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FW-190 Pilot
04-19-2005, 08:57 PM
canadian has send a lot of troops and resource to the war too, their nickname during the war is something like "world's factory"
if you have some info about canadian military, please post it in here thanks

RighteousDuncan
04-19-2005, 09:07 PM
Source http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:tIfKTr2SracJ:www.around.ntl.sympati co.ca/~toby/ww2.html+canadian+effort+in+ww2&hl=en&client=firefox-a

This is pretty accurate stuff, I checked it with some other sources, enjoy mate!
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World War Two
'The Truly Global Conflict'
1939 - 1945

A Canada of 12 million people put 1.1 million citizens into uniform during WWII.
France Crumbles

For a full year, from June 1940 when France fell until June 1941 when the Germans invaded Russia, Canada was the second largest power in the struggle against Hitler's Europe.

After the evacuation at Dunkirk and while Paris was enduring its short-lived siege, a Canadian and a Scottish division were sent to Normandy (Brest) and penetrated 200 miles inland toward Paris before they heard that Paris had fallen and France had capitulated. They retreated and re-embarked for England, and that was a good thing. At this stage of the war, the Germans would probably have destroyed them.

At the same time as the Canadian 1st division landed in Brest, the Canadian 242 Squadron (Douglas Bader's squadron) of the RAF flew their Hurricanes to Nantes (100 miles south-east) and set up there to provide air cover.

After the fall of France, the 1st Canadian Division was the only mobile, armed and fully manned ground division in all of the British Isles, and defence against a German invasion might have fallen squa

rely on it.
Canada - Arsenal to the War Effort

Canadian war factories were safe from bombing. Canada became an arsenal, and was Britain's chief overseas supplier of war materiel.

Canada did not accept American Lend-Lease aid. Actually Canada ran its own lend-lease program for its allies called "Mutual Aid", supplying its allies with four billion dollars worth of war materiel. A further credit of a billion dollars was given to Britain.
Battle of Britain

About 104 Canadian pilots flew in the Battle of Britain (August-October 1940), some of them in the all-Canadian R.A.F. 242 Squadron and the rest with various squadrons. Their numbers as non-British pilots were second only to the Poles (who were expatriates whose air force had already been destroyed by the Luftwaffe). Twenty Canadian pilots lost their lives in stemming the German onslaught.
On August 30, in a major engagement, 242 Squadron attacked a formation of over 100 Germans and shot down 12. None of the squadron's planes were lost.


Commemorative stamp - 1980

The men of No. 1 Squadron RCAF were the first Canadian fighter pilots to arrive in Britain as a unit. They crossed the North Atlantic in ships, with their own Canadian-built Hawker Hurricanes still in wooden crates.

No. 1 Sqn. arrived in England at the height of the Battle of Britain. Their operational training took place virtually between the air battles raging around their base at Croydon. The Squadron (later re-numbered to 401) was swiftly declared "operational" and became the first RCAF unit to engage the enemy when it intercepted German bombers over southern England on August 26th. It shot down three and damaged four, for the loss of one Hurricane.
By mid-October No. 1 Squadron had shot down 31 German planes, with another 43 "probables" or damaged, for a loss of 16 Hurricanes, and three pilots killed.

Flight-Lieutenant Gordon R. McGregor of No.1 Squadron shot down five German aircraft and won a DFC.

Canadian Aces

There were 142 Canadian aces in WWII (an ace being a pilot who shot down five or more enemy aircraft). Thirty-two of these aces shot down ten or more aircraft. The top five aces were:

"Screwball" George Beurling - 32 kills

"Woody" Vernon Woodward - 21 kills

Henry McLeod - 21 kills

Mark Brown - 18.5 kills

William McKnight - 16.5 kills

Hong Kong

In WWII Canadian soldiers were among the first ground troops to fight the Japanese, in Hong Kong. As part of the defending force, two thousand Canadians, in two battalions, held out on Hong Kong Island against impossible odds for 17 days. 300 were killed and 500 wounded before the surrender.

After the fall of Hong Kong, the Canadians were imprisoned in horrid conditions. Of the Canadian POW's (Prisoners of War), 250 died of malnutrition, maltreatment and disease in Japanese prison camps before the end of the war.

Dieppe

The Dieppe Raid in 1942 was the first large scale attack on Hitler's Fortress Europe, and it was 5000 Canadian troops who made up 85% of the force. The attack had little chance of success from the outset. Only 2000 Canadians returned. 1000 were killed and 2000 were taken prisoner after a single day of fighting.

(The raid was billed as a 'test' of the German defenses, but it was poorly conceived. Lord Louis Mountbatten, who was in charge of the operation, put a bold face on it, but it is thought by some that he should bear the blame for the fiasco. Instead he received another medal.)
Battle of Malta

In the Battle of Malta, where the Luftwaffe and the Italian Regia Aeronautica were fought to a standstill, 25% of the defending pilots were Canadians. George 'Buzz' Beurling, Canada's top ace with 32 kills, fought there.

