invent something before you can build it :wink:
And there was me thinking Victory was derived from the Latin Vici, derived from the word Conquer (can't remember latin verb endings, absolutely hated the things at school, so won't try and put the proper one in). Then again, being as JC was referring to us despite having really been little more than a tourist you may just have a point...

Gen. Sandworm
06-06-2005, 10:31 PM
Bluffcove ............ comon you almost getting like IRONMAN on your claims. I can despute most of the things you claim the British Emipire was responsible for. Do you want to be viewed as the British version of IRONMAN...........coz that is where you are headed. I am well educated and mostly self educated.........real education(if you need my background I will produce it). I will be a doctor someday...I do not doubt it. And not a medical doctor. Your a good guy but quit blowing smoke aka bullshit. But I will commend you that you do admit when you are wrong. Not easy sometimes. I know. But thats how it is. Lets keep things good. I have a bunch of guys who i have to look towards the future of this site. Future leaders. Future mod. In the near future I "may" not be here. And it will be you guys I look to for leadership. I suggest you show yourselves.

LargeBrew
06-06-2005, 11:08 PM
General Sand Worm, ease springs. Bluff was'nt turning into IronMan he was being Ironyman.

IRONMAN
06-07-2005, 03:14 AM
british made the mp3 ? ,that`s important,i can`t live without it.
No, the MP3 format was developed by Fraunhofer IIS, a German company.



Let us instead look at a few of the meagre offerings the British made to the world, none of which, according to Ironman, were world changing.

Not forgetting Differential Calculus and both the programmable and non-programmable computer. Both of these (calculus

particularly) have far more earth shattering consequences than most of the items on your list.

Reiver, you have mistakenly claimed that many things are British inventions which are not. 24 of the 46 things you claim are British inventions are not British Inventions at all. That means over 50% of what you said is untrue! Man, that's a LOT of falicy right there. A couple of them are not inventions at all, but adaptations of someone else's invention. Here are those many things that you claimed to be British inventions, but are not:

Calculus
Like the jet engine, calculus was invented at the same time independantly by a German and a Brit.

Anesthesia
"The first herbal anaesthesia was administered in prehistory. Opium and hemp were two of the most important herbs used.

They were ingested or burned and the smoke inhaled. Alcohol was also used, its vasodilatory properties being unknown. In China, Taoist medical practitioners developed anaesthesia by means of acupuncture. In South America preparations from datura, effectively scopolamine, were used as was coca. In Medieval Europe various preparations of mandrake were tried as was henbane (hyoscyamine)." - Wikipedia

Ancient man used anesthisia for surgury in several places around the world. What Henry Hill Hickman did was make a gas to be used as anesthisia. He came thousands of years too late to invent it for surgical use.

Antisepsis
Invented thousands of years ago in various places around the world. The ancient Norse, for example, used cow urine dried to a paste.

Portland Cement
Cement was invented by the Romans. Portland Cement is a derivative of that invention.

Iron as a Building Material
For crying out loud. That's not an invention. How about iron as a sword, or as a cauldron, or a tool. Inventions? Hardly. Those are adaptations. You claim a number of things are British inventions when they are only adaptations here.

Tubular Steel
For crying out loud. That's not an invention. It's an adaptation. Didn't the US company US Steel do that first anyway? There are other adaptations I am not even mentioning that you claim are inventions.

Bessemer Converter
This is an adaptation of the Swedish invention of the Blast Furnace, which made the Swedes the 1st people in Europe to make steel.

Canning of Food
French confectioner Nicholas Appert developed a method of vacuum-sealing food inside glass jars. However, glass containers were unsuitable for transportation, and soon they had been replaced with cylindrical tin or steel cans (tin-openers were not to be invented for another thirty years - at first, soldiers either had to cut the cans open with bayonets or smash them open with rocks to get the food out!). The French Army began experimenting with issuing tinned foods to its soldiers, but the slow process of tinning foods and the even slower development stage, along with the difficulties of loading wooden wagons with tons of metal canisters, prevented the army from shipping large amounts around the Empire, and the war ended before the process could be perfected. A Brit adapted the process to larger containers and mass production.

Refrigeration
Oliver Evans (US) designed a refrigeration machine which ran on vapour in 1805. He is often called the inventor of the refrigerator.

The Electric Motor (1834)
Invented by blacksmith Thomas Davenport of Vermont, USA
http://www.memagazine.org/backissues/july99/features/blacksmith/blacksmith.html

First Pocket Calculator
The first pocket-sized calculator, the Bowmar 901B. Bowmar/ALI Inc., Acton, Massachusetts, U.S.A
http://www.vintagecalculators.com/html/bowmar.html

Fulminate Ignition
The Needle Gun, rifle named for its inventor, Nikolaus von Dreyse (Germany). It had a long, sharp firing pin designed to pierce the charge of propelling powder and strike the detonating material (usually mercury fulminate) located at the base of the bullet. The Dreyse rifle, invented between 1827 and 1829, was adopted by the Russian Army in 1848.

Logarithms
Joost Bürgi, a Swiss clockmaker in the employ of the Duke of Hesse-Kassel, first conceived of logarithms.

The Orbits of Comets
First discovered by Thales of Miletus (635 BC - 543 BC), Greek philosopher

Abolition of Slavery
Conceptualized 1st by followers of Second Great Awakening, a great religious revival in United States

Legal System Utilised by all English-speaking Nations
Some English-speaking nations used Roman Law for centuries.

Railway
The first horse tracked vehicles, drawn wagonways appeared in Greece, Malta, and parts of the Roman Empire at least 2000 years ago using cut-stone tracks. They began reappearing in Europe, from around 1550, usually operating with crude wooden tracks. In the late 18th century iron rails began to appear.

Hovercraft
The first recorded design for a vehicle which could be termed a Hovercraft was in 1716 by Emanuel Swedenborg, a Swedish designer, philosopher and theologian.

Television
The German student Paul Gottlieb Nipkow proposed and patented the first electromechanical television system in 1885. Nipkow's spinning disk design is credited with being the first television image rasterizer.

A fully electronic system was first demonstrated by Philo Taylor Farnsworth in the autumn of 1927. Farnsworth, a Mormon farm
boy from Rigby, Idaho, first envisioned his system at age 14. He discussed the idea with his high school chemistry teacher, who
could think of no reason why it would not work (Farnsworth would later credit this teacher, Justin Tolman, as providing key insights into his invention). He continued to pursue the idea at Brigham Young Academy (now Brigham Young University). At age 21, he demonstrated a working system at his own laboratory in San Francisco. His breakthrough freed television from reliance on spinning discs and other mechanical parts. All modern picture tube televisions descend directly from his design.

Telephone
The very early history of the telephone is a confusing morass of claim and counterclaim, which was not clarified by the huge mass of lawsuits which hoped to resolve the patent claims of individuals. There was a lot of money involved, particularly in the Bell Telephone companies, and the aggressive defense of the Bell patents resulted in much confusion.

"Alexander Graham Bell is commonly, but incorrectly (see the discussion above), credited as the first inventor of the telephone." - Wikipedia

MP3 Format
Developed by Fraunhofer IIS, a German company.

First MP3 Player
"The world's first mass-produced hardware MP3 player was Saehan's MPMan, sold in Asia starting in the late spring of 1998. It was released in the United States as the Eiger Labs MPMan F10/F20 (two variants of the same device) in the summer of 1998."
http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-6450-5622055-1.html

World Wide Web
Co-invented by a Brit and Belgian Robert Cailliau

Come on leiver, don't peddle bullcrap, again. I don't know about the rest of you, but my advice is not to place much stock in the things reiver says. With a track record for spouting so much falicy, he can hardly be trusted.

Bluffcove
06-07-2005, 03:22 AM
Bluffcove ............ comon you almost getting like IRONMAN on your claims. I can despute most of the things you claim the British Emipire was responsible for. Do you want to be viewed as the British version of IRONMAN...........coz that is where you are headed. I am well educated and mostly self educated.........real education(if you need my background I will produce it). I will be a doctor someday...I do not doubt it. And not a medical doctor. Your a good guy but quit blowing smoke aka bullshit. But I will commend you that you do admit when you are wrong. Not easy sometimes. I know. But thats how it is. Lets keep things good. I have a bunch of guys who i have to look towards the future of this site. Future leaders. Future mod. In the near future I "may" not be here. And it will be you guys I look to for leadership. I suggest you show yourselves.

I apologise for suggesting that Queen Victoria's name led to the founding of new verbs in the English language, and I appreciate it is very unlikely that she ever had an arm wrestle with Joan of Arc. I have been lied to all these years. :oops:

I shall now go and flagellate myself with sticks and hold hot coals by way of penance.

Sorry Sandy :wink:

(Please Dont compare me to FRIONPAN again!) :twisted:

South African Military
06-07-2005, 05:57 AM
More British Inventions (or ppl from around that area eg. United Kingdom) :

Please note the following information listed here is taken from a reliable internet source. The author is not responsible for any misguided information. Also note: It is possible that some of the items listed is a reinvention. Tho it might be a reinvention, it is a very usefull reinvention and should be noted.


