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pampa14
09-12-2015, 07:29 AM
I share with you some pictures of aircraft applied with camouflage called Barclay. A question, does this camouflage was used operationally or only a test? To see the photos, please visit the link below.


http://aviacaoemfloripa.blogspot.com.br/2011/01/camuflagens-barclay.html


Best Regards.

Nickdfresh
09-13-2015, 08:41 AM
I share with you some pictures of aircraft applied with camouflage called Barclay. A question, does this camouflage was used operationally or only a test? To see the photos, please visit the link below.


http://aviacaoemfloripa.blogspot.com.br/2011/01/camuflagens-barclay.html


Best Regards.

I believe it would have only been used as a test. That sort of angular, "Dazzle camouflage" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dazzle_camouflage) was all the rage for a while on surface ships and I think some naval and merchant marine vessels did use it operationally, but no USN/USMC planes that I've ever seen ever were coated while flying operationally AFAIK...

Frankly Dude Really
09-15-2015, 05:30 AM
and it has a patent US 2190691 , whaddayaknow: http://www.google.com/patents/US2190691

also at a War Thunder webpage:
At Naval Air Station, North Island, California, 9 September 1940. It is painted in McClelland Barclay experimental camouflage design number 2.

Some of Fighting Squadron Three's F2A-1s were experimentally painted in disruptive camouflage in mid-1940. These designs prepared by McClelland Barclay, a Naval Reserve officer and noted artist, were evaluated under operational conditions. The tests showed that pattern camouflage was of little if any use for Navy combat aircraft.

tankgeezer
09-15-2015, 12:19 PM
Radar always seems to find even camo painted planes..

Nickdfresh
09-15-2015, 03:02 PM
I'm no expert at this sort of thing, but according to the link "dazzle camouflage" was adopted in WWI with relatively little testing and was not designed to hide a ship but rather misdirect fire and confuse observers as to its speed and heading. It was used in WWII but I have no idea how effective it was or what the conclusions based on statistical studies/analytics were as to its value...

tankgeezer
09-16-2015, 08:34 AM
The Dazzle method was developed to prevent effective torpedo attacks by confusing attempts to estimate course, and speed, and aspect of the target.

Rising Sun*
09-16-2015, 08:57 AM
The Dazzle method was developed to prevent effective torpedo attacks by confusing attempts to estimate course, and speed, and aspect of the target.

I believe it was 100% successful in preventing torpedo attacks on aircraft, and not just the type in the first post.

tankgeezer
09-16-2015, 09:57 PM
Indeed it was very useful at that, then when they tried it with Ships, it wasn't quite as good.;) :D

Rising Sun*
09-17-2015, 09:25 AM
If they'd tried this "am I having an LSD hallucination" paint on ships, submarine commanders would have been spinning out on their periscopes.

7515

Nickdfresh
09-17-2015, 01:22 PM
7516
Then there was this pretty exotic camouflage, or rather paint scheme, painted on a few of the M-46 Pershing/Patton tanks during Korea... :)

tankgeezer
09-17-2015, 05:22 PM
An effort to frighten the natives so I'm told, into thinking the Tank was some dark vengeful Spirit creature bent on their destruction.

tankgeezer
09-17-2015, 05:24 PM
If they'd tried this "am I having an LSD hallucination" paint on ships, submarine commanders would have been spinning out on their periscopes.

7515

Looks like M.C. Escher at his work.

Rising Sun*
09-18-2015, 10:01 AM
An effort to frighten the natives so I'm told, into thinking the Tank was some dark vengeful Spirit creature bent on their destruction.

Just an American tiger tank, with an inexplicably long and narrow nose. Military equivalent of 1960s Esso promotion of putting a tiger in your tank, so that people were supplied with fake tiger tails to hang out of their petrol filler holes, with no effect on the car's performance.

The anti-tank gunners opposed to the garish M46 must have been rather pleased by its heightened visibility. The tank crews the reverse.

Nickdfresh
09-18-2015, 01:27 PM
Just an American tiger tank, with an inexplicably long and narrow nose. Military equivalent of 1960s Esso promotion of putting a tiger in your tank, so that people were supplied with fake tiger tails to hang out of their petrol filler holes, with no effect on the car's performance.

The anti-tank gunners opposed to the garish M46 must have been rather pleased by its heightened visibility. The tank crews the reverse.

The scheme was based on some supposed superstitions that the Chinese PLA soldiers had regarding a fear of tigers; whether these "tigers" were supernatural or corporeal ones I am not sure and I doubt most PLA suffered any psychological terrors regarding the tiger face. They would have been much more worried about 90mm gun and .30/.50 cal. machine-guns. I think the scheme was largely specific to one or two offensives such as "Operation Ripper" in the later part of the war and I am guessing it was applied in no small part with the assumption that the Chinese PLA "Volunteers" had a sore lack of antitank weapons as well as tanks and tank destroyers...

tankgeezer
09-19-2015, 09:00 AM
Just an American tiger tank, with an inexplicably long and narrow nose. Military equivalent of 1960s Esso promotion of putting a tiger in your tank, so that people were supplied with fake tiger tails to hang out of their petrol filler holes, with no effect on the car's performance.

The anti-tank gunners opposed to the garish M46 must have been rather pleased by its heightened visibility. The tank crews the reverse.

I remember that ad campaign, it was fairly popular here. I totally agree that the paint job made it a very easy to engage target. In Germany, we had the figure of a Lion's head on the side of our Turrets, painted in red. Now that would make a great aiming point for the enemy, so the plan was to paint it over should we ever have to drop by, and meet the Soviet neighbors.

Rising Sun*
09-19-2015, 10:02 AM
I remember that ad campaign, it was fairly popular here. I totally agree that the paint job made it a very easy to engage target. In Germany, we had the figure of a Lion's head on the side of our Turrets, painted in red. Now that would make a great aiming point for the enemy, so the plan was to paint it over should we ever have to drop by, and meet the Soviet neighbors.

I may have missed that ad, but I think your last photo of a tiger in the tank wasn't part of the somewhat more modest civilian oriented ESSO tiger tail campaign. ;) :D

7520

Rising Sun*
09-19-2015, 10:25 AM
How the tiger gets into your tank.

Ahh, the long ago experience of driveway service etc and, apparently, middle class petrol sniffing.

And a hose which has a lock filler nozzle on it instead of having to hang on to it for ages while our crappy ULP thin nozzles fill.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=35YtoXKJg7Q&list=PL5160CCCE28A6EF34

tankgeezer
09-20-2015, 09:28 AM
Here's a clip of how gas stations in the States used to be back in the post war 50's. https://youtu.be/EjXFAzJpzxU
With the advent of reformulated gas, (alcohol added as an oxidizer to help kill volatile organic compounds in the exhaust) they mandated to use of a slightly smaller diameter filler nozzle and a restrictor plate in the car's filler pipe so that only to RFG nozzle would fit into it. The non RFG nozzles were normal sized, and not fit. At the yearly emissions test the guy would check to see that the restrictor plate hadn't been fiddled with, and even normal wear might get one flagged for that, they would require a replacement of the plate before passing the car through the test. Though this has long since passed, as there is only RFG fuel available nowdays, aside from a few stations that do offer 100% real gas for older, and classic cars that can't use the Big Brother Bug Juice. Now if only we could get some 100 octane so my bikes would run properly.