Link to Canadian Aces of WW2 for a detailed account of Beurling's exploits.

Italy

In the invasion of Sicily and Italy, Canada had 76,000 troops, and lost 10,000 as casualties, 2000 of them fatal. Details of the Battles of Ortona and Monte Cassino will yield more information on the quality of the Canadian fighting man.

The Hitler Line in central Italy was first ruptured by tanks of the Canadian 5th Armoured Division.
Swift Sea Strikes
Better-known are Canada's destroyers and corvettes, but small, fast attack boats were also important. Canada had two flotillas of motor torpedo boats (MTB's) and motor gun boats (MGB's) in the English Channel. They fought German E-boats (torpedo boats) and flak ships, disrupted enemy coastal convoys, cleared mines, and landed supplies for agents on German-occupied islands.

Canadian MTB's and MGB's also operated off Tunisia and Sicily in 1943, and along the Italian coast in 1944. Some of the best-known Canadian captains fought in the Adriatic and the Ionian and Aegean seas. The most famous captain, Tommy Fuller, became known as "THE PIRATE OF THE ADRIATIC".
D-Day
Before dawn on D-Day, 230 heavy bombers from RCAF No.6 Group pounded German shore batteries with 860 tons of bombs. And in the daylight hours, RCAF fighter squadrons flew top cover for the invasion beaches.

Fifty Canadian destroyers, frigates and corvettes assisted in covering the invasion, providing anti-submarine escort and bombarding shore targets.

On D-Day, 14,000 Canadians stormed ashore on Juno Beach and were the only force to capture all their initial objectives that day, at a cost of 1000 casualties, of which 350 were fatal.
Juno Beach
Sherman tanks of the Canadian 1st Hussars land on the beach.

By D-Day 1944, there were in Europe three RCAF Spitfire wings, plus a wing of ground-attack Typhoons and a reconnaissance wing of Spitfires and Mustangs.
Invasion stripes
An RCAF Spitfire gets its "invasion stripes" for D-Day

Normandy and the Low Countries

The Battle of Caen and Falaise Gap, the Rhineland Campaign, all saw large-scale participation by Canadian infantry and armour.

THE BATTLE OF THE SCHELDT was particularly bloody. In five weeks the Canadian First Army took almost 6500 casualties. But the "Water Rats" were victorious.

THE LIBERATION OF HOLLAND was almost entirely a Canadian operation. Still today, the gratitude of the Dutch to Canada is overwhelming.

The Battle of the Atlantic

In 1943 Canada took over naval control of the north-west Atlantic, and by war's end, 80% of the convoys across the North Atlantic were protected by Canadian escort vessels.

The Royal Canadian Navy operated 373 mostly Canadian-built escort vessels on convoy duty in the North Atlantic, CORVETTES and destroyers for the most part, and sank 27 U-Boats. (Canadian aircraft sank another 25.)
The Bomber Offensive

The first Canadian bomber mission over Europe was on June 12, 1941. A year later 68 RCAF bombers took part in the first 1000 bomber raid. By 1944, the RCAF was regularly sending out more than 200 heavy bombers a night on single raids.

By 1944, a quarter of what is usually referred to as the British bomber offensive over Europe was actually Canadian.
On the night of October 6, 1944, RCAF NO. 6 group sent out a record 293 four-engine bombers, Halifaxes and Lancasters, to bomb Dortmund.

10,000 Canadians lost their lives in Bomber Command.
Jimmy Doolittle Flies with the Canucks

331 Wing RCAF (420,424,425 Squadrons) operated from Tunisia in July to October of 1943. They were given a lot of credit for saving the Salerno landings by very accurate night-time bombing of a panzer division attacking the Americans. The aircraft they used was the Wellington Mark X twin-engine bomber, a tropicalized version of the Wellington.

The official RCAF history mentions that General Jimmy Dolittle (USAAF, of Tokyo Raid fame) flew a night mission over Sicily with the Canucks to observe how they could bomb so accurately at night.
Wellington Crew
RCAF Wellinton Crew of 425 Sqn. My thanks to Ted Biech for the information on 331 Wing.
His father, P/O A. Biech, was the navigator, second from left in the photo.
Encounter with German Jets
On March 31, 1945, about 5 weeks before the war ended, RCAF bombers on a daylight mission to Hamburg had the misfortune to run into a force of 30 Messerschmitt Me-262 jet fighters. Eight Canadian Lancasters and Halifaxes were shot down.

See March 1945 Daily Operations for a detailed account.