Disc Brakes- Frederick William Lanchester
Cat eyes (the reflectors on the road)-Percy Shaw
Concrete (hydraulic cement)-John Smeaton
Portland Cement-Joseph Aspdin
Depth Charges-British Government
Air Pump (Diving)-John Smeaton
Succesfull self-contained breather(Diving)-William James
Closed circuit oxygen rebreather(Diving)-Henry Fleuss
Electric Motor-Michael Faraday
Electromagnet - William Sturgeon
Fax Machine - Alexander Bain
Holography - Dennis Gábor
Internal Combustion Engine - Samuel Brown
Jet Engines - Sir Frank Whittle <- DEBATABLE
Tramway Locomotive - Richard Trevithick
Lightbulbs - Humphry Davy
Penicillin - Alexander Fleming
Periscope - Sir Howard Grubb
Periodic Table - John Newlands
Radar Locating of Aircraft - Sir Robert Alexander Watson
Submarine - William Bourne
Shrapnel - Henry Shrapnel
Steam Engine - Thomas Savery
Steel Production - Sir Henry Bessemer
Television - John Logie Baird

And many, many more...

Edit-Font [b] ERROR

Gen. Sandworm
06-07-2005, 06:44 AM
Bluffcove ............ comon you almost getting like IRONMAN on your claims. I can despute most of the things you claim the British Emipire was responsible for. Do you want to be viewed as the British version of IRONMAN...........coz that is where you are headed. I am well educated and mostly self educated.........real education(if you need my background I will produce it). I will be a doctor someday...I do not doubt it. And not a medical doctor. Your a good guy but quit blowing smoke aka bullshit. But I will commend you that you do admit when you are wrong. Not easy sometimes. I know. But thats how it is. Lets keep things good. I have a bunch of guys who i have to look towards the future of this site. Future leaders. Future mod. In the near future I "may" not be here. And it will be you guys I look to for leadership. I suggest you show yourselves.

I apologise for suggesting that Queen Victoria's name led to the founding of new verbs in the English language, and I appreciate it is very unlikely that she ever had an arm wrestle with Joan of Arc. I have been lied to all these years. :oops:

I shall now go and flagellate myself with sticks and hold hot coals by way of penance.

Sorry Sandy :wink:

(Please Dont compare me to FRIONPAN again!) :twisted:

Sorry Bluffy if i was harsh. Sometimes the General has a few to many but just seems like you where saying the Brits invented everything but dirt. :lol:

reiver
06-07-2005, 07:32 AM
british made the mp3 ? ,that`s important,i can`t live without it.
No, the MP3 format was developed by Fraunhofer IIS, a German
company.
I didn't say the British "made" the MP3 player.

Kane Kramer invented the technology behind the MP3 and founded the British Inventors Society


"Interviewed by Juliet Rix
Thursday September 30, 2004
The Guardian

You invented the MP3 player?
I came up with the idea of downloading music (and data and video) down telephone lines in 1979 when I was 23, and patented it. With James Campbell, who was 21, I developed a working prototype. We had orders worth £60m from the recording industry for our solid-state digital recorder when we lost control of the patent. There was a coup attempt within the company and we couldn't raise enough money to pay the patent fees in time. So the patent was voided. "




Let us instead look at a few of the meagre offerings the British made to the world, none of which, according to Ironman, were world changing.

Not forgetting Differential Calculus and both the programmable and non-programmable computer. Both of these (calculus

particularly) have far more earth shattering consequences than most of the items on your list.

Reiver, you have mistakenly claimed that many things are British inventions which are not. 24 of the 46 things you claim are British inventions are not British Inventions at all. That means over 50% of what you said is untrue! Man, that's a LOT of falicy right there. A couple of them are not inventions at all, but adaptations of someone else's invention. Here are those many things that you claimed to be British inventions, but are not:

You mean adaptations like the "Roman" arch?

Calculus
Like the jet engine, calculus was invented at the same time independantly by a German and a Brit.
Firstly, I didn't mention calculus.
Second, what's your point?
You agree a Brit invented it. So a German did too. And?

Anesthesia
"The first herbal anaesthesia was administered in prehistory. Opium and hemp were two of the most important herbs used.

They were ingested or burned and the smoke inhaled. Alcohol was also used, its vasodilatory properties being unknown. In China, Taoist medical practitioners developed anaesthesia by means of acupuncture. In South America preparations from datura, effectively scopolamine, were used as was coca. In Medieval Europe various preparations of mandrake were tried as was henbane (hyoscyamine)." - Wikipedia

Ancient man used anesthisia for surgury in several places around the world. What Henry Hill Hickman did was make a gas to be used as anesthisia. He came thousands of years too late to invent it for surgical
use.

James Simpson, an Edinburgh physician, was the first doctor to use anaesthetics to relieve the pain of surgery in the mid 19th Century. His main objective at the beginning was to alleviate the pain that women felt in childbirth. There was strong opposition to this idea from the Church, because the Old Testament claims that God's punishment to women for the sins of Eve was that they should bring forth children in pain. Fortunately for women everywhere, Simpson won this argument. I despise the recent trend in the USA for impressionable pregnant women to refuse any painkillers during delivery. Their fear of harming the baby with the drugs often means a longer birth and more trauma to the baby than a quick painless birth.

Antisepsis
Invented thousands of years ago in various places around the world. The ancient Norse, for example, used cow urine dried to a paste.
And you would consider that as a satisfactory antiseptic?
I wonder what your reaction would be if that was suggested during surgery.
Joseph Lister, Professor of surgery at Glasgow University, was the first to realize that the high post-operative mortality of his patients was due to the onset of bloodpoisoning (sepsis) caused by micro-organisms. Operating theatres were not the pristine places they are today. In the early 19th century, they were awash with blood and amputated body parts. In 1865 Lister found that carbolic acid was an effective antiseptic.
Portland Cement
Cement was invented by the Romans. Portland Cement is a derivative of that invention.

The arch was invented by Greeks and others.
According to you it's development was more important.

Iron as a Building Material
For crying out loud. That's not an invention. How about iron as a sword, or as a cauldron, or a tool. Inventions? Hardly. Those are adaptations. You claim a number of things are British inventions when they are only adaptations here.
And no. Using cast iron as a building material is not a development.
It was an innovation, as you well know.

Tubular Steel
For crying out loud. That's not an invention. It's an adaptation. Didn't the US company US Steel do that first anyway? There are other adaptations I am not even mentioning that you claim are inventions.

Sir William Fairbairn (1789 - 1874) was born in Kelso, in southern Scotland. An engineer, he developed the idea of using tubular steel, which was much stronger than solid steel, as a construction material.
Remember all those Roman developments you keep telling us are more important than the original ideas?


Bessemer Converter
This is an adaptation of the Swedish invention of the Blast Furnace, which made the Swedes the 1st people in Europe to make steel.

In October, 1855, Bessemer took out a patent for his process of rendering cast iron malleable by the introduction of air into the fluid metal to remove carbon. Bessemer's industrial process was similar to a Chinese method to refine iron into steel, developed in the second century BCE. They called this process the "hundred refinings method" since they repeated the process 100 times.

There's that word "patent" again.

Canning of Food
French confectioner Nicholas Appert developed a method of vacuum-sealing food inside glass jars. However, glass containers were unsuitable for transportation, and soon they had been replaced with cylindrical tin or steel cans (tin-openers were not to be invented for another thirty years - at first, soldiers either had to cut the cans open with bayonets or smash them open with rocks to get the food out!). The French Army began experimenting with issuing tinned foods to its soldiers, but the slow process of tinning foods and the even slower development stage, along with the difficulties of loading wooden wagons with tons of metal canisters, prevented the army from shipping large amounts around the Empire, and the war ended before the process could be perfected. A Brit adapted the process to larger containers and mass production.

Refrigeration
Oliver Evans (US) designed a refrigeration machine which ran on vapour in 1805. He is often called the inventor of the refrigerator.

The Electric Motor (1834)
Invented by blacksmith Thomas Davenport of Vermont, USA
http://www.memagazine.org/backissues/july99/features/blacksmith/blacksmith.html

Michael Faraday (1791-1867)
British physicist and chemist, best known for his discoveries of electromagnetic induction and of the laws of electrolysis. His biggest breakthrough in electricity was his invention of the electric motor.

First Pocket Calculator
The first pocket-sized calculator, the Bowmar 901B. Bowmar/ALI Inc., Acton, Massachusetts, U.S.A
http://www.vintagecalculators.com/html/bowmar.html



Fulminate Ignition
The Needle Gun, rifle named for its inventor, Nikolaus von Dreyse (Germany). It had a long, sharp firing pin designed to pierce the charge of propelling powder and strike the detonating material (usually mercury fulminate) located at the base of the bullet. The Dreyse rifle, invented between 1827 and 1829, was adopted by the Russian Army in 1848.