Commonwealth Air Training Plan
RCAF poster

Throughout the war, Canada provided training facilities and instruction to airmen from all over the world in the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan, graduating 132,000 pilots and aircrew, over half of whom were Canadian.
U.S. president F.D. Roosevelt called Canada "the aerodrome of democracy".

By the war's end there were 48 RCAF squadrons serving in the Western European, Mediterranean and Far Eastern theatres.

Canadian planes and pilots served all over the world, including in Tunisia and the Indian Ocean. Patrolling for the British forces, a Canadian PBY gave the first warning of a Japanese fleet's approach to Ceylon and saved the allied forces there from a surprise attack. The Japanese were beaten off. The PBY was shot down by Japanese Zero fighters, and its crew taken prisoner. The pilot, Leonard Birchall, became known as "THE SAVIOR OF CEYLON".

Canadian fighter squadrons used Hurricanes, Spitfires, Typhoons, Mustangs, and P-40 Warhawks, among others.

RCAF 442 Sqn Mustang Mk IV's (D's) flew top cover for the liberation of the Channel Islands, May 9, 1945, the final combat operation in the
European Theater.

Sturmtruppen
04-21-2005, 01:35 PM
:shock:
"Screwball" George Beurling - 32 kills

"Woody" Vernon Woodward - 21 kills

Henry McLeod - 21 kills

Mark Brown - 18.5 kills

William McKnight - 16.5 kills

canadians aces of flight!,cool 8)

Gen. Sandworm
04-21-2005, 02:21 PM
Damn RighteousDuncan thats alot of info.....thanks for the post.

Gen. Sandworm
04-23-2005, 02:20 PM
I moved this from General WW2 Disscussion to Other Military Units because it seems more like it has more business here. :D

Sturmtruppen
04-23-2005, 02:22 PM
I moved this from General WW2 Disscussion to Other Military Units because it seems more like it has more business here. :D
right! :wink:

FW-190 Pilot
04-23-2005, 02:32 PM
Mark Brown - 18.5 kills ??
whats that 0.5 kill means? thanks for helping me out

and do you think canadian shouldnt be sending soldiers to protect hong kong, i am from hong kong and i dont think they should. why? because the japanese are too strong by then, sending troops to battlefield like that is just sucide, i rather send them to places where they would have better chance to defend themselves

Sturmtruppen
04-24-2005, 01:24 AM
Mark Brown - 18.5 kills ??
whats that 0.5 kill means? thanks for helping me out


lol! :lol: ,maybe he killed the half part of an enemy

WildBoar
04-24-2005, 02:58 PM
The .5 would have been a shared kill where he and another pilot both claimed the Kill.

FW-190 Pilot
05-14-2005, 11:51 PM
just to say our prime minister a few days ago, he miss a day to the ceremony to thanks canadian to save holland from the nazi (is that holland, i forget), the soldiers diss him for being one day late. the reason is because the prime minister has a minority government and might be too busy to deal with opposition? still its not the reason to be late though. he has over 60% support when he siege power, but blew it on a sponsorship scandal

FW-190 Pilot
07-02-2005, 12:02 AM
new info from news
Tourist spot Casa Loma was found to be used as secret factory for new weapons like sonar ships that detects german subermine

the reason they are doing that is to prevent german from ever bombing it.
This is clever but i think its totally not needed, since germany would never be stupid enough to send bombers to go that far, not to mention they having the technology to do that

Dani
07-07-2005, 04:09 AM
General info:
http://www.mapleleafup.org/vehicles/cac/index.html

Dieppe raid (operation Jubilee)
http://www.geocities.com/dieppe_berlin/1Canada/1-Battle/dieppe.htm
Quoted from above site:
It had been a massacre that day of August 19, 1942. The Canadians had scrambled from their ungainly landing craft directly into a storm of fire from the German positions dominating the beaches of Dieppe. There had been almost no preliminary naval bombardment to support the attackers nor much preliminary bombing to soften the Dieppe defenses. The Churchill tanks, struggling ashore with enormous difficulty, had found that their treads could not get purchase on the stony shingle. The 27 tanks that made it out of the water could fire their guns but, unable to move well, they could offer only limited fire support to the infantry.

Worse was to come as military commanders, offshore and insulated from the chaos by faulty communications and the heavy smoke of battle, reinforced failure, sending new battalions from the floating reserve to be cut to pieces on the beaches. A disaster to Canadian arms and Allied hopes. The Canadians of the 2nd Division had absorbed 68% casualties in the battle for Dieppe- 3367 out of 4963 officers and men. 907 were killed on the beaches or died in captivity, 586 were wounded, and 1946, including many wounded, were taken prisoner by the victorious Germans.

The defenses of Fortress Europe had been tested in the largest European landing operation since Britain had been driven from the continent at Dunkirk - and the defenses proved unbreachable. In England, nervous war planners knew that the Allies had suffered a serious beating. Seizing a fortified port, seemingly a requirement for a successful invasion, had become the most difficult of tasks.

http://img301.imageshack.us/img301/7900/200213667zc.jpg
Canadian prisoners.

http://www.24hourmuseum.org.uk/trlout/TRA13494.html

We should never forget them. May R.I.P.

Edited to add the picture.

Walther
07-07-2005, 09:04 PM
One important thing concerning the Canadians:

While they had conscription in Canada, overseas service was purely voluntary (until spring 1945, then conscripts got sent over when the war was almost over. They were called "Zombies" by the volunteers).

Jan

Roland
08-22-2005, 01:53 AM
Does anyone know of a website with a list of weapons the Canadians used?

Hosenfield
08-22-2005, 02:20 AM
i think canadians used the same weapons as the british forces along with similiar uniforms. Canadian troops were probably some of the most repected troops in normandy ( by the germans) due to their mostly volunteer status.

Minimalistix
08-22-2005, 05:27 AM
thanx for the topic, ive learnt alot!!!

does anyone know if Canadians served in the Pacific alongside Australians,/or Brits and/or Americans

Firefly
08-22-2005, 08:05 AM
Does anyone know of a website with a list of weapons the Canadians used?

I think you will find some interesting things here:

http://www.canadiansoldiers.com/

The Canadians, like the Australians and other Commonwealth nations were equipped the same way as the UK Army.

Roland
08-23-2005, 07:54 PM
Thanks for the link. That site was pretty informative.

Hosenfield
08-24-2005, 05:11 PM
The only thing i like about canada is its women.

Fallschirmjager
09-06-2005, 01:27 AM
I don't know, I really like smoking the marijuana ;D but the women are good to.

BDL
09-06-2005, 02:09 AM
thanx for the topic, ive learnt alot!!!

does anyone know if Canadians served in the Pacific alongside Australians,/or Brits and/or Americans

Yes, Canadians were amongst those captured by the Japanese at Hong Kong when the war started. I've heard reports of the Japanese bayonetting their wounded and forcing survivors to jump off the battlements of a castle there.

Minimalistix
09-06-2005, 02:27 AM
the Japanese did many cruel things during that dark part of their history

they forced labour into the allied troops to construct the notorious Thai-Burmese Train Track

they fed them only 1 cup full of rice everyday

into some POW camps, the death toll was as high as 90%

the Japanese left food outside the prisons boundaries and had a guard secretly hidden so when a person went to eat it they'd be shot

they were also used as guinea pigs during Japanese Scientific investigations

firemainstreet
10-07-2005, 05:31 AM
Hello :arrow: http://www.marville.org/
Here the web site of the first wing of Royal Canadian Air Force, (after the war) they was beside at my village, I live in Belgium but France is to one km and they are to go to Germany in 1967, because General de Gaulle not to more need NATO Everyone remembers of them, because they gave to their lives during the war for the freedom of people of our countries ,the Germans were very malicious at the end of the war not only the SS because to see the end of war to come for the Reich
:oops: I can't Speak English sorry for the grammatical mistake if you don't understand me excuse :cry:

Crab_to_be
10-07-2005, 06:01 AM
Welcome, and thanks for the hyperlink. We have lots of users here from around the world; no one will criticise your english. Think of it as a good way to practise.

Crab.

Cdn Fire
10-27-2005, 10:15 AM
Canads last VC was in the Pacific bombing a Jap destoryer

Cdn Fire
10-27-2005, 10:17 AM
One important thing concerning the Canadians:

While they had conscription in Canada, overseas service was purely voluntary (until spring 1945, then conscripts got sent over when the war was almost over. They were called "Zombies" by the volunteers).

Jan

Most of the Zombies came the chicken province called Quebec

Dani
10-27-2005, 10:21 AM
the chicken province called Quebec

Why you say "chicken"? What means?

Cdn Fire
10-29-2005, 04:14 PM
the chicken province called Quebec

Why you say "chicken"? What means?

Most not all didn't think they should be fighting.it wasn't there war(Quebec)

FluffyBunnyGB
10-29-2005, 05:31 PM
The Canadians did have a few home-grown weapons in WW2 (as did the Aussies).

The RAM tank was probably one of the better known, which was basically an M3 GRANT chassis with a hull of Canadian design that looked a bit like a SHERMAN with a very prominet side hatch.

By the time it was developed, things had moved on a bit, and it's 6 pdr gun wasn't really effective.

Some were converted to either ARV, FOO or gun towers for the 17 pdr, but most were turned into the RAM KANGAROO where the turret was taken off and they were used as APCs.