Forsyth, Alexander John , 1769–1843, Scottish inventor. He invented in 1807 the first workable percussion cap for the ignition of gunpowder in firearms. Forsyth refused an offer from Napoleon of £20,000 for the secret and was later pensioned by the British government.


Logarithms
Joost Bürgi, a Swiss clockmaker in the employ of the Duke of Hesse-Kassel, first conceived of logarithms.
"Conceived of"?

Although there is evidence that logarithms were known in 8th century India, their invention as an aid to calculation is attributed to a Scottish nobleman named John Napier (1550-1617) in his Mirifici logarithmorum canonis descriptio (1614) and Mirifici logarithmorum canonis constructio (published posthumously in 1619). In collaboration with Oxford professor Henry Briggs, Napier refined his logarithms by constructing tables for logarithms in base 10. Napier is also credited with creating one of the earliest calculating machines ("Napier's bones") and with the first systematic use of the decimal point.

The Orbits of Comets
First discovered by Thales of Miletus (635 BC - 543 BC), Greek philosopher
Thales of Miletus left no writings, indeed there is doubt if he ever made any.
I'd be fascinated to know where you find so much unarguable information on the man when he left no evidence behind.Abolition of Slavery
Conceptualized 1st by followers of Second Great Awakening, a great religious revival in United States
"Conceptualised"?
Now thinking about something makes it happen?
Come on, Ironman, even you can do better than this.
Legal System Utilised by all English-speaking Nations
Some English-speaking nations used Roman Law for centuries.

And they would be which?

Railway
The first horse tracked vehicles, drawn wagonways appeared in Greece, Malta, and parts of the Roman Empire at least 2000 years ago using cut-stone tracks. They began reappearing in Europe, from around 1550, usually operating with crude wooden tracks. In the late 18th century iron rails began to appear.

Yes, Ironman, I really overlooked those horse-drawn vehicles, didn't I?

Hovercraft
The first recorded design for a vehicle which could be termed a Hovercraft was in 1716 by Emanuel Swedenborg, a Swedish designer, philosopher and theologian.

And by the same standard of logic, DaVinci invented the helicopter.

"The hovercraft was invented by Christopher Cockerell in 1956. The theory behind one of the most successful inventions of the 20th century, the Hovercraft, was originally tested in 1955 using an empty KiteKat cat food tin inside a coffee tin, an industrial air blower and a pair of kitchen scales. Sir Christopher Cockerell developed the first practical hovercraft designs, these led to the first hovercraft to be produced commercially, the SRN1."

Television
The German student Paul Gottlieb Nipkow proposed and patented the first electromechanical television system in 1885. Nipkow's spinning disk design is credited with being the first television image rasterizer.

A fully electronic system was first demonstrated by Philo Taylor Farnsworth in the autumn of 1927. Farnsworth, a Mormon farm
boy from Rigby, Idaho, first envisioned his system at age 14. He discussed the idea with his high school chemistry teacher, who
could think of no reason why it would not work (Farnsworth would later credit this teacher, Justin Tolman, as providing key insights into his invention). He continued to pursue the idea at Brigham Young Academy (now Brigham Young University). At age 21, he demonstrated a working system at his own laboratory in San Francisco. His breakthrough freed television from reliance on spinning discs and other mechanical parts. All modern picture tube televisions descend directly from his design.

"John Logie Baird is the Scottish inventor who obtained the world's first real television picture in his laboratory in October, 1925, and demonstrated it to the British public on January 26, 1926. The image obtained was a small 30-line vertically-scanned red and black image, but it was television. Mechanical television based on Baird's systems dominated international television for the next few years into the early 30's"

Telephone
The very early history of the telephone is a confusing morass of claim and counterclaim, which was not clarified by the huge mass of lawsuits which hoped to resolve the patent claims of individuals. There was a lot of money involved, particularly in the Bell Telephone companies, and the aggressive defense of the Bell patents resulted in much confusion.

"Alexander Graham Bell is commonly, but incorrectly (see the discussion above), credited as the first inventor of the telephone." - Wikipedia

"In the 1870s, two inventors Elisha Gray and Alexander Graham Bell both independently designed devices that could transmit speech electrically (the telephone). Both men rushed their respective designs to the patent office within hours of each other, Alexander Graham Bell patented his telephone first. Elisha Gray and Alexander Graham Bell entered into a famous legal battle over the invention of the telephone, which Bell won."
There's that word patent again.

MP3 Format
Developed by Fraunhofer IIS, a German company.

First MP3 Player
"The world's first mass-produced hardware MP3 player was Saehan's MPMan, sold in Asia starting in the late spring of 1998. It was released in the United States as the Eiger Labs MPMan F10/F20 (two variants of the same device) in the summer of 1998."
http://reviews.cnet.com/4520-6450-5622055-1.html

See above.

World Wide Web
Co-invented by a Brit and Belgian Robert Cailliau

Come on leiver, don't peddle bullcrap, again. I don't know about the rest of you, but my advice is not to place much stock in the things reiver says. With a track record for spouting so much falicy, he can hardly be trusted.

And relax, dear boy, no one needs my warnings about your posts.

Walther
06-07-2005, 07:46 AM
Concerning calculus, please don´t forget Leibnitz, he developed the same ideas at about the same time as Newton. They were even in correspondence. Newton though applied his findings on physics.
AFAIK, the common used notation for a differential dx/dy comes from Leibnitz, Newton used a dot on top of the variable to notate the differential quotient.

Jan

Gen. Sandworm
06-07-2005, 08:19 AM
Concerning calculus, please don´t forget Leibnitz, he developed the same ideas at about the same time as Newton. They were even in correspondence. Newton though applied his findings on physics.
AFAIK, the common used notation for a differential dx/dy comes from Leibnitz, Newton used a dot on top of the variable to notate the differential quotient.

Jan

Actually Newton and Leibnitz didnt have much communication untill Leibnitz published his work. Many stared to give Leibnitz credit for developing a new math. This pissed Newton off something awful because he had came up with pretty much the same ideas about 7 or so years before but never published anything on it. Today most say that Newton and Leibnitz developed Calculus independently of each other.

Walther
06-07-2005, 08:35 AM
Well, as my father (who used to do both research and teaching in Palaeontology at Freie Universität Berlin) used to say:
Publish or Perrish!

Jan

IRONMAN
06-07-2005, 10:56 AM
America is Leading the World's Innovation. What American inventions do YOU use on a daily basis? ...

"Okay, so it's popular to hate America... but could you live without it? America is credited with many of the world's most important inventions and advances affecting the quality of human life. "Down with U.S.A.", you say... but are you willing to reject all things American?
Furthermore, it is laughable to witness the all-too-common scenario of the businessman, say from Europe or the Middle East, go into a rant on how America is the scourge of the planet and is destroying the quality of life through globalization, -- WHILE standing there holding an American made notebook computer, which he uses with his American made cell phone, to connect to an American satellite, to call his company's headquarters in America, which hired him because of his degree from an American University!

Hypocrisy at its best!

# If we're so greedy, why do you crave our money?
# If our culture's so base, why do you seek out our movies?
# If our people are so tacky, why do you hunger for our tourism?
# If our fast food is so passé, why do your countrymen rarely pass up going to a McDonald's?
# If our people are so stupid, why do your people seek out our universities?
# If we're so backwards, why do you buy our computers?
# If we're so unconcerned about the world, why did we commit $15 billion to wipe out AIDS in this world?
# And if we're so selfish, why are we always there when you need us?

Maybe it's just me, but I cannot -- for the life of me -- remember the last time I saw peasants in rickety boats, risking life and limb to come to your country. They risked it all to be in "this" country. Now, I'm not asking you to love us all days. But maybe think about us this Normandy anniversary day. Dead men do tell tales. Hear them.

Someone said I had a problem with foreigners. That’s not true. I just have a problem with lying and ungrateful ones."

http://www.usenvy.com/inventions.html

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
I can't stop laughing, my sides are hurting! It could not have been stated better.

Voluntary Escaper
06-07-2005, 11:07 AM
American inventions I don't use:

McDonald's! I don't want to end up a [email protected]

Guantanamo Bay! I wouldn't want to go there either as a detainee or a detainor!

The War on Terror! I handed my uniform in and am not playing anymore.

I think the list needs further investigation.

Is the Internet invention claim based on the discredited Al Gore story?
The calculator claim ignores the inventor of the slide rule and the Frenchman who invented a mechanical calculator.

Also, most of the devices are labour-saving and environment-polluting items suitable for [email protected] and geeks! :twisted:

IRONMAN
06-07-2005, 11:11 AM
American inventions I don't use:

McDonald's! I don't want to end up a [email protected]

Guantanamo Bay! I wouldn't want to go there either as a detainee or a detainor!

The War on Terror! I handed my uniform in and am not playing anymore.

I think the list needs further investigation.

Is the Internet invention claim based on the discredited Al Gore story?
The calculator claim ignores the inventor of the slide rule and the Frenchman who invented a mechanical calculator.