Later in the War, the Canadians built a close copy of the SHERMAN, called the GRIZZLY, of which only about 188 were made. Post War, 50 were sold to portugal where they remained in service until 1973, when they were sold to private collectors. For this reason, many of the remaining SHERMAN tanks are actually GRIZZLY.

An experimental variant of the GRIZZLY was the SKINK, which was a fairly standard hull fitted with a quad 20mm AA turret.

Link to information about RAM and variants

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ram_tank

GRIZZLY and variants

http://web.inter.nl.net/users/spoelstra/g104/p.htm

This site has useful information about the Canadian input, especially the vehicles such as the CMP trucks and WINDSOR carrier.

http://www.mapleleafup.org/vehicles/index.html

IronFist
11-07-2005, 06:32 PM
THe Canadian military used mostly british weapons in WWII. Their appaerance was also much like the british. THe same rank structure was also used. All Canadians sent to battle were volunteers (1.1Million) and were well respected around the world for that fact.

Halger280HVMag
11-11-2005, 01:57 PM
Good day all....

Nice to meet you I'm sure....

Since this is November 11, I am posting a war-bond poster depicting my Father; Brigadier General Dollard Menard Canadian Army(1913-1997).....

Although my thoughts go-out to ALL Soldiers who fought for their country.....

Being from the province of Quebec, my father's soldiers died valiantly and in French...they were ALL volunteers.....

http://www.members.shaw.ca/jpmenard/19Aug1942.jpg

Firefly
11-11-2005, 03:59 PM
Welcome friend. Interestring post indeed, do you have any other information on your father?

Halger280HVMag
11-11-2005, 04:39 PM
Thanks for the welcome...

I'm an old man and I have many stories.... :)

Here is a photo of my father leading his Regiment ashore (Regiment de Hull) At the Joint USA/Canada landinds on the Island of Kiska in August 1943, the remainder of the invasion force landed on the beaches of the the island of Attu, the last Island in the Aleutian chain extending from western Alaska......The wounds received at Dieppe were not yet fully healed....

Another member asked about armament...note that he is carrying an M1 Carbine and underneath his battle-dress jacket in a shoulder holster, is the same 1911 that he carried at Dieppe. The pistol was re-barreled by a US Armorer to .45 ACP from .455, during the Ocean voyage to Kiska....Note also the US pack-frame and US rank insignia which were used to prevent confusion amongst the troops in the two forces involved in the operation....



http://www.members.shaw.ca/jpmenard/DMenardKiska.jpg

Firefly
11-11-2005, 06:32 PM
Very interesting mate, I see he is also wearing the US Helmet.

Where did he go from there, back to Europe?

Charles
11-11-2005, 06:32 PM
Welcome :wink:

Great two posts there :!:

11-11-2005, 10:23 PM
Welcome! Did you see the pictures i posted from the Dieppe Raid? It's in the Black and White category of the gallery.

Roland
11-12-2005, 12:45 AM
Does anyone know whether the Canadians used the P-47 thunderbolt ? I assume they did because the British used it but i don't know for a fact if the Canadians did or not.

Halger280HVMag
11-12-2005, 08:16 PM
Firefly
He returned to Canada via Vancouver BC, arriving Mid January 1944...it was in Vancouver that he encountered his likeness plastered on the walls, he was not aware at the time, that such a poster even existed....

He was not immediately re-assigned...his wounds needing further attention. His next assignment came at the end of 1945, it was to serve as the military attache at the Canadian Embassy in Paris, the ambassador at that time was General Georges Vanier...My mother, younger sister and self followed on a small steamer bouncing in the winter Atlantic storms, arriving in France via England early 1946, we remained in France until late 1949, returning to Canada, however, this time the atlantic winter fury was eased somewhat,by the fact that we were travelling on the "Empress of Scotland".... :)

ww2admin

Yes...A fine collection.

Thanks for your efforts....

IronFist
11-22-2005, 11:57 PM
I'm sure some canadian pilots has the pleasure of flying a P-47. But it was not used thoughly nor was it a regularly used airplane in the Canadian Air Force of WWII.

Sturmtruppen
11-23-2005, 04:39 PM
Great!, The good quebec, French and Catholical, that's great, my fav place in canada btw.


A really good post, you must be proud of your father!.

Brian Hall
11-24-2005, 09:25 AM
Hello everyone,

I'm new here and unfortunately short on time. My grandfather passed away Sun 20th Nov. and I'm trying to colourise a photo for his service, this Sat (only 2 short days away). I'd like to be fairly accurate if I can, but haven't found any reference for the pouch he's wearing on his chest. I've made it the same colour as the other straps, etc. but would welcome any input.

Any assistance offered would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance!

Brian

http://www.doughhook.com/grandad.jpg

Cdn Fire
12-02-2005, 11:33 AM
Just a guess maybe its for his gas mask

FluffyBunnyGB
12-02-2005, 01:05 PM
I think (note: think) it's either an early '37 pattern or local Canadian pattern respirator (gas mask) pouch. If so, then it is very likely it would be the same colour as the rest of the webbing. The other webbing appears to be standard '37 pattern and thus should be a light khaki colour, much as you have illustrated.

Kind regards

Fluffy

PS I put some links to Canadian websites earlier in this thread. They mau have more info.

Kovalski
12-20-2005, 09:52 AM
Hi everyone!
Do you know any really good internet sources describing what happend on Hill 140 during Operation Totalize in Normandy 1944? Recently I've found an information in polish press about the behavior of Polish 1st Armored in that area and its influence on massacre of Canadians on that hill. I've never heard about that and I was really shocked. Till that moment I was convienced that Polish did great job in Normandy. Thanks for your posts. Sorry for my english

Dani
12-20-2005, 03:22 PM
Welcome, Kovalski!
I don't know what you've read in Polish press, but I will quote something:


Elements of the Polish Armd. Div. were less than a mile from Point 140 where the British Columbia and Algonquin regiments were being systematically destroyed. However, the Poles could not advance further.

Why? Read the page from where I quoted (for a general view):
http://www.legionmagazine.com/features/canadianmilitaryhistory/00-01.asp

As for happend with British Columbia Regiment:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/ww2/A4103038

Operation Totalize:
http://www.legionmagazine.com/features/canadianmilitaryhistory/99-09.asp

Maps:
http://www.canadahistory.com/sections/conflict/confwwiiddaymaps-totalise.htm
http://www.onwar.com/maps/wwii/westfront/1totalize.htm

Kovalski
12-21-2005, 01:18 PM
Thanks Dani!
:)
As far as I remember, the article I read included a strong critic of Polish Div. HQ. For example, arbitrary decision of changing the direction of attack during the first phase of Operation Totalize. In effect of such a behavior Polish 1st Armored was the only Allied unit, which direct location was unknown at the end of the first day. The Corp's HQ wasn't sure where Poles really were at the moment. I don't know the reasons, but it is unquestionable that Poles didn't complete majority of their objectives. The author of a article wrote that Canadians had to complete it. But the strongest accusation was about the lack of reaction during the massacre on Hill 140. He suggests that Poles were able to help Canadians, but they didn't do nothing. I don't know if it is true. As I wrote before, I have never heard or read about that. I would like to compare this version with others, maybe much more reliable. The author of that article (I can't recall his name) is Polish, text came out in "Militaria XX wieku". I'm asking polish members (if there are some) for help. Maybe you know something more about that tragic events, maybe you can point at some polish sources. Also I'm asking Canadians for help. How polish-canadian relations during Operation Totalize are described in your country?Unfortunately, I don't have enough time to do a internet search by myself becuse of my boss :(
I would be grateful to you for any help.

CDN3RD_Canadian
03-23-2006, 11:13 PM
here is a site with some interesting info on the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion.

http://www.1stcanpara.org/UNIT_HISTORY/unit_history.html

Lancer44
05-12-2006, 12:37 AM
Thanks Dani!
:)
As far as I remember, the article I read included a strong critic of Polish Div. HQ. For example, arbitrary decision of changing the direction of attack during the first phase of Operation Totalize. In effect of such a behavior Polish 1st Armored was the only Allied unit, which direct location was unknown at the end of the first day. The Corp's HQ wasn't sure where Poles really were at the moment. I don't know the reasons, but it is unquestionable that Poles didn't complete majority of their objectives. The author of a article wrote that Canadians had to complete it. But the strongest accusation was about the lack of reaction during the massacre on Hill 140. He suggests that Poles were able to help Canadians, but they didn't do nothing. I don't know if it is true. As I wrote before, I have never heard or read about that. I would like to compare this version with others, maybe much more reliable. The author of that article (I can't recall his name) is Polish, text came out in "Militaria XX wieku". I'm asking polish members (if there are some) for help. Maybe you know something more about that tragic events, maybe you can point at some polish sources. Also I'm asking Canadians for help. How polish-canadian relations during Operation Totalize are described in your country?Unfortunately, I don't have enough time to do a internet search by myself becuse of my boss :(
I would be grateful to you for any help.

Hi Kovalski,

Author of the article in "Militaria XXw", Greg Czwartosz is one of the most respected historians of Polish I-st Armoured Division.
He is currently writing book about Falaise battle.
His opinions and his research are pointing into directions which are not very convenient for historians still thinking either as "commies wanted to see it" or the others "hooked into Polish exile circles in London".
His article put him under heavy flak from both directions.
"London" historians want to see everything rosy, heroical and like in school textbooks for twelve years old kids.
In reality 1-st Armoured Division was very undisciplined. General Maczek, with his experience as commander of 10-th Motorised Brigade in Poland 1939 and recreated 10-th Brigade during France campaign 1940, treated all orders from general Simonds very suspiciously.
Maczek, as ex-cavalry officer, could not bear that "infantry general" is commanding II Corps.
It is really tragic that Polish-Canadian co-operation was that bad.
Articles in Legion magazine, to which links Dani provided, are very gentle for Poles. The truth is that 1-st Armoured Division failed in Operation Totalize. Soldiers fought well, but division as part of II Corps failed.