Also, most of the devices are labour-saving and environment-polluting items suitable for [email protected] and geeks! :twisted:


Look at the "brief" list below of American contributions to mankind and then begin working on excuses for your hypocrisy!:

Airplane
Air-conditioner
Alternating current generator
Audio / Magnetic recording
Bar code
Bra
Calculator
Cellular phone
Compact disc (CD-ROM)
Computer
Dishwasher
Electric motor
Email
Escalator
Ethernet (computer LAN, intranet)
Fiber optics
Flashlight
Gasoline
Internet
Kevlar
Laser
LCD (Liquid Crystal Display)
Lie detector / Polygraph
Light bulb
Metal detector
Microphone
Microwave oven / Discovered microwaves
Modem
Motion picture (movie)
MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)
Nuclear fission / Nuclear reactor
Nylon
Oil well
Phonograph / Record player
Plastic (celloid modern day plastic)
Quartz clocks / Wrist watch
Refrigerator
Robot
Smoke detector
Soda (soft drinks)
Space Shuttle
Stapler
Tape (masking, scotch, etc.)
Teflon
Telephone
Television
Television camera
Touch-screen technology
Tupperware
Video game
Video recorder
Video tape
Vulcanized rubber / Tire
Washing machine
Xerox (photocopy)
Zipper

Sturmtruppen
06-07-2005, 11:21 AM
well,you must admit america leads inventions, great britains has lots of years of history usa was declared independence in 1776 ,so,britain had more years.it`s like comparing civilizations with 300 years and a civilization of more than 1000 years.britain had lots of time for investigations,and it had the resources necesary from the beggining.

Walther
06-07-2005, 11:36 AM
Is the Internet invention claim based on the discredited Al Gore story?
The calculator claim ignores the inventor of the slide rule and the Frenchman who invented a mechanical calculator.

Also, most of the devices are labour-saving and environment-polluting items suitable for [email protected] and geeks! :twisted:


Look at the "brief" list below of American contributions to mankind and then begin working on excuses for your hypocrisy!:

Airplane
Air-conditioner
Alternating current generator
Audio / Magnetic recording
Bar code
Bra
Calculator
Cellular phone
Compact disc (CD-ROM)
Computer
Dishwasher
Electric motor
Email
Escalator
Ethernet (computer LAN, intranet)
Fiber optics
Flashlight
Gasoline
Internet
Kevlar
Laser
LCD (Liquid Crystal Display)
Lie detector / Polygraph
Light bulb
Metal detector
Microphone
Microwave oven / Discovered microwaves
Modem
Motion picture (movie)
MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)
Nuclear fission / Nuclear reactor
Nylon
Oil well
Phonograph / Record player
Plastic (celloid modern day plastic)
Quartz clocks / Wrist watch
Refrigerator
Robot
Smoke detector
Soda (soft drinks)
Space Shuttle
Stapler
Tape (masking, scotch, etc.)
Teflon
Telephone
Television
Television camera
Touch-screen technology
Tupperware
Video game
Video recorder
Video tape
Vulcanized rubber / Tire
Washing machine
Xerox (photocopy)
Zipper[/quote]

Ok,

The bra was already used by ancient Roman women.

While the basic structure of the internet is American (based on the ARPA net of the late 1960s), the World Wide Web and Hypertext protocol we are using daily and which brought the internet out of the domain of the geeks, was invented by scientists of the European High Energy physics research center CERN in Switzerland and made workable by British scientists.

The refrigerator was invented by the German engineer Linde, same as the air conditioner (they use the same cooling system)

The first real plastic (not a converted natural product as celluloid is), was Bakelite, an invention of the Belgian chemist Baekeland.

The metal detector was invented by a exile Polish Army Signals Officer in Britain during WW2 and first adopted by the British.

Magnetic recording was AFAIK invented in Germany during the 1930s.

The first electronic TV camera was build in Germany in 1936 by Telefunken and used during the Olympic games, using an invention by a Russian engineer (the ikonoskope tube as a detector). Previous electro mechanical TV cameras used the Nipkov disk invented by a Russian.

The electric motor was invented by Siemens in Germany.

Even the Wright brothers agreed that they built the first motorised aircraft based on research done by e.g. the Lilienthal brothers from Germany. After the first flight, the American public lost interest in aviation very fast, so much of airplane development, to make it a practical vehicle, was done in pre WW1 France, this is the reason why so many French words are being used in aviation, e.g. nacelle, empenage, aileron etc.

The Quartz clock was AFAIK a German invention.

Gasoline (as a petroleum destillate) was already wellknown long before.

The telephone has been credited to the German Philipp Reis, Graham Bell improved it and made it practical.

Nylon (Polyamide 6,6) was an American invention, Perlon, which is also a Polyamide with almost the same properties was invented in Germany. The difference is that the Americans used raw material made from oil, while the Germans used materials made from coal.

The first movie camera was actually invented by the Lumiere brothers in France, Edison had the better PR.

Oil wells were already drilled by the Chinese almost thousand years ago, but they didn´t have real use for the liquid.

The first washing machine was invented in 1767 by a guy called Jacop Christian Schäffern. Judging by his name I assume that he was either German or Austrian.

The idea of a Robot is Czech, where actually the name comes from (Robot = worker).

I don´t know enough about the other items to make statements in here.

Jan

Bladensburg
06-07-2005, 12:14 PM
Wasn't Vulcanised rubber invented bu a Scot called Dunlop?

The Abolitionist movement was active in Britain before 1776 so there is absolutely no way in Hell that it originated in the "United States". Indeed, cynical historians have pointed out that the first serious Anti-Slavery debates in Parliament in 1771 may well have contributed to the seccessionist movement in America. The idea of an Empire-wide restriction on slave keeping or trading must have seriously worried many "enlightened" Americans of the time.

The Swedes were NOT the first people in Europe to make steel - they may heve been the first to mass-produce it but not make it.


Iron as a Building Material
For crying out loud. That's not an invention. How about iron as a sword, or as a cauldron, or a tool. Inventions? Hardly. Those are adaptations. You claim a number of things are British inventions when they are only adaptations here.
And no. Using cast iron as a building material is not a development.
It was an innovation, as you well know.


I suggest you come and have a look at Ironbridge as I have several times. There was nothing like it anywhere in the world before, if that is not the definition of an invention God knows what is.

IRONMAN
06-07-2005, 12:24 PM
The bra was already used by ancient Roman women.

You mean the bustier, not the Brazzier.


While the basic structure of the internet is American...

OK, so it was an American invention then.


The refrigerator was invented by the German engineer Linde, same as the air conditioner (they use the same cooling system)

The refgriderator is not the same thing as an air conditioner. Nice try though.


The first real plastic (not a converted natural product as celluloid is), was Bakelite, an invention of the Belgian chemist Baekeland.

The first "real" plastic? :lol: Right. Sorry, it was American.


The metal detector was invented by a exile Polish Army Signals Officer in Britain during WW2 and first adopted by the British.

Invented by A&S Company, Santa Clara, CA


Magnetic recording was AFAIK invented in Germany during the 1930s.

Tape recorders are an invention. :lol: It was American.


The first electronic TV camera was build in Germany in 1936 by Telefunken and used during the Olympic games, using an invention by a Russian engineer (the ikonoskope tube as a detector). Previous electro mechanical TV cameras used the Nipkov disk invented by a Russian.

See my previous post. An American student did that first.


The electric motor was invented by Siemens in Germany.

See my previous post. An American blacksmith invented it.


Even the Wright brothers agreed that they built the first motorised aircraftIt was an American invention. Nice try.


The Quartz clock was AFAIK a German invention.

No, it was American. The quarts oscillator is what you refer to. That's not a clock.


Gasoline (as a petroleum destillate) was already wellknown long before.

Known by nobody before an American invented it. Are you thinking of kerosene perhaps?


The telephone has been credited to the German Philipp Reis, Graham Bell improved it and made it practical.

Nope. See my previous post. The inventors are many. Nobody can take credit for it.


Nylon (Polyamide 6,6) was an American invention

Right.


The first movie camera was actually invented by the Lumiere brothers in France, Edison had the better PR.

Bell and Howell you mean? :lol:


Oil wells were already drilled by the Chinese almost thousand years ago, but they didn´t have real use for the liquid.

They did not well oil. They found it coming out of the ground. Nice try.


The first washing machine was invented in 1767 by a guy called Jacop Christian Schäffern. Judging by his name I assume that he was either German or Austrian.

The First Washing Machines
The earliest manual washing machines imitated the motion of the human hand on the washboard, by using a lever to move one curved surface over another and rubbing clothes between two ribbed surfaces. This type of washer was first patented in the United States in 1846 and survived as late as 1927 in the Montgomery Ward catalogue.

It was an American invention.


The idea of a Robot is Czech, where actually the name comes from (Robot = worker).

He did not invent it. He only envisioned it. Nice try though.

Voluntary Escaper
06-07-2005, 12:45 PM
Airplane - a major pollutant and the scourge that delivers American tourists to civilised parts of the world!

Air-conditioner - for sweaty rednecks!

Alternating current generator - American my backside! Actually the first practical AC transformer was developed by Frenchman Lucien Gaulard and Englishman John Gibbs. Also, after studying alternating current for a number of years, Charles Steinmetz (German Pole) patented a "system of distribution by alternating current" (A/C power), on January 29, 1895.

Audio / Magnetic recording The first magnetic recording device was demonstrated and patented by the Danish inventor Valdemar Poulsen in 1898.

Bar code - for fat Americans at the Mall to load their shopping trolleys!

I shall continue later! :twisted:

Voluntary Escaper
06-07-2005, 12:47 PM
As the United States of America was a British invention, does that mean that the British Empire should take the credit? :shock:

Voluntary Escaper
06-07-2005, 12:48 PM
Yee hah! I've been promoted! Only 9 ranks below my ex-service rank! :wink:

Walther
06-07-2005, 01:21 PM
Refrigerator, A/C system, without Linde´s cooling machine they would both not work.

Electric motor, while Siemens made it practical, the principle was invented by Faraday in England and the first working rotastional motor was designed in Belgium by Zenobe Gramme from Belgium.

Celluloid is a converted natural product, cellulose from wood treated with nitric acid and disolved in acetone. After evaporation of the acetone it goes back into the cellulose nitrate state.

Bakelite is a group of fully artificial compounds made of phenol and formaldehyde, using various different catalysts, either acidic or alcalic, to create special properties.

Metal detector:
http://www.answers.com/topic/polish-mine-detector?hl=mine&hl=detector

Washing machine: An American might hold the first American patent on it, but before the begin of the 19th century, there was no real patent office. This doesn´t mean somebody did not invent it before. And the fname I gave is the first reference.
Or I could patent the wheel and claim that I invented it first.

AFIAK, Roman cement was rather burned limestone (lime mortar) and no the complex mix known today.


Jan

Walther
06-07-2005, 01:33 PM
TV camera, Zworkin, the guy who invented the Ikonoskop tube was a Russian born naturalised American. The first practical electronic TV camera was the German one built by Telefunken.
Even before, the first patent on TV was the German Paul Nipkow from 1885.

He built the first working electromechanical TV camera and a simple receiver, using his disk.
Braun from Germany invented the cathode ray tube, without which no TV set (except the modern LCD screens) would work.

And even the Weright brothers gave the sources of their research.
Following their flight the idea became forgotten in the US, else why would the US Army have to use French aircraft during WW1?

Jan

reiver
06-07-2005, 01:38 PM
Ironman wrote :
Maybe it's just me, but I cannot -- for the life of me -- remember the last time I saw peasants in rickety boats, risking life and limb to come to your country. They risked it all to be in "this" country.

Maybe if you read a little more widely you would have heard of Chinese dying in the back of lorries, trying to smuggle themselves into the UK.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/1325826.stm

Or the people trying to smuggle themselves to the UK by avoiding armed French police and negotiating razor wire to smuggle themselves on to cross-channel trains, again to the UK.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/1897296.stm

Many "peasants in rickety boats"also risk life and limb to get to Australia.

While America is unquestionably the destination of choice for many, it is not the only "Land of Opportunity".

reiver
06-07-2005, 01:44 PM
TV camera, Zworkin, the guy who invented the Ikonoskop tube was a Russian born naturalised American. The first practical electronic TV camera was the German one built by Telefunken.
Even before, the first patent on TV was the German Paul Nipkow from 1885.

He built the first working electromechanical TV camera and a simple receiver, using his disk.
Braun from Germany invented the cathode ray tube, without which no TV set (except the modern LCD screens) would work.

And even the Weright brothers gave the sources of their research.
Following their flight the idea became forgotten in the US, else why would the US Army have to use French aircraft during WW1?

Jan
And according to The A&S Company themselves:

In 1925, Gerhard Fischer invented a portable metal detector. Fischar's model was first sold commercially in 1931 and Gerherd Fischar was behind the first large-scale production of metal detectors.

According to the experts at A&S Company: "In the late 1920's, Dr.
Gerhard Fisher, the founder of Fisher Research Laboratory was commissioned as a research engineer with the Federal Telegraph Co. and Western Air Express to develop airborne direction finding equipment. He was awarded some of the first patents issued in the field of airborne direction finding by means of radio. In the course of his work, he encountered some strange errors and once he solved these problems, he had the foresight to apply the solution to a completely unrelated field, that of metal and mineral detection

Dr. Fischer had immigrated to the United States after studying electronics at the University of Dresden.

Voluntary Escaper
06-07-2005, 03:01 PM
Maybe it's just me, but I cannot -- for the life of me -- remember the last time I saw peasants in rickety boats, risking life and limb to come to your country. They risked it all to be in "this" country.

As I recall, the last time that happened was the Vietnamese Boat People, who indeed sailed to the US - because the US had trashed their own country in a misbegotten war from which they have learned no lessons! :twisted:

Bluffcove
06-07-2005, 03:13 PM
You mean the bustier, not the Brazzier.

Brazzier? That is a posh restaraunt, do you not have any high class eating establishments in Hicksville?

How would you know about Bras anyway? Training bras are hardly something to be proud of stockpiling?

Tubbyboy - take the piss would you!!!

Cuts
06-07-2005, 03:18 PM
Wasn't fibre optics invented by a Dutchman ?

I seem to recall the name Abraham van Heel in the early fifties. Anyone heard of him ?

Iron Yeoman
06-07-2005, 03:25 PM
Brazzier? That is a posh restaraunt, do you not have any high class eating establishments in Hicksville?


I believe they have the 'Restaurant de Roadkill' serving the finest armadillo a la orange and racoon in source bernaise.

Cuts
06-07-2005, 03:41 PM
Brazzier? That is a posh restaraunt, do you not have any high class eating establishments in Hicksville?


I believe they have the 'Restaurant de Roadkill' serving the finest armadillo a la orange and racoon in source bernaise.

But is it as good as the "Is This The Way to Armadillo" video (qv) ?

Voluntary Escaper
06-07-2005, 03:48 PM
I believe they have the 'Restaurant de Roadkill' serving the finest armadillo a la orange and racoon in source bernaise.

Ahh yes. You can tell the more tender meat by the more numerous tyre marks....

IRONMAN
06-07-2005, 05:48 PM
I's love to debate with you guys, but i can't today. My dog died today. He was a beautiful Chocolate Labradore Retriever. The smartest dog I've ever seen. There was no trick you could not teach him in 5 minutes flat. He was the most loving dog. I accidentally killed him. I put some poison for rats down behind his feeder house and after working so hard to do some engineering work for him in the yard, I forgot to put the cinder blocks back between his house and the feeder house. This allowed him to get to the poison. I'm 43 years old and I cried like a small child today. I feel completely empty inside. Maybe I'll be back to post sometime. Till then, you guys take care.

His name was Snapper, but we called him "Snap Snap".

Sturmtruppen
06-07-2005, 05:51 PM
I's love to debate with you guys, but i can't today. My dog died today. He was a beautiful Chocolate Labradore Retriever. The smartest dog I've ever seen. There was no trick you could not teach him in 5 minutes flat. He was the most loving dog. I accidentally killed him. I put some poison for rats down behind his feeder house and after working so hard to do some engineering work for him in the yard, I forgot to put the cinder blocks back between his house and the feeder house. This allowed him to get to the poison. I'm 43 years old and I cried like a small child today. I feel completely empty inside. Maybe I'll be back to post sometime. Till then, you guys take care.

His name was Snapper, but we called him "Snap Snap".

:( :( so sorry ironman my apologies.

Sturmtruppen
06-07-2005, 05:58 PM
guys,please don`t fight,just debate like normal men,ironman,i understand you,take your time to feel better,we will be waiting for new debates..
you must know that your dog is in a better place.

Bluffcove
06-07-2005, 06:07 PM
Bad luck mate, my cousin is a taxidermist I can give you the address if you want, Postage and packing will be free.

RIP - Snap Snap.

I have composed a limeric in his "honor"

There once was a dog called snapper
he ate poison to try and get fatter
the poison killed him
I guess now he is thin
that poor old dog they called snapper

Im not much good at limericks.

Man of Stoat
06-07-2005, 07:09 PM
Percussion ignition was invented by a Brit called Forsyth, who patented it in 1807. The Dreyse needle-rifle was the first militarily practical breech-loading rifle using a self-contained cartridge, an invention in itself which would not have been possible without Forsyth's invention. Alledgedly they're rather scary to fire, since there's sod all obturation & gas therefore escapes at the breech.

Sid the Sexist
06-07-2005, 07:21 PM
There was no trick you could not teach him in 5 minutes flat

Apart from the trick of not eating poison presumably ?

Dogs are slobbering morons, get used to it :D

Cuts
06-07-2005, 07:30 PM
Apart from the trick of not eating poison presumably ?