We are both Poles, Kovalski, but we can only gain respect of other nations by being objective and adhere to historical truth.
I'm always happy to post information about Polish Forces performing well, but in this case history should be straightened up; most books about 1-st Armoured written during communist era, like gen. Skibinski's for example,
can be now thrown to the bin as complete fantasies and lies.

BTW, send me your private mail address - I have "Totalize" in PDF format - I read it before printing of Militaria and I'm happy to send it to you. :)

Cheers,

Lancer44

Erik
06-03-2006, 02:40 AM
Hello everyone

I've developed a hobby of attempting to add colour into Canadian WWII photos. Here are a few I've done so far...

http://wwii.ca/photos/colour/regina_rifies_caen.jpg

http://wwii.ca/photos/colour/sicily_soldier.jpg

The above didn't take more then and hour to complete. These were more "practice" as in the near future I plan to work on each photo alot longer so I can achieve a more realistic look.

Erik

Canadian_Patriot
06-21-2006, 01:58 PM
Hey, Im new to this forum.Im canadian, and i've been interested in WW2,and the military since i was 8-9 years old.I'm currently 17 years old and living in newfoundland.

Firefly
06-21-2006, 03:54 PM
Those photos are really good Erik, please feel free to share more with us.

elyse_42
12-02-2006, 09:33 AM
yes it is holand and poland that we canadians freed

Kovalski
12-02-2006, 12:13 PM
yes it is holand and poland that we canadians freed

You did what? :)

VonWeyer
12-02-2006, 04:59 PM
Awesome photo's mate, keep the coming!

ArmyDude1973
12-08-2006, 02:38 PM
hi every one i wold like to say that the post from righteous duncan at the opening page is realy good but in my opion i dont think the canada army would be cut down in france because of the war was on to major sides one bieng with the ailes the outher being with russia so the germanys army was cut into to fighting groups of men how ever if germany had one frount they might have been cut to threads but keep up the good work and thanks for the info

ArmyDude1973
12-08-2006, 02:46 PM
i would like to let people know how bad canada was thou i served as [qor] queens own rifels. then transferd to [rhli] royal hamilton light infentry in early 80s and late 90s and wile i was with these unites we were still tryen to get people to enlist because the raids on d-day cost a lot of men from these unites we were 1500 strong then but before the war i belive we were ten times that amount im not sure how many more canadas outher units went but in my opion thats a long time to recover

GermanSoldier
01-28-2007, 12:04 PM
Here is a website on the Canadian military.
http://canorbat.freehosting.net/unitsmain.htm

Rocketeer
03-11-2007, 07:01 PM
and do you think canadian shouldnt be sending soldiers to protect hong kong, i am from hong kong and i dont think they should. why? because the japanese are too strong by then, sending troops to battlefield like that is just sucide, i rather send them to places where they would have better chance to defend themselves


The Canadians were sent to Hong Kong beacuse at that point it was still a British Colony[sp], and Canada kinda sorta maybe felt it was our duty to help the Brit's, with us being tied to them and all. Both sides knew it would be a massive upset, but they whent anyways.

ww2admin
03-11-2007, 07:32 PM
Erik,
THosd were fantastic! I thought they were real color photographs. Thanks, keep 'em coming.

GermanSoldier
03-11-2007, 09:13 PM
Good photos Erik!
Here are some Canadian Military

Canadian Medic
http://i17.tinypic.com/43czp0g.jpg

Canadian Infantryman
http://i17.tinypic.com/2elqm8p.jpg

Canadian Tank Crew
http://i15.tinypic.com/34iloae.jpg

Canadian Infantry Unit in Africa
http://i16.tinypic.com/2uswzzn.jpg

Erik
03-16-2007, 03:37 AM
Thanks,

I'll probably work on another colour photo sometime soon. In the meantime my site currently has nearly 400 Canadian WW2 photos (link (http://wwii.ca/mediacat-1.html)), adding new ones all the time... check them out if you wish.