Dogs are slobbering morons, get used to it :D

Unfortunately dogs do tend to do that.

A moronic neighbour set rat poison out, but decided the laws relating to 'approved poison containers' weren't applicable to him.

Took a week of nursing the hound before it recovered & now it won't go near anything with a similar colour to the poison.


The neighbour was taught the error of his ways too...

trev
06-08-2005, 01:03 AM
IRONMAN

Rat poison takes a few days to kill large animals; its quite simple for a veterinary surgeon to administer the antidote for the particular poison, all that’s required is a sample or the original container.

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 01:54 AM
Erwin, Bluffcove, Trev, your kindness is appreciated. Thank you. He was left alone for 2 days with his automatic feeder and waterer. He had been left alone that way more than once and there was never a problem, but when I came back, he had eaten the poison long before, and was on the virge of death. It was too late. When you love a pet very much, it's hard to take.

Sid, your comment tell me that you are a worthless, heartless, insensitive person. Anyone who can make such a comment when someone is heartbroken is over such a loss is very lowly. Cuts, your commnet implies that you think I am moronic, and under the circumstances, that is pretty pathetic too. It was a trajic oversight, but it was not the result of being a moron. I am not a moron, but in fact very intelligent with a high IQ. Your insensitivity reveals your character. I had not planned on posting anything more about it, and I don't want to discuss it again, but having read those comments I could not help myself.

trev
06-08-2005, 02:30 AM
So you freely admit that you left a large dog alone for 2 days, without noticing that the poor dog had eaten rat poison, in my book that’s irresponsible ownership.
Did you not consider putting the dog in kennels while you went away?
Over here in the UK you would more than likely be prosecuted for cruelty to animals and neglect. Via the RSPCA.
Sorry to say it but people who leave their pets at home without taking sufficient steps to ensure their well-being should not have animals.
TOTALLY DISGUSTED.

Cuts
06-08-2005, 03:05 AM
......

Cuts, your commnet implies that you think I am moronic, and under the circumstances, that is pretty pathetic too. It was a trajic oversight, but it was not the result of being a moron. I am not a moron, but in fact very intelligent with a high IQ. Your insensitivity reveals your character. I had not planned on posting anything more about it, and I don't want to discuss it again, but having read those comments I could not help myself.

Once again you read a post with your own preconceived ideas in place.

You really should open your blinkered eyes and comment on what is actualy written rather than what you want to see.

My post was about dogs and the actions of a none-too-bright neighbour.
I don't know what your local laws are in regard to the use and placing of poisons but I do know what they are here.

You say that I implied you are a moron, I have made no such accusation or implication.
I know neither your IQ nor indeed if you have felt the need to have it assessed.
However I now believe you do have some sort of psychological problem as you are incapable of replying to certain posters without feebly attempting to denigrate them.

Your comment to me says more about your paranoia than your extremely stilted reading of mine says about my character.

I will now be passing on all your posts to the AMS trickcyclists and will await their assessment with interest.

South African Military
06-08-2005, 05:09 AM
South African Inventions

Listed here is some of the Major South African inventions. Who could of thought such a country could change the world so much?


Speed Gun-Henri Johnson

Pratley Putty (Famous glue that held pieces of the Apollo XI together-It went to the moon!!!!)-George Pratley

CAT scan- Allan Cormack and Godfrey Hounsfield (They got a Nobel Prize)

The Heart Transplant- Dr Chris Barnard

Oil from Coal- South Africa.

Dolos (Those wierd shaped conrete blocks weighing ten tons to protect harbors. Im sure everyone here has seen one. )-Aubrey Kruger

http://www.mieliestronk.com/dolos2.jpg

APS therapy-Gervan Lubbe

Exhaust system-(Please fill)

And more...

Cuts
06-08-2005, 05:41 AM
South African Inventions

Listed here is some of the Major South African inventions. Who could of thought such a country could change the world so much?


Speed Gun-Henri Johnson

Pratley Putty (Famous glue that held pieces of the Apollo XI together-It went to the moon!!!!)-George Pratley

CAT scan- Allan Cormack and Godfrey Hounsfield (They got a Nobel Prize)

The Heart Transplant- Dr Chris Barnard

Oil from Coal- South Africa.

Dolos (Those wierd shaped conrete blocks weighing ten tons to protect harbors. Im sure everyone here has seen one. )-Aubrey Kruger

http://www.mieliestronk.com/dolos2.jpg

APS therapy-Gervan Lubbe

Exhaust system-(Please fill)

And more...

ZA also carried out the world's first penis extension - on a Taiwanese chap.
His wife looked most pleased !

Walther
06-08-2005, 06:35 AM
South African Inventions

Listed here is some of the Major South African inventions. Who could of thought such a country could change the world so much?


Oil from Coal- South Africa.

And more...

Ahem,

Ever heard of the Bergius process (developed 1913 in Germany) or the Fischer-Tropsch process (developed 1925, also in Germany) for making petrol out of coal?

Coal is Germany´s most abundand natural energy resource, while we have very little oil, so Germany´s chemical industry concentrated for a long time on manufacturing oil out of localy mined coal, especially during war time.
German coal only became uneconomical in the 1970s, when imported coal from e.g. Australia or China became cheaper. The reason is that while German coal is of good quality, the coal seams, especially in the Ruhr area, are up to 800 meters underground and are only up to 3-4 meter thick. Australian can be dug up using strip mining technologies, since the seams are only covered by e.g. 50 meters of dirt, and the thickness of the seams is up to 20 meters, so instead of high tech mining. like in Germany, they can use ordinary diggers to get it. The Chinese on the other hand don´t bother about safety for their miners and they get paid third world wages, due to this, up to now, Chinese and Australian coal is, even included the transport, cheaper than German coal. Currently there are only 10 active coal mines left in the Ruhr area, in the 1950s there were hundreds.
There is a change coming though:
There is still a lot of steel industry in the Ruhr area, which requires coke for smelting the iron. In the past the steel mills were often built beside coal mines and had their own coke plants. In the 80s, the managers closed the coke plants, since the Chinese could supply coke at a lower price than localy manufactured coke.
But now the Chinese are catching up on steel manufacture for their own market and refuse to export coke. This drove steel prices in Germany up and there are thoughts now to reopen some coal mines and to build new state of the art coke plants. This shows the dangers of making your economy too dependend on some other country.

German chemical industry was always coal centered (as seen with the Nylon versus Perlon).

Jan

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 09:57 AM
So you freely admit that you left a large dog alone for 2 days, without noticing that the poor dog had eaten rat poison, in my book that’s irresponsible ownership.
Did you not consider putting the dog in kennels while you went away?
Over here in the UK you would more than likely be prosecuted for cruelty to animals and neglect. Via the RSPCA.
Sorry to say it but people who leave their pets at home without taking sufficient steps to ensure their well-being should not have animals.
TOTALLY DISGUSTED.
Without noticing? I was not even home. I could not notice. The dog had an automatic feeder and waterer in a huge wooden box that I built myself AND a dog house made of very expensive treated wood with a shingled roof as well, in a larger fenced yard that was mostly shaded by numerous large trees regardless of the time of day! The dog was EXTREMELY well cared for. He was spoiled rotten in fact, and was a house dog for the most part. You don't know what you are talking about when you suggest that neglect was involved. His condition was one that was quite the oposite of neglected. I doubt you ever knew a pet that was as well cared for as he! Just the other day, I was brushing his teeth to remove a spot of tartar on them after giving him a flea & tick shampoo, which he received regularly!

You have accuse without understanding how well he was cared for and how pampered his condition was. There was no neglect involved. He was never neglected for 1 second. It was simply a trajic accident. I hope now you understand that your accusation was in error.


If I thought your dog had really died then I might have commiserated, but as you have proven yourself to be a pathological liar I just don't believe anything you write.
If you suggested the sky was blue I'd go outside and look up to check :D
I know this much. You never owned a pet that was as loved or pampered as mine was. Someone as shallow as you could not care for an animal the way mine was cared for. That much is certain. Anyone that tosses insults at a person about how they supposedly cared poorly for their beloved pet which has just died ranks very low in the scheme of things.


I will now be passing on all your posts to the AMS trickcyclists and will await their assessment with interest.
Like I give a crap? I see that you rely on others for your opinions. They will form an opinion based on very limited facts and provide you with an "assesment" that supports your half-informed mind. That is perfect for you. It was however, inconsiderate to say what you said in light of the terrible thing which had occurred, and that revealed your true character. You're about 2 steps down the ladder from being the kind of person that I am. You have made that clear to me.

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 10:45 AM
Alternating current generator - American my backside! Actually the first practical AC transformer was developed by Frenchman Lucien Gaulard and Englishman John Gibbs. Also, after studying alternating current for a number of years, Charles Steinmetz (German Pole) patented a "system of distribution by alternating current" (A/C power), on January 29, 1895.

Sorry, but AC current generator was invented by an American...

"On 20 March 1886 William Stanley provided alternating current electrification to offices and stores on Main Street in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He thus demonstrated the first practical system for providing electrical illumination using alternating current with transformers to adjust voltage levels of the distribution system."
http://www.ieee.org/organizations/history_center/stanley.html

FW-190 Pilot
06-08-2005, 11:56 AM
interesting fact about the word robot is not invented by americans, instead they mean "force to work" in czech republic language
btw, delete a whole bunch of post to aviod flame war again

Voluntary Escaper
06-08-2005, 02:52 PM
Erwin, Bluffcove, Trev, your kindness is appreciated. Thank you. He was left alone for 2 days with his automatic feeder and waterer.

Any loss of a pet is tragic and deserves sympathy.

However, I must take issue with the idea of leaving a dog alone for 2 days. I have a rescued dog that was locked up for days on end by a previous owner. We just got back from taking it for a 90 minute walk on a summer evening, and the dog still wanted more. I feel bad about leaving the beast for even a morning or an afternoon!

Leaving a social animal such as a dog alone for 2 days is psychological cruelty. :evil:

Voluntary Escaper
06-08-2005, 02:54 PM
"On 20 March 1886 William Stanley provided alternating current electrification to offices and stores on Main Street in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He thus demonstrated the first practical system for providing electrical illumination using alternating current with transformers to adjust voltage levels of the distribution system."


In 1882, Goulard and his English colleague Gibbs patented a system of distributing power using alternating current and two-coil induction devices. They used devices (then known as secondary generators) of the Ruhmkorff type in the first alternating current distribution system and had a 1:1 ratio and were used with their primaries in series.

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 03:08 PM
Erwin, Bluffcove, Trev, your kindness is appreciated. Thank you. He was left alone for 2 days with his automatic feeder and waterer.

Any loss of a pet is tragic and deserves sympathy.

However, I must take issue with the idea of leaving a dog alone for 2 days. I have a rescued dog that was locked up for days on end by a previous owner. We just got back from taking it for a 90 minute walk on a summer evening, and the dog still wanted more. I feel bad about leaving the beast for even a morning or an afternoon!

Leaving a social animal such as a dog alone for 2 days is psychological cruelty. :evil:

Not at all. It was done rarely and the dog had every ammentiy. He never wanted for anything. As for walks, he was walked daily and brought into the house to be played with, petted, fed, cared for, and to just lie around at our feet being sweet-talked.

Voluntary Escaper
06-08-2005, 03:14 PM
Leaving a social animal such as a dog alone for 2 days is psychological cruelty.


It was done rarely

Doesn't matter. My dog either goes in kennels or with relations if it is to be left alone for more than 8 hours.

Check with the ASPCA:


Every dog needs daily exercise for mental and physical stimulation.

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 03:19 PM
"On 20 March 1886 William Stanley provided alternating current electrification to offices and stores on Main Street in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He thus demonstrated the first practical system for providing electrical illumination using alternating current with transformers to adjust voltage levels of the distribution system."


In 1882, Goulard and his English colleague Gibbs patented a system of distributing power using alternating current and two-coil induction devices. They used devices (then known as secondary generators) of the Ruhmkorff type in the first alternating current distribution system and had a 1:1 ratio and were used with their primaries in series.

"Lucien Gaulard (1850 - November 26, 1888) invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy. Gaulard was born in Paris, France. A power transformer developed by Gaulard of France.."

Appearently, the invention of an alternating current generator is French, not British or American!

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 03:22 PM
Doesn't matter. My dog either goes in kennels or with relations if it is to be left alone for more than 8 hours.

Check with the ASPCA:


Every dog needs daily exercise for mental and physical stimulation.

How nice for you. The dog never wanted for anything and was provided everything he needed. He was better cared for and more time was spent with him than the vast majority of pets anywhere. Your assumption is falicy.

As I have told you, you idiot, the dog got more excersize and stimulation than the vast majority of pets. Read that again and again until it sinks into your skinny noodle.

Voluntary Escaper
06-08-2005, 03:23 PM
Every dog needs daily exercise for mental and physical stimulation.

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 03:23 PM
Every dog needs daily exercise for mental and physical stimulation.

As I have told you, you idiot, the dog got more excersize and stimulation than the vast majority of pets on a daily basis. Read that again and again until it sinks into your skinny noodle. :roll:

reiver
06-08-2005, 03:32 PM
"On 20 March 1886 William Stanley provided alternating current electrification to offices and stores on Main Street in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. He thus demonstrated the first practical system for providing electrical illumination using alternating current with transformers to adjust voltage levels of the distribution system."


In 1882, Goulard and his English colleague Gibbs patented a system of distributing power using alternating current and two-coil induction devices. They used devices (then known as secondary generators) of the Ruhmkorff type in the first alternating current distribution system and had a 1:1 ratio and were used with their primaries in series.

"Lucien Gaulard (1850 - November 26, 1888) invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy. Gaulard was born in Paris, France. A power transformer developed by Gaulard of France.."

Appearently, the invention of an alternating current generator is French, not British or American!

Selective editing again, Ironman?

The above paragraph, in full reads :
Lucien Gaulard (1850 - November 26, 1888) invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy. Gaulard was born in Paris, France.

A power transformer developed by Gaulard of France and John Gibbs of England was demonstrated in London, and attracted the interest of Westinghouse. Gaulard and John Gibbs , first exhibited a device in London in 1881 and then sold the idea to American company Westinghouse. They also exhibited the invention in Turin in 1884, where it was adopted for an electric lighting system.
(My bold letters)
http://www.physicsdaily.com/physics/Lucien_Gaulard

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 03:40 PM
The above paragraph, in full reads :
Lucien Gaulard (1850 - November 26, 1888) invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy. Gaulard was born in Paris, France.

A power transformer developed by Gaulard of France and John Gibbs of England was demonstrated in London, and attracted the interest of Westinghouse. Gaulard and John Gibbs , first exhibited a device in London in 1881 and then sold the idea to American company Westinghouse. They also exhibited the invention in Turin in 1884, where it was adopted for an electric lighting system.
(My bold letters)
http://www.physicsdaily.com/physics/Lucien_Gaulard

"Lucien Gaulard (1850 - November 26, 1888) invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy. Gaulard was born in Paris, France."

...and the paragraph states that a Frenchman invented it. Stiffle yourself!

reiver
06-08-2005, 03:48 PM
The above paragraph, in full reads :
Lucien Gaulard (1850 - November 26, 1888) invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy. Gaulard was born in Paris, France.

A power transformer developed by Gaulard of France and John Gibbs of England was demonstrated in London, and attracted the interest of Westinghouse. Gaulard and John Gibbs , first exhibited a device in London in 1881 and then sold the idea to American company Westinghouse. They also exhibited the invention in Turin in 1884, where it was adopted for an electric lighting system.
(My bold letters)
http://www.physicsdaily.com/physics/Lucien_Gaulard

"Lucien Gaulard (1850 - November 26, 1888) invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy. Gaulard was born in Paris, France."


...and the paragraph states that a Frenchman invented it. Stiffle yourself!

Don't be a complete idiot Ironman.
It was patented by both men.
Does stiffle mean the same as stifle?

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 04:22 PM
The above paragraph, in full reads :
Lucien Gaulard (1850 - November 26, 1888) invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy. Gaulard was born in Paris, France.

A power transformer developed by Gaulard of France and John Gibbs of England was demonstrated in London, and attracted the interest of Westinghouse. Gaulard and John Gibbs , first exhibited a device in London in 1881 and then sold the idea to American company Westinghouse. They also exhibited the invention in Turin in 1884, where it was adopted for an electric lighting system.
(My bold letters)
http://www.physicsdaily.com/physics/Lucien_Gaulard

"Lucien Gaulard (1850 - November 26, 1888) invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy. Gaulard was born in Paris, France."


...and the paragraph states that a Frenchman invented it. Stiffle yourself!

Don't be a complete idiot Ironman.
It was patented by both men.
Does stiffle mean the same as stifle?

A ptent does not mean invented. It was invented by the Frenchman, and the article quotes states so.

Read it again for your skinny noodle:

"Lucien Gaulard (1850 - November 26, 1888) invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy. Gaulard was born in Paris, France."

Silly boy. :lol:

reiver
06-08-2005, 04:29 PM
The above paragraph, in full reads :
Lucien Gaulard (1850 - November 26, 1888) invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy. Gaulard was born in Paris, France.

A power transformer developed by Gaulard of France and John Gibbs of England was demonstrated in London, and attracted the interest of Westinghouse. Gaulard and John Gibbs , first exhibited a device in London in 1881 and then sold the idea to American company Westinghouse. They also exhibited the invention in Turin in 1884, where it was adopted for an electric lighting system.
(My bold letters)
http://www.physicsdaily.com/physics/Lucien_Gaulard

"Lucien Gaulard (1850 - November 26, 1888) invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy. Gaulard was born in Paris, France."


...and the paragraph states that a Frenchman invented it. Stiffle yourself!