Edit: Already working on a new one!
http://wwii.ca/temp/colour_work_caen.jpg

John Cahill
03-23-2007, 09:01 PM
RCAF Wellinton Crew of 425 Sqn. My thanks to Ted Biech for the information on 331 Wing.
His father, P/O A. Biech, was the navigator, second from left in the photo.
Canadian planes and pilots served all over the world, including in Tunisia
*******
Hello Rigteous Duncan, et. al.
I tried the link in your post but could not connect. Apparently there are some photos for which captions had been provided. I am particularly interested in 331 Wing RCAF during it's time in Tunisia and would appreciate connecting with Ted Biech or any others who might be able to provide me with leads dealing with an "RAF" bomber field at Bou Ficha, Tunisia, summer of 1943. Any help shall be greatly appreciated.

John Cahill, Mount Vernon, Virginia, USA

Dutch Knight
06-01-2007, 10:13 PM
To put canadas Contribution to the war effort into the proper perspective. Up to 1939 canadas navy had a regular strength of under 2000, canadas airforce had 298 officers and 2750 airmen. Canadas army was no better with a regular foce strength 4261 all ranks. So the amount of expansion in a very short time and the calliber of men and weapons produced by canada was astounding.

Walther
06-02-2007, 01:29 AM
Most of the Zombies came the chicken province called Quebec

As also did several first class regiments (e.g. Le regiment de la Chaudiere)

Jan

Walther
06-02-2007, 01:53 AM
I think (note: think) it's either an early '37 pattern or local Canadian pattern respirator (gas mask) pouch. If so, then it is very likely it would be the same colour as the rest of the webbing. The other webbing appears to be standard '37 pattern and thus should be a light khaki colour, much as you have illustrated.

Kind regards

Fluffy


Depends.
As per regulations the P37 webbing (light khaki in it's natural state) was supposed to be blancoed, this means to be treated with a fabric preservation compound, which came in cakes looking like a hockey puck and which was then mixed with water to form a stiff paste (like white wash) and then brushed upon the webbing, after which it was leeft to dry. Early war British regulations gave the shade pea green, but later (at least in the European theatre of operations) khaki green No. 3 became regulation, which is a dark olive drab shade. In Northern Africa the troops simply used to brush their webbing, which sunlight turened into a very light khaki. The brass fittings (black steel fittings are post war) were supposed to be either painted over in the field (in garrison polished as per RSM orders!) or left to get dull.
The respirator bag was not to be blancoed, as well as "General service" webbing items, which did not belong to the personal equipment of an individual soldier, but came out of regimental stores (like e.g. a Bren spare barrel bag) were usually left in their original colour.

So far the regulations.

Many Canadian soldiers wanted to show that they were NOT British but Canadians. In the Normandy some replacements wore unblancoed webbing, due to no time to blanco it in the field, others had their webbing still blancoed from the camps in Britain, others followed regimental customs, e.g. pre war the Queen's Own Rifles of Canada had their webbing dyed black, since they were a rifles unit.

In the jungles of the Far East, webbing was, after an initial period, vat diyed jungle green in the units, together with the uniforms down to underwear.

Jan

Rising Sun*
06-02-2007, 09:32 AM
Canadas army was no better with a regular foce strength 4261 all ranks.

Was that the total size of your pre-war army forces, or just of your regular army?

We too had a very small regular army pre-war, but its function was essentially to be a training cadre for the militia, i.e part-time civilian soldiers. So our regular army was very small, but our total army was much bigger.

Dutch Knight
06-06-2007, 10:25 PM
Yes the the regulars were used as a trianing cadre for a very rapid expansion. the reserve forces were almost non existant. From a total Canadian population at the time of between 11 to 12 million, Canada by the end of the war, had put in the field 1.1 million men and women for the war effort. Roughly about 10 % of the population was in uniform.

Erik
06-24-2007, 03:17 AM
Was that the total size of your pre-war army forces, or just of your regular army?

"Canada's army, outdated and uprepared for another global confict, grew rapidly at the outbreak of war. The RCAF had fewer than 20 modern combat aircraft and the navy consisted of only six destroyers. From a pre-war regular army of 4,500 men and 51,000 partly-trained reservists, 58,000 Canadians would enlist in September 1939 alone."
- http://wwii.ca/page2.html

In Canada 40% of men aged 18-45 enlisted.

Erik
01-15-2008, 06:09 PM
http://wwii.ca/tmp/can_soldier_colour2.jpg

How's it looking?

OLD RSM
02-16-2008, 03:22 PM
Hi Erik
The Picture looks like 3rd Canadian Div Royal Winnipeg Rifles.
Cheers

Erik
06-12-2009, 10:43 AM
http://www.wwii.ca/images/temp/corby_work.jpg
http://www.wwii.ca/images/temp/newone.jpg
Just practising.

navyson
06-12-2009, 06:45 PM
Great job colorizing Erik! You should do some pictures from the picture side of WW2 in color. Or, post some pictures that you've colorized.

Erik
06-12-2009, 09:06 PM
I need more practice before I'm ready to go all out and do a complete photo. When I do I'll post it here.