Don't be a complete idiot Ironman.
It was patented by both men.
Does stiffle mean the same as stifle?

A ptent does not mean invented. It was invented by the Frenchman, and the article quotes states so.

Read it again for your skinny noodle:

"Lucien Gaulard (1850 - November 26, 1888) invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy. Gaulard was born in Paris, France."

Silly boy. :lol:

Ahhhh, it becomes so clear when you explain it, dear boy.
The Frenchman invented it, and let the Englishman have a share in the patent out of the goodness of his heart.
How selfless.

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 04:32 PM
Ahhhh, it becomes so clear when you explain it, dear boy.
The Frenchman invented it, and let the Englishman have a share in the patent out of the goodness of his heart.
How selfless.
So, it wasn't a British invention then. Correct.

Voluntary Escaper
06-08-2005, 04:34 PM
As the poster of the French/English AC invention message, I don't recall claiming it was a British invention.

reiver
06-08-2005, 04:37 PM
Ahhhh, it becomes so clear when you explain it, dear boy.
The Frenchman invented it, and let the Englishman have a share in the patent out of the goodness of his heart.
How selfless.
So, it wasn't a British invention then. Correct.

Actually, dear boy, you have me confused with someone else again.
I never suggested it was, I merely picked up on your selective editing of quotes.
The only electrical devices I mentioned as British inventions were the electro-magnet and the electric motor.
As for the transformer you seem so concerned with, it appears to have been a joint venture, wouldn't you say?

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 04:54 PM
Ahhhh, it becomes so clear when you explain it, dear boy.
The Frenchman invented it, and let the Englishman have a share in the patent out of the goodness of his heart.
How selfless.
So, it wasn't a British invention then. Correct.

Actually, dear boy, you have me confused with someone else again.
I never suggested it was, I merely picked up on your selective editing of quotes.
The only electrical devices I mentioned as British inventions were the electro-magnet and the electric motor.
As for the transformer you seem so concerned with, it appears to have been a joint venture, wouldn't you say?

No, since the encyclopedia says the Frenchman inventred it. Silly boy.

reiver
06-08-2005, 04:56 PM
Ahhhh, it becomes so clear when you explain it, dear boy.
The Frenchman invented it, and let the Englishman have a share in the patent out of the goodness of his heart.
How selfless.
So, it wasn't a British invention then. Correct.

Actually, dear boy, you have me confused with someone else again.
I never suggested it was, I merely picked up on your selective editing of quotes.
The only electrical devices I mentioned as British inventions were the electro-magnet and the electric motor.
As for the transformer you seem so concerned with, it appears to have been a joint venture, wouldn't you say?

No, since the encyclopedia says the Frenchman inventred it. Silly boy.

Actually, dear child, it doesn't.
It says "invented devices for the transmission of alternating current electrical energy".
Where does this refer to the patented transformer?

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 04:57 PM
As the poster of the French/English AC invention message, I don't recall claiming it was a British invention.

No, the encyclopedia and scientific world credit the Frenchman for inventing it.

Oh, and your signature displays your ignorance and lack of worth. If it was intended to upset me, it fails. It only shows me how insensitive, ignorant, and deperate you are to pass along the abuse you received as a child. :lol:

reiver
06-08-2005, 05:00 PM
As the poster of the French/English AC invention message, I don't recall claiming it was a British invention.

No, the encyclopedia and scientific world credit the Frenchman for inventing it.

Oh, and your signature displays your ignorance and lack of worth. If it was intended to upset me, it fails. It only shows me how insensitive, ignorant, and deperate you are to pass along the abuse you received as a child. :lol:

LMAO

reiver
06-08-2005, 05:18 PM
As the poster of the French/English AC invention message, I don't recall claiming it was a British invention.

No, the encyclopedia and scientific world credit the Frenchman for inventing it.

Oh, and your signature displays your ignorance and lack of worth. If it was intended to upset me, it fails. It only shows me how insensitive, ignorant, and deperate you are to pass along the abuse you received as a child. :lol:

LMAO

VE, the laughter was in no way aimed at you.
Just a random thought about some previous threads.

Voluntary Escaper
06-08-2005, 05:35 PM
VE, the laughter was in no way aimed at you.
Just a random thought about some previous threads

Please feel free to laugh at me or anyone/thing else! :D 'Tis a free world after all...

As for Ironman, may I state that I regret the passing of your dog and extend my sympathies. I reiterate my animal welfare concerns once more and leave it at that. I will retain the first part of your chastening remark for my own use in my signature block.

Now I may sleep!

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 05:46 PM
VE, the laughter was in no way aimed at you.
Just a random thought about some previous threads

Please feel free to laugh at me or anyone/thing else! :D 'Tis a free world after all...

As for Ironman, may I state that I regret the passing of your dog and extend my sympathies. I reiterate my animal welfare concerns once more and leave it at that. I will retain the first part of your chastening remark for my own use in my signature block.

Now I may sleep!

Your animal welface concerns are unwarranted, as has been explaind to you. The fact that you keep bringing it up bespeaks of your true character.

Sturmtruppen
06-08-2005, 05:57 PM
please,don`t make comments about ironmans dog,we musn`t be agressive.
we must think that could happen to us.
ironman,feel free to insult or say anything you want,because you aren`t obligated to tolerate insults like this.

you must know that your dog is in a better place like i said,snap-snap wants to see you happy.

again,my apologizes.

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 06:05 PM
please,don`t make comments about ironmans dog,we musn`t be agressive.
we must think that could happen to us.
ironman,feel free to insult or say anything you want,because you aren`t obligated to tolerate insults like this.

you must know that your dog is in a better place like i said,snap-snap wants to see you happy.

again,my apologizes.

A true gentleman.

Sturmtruppen
06-08-2005, 06:15 PM
please,don`t make comments about ironmans dog,we musn`t be agressive.
we must think that could happen to us.
ironman,feel free to insult or say anything you want,because you aren`t obligated to tolerate insults like this.

you must know that your dog is in a better place like i said,snap-snap wants to see you happy.

again,my apologizes.

A true gentleman.
muchas gracias señor

Cuts
06-08-2005, 06:18 PM
......

It was however, inconsiderate to say what you said in light of the terrible thing which had occurred, and that revealed your true character. You're about 2 steps down the ladder from being the kind of person that I am. You have made that clear to me.

It was inconsiderate of me, in the light of the passing of your own dog by poison, to mention that someone else had laid poison in an illegal manner which had affected mine ?

Do you have any idea of the meaning of the words you use ?
Please purchase a dictionary. Webster's Unabridged will do, they are freely available in the United States.

Your opinion of where I may or may not be on your 'ladder' is of no consequence to me, especially as it comes from the same source as your knowledge of military firearms, ie your fantasy.

If you wish to be taken with a modicum of of seriousness on this site you should get that chip off of your shoulder and read what is actually written by posters, rather than putting your own slant into other people's words.

IRONMAN
06-08-2005, 06:55 PM
......

It was however, inconsiderate to say what you said in light of the terrible thing which had occurred, and that revealed your true character. You're about 2 steps down the ladder from being the kind of person that I am. You have made that clear to me.

It was inconsiderate of me, in the light of the passing of your own dog by poison, to mention that someone else had laid poison in an illegal manner which had affected mine ?

Do you have any idea of the meaning of the words you use ?
Please purchase a dictionary. Webster's Unabridged will do, they are freely available in the United States.

Your opinion of where I may or may not be on your 'ladder' is of no consequence to me, especially as it comes from the same source as your knowledge of military firearms, ie your fantasy.

If you wish to be taken with a modicum of of seriousness on this site you should get that chip off of your shoulder and read what is actually written by posters, rather than putting your own slant into other people's words.

Your inconsideration allows you to not see the inconsiderate quality of it.
Please, let's not discuss my dog anymore. I have asked you guys not to, since it is a very personal thing that I bear. It does not serve anyone to bring it up. If anyone wants to criticize me or something I say, be descent enough to leave my dead dog out of it.

Gen. Sandworm
06-08-2005, 07:11 PM
Enough about the dog. Drop it already........ everyone. Goddamn like a bunch of kids. :roll:

Sturmtruppen
06-08-2005, 07:12 PM
yes general,thanks

Bluffcove
06-09-2005, 09:51 AM
Bluffcove was stating how he doesnt want to talk about your dog and more coz he just loves listening to the mods. He also says that we should drop the subject of IRONMAN's dog.

Edited by Gen. Sandworm

Bluffcove
06-09-2005, 10:03 AM
hear hear!

Sandworm was just saying he wants me to be a mod! because he feels im an upstanding citizen :twisted:

Gen. Sandworm
06-09-2005, 10:13 AM
hear hear!

Sandworm was just saying he wants me to be a mod! because he feels im an upstanding citizen :twisted:

Uh no I didnt................your not trying to start a war with a mod are you???? Coz that would be pretty dumb.

FW-190 Pilot
06-27-2005, 02:56 AM
chinese invention
paper, firepowder, rockets
one of the first country to use gernades